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Masters Degrees (Ma Economics)

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The 2-year MA Economics programme is structured to provide an international quality education in Economics and Econometrics for students with an interest in, and aptitude for, Economics but no necessary prior background. Read more

Overview

The 2-year MA Economics programme is structured to provide an international quality education in Economics and Econometrics for students with an interest in, and aptitude for, Economics but no necessary prior background. The programme is designed to help the student become a problem solver and therefore enhance their flexibility in the job market. It is a stimulating and challenging degree that aims to provide the student with a wide range of skills demanded by prospective employers. Successful graduates attain economic, quantitative and communication skills that are highly sought by employers in the public and private sectors.

Course Structure

The first year is an intensive and extensive introduction to the world of economics. The aim is that by the year end, students will be at the same level as a graduate of a BA / BBS / BSc graduate in Economics. Students will cover the basic concepts, empirical methods and applications in Microeconomics, Macroeconomics and Econometrics as well as choosing field courses of interest from a range of optional modules.

The second year builds upon this and is structured to be stimulating and challenging. It is designed to give graduates the necessary economic and quantitative skills that employers seek today. In the first semester, students take modules in the core areas of Microeconomics, Macroeconomics and Econometrics as well as a module in research methods. All modules are a mixture of theory and practical application. In the second semester, students must take Microeconomics II and three field courses. Field courses offered in any year may include, Industrial Organisation, International Trade, Labour Economics, Growth and Development, Financial Economics, International Finance, and Financial Risk Analysis. During this semester, students also develop a thesis proposal under the guidance of their supervisor. The thesis allows the student to undertake independent research and is completed over the summer.

Career Options

The 2-year MA Economics at Maynooth University is a great opportunity for interested candidates to equip themselves for a career in Economics. Without requiring any background in the subject, students who are ready to make this important investment can expect to earn high returns in their future careers.

Recent graduate have an excellent employment record, both in the public and private sectors. Graduates have taken up research positions at institutions like the Central Bank of Ireland, the Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), while others have pursued careers in retail and investment banking, fund management, economic development and economic consultancy firms. The diverse careers of our graduates reflect the adaptability and flexibility of our graduates.

Check out testimonials from our graduates at https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/economics-finance-and-accounting/our-graduates

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC code
MHH70

The following information should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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The Master of Arts program offers students in a wide range of disciplines the opportunity to earn a master’s degree by writing a thesis and successfully completing a limited number of courses. Read more
The Master of Arts program offers students in a wide range of disciplines the opportunity to earn a master’s degree by writing a thesis and successfully completing a limited number of courses. The number and details of the courses are determined within the first semester of the student's program.

Students may complete their degrees in either a full- or part-time capacity. Full-time students complete a 24-month program while part-time students complete a 48-month program. Part-time students will normally complete all required course work in the first 24 months, with the subsequent months committed to continued research and production of the thesis.

Although degrees are awarded in specific disciplines, the program is administered centrally by the School of Graduate Studies, rather than by individual departments or faculties/schools.

Course detail

Graduate degrees traditionally have been awarded for the successful completion of a satisfactory thesis. The thesis route expresses the fundamental tradition of academic scholarship. It also relates to the University’s undergraduate programs, because the creation of a thesis in any discipline calls for a range of skills which are central to the liberal education tradition, including analysis and synthesis of ideas, empirical investigations, the construction and articulation of arguments, and writing skills.

Because of the nature of the M.A. program, the thesis forms the central requirement of the program. At the master’s level, a thesis involves close collaboration between supervisor and student. Consequently, it is necessary for a candidate to establish contact with potential supervisors prior to application for admission. Candidates seeking potential supervisors should contact either the relevant academic department or the School of Graduate Studies.

Format

The program is typically completed in 24 months and contains rigorous training in microeconomic theory, macroeconomic theory, and econometrics, as well as elective courses in a range of applied fields. The program is limited to a small number of students to enhance scholastic achievement through close faculty interaction.

The program comprises two components. The first component is scheduled for the first year and requires students to take a minimum of five courses. The second component is the thesis project which must be completed by the end of the second year. The details of the program components are:

Why study at the University of Lethbridge?

As a graduate student at the University of Lethbridge, you’ll find yourself at the centre of a student-focused environment that nurtures innovation, critical thinking and creativity.

The University of Lethbridge is one of Canada’s top-ranked universities and leading research institutions.

At the foundation of our graduate programs is a multidisciplinary and personalized experience. A collaborative environment is encouraged between faculty and students. This means you have flexibility in decisions regarding the research and learning path you take.

At the U of L, we are committed to helping every one of our students thrive. From aiding with financial support to one-on-one mentorship to individualized career advice, you’ll find support every step of the way.

When you graduate, you will have the confidence you need to succeed in whatever you do, whether that means pursuing further education, teaching in an academic setting or establishing a professional career.

We’re here to help as you find the answers to your questions. As Alberta’s Destination University, the U of L gives you room to think, create and explore, providing a university experience unlike any other.

How to apply

In order to apply, you will need to provide the following documentation:

• Academic Transcripts
• Curriculum Vitae
• Three Letters of Reference
• Letter of Intent
• English Language Proficiency (ELP)

All applications and supporting documents must be provided through the online portal: https://www.uleth.ca/future-student/graduate-studies/apply

Co-operative Education & Internships Option

The Co-operative Education/Internship Option is available to students for the Master of Arts (MA) and Master of Science (MSc) programs. Co-operative education is an educational model that formally integrates academic study at the master’s level with relevant, paid work experience in appropriate employment fields such as government, institutions, and industry. The University, the employer, and the student are in partnership to ensure an enriching experience toward the student's professional development.

Further information visit the website: http://www.uleth.ca/artsci/coop/co-operative-education-internship-option-graduate-studies

Funding

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.uleth.ca/graduate-studies/master-arts/award-opportunities

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The Economics master’s program provides students with the knowledge required for entry-level or mid-level positions conducting economic analysis and forecasting within industry or government. Read more
The Economics master’s program provides students with the knowledge required for entry-level or mid-level positions conducting economic analysis and forecasting within industry or government. Courses are selected to allow students to be well prepared for these as well as related alternatives.

Visit the website: http://manderson.cba.ua.edu/academics/departments/masters_program/master_of_arts_in_economics

Course detail

Students pursue the master’s degree by following one of three different tracks. Each track is designed with a different objective, though the choice of one over the other does not close any option the student may later want to pursue. Markets may rise and fall, but our graduates remain ahead.

Track 1: PhD Preparation

Track I prepares the student for a doctoral program.

Required Courses:

EC 570
Introduction to Mathematical Economics

EC 610
Seminar in Microeconomic Theory

EC 611
Seminar in Macroeconomic Theory

EC 616
Seminar in Monetary Economics

EC 660
Game Theory

EC 670
Econometrics

ST 554
Mathematical Statistics I

In addition to these courses, students would complete an additional twelve hours of graduate coursework.

Track 2: Applied Economics

Track II is for students who want to prepare for a career for which they apply the skills of economic analysis. These jobs are typically in the financial sector, government agencies or industry.

Required Courses:

EC 570
Introduction to Mathematical Economics

EC 508
Microeconomic Theory

EC 513
Economic Forecasting & Analysis

ST 521
Statistical Data Management SAS I

ST 531
Knowledge Discovery & Data Mining I

EC 509
Macroeconomic Theory & Policy

EC 571
Econometrics

ST 522
Advanced Statistical Data Management SAS II

ST 532
Advanced Data Mining II

The set of required courses enhance students’ understandings of the core concepts in microeconomics and macroeconomics, developing the quantitative skills necessary to work in econometrics and economic forecasting.

Track 3: Policy Economics

The set of courses enhances students’ understanding of the core concepts in microeconomics and macroeconomics, as well as enhancing students’ skills in understanding and analyzing policy issues. Students also gain quantitative skills through course work in econometrics and economic forecasting. This degree program requires 30 hours of coursework.

Required Courses:

EC 570
Introduction to Mathematical Economics

EC 508
Microeconomic Theory

EC 513
Economic Forecasting & Analysis

EC 509
Macroeconomic Theory & Policy

EC 571
Econometrics

Four 500-level elective courses are also required.


How to apply: http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

Fund your studies

Student Financial Aid provides comprehensive information and services regarding opportunities to finance the cost of education at The University of Alabama. We recognize that financial assistance is an important key to helping reach your educational and career goals. The financial aid staff is dedicated to making the financial aid process as straightforward as possible. Visit the website to find out more: http://financialaid.ua.edu/

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Koç University is one of the best places to obtain a MA degree in economics. The Economics faculty at Koç University has a solid reputation as contributors to the frontiers of knowledge in Turkey and abroad. Read more
Koç University is one of the best places to obtain a MA degree in economics. The Economics faculty at Koç University has a solid reputation as contributors to the frontiers of knowledge in Turkey and abroad.
Recently, the department has been ranked number 1 in Turkey and continues to improve its ranking in Europe and the world (Rankings are available here) Students are supported by research and teaching assistantships. They will have the opportunity to participate in the research projects of faculty members and teach their own classes so that they can develop their teaching skills further.

Current faculty projects and research interests:

• Mathematical Foundations
• Mathematics for Economists
• Microeconomics
• Macroeceonomics
• Econometrics
• Game Theory
• Law and Economics
• Mechanism Design
• International Trade
• Financial Economics
• Experimental Economics
• Economics of Information and Contracts
• The Economics of Instıtutions

Entry Requirements

1. GPA: 3.0 minimum

2. GRE (foreign students) score with the following minimum scores.
GRE: 155 Quantitative section

3. English proficiency exam. Applicants need to have taken one of the following exams and have at least the minimum score listed below. Native English speakers do not need to take an English exam.
TOEFL IBT (80/120)
IELTS: 6.5

4. Statement of purpose: In addition to telling us about your academic background, try to be as specific as possible about which topics you would like to study and research while at Koç University.

5. Two letters of recommendation
Two recommendation letters are required for M.A. applications.

6. Interviews
A short list of candidates will be invited for an interview, either in person or through Skype.

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This course explores both the economic and political dimensions of international development - differentiating it from MSc programmes in development economics - as well as the links between social choice and development economics. Read more
This course explores both the economic and political dimensions of international development - differentiating it from MSc programmes in development economics - as well as the links between social choice and development economics.

Course Content

You will take a core 20 credit Development Economics in PPE module, which covers topics such as well-being and human development, growth, poverty, corruption and rent-seeking, child labour, and the environment - at an advanced level. You will also take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted). This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take at least 50 credits of economics modules, including applied microeconomics, macroeconomics, econometrics and Economics of Development: Theory and Practice.

You will also take a further 20 credits of taught modules, from a wide range of options offered by the Politics and Economics departments.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP degrees means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Economics and Development prepares students for careers in economics and development, including careers in international organisations, public life and research. It also provides essential research training for doctoral study in economics.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

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This course explores the inter-connections between normative economics and ethics at an advanced level. Read more
This course explores the inter-connections between normative economics and ethics at an advanced level. These connections have been central to the development of modern economics and moral philosophy, and can be found in classic texts in economics and philosophy, including those of Adam Smith, Karl Marx and John Stuart Mill.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take at least 40 credits of economics modules, including 'Applied Microeconomics', 'Macroeconomics' and 'Econometrics'; and 20 credits of philosophy modules in 'Practical philosophy' or 'Analytical political philosophy'.

You will take a further 30 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Economics and Philosophy departments, to include at least 10 credits from Economics.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Philosophy modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Economics and Philosophy prepares students for a wide range of careers, including careers in economics, public life, finance and research. It also provides essential research training for doctoral study in economics.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

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Interconnections between economics and politics are deep and take centre stage in this course. Indeed in the early stages of its development, what we now call ‘economics’ was known as ‘political economy’. Read more
Interconnections between economics and politics are deep and take centre stage in this course. Indeed in the early stages of its development, what we now call ‘economics’ was known as ‘political economy’. This course is tailor-made to suit a wide range of students with interests in the two disciplines and the relation between them.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will also take at least 30 credits of economics modules, including applied microeconomics, macroeconomics and econometrics.

You will take a further 50-60 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Economics and Politics departments. These will include at least 20 credits in Politics and 20-30 credits in Economics.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The variety of optional modules available on the MA in PPE: Economics and Politics prepares students for a wide range of careers, including careers in economics and politics, finance, international organisations and international development. It also provides essential research training for doctoral study in economics.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers.

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The MA program at the University of Calgary supplies students with a strong foundation of theoretical and empirical knowledge. Students can also diversify their academic portfolio by choosing their own areas of specialization. Read more
The MA program at the University of Calgary supplies students with a strong foundation of theoretical and empirical knowledge. Students can also diversify their academic portfolio by choosing their own areas of specialization. Areas of specialization at our Department of Economics include, but are not limited to: international trade, environmental economics, industrial organization, and behavioral economics.

We offer two different M.A. programs: Course- Based and Thesis-Based.

Our Course-based MA program is a twelve month program consisting of both course work and a major research project. Approximately 20 students are admitted to this program every year. This program is designed to prepare students for employment in the public or private sector, or to pursue further studies in a PhD program. Recent graduates have taken positions at such institutions as Canadian Pacific, BMO Financial Group, and the Alberta Utilities Commission.

Our Thesis-based MA program is intended for MA students with a greater interest in independent research. In return for a slightly reduced course load, students are required to prepare and orally defend a formal thesis (original research). Students usually complete this program in 12 to 24 months and recent graduates have gone on to work in such institutions as Industry Canada and have earned placement in PhD programs ranging from UBC to Princeton University.

Our faculty continuously receive funding from the Social Science and Humanities Research Council as well as other agencies. Some members of our faculty also hold Tier I and II Canada Research Chairs. Because of this, we can offer our M.A. students ample opportunity to gain research experience at the University of Calgary. Given our large undergraduate base, M.A. students have a very high likelihood of consistently getting a full Teaching Assistantship position each semester.

Our students have access to a plethora of information pertinent to their research and learning through our libraries which includes textbooks, handbooks and journals in all the specializations that we offer. We are also home to a federal data centre that permits students to apply directly for their own research agendas.

We encourage our senior students to participate in a mentoring program for incoming students. If you are anxious about joining our Economics department, coming to the university, or living in Calgary in general, you can request a mentor to help you adjust to the University of Calgary lifestyle.

M.A. students have access to a number of recreational facilities including a fully equipped gym, swimming pool, and squash courts. Access to such facilities is included with tuition. Our department holds start of semester welcoming parties, Christmas parties and a variety of social events are carried out by our student graduate association.

MA Course-based

The standard course-based MA program is a twelve month combination of formal coursework and closely supervised structured research. Students complete two semesters of course work in the fall and winter terms and must complete no less than seven one semester graduate courses. In addition to the standard seven one semester graduate courses, students are required to enroll in a set of four research methods courses over the course of their twelve month program of study. These courses are conducted by active researchers in the economics department and are intended to provide structure and help for students through the process of conducting original research in economics. The program is capped by a formal research paper which is completed over the spring and summer semesters. Students are required to present their paper at the department’s annual “open conference” held in August.

MA Thesis-based

The Thesis based MA program is similar to the course based but replaces the closely supervised structured research with a less formal supervision arrangement. Instead of enrolling in the four research methods courses, thesis based students will be expected to find a single faculty member to supervise their research. The research paper requirement is also replaced by a formal thesis. The quality and originality of a formal thesis is required to be higher than that of the course based research paper. Additionally, thesis based students are required to undergo a formal oral thesis defense. Given the increased demands of a formal thesis, thesis based students are required to take six one semester graduate courses rather than the seven required for course based students.

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Never has there been a more important time for a new approach to economics. There is an urgent need for a radical rethink of our economic system. Read more
Never has there been a more important time for a new approach to economics.

There is an urgent need for a radical rethink of our economic system. We need new thinking and new models that recognise the challenges we face now, rather than blindly following the path that has led us into the converging crises we now face.

These models will enable us to both mitigate the impacts and adapt to these inter-locking crises – including climate change, biodiversity loss, the peaking in fossil fuel energy supplies, financial instability, food security, poverty and so on.

They will be built on an understanding of the complementarity of ecological protection and human flourishing.

For 20 years, pioneering thinkers and practitioners have been developing alternative economic ideas, models and experiments that were once considered radical and marginal.

As we turn to face a new economic dawn, these theories and practices are now moving centre stage.

"I teach at Schumacher College because of its strong link with ecological sustainability and an approach which is based on collaborative co-creation. People are not told what to do, together they co-create their ideas. It’s a fundamentally different model of education that we can learn from and apply to the economy as well as other areas of our life."
Professor Eve Mitleton-Kelly, London School of Economics

"In making the transition to a world in which we can all thrive within planetary boundaries, it is paradigm shift or bust, and nobody does paradigm shift better than Schumacher College. Its learning environment and the content of its courses make visions of a better world tangible. And, the Economics for Transition MA shows how right now we can take the first steps to get there."
Andrew Simms, Fellow of New Economics Foundation

"Schumacher College is one of the few places I know where economic questions are being asked as openly as they need to be. When I run seminars there, I learn as much as I teach."
Kate Raworth, Visiting Research Associate at Oxford University’s Environmental Change Institute

Why Schumacher College?

Since 1991, Schumacher College has been pioneering radical new thinking in economics, attracting leading teachers, practitioners and activists from across the globe. We have inspired and supported thousands of organisations and individuals from many different countries in their quest to achieve a more sustainable and equitable world.

In 2011, in response to the deepening economic and related crises, we launched our first postgraduate programme in Economics for Transition in association with the New Economics Foundation, the Transition Network and the Business School at Plymouth University.

Now in its fourth year, this partnership offers you an unparalleled opportunity to learn about the cream of radical economic thinking, activism and entrepreneurship globally.

Hosted by highly respected radical economists, completed by an unrivalled visiting faculty of teachers and practitioners from across the world, you have a unique chance to join those at the forefront of new economic thinking.

Our teachers include:

Jonathan Dawson – Schumacher College
Tim Crabtree – Schumacher College
Stephan Harding – Schumacher College
Julie Richardson – Schumacher College
Anna Coote and Tony Greenham (link is external) – New Economics Foundation
Rob Hopkins, Jay Tompt & Sophy Banks (link is external) – Transition Network
David Bollier – co-founder of the Commons Strategies Group
Gustavo Esteva – founder of the Universidad de la Tierra
Fiona Ward – REconomy Project
Pat Conaty – NEF Fellow
Tim ‘Mac’ Macartney – Founder and CEO of Embercombe
Robin Murray – Industrial and environmental economist.
Kate Raworth – Senior Visiting Research Associate at Oxford University’s Environmental Change Institute
Dr. Martin Shaw – Author, mythologist, storyteller and award winning wilderness Rites-of-Passage guide

Who is this course for?

We are delighted to receive your application whether you are coming directly from an undergraduate degree, taking time-out to study mid-career or wanting an opportunity to retrain in a subject area that is of huge importance to our global economic future and wellbeing.

We are looking for enthusiastic agents of change who are ready to co-create a new economy in practice. We are looking for those prepared to take a risk and stand on the cutting-edge of new thinking in this area.

Schumacher College welcomes students from all over the world in its diverse mix of cultural experience and age group that allows for rich peer to peer learning.

What you will learn?

The key sustainability issues facing the world today
How ecological, economic and social crises are systemically linked to the malfunctioning of today’s globalised economy
A critique of the dominant neoclassical, industrial growth model from different perspectives
A theoretical and experiential understanding of an ecological world-view
How to apply ecology and complexity science to the economy and social systems
The co-creation of a new approach to economics drawn from alternative schools of thought
The co-creation of future scenarios and pathways towards low-carbon, high wellbeing and resilient economies
Participation in current debates on the economics of transition
New economics tools, methods and policies and their application to real-world case studies
Self-evaluation to improve professional practice

You will also carry out an independent research project related to the economics of transition

Where you will go?

Are you ready to join a new generation of business leaders, entrepreneurs, policy-makers, researchers, consultants and activists?

Graduates from this programme will have the skills and knowledge to work for sustainable change in the public and private sectors as well as in civil society, or to set up their own projects or organisations that will contribute to the transition to a new economy.

Hear from some of our past and present students and find out how this programme has changed their lives and careers by reading our the Economics for Transition student profiles.

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Our MA in Culture Industry will allow you to explore the interface between contemporary economics and culture, from the scale of a start-up or artwork to that of governmental policy, a city, or the global marketplace. Read more

Our MA in Culture Industry will allow you to explore the interface between contemporary economics and culture, from the scale of a start-up or artwork to that of governmental policy, a city, or the global marketplace. It will also provide the approaches in critical and theoretical analysis that will enable you to conduct further academic research in areas ranging from art history to urban studies and critical theory.

Taking full advantage of the UK’s leading role in the creative industries, and London’s status as a world city, this course creates opportunities for you to:

  • make projects
  • go on field trips
  • do placements
  • carry out academic learning and research
  • meet leading creative practitioners and theorists

This will give you first-hand experience of the fast moving creative economy, as well as giving you indispensable skills in understanding that economy from a cultural, philosophical and political standpoint.

Engage with the cultural sector

Within the accelerated climate of digital networks and globalisation, the forms and behaviour of culture are mutating, converting the workshop into the handheld device and the cinema and gallery into the bedroom. This course is aimed at creative practitioners, entrepreneurs and theorists wanting to experiment with these changes, and set them into a historically and discursively rich framework.

Through participant observation, critical theory, and playful experiment, the course will not just prepare you for a career in the cultural sector, but help you to engage with it imaginatively, critically and tactically.

Placements

Placements are student-led and supported by the research and organisational network of the course leaders. Students on the MA in Culture Industry have undertaken placements at the BBC, Stephen Graham Gallery, White Cube gallerySHAPE ArtsChinatown Oral History ProjectMaximum Rock n Roll, the British CouncilBlack Dog PublishingResonance FMGlasgow BiennaleLondon Architecture WeekGlastonbury FestivalLondon Film Festival, the British MuseumSouth Bank CentreGrizedale Arts, the Japan Foundation, the London Anime and Gaming Con, and Sound and Music.

Students' projects

Our students’ projects are very diverse, and have included exhibitions, publications, websites, photographic projects, market stalls, travel guides, films, novels, app prototypes, ethnographies, and community resource projects.

Modules & structure

Core modules

Recommended option modules

You take option modules to the value of 30 credits. This could include:

Assessment

Essays; project report and documentation/placement report and documentation; research lab participation.

Download the programme specification. If you would like an earlier version of the programme specification, please contact the Quality Office.

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.



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The private, public, and nonprofit sectors demand economists and analysts who are equipped with a strong foundation in quantitative economics — and the ability to apply that knowledge to the challenges changing economies face. Read more

The private, public, and nonprofit sectors demand economists and analysts who are equipped with a strong foundation in quantitative economics — and the ability to apply that knowledge to the challenges changing economies face. We provide students with the rigorous training that’s essential to financial and economic analysis.

Our program trains students in the heart of the west coast's financial capital so that they can become leaders and analysts in investment, wealth management, banking, corporate financial management, international finance and economics, and a host of other industries. Some graduates pursue PhD programs in economics.

You can find more information here

Overseas Study and Internships

Graduate students may spend a summer at a university abroad and earn six credits (as electives) toward their degree at USF. Overseas study requires approval by the graduate adviser and coordinator of the area of concentration. Students might also pursue an internship, which would substitute for an elective course upon approval by the graduate adviser.

You can request more information from our website

Concentration Areas

Concentration options provide a framework by which graduate students may organize their program to achieve individual goals.

  • General Economics

Students collaborate with a Graduate Adviser to design a plan of study. Some students use this option to prepare for PhD studies; others prepare for careers as economists in government or the private sector. Opportunities exist for directed research, a master's thesis, study/research abroad, and internships.

  • Financial Economics

Students have the opportunity to study domestic and international financial markets, as well as the principles of financial decision-making in the banking, investment management, and corporate financial management professions. Students may also enroll in MBA courses and will complete a research project in the field of financial economics.

  • International Economics

Students take courses in International trade and International finance, and select three electives from such courses as Economic Development, Development Microeconomics, Development Macroeconomics, Natural Resource Economics and Development Policy, and International Political Economy. Students also complete a research project in international economics.

Scholarships

We offer a limited number of merit-based scholarships to incoming students on a competitive basis. There is no separate application for these one-time scholarships, which are limited in number, vary in amount, and cover only part of tuition costs. If a scholarship is awarded, it will be indicated in the admission letter sent by the Economics program. All students admitted to the Economics graduate program are considered for these scholarships during the admission decision process.

You can request more information on our program and scholarships by visiting our website



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Unlike MA courses which focus narrowly on specific areas relating to the politics of development, this course offers an integrated and interdisciplinary education with a focus on politics and international development. Read more
Unlike MA courses which focus narrowly on specific areas relating to the politics of development, this course offers an integrated and interdisciplinary education with a focus on politics and international development. Building on the range of staff at the University with interests in the area, it covers both the political and economic dimensions of international development, and gives you a foundation in economics. It also provides essential research training in the Social Sciences.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take the 'Theories and Policies of Development Governance' module in your first term, followed by one of three development modules in your second term: 'Development and Conflict', 'Politics of International Trade and Development', or 'Development Economics'.

You will also take one of two 10 credit Economics modules: either 'Applied Microeconomics I', which covers central topics in microeconomics including consumer theory, decision theory, welfare and market equlibrium and efficiency; or 'Economic Analysis for PPE', which provides a non-technical introduction to Economics.

In addition you will take a further 40 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Economics or Politics departments, with at least 20 credits being from Politics.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Politics and Development prepares you for careers in public life and development, including careers in international organisations, politics and research.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers. For further information visit the YorkWorks webpages.

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The M.A. program in Economics at UBC owes its strength to the quality of its research faculty, opportunities for intensive training in theoretical and applied work, and a diverse offering of specializations. Read more

Overview

The M.A. program in Economics at UBC owes its strength to the quality of its research faculty, opportunities for intensive training in theoretical and applied work, and a diverse offering of specializations.

The 12-month M.A. program is designed to prepare students for employment in the public or private sector, or to pursue further studies in a Ph.D. program. Recent graduates have taken positions at the Bank of Canada, the Department of Finance, Statistics Canada, KPMG, PricewaterhouseCoopers and numerous other organizations. Those looking to pursue a Ph.D. in economics have gone on to studies at Berkeley, Michigan, Minnesota, Princeton, Stanford, UCLA, as well as our own Ph.D. program!

Each year we typically admit about 50 students to our program. As a result we are able to offer training in a wide range of theoretical, empirical, and policy-related fields. Students may also take advantage of courses offered through The Institute for Advanced Studies in Economics, a collaborative teaching and research initiative by the Vancouver School of Economics and the Strategy and Business Economics division at the Sauder School of Business.

Virtually all of our research faculty hold grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council and other funding agencies, resulting in numerous opportunities for experience as research assistants for our M.A. students. The School houses the Centre for Labour Studies and manages the British Columbia Inter-University Research Data Centre. Hence, unique training opportunities and access to data and computing resources are available to our students.

The School has its own computer lab for the exclusive use of our graduate students. The School lounge offers a comfortable space to chat with colleagues and faculty over coffee, and for study groups to meet to analyze and work out issues of debate in depth. The UBC Library collection numbers over one million volumes. In terms of economics material, the holdings are particularly extensive in serial publications and the post-war literature.

The Graduate Student Centre, of which all graduate students are members, is nearby and has facilities for social activities. In addition, the School holds regular social activities during the year. These include the Grad Student Welcome Party in September, and the School’s Holiday Party in December! Members of our School also take part in activities such as intramural sports and the annual 10km Vancouver Sun Run.

We invite you to explore our website and learn more about what our M.A. program, the Vancouver School of Economics, the thriving academic environment at UBC, and the stunning, cosmopolitan city of Vancouver can all offer to you.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Arts
- Specialization: Economics
- Subject: Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework only
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts
- School: Vancouver School of Economics

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Before the emergence of economics and politics as distinct disciplines, ‘political economy’ was a discipline in itself. There has been a considerable expansion of research across the three PPE disciplines in recent years, resulting in political economy becoming one of the most exciting areas of study and research. Read more
Before the emergence of economics and politics as distinct disciplines, ‘political economy’ was a discipline in itself. There has been a considerable expansion of research across the three PPE disciplines in recent years, resulting in political economy becoming one of the most exciting areas of study and research.

The flexible structure of this course means it is suitable for a wide range of students with interests in politics and economics.

Course content

You will take the core 20 credit interdisciplinary module 'The PPE of Social Choice', which covers topics such as decision making, rights and justice relating to social choice (broadly interpreted) at an advanced level. This module is jointly taught by members of staff from all three of York's internationally excellent PPE departments.

The 10 credit 'PEP Graduate Skills Workshop' will prepare you for undertaking research, covering areas such as writing research proposals and specific interdisciplinary skills.

You will take one of two 20 credit international political economy modules: either 'Critical Theories of International Political Economy', or 'Contemporary Issues in International Political Economy'.

You will also take one of two 10 credit Economics modules: either 'Applied Microeconomics I', which covers central topics in microeconomics including consumer theory, decision theory, welfare and market equlibrium and efficiency; or 'Economic Analysis for PPE', which provides a non-technical introduction to Economics.

You will take a further 60 credits of taught modules of your choice, from a wide range of options offered by the Politics or Economics departments.

You will also write a 12,000 word dissertation, which is worth 60 credits.

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in two main ways: seminars and lectures. The main focus of your coursework will be your seminar group, normally containing 10-16 students. In seminars you will produce and discuss your own work, under the guidance of a module tutor. Seminars are normally accompanied by lectures, attended by all of the students taking the module.

The School prides itself on the friendliness of its staff and on the support that it provides for its students. Lecturers, seminar tutors and your supervisor will all help you to get the most out of the programme and, in particular, to understand the importance of interdisciplinary study.

Most modules will use the University's virtual learning environment 'Yorkshare', which may be used to access module resources or for more interactive work.

The modular system is based on a notional 40-hour week for each student. The amount of 'contact' time (lectures and seminars) varies depending on the modules you choose. The remaining time will be spent reading, preparing for seminars and essays, analysing ideas and data, making interdisciplinary connections and, of course, thinking.

Assessment

There are three assessment periods during the academic year: week 1 of the Spring term, week 1 of the Summer term and weeks 5-8 of the Summer term. Assessments occur throughout your year of study, usually in the term immediately after the module has been taken. The majority of assessments are either unseen examination papers or essays, which varies depending on which department is running the module. Most Economics modules for example are assessed by exams, but most Politics modules by essays.

You will spend the summer and summer vacation terms working on your dissertation, which will be handed at the end of the summer vacation (mid September).

Reasonable adjustments in assessments will be made for students with disabilities, for example extra time in exams or use of a computer. The School works with the Disability Services team to ensure all students have the support they require.

Careers

The interdisciplinary nature of the School of PEP postgraduate courses means you develop a wide range of transferable skills. Employers value these degrees precisely because they make you think across boundaries and engage critically with a range of different material.

The MA in PPE: Political Economy prepares you for many careers in economics and politics, ranging from finance to international organisations and development. It also provides training for doctoral research in politics.

The careers branch of the Club of PEP, YorkWorks, aims to provide a platform for students to meet with experts and industry insiders to learn about the world of work and find out more about a career path that interests them, for example by organising careers conferences with graduate employers. For further information visit the YorkWorks webpages.

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This MA will enable you to master key tools used for the financing of individual companies - derivatives, investment appraisal and risk management - and provides an in-depth study of financial issues affecting the broader economic environment, such as crises and bubbles in the international economy. Read more
This MA will enable you to master key tools used for the financing of individual companies - derivatives, investment appraisal and risk management - and provides an in-depth study of financial issues affecting the broader economic environment, such as crises and bubbles in the international economy. It offers an opportunity to develop the key analytical skills necessary for carrying out research on contemporary issues in financial economics.

Key features
This course offers a good preparation for work with a range of public and private institutions in the area of applied financial economics, including banks and insurance companies; firms dealing with the reporting and evaluation of financial information; and domestic and international regulatory agencies focusing on the financial sector.

Lectures are supplemented by seminars, giving an opportunity for regular feedback and discussion.
The University's Economics department is actively engaged in research and publication on financial topics, and you will benefit from regular staff seminars and workshops.

What will you study?

You will study core aspects of macro- and microeconomic theory, of applied econometrics and economic policy, and of the long-term historical and conceptual context of the contemporary issues and debates. Consequently, you will master a range of economic analysis, key analytical skills and empirical background necessary to participate in discussions on financial economic issues.

You will work individually with a member of staff to choose a topic for your dissertation, research this topic and write up your conclusions. Your topic will be a contemporary issue relating to a microeconomic or macroeconomic aspect of financial economics. You will work on your dissertation with a member of the Economics department who specialises in and pursues research in the field of financial economics.

Assessment

Graded problem sets, practical coursework, essays, examinations, thematic case studies, policy briefs, and dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Applied Econometrics and Microeconomic Analysis
-Economic Change and Ideas
-Economics Dissertation
-Financial Economics
-Macroeconomic Theory and Policy

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