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Masters Degrees (M Phil)

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International Peace Studies examines the sources of war and armed conflict and suggests methods of preventing and resolving them through processes of peacemaking and peacebuilding. Read more
International Peace Studies examines the sources of war and armed conflict and suggests methods of preventing and resolving them through processes of peacemaking and peacebuilding. The course combines perspectives from international relations, ethics and conflict resolution to reflect critically upon the wide range of social, political and economic issues associated with peace and political violence. A week-long Mediation Summer School provides an opportunity to develop practical skills in the area of conflict resolution and mediation. There is also the option to participate in various field trips in Ireland and abroad. Students are required to take the two core modules as well as four modules from the list of modules. A sufficient number of optional modules must be taken to fulfil credit requirements. A. Core Modules The Politics of Peace and Conflict Research Methods B. Students must take four modules from the following list of options: International Politics Ethics in International Affairs Conflict Resolution and Nonviolence Armed Conflict, Peace-building and Development The United Nations and Peacekeeping Human Rights in Theory and Practice Gender, War and Peace Northern Ireland: Conflict, Religion and the Politics of Peace The Politics of the Idea of Europe Race and Ethnicity, Theoretical Concepts Ethnic Conflict, Peace and the State NGOs in Theory and Practice: Internship Module Some changes to the structure and content of this course may be made during 2012-13. Prospective candidates should contact the Executive Officer for information on new developments. Teaching takes place in Dublin over two terms. A one term, non-degree course is available and is ideal for those on sabbatical, or for those who prefer a shorter period of study. There is also the option of attending single modules. Modules from the M.Phil. in Intercultural Theology and Interreligious Studies and the M.Phil. in Conflict Resolution and Reconciliation are open to students on the M.Phil. in International Peace Studies. Students seeking to be assessed for their work on a module in either of the two other courses must first secure the permission of the relevant course coordinators. Dissertation: A research dissertation (15,000 – 20,000 words) to be supervised by an appropriate member of staff and to be submitted by 16 August.

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The Department welcomes applications from well-qualified graduates to register for research degrees (M.Phil or Ph.D). Members of staff have experience of supervising research students in a very wide range of topic areas. Read more
The Department welcomes applications from well-qualified graduates to register for research degrees (M.Phil or Ph.D). Members of staff have experience of supervising research students in a very wide range of topic areas. Applications are particularly welcome from graduates who would like to study in the following areas:

- Transnational Communication and Globalization
- Political Communication
- Gender and Ethnicity
- Influence and Representation
- Production and Consumption

There are three possible routes that students can follow:

1) M.Phil or Ph.D by Research
2) Ph.D by Research under the ESRC’s 1+3 Scheme
3) ‘New Route’ or integrated Ph.D

It is strongly recommended that prospective students seek advice from the Centre’s Postgraduate Tutor at an early stage to ensure that they are aware of all the available options.

Subject specific modules available include (list is subject to variation):

Research Methods in Media and Communications (20 credits)
Contemporary issues in Media and Cultural Studies (20 credits)
Processes and Structures in Mass Communications (20 credits)
The Study of Mass Media Audiences (20 credits)
The International Context of Mass Communication (10 credits)
Political Communication (10 credits)
Option modules include: Film as Mass Communication (10 credits), Advertising and Cultural Consumption (10 credits) and News Management, Communication and Social Problems (10 credits).

Start month(s): January, April, July and October

Duration: Full time, at least 2 years for the M.Phil, at least 3 years for the Ph.D, 4 years for the ‘New Route’ or Integrated Ph.D scheme.

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The M.Phil. in Classics is designed both for those who are already fully trained in the classical languages and for those who have completed non-language based degrees. Read more
The M.Phil. in Classics is designed both for those who are already fully trained in the classical languages and for those who have completed non-language based degrees. The course provides students with an excellent grounding in postgraduate research skills in Classics. It also hones the sort of analytical, written, and verbal communication skills that are highly valued and effective in careers outside the university and education sectors. Since its establishment in 2008 the M.Phil. in Classics has attracted students from all over the world. Many have gone on to do doctoral studies in Trinity College and in other universities internationally.

The course has two compulsory elements. The weekly core module Research and Methods runs throughout the year and communicates core research skills and knowledge across the main strands of classical scholarship. All students also write a dissertation of 15,000 to 20,000 words on an agreed topic, individually supervised by a member of staff. The dissertation offers an opportunity to begin to specialise in a particular strand of scholarship, whether literary, philosophical, historical or archaeological. In addition, students choose four elective modules (or two if they take beginners' Greek or Latin), which likewise allow them to build specific skills and to follow their individual interests.

Recently taught electives include:
Greek Language;
Latin Language;
Classics and European Identity;
Textual Criticism;
Gender and Genre in Augustan Poetry;
Greeks and Barbarians;
Ancient Drama, Adaptation and Performance;
Curiosity and Crisis in the Late Fifth Century:
Receptions of the Sophists;
The Eternal City:
The Archaeology of the City of Rome;
Lost in the Labyrinth? 'Reading' Aegean Bronze Age Art;
Rulers and Image-making in the Hellenistic World.

For students with intermediate and advanced Greek and Latin a range of author- and topic-based modules are available. Students may also apply to take one Directed Reading module outside listed taught modules (within the areas of expertise of staff members) or an approved module from another M.Phil. course. Available options vary from year to year, subject to staffing demands.

The initial closing date for applications is 30th April and offers will be made on a rolling basis from January 2014. Should places remain unfilled, applications received after the initial closing date will be considered.

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This is an interdisciplinary course which provides an overview of European intellectual and cultural history, looking at Europe and its history from a range of disciplinary perspectives. Read more
This is an interdisciplinary course which provides an overview of European intellectual and cultural history, looking at Europe and its history from a range of disciplinary perspectives. It focuses on constructions and representations of identity, the emergence of the idea of Europe, political symbolism and nationalism, symbolic geographies and so on. The course builds on the inclusive, interdisciplinary approach of Trinity's undergraduate European Studies programme, but with a higher level of intellectual sophistication and breadth.

Course Content

The course consists of a compulsory two-semester module (carrying 20 ECTS credits), a number of optional one-semester modules (two per semester taken, each carrying 10 credits), and a dissertation (worth 30 credits). Each taught course module runs for an 11 week period within the 12-week semester, and meets once a week for a two-hour lecture or seminar. Teaching is spread over 22 weeks from September to the following April.

The compulsory (core) module, 'Europe and its Other(s): Ideas, identities and symbolic geographies in Europe', introduces a number of theoretical approaches to European intellectual, cultural and political history. Four optional single-semester modules are chosen from the lists below; these encourage students to apply and develop these approaches, with a focus both on distinct national or regional cultures and histories on the one hand, and/or specific issues and problems in European history and culture(s) on the other. A student may apply to the Course Committee, through the Course Director, for permission to take a relevant taught course module in another M.Phil. programme offered by the University. Not more than two modules from outside the European Studies M.Phil., and not more than one module from outside the School of Languages, Literatures and Cultural Studies, will normally be permitted.


Core component: 'Europe and its Other(s): Ideas, identities and symbolic geographies in Europe' (two semesters, 20 credits)

Optional modules

Figurations of European National Identities

Cultures of Memory and Identity in Central Europe

Representations of the Other Europe: Cinema in Communist and Post-Communist Central and Eastern Europe

Spain's European Identity

Intellectuals and Commitment


Optional modules available in other SLLCS programmes (subject to availability):

Literature and Exile

Moving between Cultures (second part)

The Aesthetics of Response: Ekphrasis and the Sublime


Optional modules available in graduate programmes in other schools (subject to availability):

Classics and European Identity (Department of Classics)

Government Institutions (Department of Political Science)

Government and Politics of the EU in conjunction with EU Policies (Department of Political Science)

Religious Tolerance and Intolerance in Early Modern Europe (Department of History)

History, Memory and Commemoration (Department of History)

Gender, Identity and Authority in Eighteenth Century France (Department of History)

Assessment

Assessment is by a submitted essay (3500-5000 words) in each course; each optional module will account for 10% of the overall programme mark. Students who meet the requirements and decide that they wish to continue for a research degree will be facilitated in registering in the September when they have submitted their M.Phil. dissertation, thus creating the possibility of moving straight on to the PhD register.

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A cross-border course - Belfast and Dublin After registration in Dublin at the start of the course, teaching takes place in Belfast over two teaching terms, September to December and January to early April. Read more
A cross-border course - Belfast and Dublin After registration in Dublin at the start of the course, teaching takes place in Belfast over two teaching terms, September to December and January to early April. The second term includes a residential Spring School in Dublin. For the remainder of the programme, including the summer dissertation period, April-September students may be based in either Belfast or Dublin depending on their research interests. A one term (twelve week) programme is available and is ideal for those on sabbatical, or for those who prefer a shorter period of study.
Course Description:
This innovative cross-border programme allows M.Phil. students to take a broader joint course Master in Conflict Resolution and Reconciliation, or a specialist option for either a Master in Conflict Resolution or a Master in Reconciliation Studies. The Conflict Resolution specialism develops skills in conflict analysis and conflict intervention for both established practitioners and those seeking to develop new expertise in conflict management, conflict resolution and conflict transformation. The Reconciliation specialism offers an inter-disciplinary approach to the challenges of social reconciliation in the aftermath of political conflict, drawing on social research, politics, theology and ethics. Particular attention is given to ethnic conflicts, and the role of religion in such conflicts and in peacebuilding and reconciliation. Case studies typically include: Northern Ireland; South Africa; Zimbabwe; Rwanda; El Salvador; Guatemala; Israel/Palestine; and Sri Lanka. The programme equips graduates for work with local and international organisations, and provides transferable skills for a wide variety of careers, including mediation, diplomacy, policy, advocacy, journalism, teaching and Ph.D. research.

Students are required to take a 10 ECTS core module in Research Skills, a further 50 ECTS of taught modules, and a 30 ECTS research dissertation. In the Conflict Resolution specialism, students are required to take the core module, Conflict Analysis and Models of Intervention. In the Reconciliation specialism, students are required to take the core module, Dynamics of Reconciliation. Optional modules worth 10 ECTS include: Conflict Resolution Skills, Conflict Transformation, Conflict Resolution Lessons from Comparative Peace Processes, Social Research for Transformation, Reconciliation in Northern Ireland, Theology of Reconciliation, Community Learning and Reflective Practice in Northern Ireland, and Post-Conflict Justice and Truth Commissions. Optional modules worth 5 ECTS include: Guided Research Project and South Africa: The Ethics of Truth and Reconciliation. Modules are generally assessed on written work of 3,000-5,000 words, to be submitted according to the internal deadlines distributed at the beginning of each academic year, with final submission date by 1 May. Subject to satisfactory performance in the written work, students may proceed to the submission of the dissertation. Students who do not reach that standard, but who nonetheless are judged by the Court of Examiners to have reached a satisfactory level of performance, may be recommended for the award of a Postgraduate Diploma, without further assessment. The 30 ECTS dissertation is 15,000-20,000 words, and to be submitted by 1 August. The dissertation is required for all M.Phil. students.

Further details on the specialist tracks are available on the School website http://www.tcd.ie/ise/resolution/

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The course is a unique opportunity to embark upon a detailed investigation into the intellectual currents and aesthetic concerns surrounding the study and practice of film. Read more
The course is a unique opportunity to embark upon a detailed investigation into the intellectual currents and aesthetic concerns surrounding the study and practice of film. From the outset, questions of history, theory and context are brought to bear on issues of close analysis and interpretation. Elective modules in Screenwriting, Creative Documentary Practice and Editing allow students to balance film theory with practice. At every step of the way your progress will be informed by an emphasis on independent study and critical thinking. In addition, the course aims to develop the key transferable skills required for postgraduate study. These include dissertation preparation, time management and oral and written presentation.


The course consists of six taught modules and a Dissertation module that includes Research Methodologies.

Dissertation and Research Methodologies
This module prepares students for the formal processes of research and writing at M.Phil. level. Classes will cover library use, archival skills, electronic resources, use of Endnote, research skills, note taking, writing and oral presentation and power-point techniques. Students will write a dissertation of approximately 12,000-15,000 words on an approved topic to be supervised by an appropriate member of staff.

In addition, students choose six of the elective modules listed below:

Aesthetics of Digital Cinema
This course traces the history of the development of the digital image with specific reference to its application to filmmaking. We will look at the analogue origins of the digital image and discuss the aesthetic implications of the shift to digital film. Further we will discuss developing models of criticism and their application to the digital cinematic image. We will be drawing examples from Western (Hollywood, Danish, British) cinemas and non-Western (Iranian) cinemas as well as from other outputs, such as YouTube.

Cinema and Ireland

This course will explore the history of Irish cinema from the 1930s to the present. It will also cover such areas as state film production policies, film censorship, and the history of Irish film distribution and exhibition. In addition, it will trace how British and American cinemas have represented Ireland and the Irish, and it will examine representations of political violence, history, gender and the cinema of the Celtic Tiger years, as well as current trends in Irish film production.

Current Trends in European Cinema
This course will look at and examine the changes taking place in cinema in Europe in the latter part of the twentieth century and the beginning of the twenty-first century. This was a period that saw enormous transformation throughout the continent - both East and West - when the post World War II political dispensation collapsed and Cold War divisions crumbled. The fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, the break-up of the Soviet Union in 1991 and the subsequent overthrow of the remaining Stalinist regimes in Eastern and Central Europe, the emergence of the European Union as a transnational political entity in 1992, and the globalisation of the world economy all impacted on the way in which films were made and the type of themes they explored and topics they tackled.

Cult Cinema
This module will examine a number of films that have acquired 'cult status' for a variety of reasons. It will pay particular attention to the ways in which these films have circulated in popular and academic discourses and the various attempts to identify 'cult' qualities and qualifying practices.

Melodrama
This module will consider a wide range of variations on the ‘melodramatic mode’, including examples from early cinema, classical Hollywood cinema, as well as current American and European cinema.Â

Editing
This module will introduce students to the craft of editing, giving students an understanding of the essential technical and creative skills involved: how a scene is assembled and seamlessly put together, cutting dialogue, creating tension and drama using editing, using pacing, editing to rhythm, cutting to music and beats. It will also provide students with a through knowledge of the editing software, Final Cut Pro X, covering all aspects of the software, from capture and system-settings, editing tools and shortcuts, to effects, transitions and colour correction. The overall aim is to give students the knowledge, tools and confidence to complete their own work to a professional standard.

Creative Documentary Practice
The aim of this module is expose students to the possibilities of creative documentary film making with a strong emphasis on learning thorough practical application. The module will take a critical look at current practices in the genre with an emphasis both on the techniques of documentary filmmaking and the practicalities of how films are made.

Screenwriting
This module will introduce students to the techniques and conventions of screenwriting. Class exercises will involve the analysis of screenplays and short films, and the course will cover both the conventional three-act structure and other models of screenwriting.

Please note: all modules are subject to change and/or availability. Students must take three modules in Michaelmas term and three modules in Hilary term, subject to timetabling.

Assessment is by a combination of coursework and dissertation:

Each module will be assessed by a combination of written and/or practice based assignments as appropriate and class participation. Total ECTS: 60
Dissertation of approximately 12,000-15,000 words and Research Methodologies assessment. Total ECTS: 30
Postgraduate Diploma

A Postgraduate Diploma in Film Theory and History may be awarded in certain circumstances on the basis of coursework alone (60 ECTS). Entry is the same as for the M.Phil. programme.

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The M.Phil. course in Medieval History is designed to provide students with a rigorous grounding in medieval history and to prepare high-calibre graduates, from any Arts or Social Science background, for doctoral study or for employment outside of academia. Read more
The M.Phil. course in Medieval History is designed to provide students with a rigorous grounding in medieval history and to prepare high-calibre graduates, from any Arts or Social Science background, for doctoral study or for employment outside of academia. The course is taught by specialists not only from the Department of History but also by medievalists in other disciplines, including archaeology, art history, classics, gender studies, literature and musicology. Aside from a thorough training in key skills, the course offers students the possibility of focusing on particular geographical areas (Ireland or elsewhere in Europe) and on themes crucial to the shaping of the medieval world, between c.500 and c.1550.

In a variety of modules students are trained in the analysis and presentation of their research findings. They are also introduced to the methodological challenges of advanced study and research at postgraduate level. The course includes a rigorous training in Latin (catering both for beginners and those with an existing qualification) and in Palaeography – the study and transcription of medieval handwriting. Study of other languages is also possible. A suite of term-long electives is available on substantive themes or topics, varying from year to year. Recently offered modules include: The Archaeology of Ancient and Early Medieval Rome; Viking Ireland; Regnum and Sacerdotium in Narrative Sources and Letters of the Eleventh Century; Saints and Sanctity in the Medieval World; Kingship in Medieval England; Renaissance Kingship, c.1488-1542; Gender Theories; Public Archaeology; and Classics and the European Identity. The weekly James Lydon Research Seminar provides an opportunity for invited medievalists from Ireland and across the world to discuss their work with graduate students. There is also a dedicated M.Phil. Research Seminar, in which Masters students present their research to fellow students and staff. The course culminates with a 20,000-word dissertation, written on an agreed topic and individually supervised by a member of staff.

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Starting in the academic year 2012-13, the music department will be offering a one-year M.Phil. in Music Composition to cater for the growing demand for graduate studies of international standing in the area. Read more
Starting in the academic year 2012-13, the music department will be offering a one-year M.Phil. in Music Composition to cater for the growing demand for graduate studies of international standing in the area. Apart from one-on-one mentorship in composition itself, students will take courses in among others, music composition, experimental music theatre and opera, film music aesthetics, advanced orchestration (using technology as an assistant), and composition for mixed media. This proposed M.Phil. course will provide a backbone of activity for the new centre of Composition and Contemporary music, part of Trinity’s new initiative in Creative Arts, Technology and Culture. The course director is the composer Donnacha Dennehy, and the composer Dr. Evangelia Rigaki is the course coordinator. Course Content: The course consists of three elements:

4 compulsory taught modules spread across two semesters (40 ECTS). Each compulsory module is worth 10 ECTS. The compulsory modules are Advanced Orchestration, Contemporary Music Studies, Composition I and Composition II.
2 optional taught modules, selected from a choice of 4 (20 ECTS). Each optional module is worth 10 ECTS. The optional modules available are (i) Composition for Mixed Media, (ii) Music Cognition and Design, (iii) Experimental Music Theatre and Opera, and (iv)Theory, Aesthetics and Analysis.
Dissertation Module. The dissertation module consists of two components: (a) final portfolio of composition, and (b) an accompanying thesis of between 10,000 and 15,000 words. The final portfolio of compositions must have a performing duration of between 20-35 minutes. Portfolios with longer performance times will also be accepted, but these must be agreed in advance with the course director.

Students will work on developing their portfolio and accompanying thesis in conjunction with an assigned supervisor. The accompanying thesis should deal with the structure, aesthetics and methods used by the candidate in the act of composition. The thesis should demonstrate a good knowledge of the context surrounding the candidate’s work, and in doing so should engage with history, criticism

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The M.Phil. course in Public History and Cultural Heritage is designed to provide students with a rigorous grounding in public history and to prepare high-calibre graduates in a unique and thorough fashion for the management of cultural heritage. Read more
The M.Phil. course in Public History and Cultural Heritage is designed to provide students with a rigorous grounding in public history and to prepare high-calibre graduates in a unique and thorough fashion for the management of cultural heritage. We define ‘public history’ and ‘cultural heritage’ broadly. The course involves analysis of cultural memory, its construction, reception and loss; and study of the public status and consumption of history in modern society. Political issues surrounding public commemoration and ‘sites of memory’ are examined and the role of museums, galleries and the media in shaping public perceptions of the past is considered. The course also surveys the more concrete questions involved in the conservation, presentation and communication of the physical heritage of past cultures, particularly where interpretation and meaning are contested.

The M.Phil. course in Public History and Cultural Heritage is designed to provide students with a rigorous grounding in public history and to prepare high-calibre graduates in a unique and thorough fashion for the management of cultural heritage. We define 'public history' and 'cultural heritage' broadly. The course involves analysis of cultural memory, its construction, reception and loss; and study of the public status and consumption of history in modern society. Political issues surrounding public commemoration and 'sites of memory' are examined and the role of museums, galleries and the media in shaping public perceptions of the past is considered. The course also surveys the more concrete questions involved in the conservation, presentation and communication of the physical heritage of past cultures, particularly where interpretation and meaning are contested.

The course is taught in collaboration with the leading cultural institutions located in Dublin and several organisations offer internships to students. In recent years participating bodies have included Dublin City Gallery; Dublin City Library and Archive; Glasnevin Trust; Hugh Lane Gallery; The Little Museum of Dublin; Marsh's Library; the National Gallery of Ireland; the National Library of Ireland; the National Museum of Ireland; and St Patrick's Cathedral.

In a variety of modules, students are trained in the analysis and the presentation of their research findings. They are also introduced to the methodological challenges of advanced study and research at postgraduate level. The course comprises a core module, entitled Remembering, Reminding and Forgetting: Public History, Cultural Heritage and the Shaping of the Past, which runs across both terms. A suite of term-long electives is available on substantive themes. A three-month internship, located in one of our collaborating institutions, runs throughout the second term. Practitioner workshops are also held in the second term and provide an opportunity for national and international 'public historians' to discuss their work with the class. In any given year this may include novelists, artists, museum directors, or heritage and tourism policymakers. The course concludes with the production of a dissertation or major project, individually supervised by an member of staff.

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The M.Phil. course builds on the material presented in the Postgraduate Diploma in Old Irish. Applicants will therefore normally have successfully completed the latter course, though persons with equivalent competence in Old Irish but who have not successfully completed the diploma are also eligible to apply. Read more
The M.Phil. course builds on the material presented in the Postgraduate Diploma in Old Irish. Applicants will therefore normally have successfully completed the latter course, though persons with equivalent competence in Old Irish but who have not successfully completed the diploma are also eligible to apply. All candidates undertake core courses in Old Irish prose, Old Irish poetry, Primitive and Archaic Irish, Early Irish law and Middle Irish. In addition students attend a series of guest lectures organised by the department, and all undertake a dissertation of 20,000 words.

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This Belfast-based degree is an innovative cross-border programme which takes an inter-disciplinary approach to the challenges of social reconciliation in the aftermath of armed conflict. Read more
This Belfast-based degree is an innovative cross-border programme which takes an inter-disciplinary approach to the challenges of social reconciliation in the aftermath of armed conflict. The programme grows out of and addresses the needs and experiences of people in Northern Ireland. Particular attention is given to ethnic conflicts and the role of religion in such conflicts. It is designed to address the challenge of developing a fuller, more complex and more systematic understanding of theoretical and practical approaches to reconciliation. Thirty years of violence have taught people some costly wisdom about reconciliation, which needs both to be consolidated and further applied in Northern Ireland and to be offered to others who have experienced similar conflicts. Reciprocally, the Reconciliation Studies programme will also be probing conflicts around the world for lessons to be applied in Northern Ireland and more widely. The programme also includes a one-week Spring School in Dublin.

Students take at least five of the eight courses offered and are assessed on four of them. The courses include Dynamics of Reconciliation; Theology of Reconciliation; Conflict Transformation; Northern Ireland – Conflict and Reconciliation; Social Research Methods; Resources of Reconciliation in World Religions; When the Fighting Stops: Transitional Justice and Truth Commissions; and Conflict and Collective Identity: Ethnicity, Nationalism and Religion. Students also participate in a one-week Spring School in Dublin, which varies in content from year to year. In addition seminars will be organised in support of the programme.

Assessment: The assessment consists of four 5,000-6,000 word essays: students submit an essay on the first course ‘Dynamics of Reconciliation’, at least one from courses 2, 3 or 4, and two others – to be completed by 1st May, and an 18,000-20,000 word dissertation to be completed by 15th September.

All students are registered on a common Masters programme and follow the same assessment procedures for the four essays required. Subject to satisfactory performance in the four essays, students may proceed to submission of a dissertation for the M.Phil. degree. Students who do not reach that standard, but who nonetheless are judged by the Court of Examiners to have reached a satisfactory level of performance, may be recommended for the award of a Postgraduate Diploma, without further assessment.

Admission Requirement:
Applicants should normally have an honors degree at second-class level or above. Students not meeting these criteria may exceptionally be considered at the discretion of the Dean of Graduate Studies.

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In recognition of a shared interest in Information Technology and a growing awareness of its relevance for music, the Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering and the Department of Music initiated a Masters Programme in Music and Media Technologies in Trinity in 1996. Read more
In recognition of a shared interest in Information Technology and a growing awareness of its relevance for music, the Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering and the Department of Music initiated a Masters Programme in Music and Media Technologies in Trinity in 1996.

A particular feature of this programme is a balanced approach to musical and technological topics. Musically, a strong emphasis is placed on the development of adaptable compositional skills, while technological topics are addressed from both a hands-on workstation/studio exposure and a fundamental mathematical and scientific basis, which focuses on musically relevant issues.

The first year is a self-contained Postgraduate Diploma course which provides the necessary musical and technological skills to allow creative individuals to engage in computer-assisted composition and production, apply software tools for the music and New Media industries and/or enter the arena of 'music-on-screen' production for New Media products.

Continuing to a second year of study toward an M.Phil. degree is an option, which is open to those achieving a sufficient standard in their first year exams. The second year combines first semester taught courses with project work in the second semester, and generally has a greater research orientation. The second semester project can be of a musical or technological nature.

Both programmes cover a wide range of subjects within the general field of music technology, and provide students with a fully professional qualification. The work is intensive and these programmes cannot be undertaken part-time.

This course has been co-funded under the National Development Plan (Graduate Skills Conversion Programme) for EU fee paying students.

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The course offers graduates in English or in related disciplines (e.g. history, art history, Irish studies, a modern language) the opportunity to study a broad range of Irish writing in English from the late-sixteenth century to the present. Read more
The course offers graduates in English or in related disciplines (e.g. history, art history, Irish studies, a modern language) the opportunity to study a broad range of Irish writing in English from the late-sixteenth century to the present. It also involves close study of single authors and addresses thematic aspects of the subject. The course is designed to be complete in itself, but can also serve as preparation for those who wish to proceed to further research in the field.

The course consists of five modules:

Single Author:

This module, taught in a weekly two-hour seminar, covers the work of four major individual authors from the Irish literary tradition. In Michaelmas term we study Swift and Yeats, and in Hilary term, Joyce and Beckett.

Perspectives in Irish Writing:

This module introduces students to the socio/cultural contexts in which Irish writing in English developed from the late sixteenth century through to the twenty-first century. It investigates key terms that students will encounter in the critical literature on Irish writing and culture: Anglo-Irish, Protestant Ascendancy, the Gaelic tradition, colonialism, the Big House, romantic and cultural nationalism, the Literary Revival. In addition to covering the significant authors of the tradition, it also addresses such issues as authorship, publishing history and reception as they bear on the emergence and development of a national literature in English and explores a number of theoretical issues.

Options:

Students take one option module in each of the semesters, choosing from the variety of special subjects on offer each year. These special subjects include: Writing the Troubles, Big House Literature, Irish Poetry after Yeats, Ireland on Stage, and Creative Writing.

In place of the special subjects offered in the second term, students may enrol for a Creative Writing Workshop (an element of the M.Phil. in Creative Writing). Entry to this workshop is restricted and based on assessment of a portfolio of the student's creative writing, which must be presented before the end of the first term.

Dissertation:

A dissertation (12,000-15,000 words) is planned in consultation with a Course Director during the second (Hilary) term and is written under the guidance of a supervisor. This work is undertaken in the third term (Trinity term) and in the long vacation (April-August).

Assessment is by a combination of course papers and exercises and dissertation.

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The M.Phil. in Gender and Women's Studies provides a critical understanding of the current scholarship on the position and representation of gender in society. Read more
The M.Phil. in Gender and Women's Studies provides a critical understanding of the current scholarship on the position and representation of gender in society. Drawing on insights and perspectives from a number of academic fields within the Humanities and Social Sciences, the course is both interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary, training students to research across a range of disciplines. Its students acquire a deep understanding of the cultural contexts in which theories of gender are produced, performed and negotiated and an ability to use primary source material as well as critical theories and scholarship. The course also hones the sort of analytical, written, and verbal communication skills that are highly valued and effective in a many different careers.

All students take the core modules Gender Theories, Gender Research Seminar and Approaches to Gender Research, which provide a grounding in key approaches and skills. Students choose further modules from a wide range of electives, varying from year to year. These include both special topics and further skills and methodologies training options, allowing students to build specific skills and to follow their individual interests. Recently offered modules include: Gender and Symbolic Violence; Gender, Art and Identity; Gender and War in the 20th Century; Saints and Sanctity in Ireland, Britain and Europe; Gender, Identity and Authority in 18th century France; Gender and Nation in Irish Writing; Approaches to Historical Research; Libraries and Archives; Curating Art in Theory and Practice. The capstone of the course is a dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words on a research topic in the area of Gender and Women's Studies selected by the student, carried out under the supervision of a member of the teaching staff of the course.

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The M.Phil. in Irish Art History provides an exciting programme exploring a range of key aspects of the history and analysis of Irish visual expression from pre-Christian to Contemporary art and architecture. Read more
The M.Phil. in Irish Art History provides an exciting programme exploring a range of key aspects of the history and analysis of Irish visual expression from pre-Christian to Contemporary art and architecture. The course is designed both for graduates of art history and for those from other, cognate, disciplines. While focused on art and artists in or from Ireland, the imagery, objects and structures are all explored within international and interdisciplinary contexts, as the course is intended to provide graduates with a range of transferable analytical and practical skills that can be applied within other cultural environments. A particular advantage of this course is the accessibility of a wide range of relevant art objects and structures in, and in the vicinity of, Trinity College as well as extensive library and archival resources. Since its establishment ten years ago, the course has attracted applications from all over the world. Many graduates have continued on to undertake Ph.D. research in Trinity and in other universities internationally, while others have taken up posts in museums, galleries, and auction houses as well as in cultural media.

The course offers general introductions to Irish art and architecture as well as a more specialized focus on selected periods and themes. It provides students with a critical understanding of the analysis of works of art within their cultural contexts, and an appreciation of the range of works created in Ireland over time. A core dimension of the course will involve exploring the concept of 'Irishness'. Through engagement with museums and galleries in Ireland, students will also have an understanding of a key curatorial issues of relevance in the development of exhibitions and collections, including the technical opportunities which the digital age offers to curators and art historians. In addition to taking compulsory core modules, students choose a number of electives, which allow them to build specific skills and to follow their individual interests. Students are assessed on the completion of a range of coursework assignments, including essays, critiques, and research exercises. The capstone of the course is a dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words on a topic selected by the student, and carried out under the supervision of a member of staff in the Department of History of Art and Architecture or the Irish Art Research Centre (TRIARC).

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