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The Department welcomes applications from well-qualified graduates to register for research degrees (M.Phil or Ph.D). Members of staff have experience of supervising research students in a very wide range of topic areas. Read more
The Department welcomes applications from well-qualified graduates to register for research degrees (M.Phil or Ph.D). Members of staff have experience of supervising research students in a very wide range of topic areas. Applications are particularly welcome from graduates who would like to study in the following areas:

- Transnational Communication and Globalization
- Political Communication
- Gender and Ethnicity
- Influence and Representation
- Production and Consumption

There are three possible routes that students can follow:

1) M.Phil or Ph.D by Research
2) Ph.D by Research under the ESRC’s 1+3 Scheme
3) ‘New Route’ or integrated Ph.D

It is strongly recommended that prospective students seek advice from the Centre’s Postgraduate Tutor at an early stage to ensure that they are aware of all the available options.

Subject specific modules available include (list is subject to variation):

Research Methods in Media and Communications (20 credits)
Contemporary issues in Media and Cultural Studies (20 credits)
Processes and Structures in Mass Communications (20 credits)
The Study of Mass Media Audiences (20 credits)
The International Context of Mass Communication (10 credits)
Political Communication (10 credits)
Option modules include: Film as Mass Communication (10 credits), Advertising and Cultural Consumption (10 credits) and News Management, Communication and Social Problems (10 credits).

Start month(s): January, April, July and October

Duration: Full time, at least 2 years for the M.Phil, at least 3 years for the Ph.D, 4 years for the ‘New Route’ or Integrated Ph.D scheme.

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Interdisciplinary Approaches to Religion and History in the Pre-Modern World. Encounter and Conflict. Read more
Interdisciplinary Approaches to Religion and History in the Pre-Modern World: Encounter and Conflict

Why is Jerusalem still such a contested place? What are the reasons for the systematic destruction by the Islamic State (IS) of the cultural heritage of the past? Why do sacred texts produced centuries ago continue to shape the lives of people today? How are they used and abused? Why does the sword sometimes replace the word in religious matters? How did religious groups, ideas and artefacts travel from one continent to another and how did that migration transform them? In other words, how did religious conflicts and encounters shape the modern world and why do they still matter today?

These are some of the topics MF Norwegian School of Theology tackles in its new M.Phil programme in History of Religions, with a primary focus on Religion in the Pre-Modern World: Encounters and Conflicts.

The programme is focused on the issues of religious cross-pollination, coexistence and conflict in three target areas: Europe, South-East Asia and the Middle East. Addressed in a long historical perspective stretching from Late Antiquity to the European Renaissance, the programme seeks to illuminate the roots of present peaceful coexistence and interchange, as well as of today’s antagonisms and conflicts. The underlying idea of the programme is that, in order to fully grasp current religious conflicts and alliances, we need to understand how the perceptions of past and present are intertwined, reciprocally dependent and constantly reshaped.

Based on a multidisciplinary approach and applying various theoretical frameworks and interpretative methods, the core courses of the programme aim to reveal historical dynamics, privileging ‘how’ and tentatively ‘why’ over ‘who’ and ‘when’.

The programme is conceived at the intersection between political history and history of religions, but relies also on other disciplines, such as the history of ideas, art history and archaeology. These are meant to provide the depth of field expected in Big History by illustrating and clarifying the macro-historical perspectives.

Teaching and learning are driven by a hands-on and case-oriented attitude and core courses are complemented by lectures and seminars of theory and method.

The programme is open to all students with a BA in related disciplines (history, religious studies, theology, archaeology, art history, social sciences, etc.).

The programme coordinator is Victor Ghica, Professor of Antiquity and Early Christian Studies. The core courses of the programme will be taught by Kristin B. Aavitsland, Professor of Cultural History, Liv Ingeborg Lied, Professor of the

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The master degree programmes are designed to accommodate students from both Norway and abroad. One semester of studies focusing on religious and cultural encounters, where the subjects of Science of Religion, Cultural Studies and Theology of Mission are presented. Read more
The master degree programmes are designed to accommodate students from both Norway and abroad. One semester of studies focusing on religious and cultural encounters, where the subjects of Science of Religion, Cultural Studies and Theology of Mission are presented. Two semesters: the Program consists of two "fields of specialisation". One of these must be one of the following four subjects: The Old Testament, The New Testament, Systematic Theology or Church History. The other field of specialisation can be chosen freely from the remaining theoretical majors of the program: The Old Testament, The New Testament, Systematic Theology, Church History, Theology of Mission or Science of Religion.During the fourth semester a thesis, 60-80 pages, must be written (30 credits) based on one of the two "fields of specialisation". Students are permitted to produce interdisciplinary assignments where the other field of specialisation or Practical Theology becomes a subsidiary subject within the assignment.

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This programme gives knowledge of various relationships between religion and society in an increasingly global and multicultural world. Read more
This programme gives knowledge of various relationships between religion and society in an increasingly global and multicultural world. The study programme is based on courses in the social sciences and religious studies. An essential part of the programme is to give insight into the different ways by which religion is shaped by various local and regional social conditions. This involves courses within: • Ethics • Sociology of religion • Intercultural communication • Diaconia The programme provides opportunities to specialize according to the students’ own interests. The programme is interreligious in its orientation. Future positions This programme aims at providing education for positions within research and education, as well as within Norwegian and international institutions and organizations, where knowledge of religion in an international and global perspective is required. It is also relevant for positions of leadership within the public and private sector. The Master’s degree qualifies for further studies on a doctoral level. The study programme is based on courses in the social sciences and religious studies. An essential part of the programme is to give insight into the different ways by which religion is shaped by various local and regional social conditions. This involves courses within: • Ethics • Sociology of religion • Intercultural communication • Diaconia The programme provides opportunities to specialize according to the students’ own interests. The programme is interreligious in its orientation. Future positions This programme aims at providing education for positions within research and education, as well as within Norwegian and international institutions and organizations, where knowledge of religion in an international and global perspective is required. It is also relevant for positions of leadership within the public and private sector. The Master’s degree qualifies for further studies on a doctoral level.

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The M.Phil. in Theology and Religious Studies is a nine-month Masters course. The M.Phil. offers the opportunity for advanced study in Theology and Religious Studies across the full range of disciplines and with a strong focus on research. Read more
The M.Phil. in Theology and Religious Studies is a nine-month Masters course. The M.Phil. offers the opportunity for advanced study in Theology and Religious Studies across the full range of disciplines and with a strong focus on research. Students can draw on the expertise of leading scholars from a wide range of subjects, which allows both for specialisation and for interdisciplinary approaches. The M.Phil. is designed for students who wish to study their subject interest at an advanced level for nine-months, but also to enable those who wish to undertake further research at doctoral level to acquire the necessary skills and understanding.

Candidates submit a thesis of between 15,000 and 20,000 words and two pieces of submitted work of not more than 5,000 words which will be an essay or an equivalent exercise. Candidates then chose to do one of the following: a three-hour language examination; an exercise; or an alternative exercise within the candidates's chosen subject area if one has not already been offered.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/dvdvmpmtr

Learning Outcomes

On completion of the M.Phil. students should have acquired:

- an introduction to research methods and skills appropriate to a chosen sub-discipline of the subject, such as will serve both: as a preparation for more advanced research or as offering skills of value to potential employers;
- more advanced and specialised knowledge of some fundamental issues and literatures at the forefront of research in that sub-discipline;
- the ability to construct a substantive, if preliminary, contribution to research on a particular issue within that sub-discipline, through the writing of a thesis.

Format

Teaching is by seminars, supervisions, and, as appropriate, classes and lectures. Each module shall normally be taught by four seminars of two hours duration in one term (though some subject areas may provide one-and-a-half hour seminars where there is no essay work being assessed during the seminar itself). Teaching for the exercises varies according to the nature of the exercise. Students may be required to submit preliminary written work for seminar presentations, or practice essays or exercises ahead of their submitted essays or exercises.

The seminars themselves constitute the teaching for the essays arising from the seminar course.

Other essays will be supervised individually. The norm is 2 hours of supervision (distributed between 2 or 3 meetings) per essay.

For theses, the norm is 4 hours of supervision, though that time may be distributed in various ways.

Feedback will be given on essays or exercises related to the seminar modules when the marks and comments are available. Feedback will be given regarding progress in the thesis during the supervisions given for it. There will also be termly reports on CGSRS.

Assessment

A thesis of between 15,000 and 20,000 words. The examiners may at their discretation request an oral examination in any aspect of the work submitted by the candidate.

Two pieces of written work, each of which shall be an essay of not more than 5,000 words, or an equivalent exercise related to a student's chosen seminar modules.
If a student does not choose to study a language, a further written exercise.

One three-hour language examination (if a student chooses to study a language).

Continuing

In order to be eligible to continue to the Ph.D., students must achieve at least a mark of 71 for the thesis and an overall average of at least 71% in the M.Phil. as a whole.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

- Burney & Gregg Bury Studentship (Philosophy of Religion & Christian Theology)
- Peregrine Maitland Studentship (Spread of Christian Religion, comparison between Christianity & other religions, the contact of Christian & other civilisations)
- Philosophy of Religion Studentship
- Polonsky-Coexist Studentship in Jewish Studies
- Shapiro Fund (Jewish Studies)
- Theological Studies Fund Studentship

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The M.Litt. is a research degree, examined, usually after two or more years of research, by a dissertation of up to 60,000 words. Read more
The M.Litt. is a research degree, examined, usually after two or more years of research, by a dissertation of up to 60,000 words. The criteria for obtaining the degree are that the dissertation represent a 'substantial contribution to knowledge', but the criteria are adapted to take account of the fact that the course lasts only two years.

It should be noted that there is no formal taught element in this course of study. It does not provide a suitable foundation course from which to proceed to a higher research degree, for which the most appropriate course is an M.Phil. If you are looking for a course of this type you should return to the graduate admissions front page and find out about the Faculty's M.Phil. courses.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/elelmlegl

Course detail

Candidates work closely with their supervisors, who will usually be assigned to them at the start of the course. It is possible to change supervisors with minimal formality, and it is often desirable to do so as the research project develops.

Although research students spend long hours working independently, they are also able to attend regular (usually fortnightly) seminars in their subject area. All graduate students are required to be members of a College, which offers a centre of social activity, as well as providing an opportunity to meet graduates who work in other fields.

All members of the University, including graduate students, are entitled to attend lectures in any Faculty.

In recent years the Faculty has admitted very few students for this degree. It is generally felt that many candidates would benefit more from a one-year, taught course such as an M.Phil., or from a full three year period of research for the Ph.D.

Format

The M.Litt. is a research based degree so there are no required teaching elements of the course, however, students must attend a minimum of ten sessions per year selected from the Graduate Research Seminars.

- One to one supervision: 8 hours per year

- Seminars & classes: 18 hours per year

Each M.Litt. student is assigned a supervisor and an advisor. The supervisor will assist in refining the research topic, oversee the general direction of work and give a clear indication of whether it is up to the standard normally expected for the degree sought.

The student has a formal advisory meeting with the supervisor and the advisor once a year. The advisor is also available for less formal consultation from the outset.

Supervisors write termly reports online which can be accessed by the students.

Assessment

Submission of a 60,000 word dissertation and an examination, conducted orally or in writing, on the subject of the dissertation.

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MPhil in Modern and Contemporary Literature is a nine-month course that runs from October to June. Read more
The MPhil in Modern and Contemporary Literature is a nine-month course that runs from October to June. This exciting MPhil explores the rich array of literature in English from 1830 to the present, and encourages students to pay particular attention to the relationship of literary texts and their historical and intellectual contexts.

The course structure is designed to enable flexibility in terms of period and specialism: you can choose to concentrate on nineteenth- or twentieth- and twenty-first-century literature, or take a selection of seminars in both. The flexible framework allows you to build a programme of specialised study in line with your own particular research interests. Guidance on developing your course of study will be given by a designated Faculty member who will also act each term as your dissertation supervisor.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/elelmpmcl

Course detail

Having completed the MPhil, students should have:

1. Developed a deeper knowledge of literature written between 1830 and the present day in general, and their chosen area of research in particular.
2. Developed an understanding of critical and theoretical debates which enable the evaluation of current research in their dissertation field.
3. Developed a sophisticated understanding of how literary form engages with history between 1830 to the present.
4. Demonstrated independent judgment based on their own research.

Format

The required elements of the course consist of two seminars in both Michaelmas and Lent term selected from the course-options offered. In Michaelmas Term the student is required to choose at least one of the two Core courses, and can take both. If one Core course is taken in Michaelmas then the second can be taken from one of the two designated Modern and Contemporary options, or (under particular circumstances) a shared option from the M.Phil. in Criticism and Culture or the M.Phil. in Eighteenth-Century and Romantic Studies. In Lent Term the student will be able to choose two courses from a pool of options that is shared between a number of the Faculty’s M.Phil. programmes. in the Faculty and in special circumstance may be able to take an option offered in another Faculty subject to the approval of the convenor.

Students are required to take the M.Phil’s Research Methods course in Michaelmas Term.

Students will be expected to attend training sessions provided by the University Library on bibliographical and library skills, along with sessions on electronic resources such as LION and the MLA bibliography.

Students are required to attend a minimum of ten sessions a year of any of the following fortnightly Graduate Research Seminars: the Nineteenth-Century Graduate Seminar; the Twentieth-Century and Contemporary Literature Graduate Seminar; the Criticism and Culture Graduate Seminar (a speaker series); the Postcolonial Graduate Seminar; the American Literature Graduate Seminar.

Each student has a supervisor who gives advice on planning the year’s work and the dissertation in particular. Supervision on the coursework essays is offered by the convenor of the appropriate class. Documentation offering specifications and guidance in relation to each element of assessed work is provided to students. Progress is monitored through the discussion with each student of draft sections of their dissertations by their supervisor and through submitted work: The short-written exercise, which is submitted in Michaelmas Term, receives feedback from the supervisor; the first course-work which is submitted at the end of Michaelmas term is returned with examiner’s comments at the beginning of Lent term; the Lent-term course-work essay returned with comments at the beginning of Easter term. Supervisors write termly reports online which can be accessed by the student.

Assessment

- A 12,000 – 15,000 word dissertation submitted at the end of Easter term which contributes 50% to the final mark.
- A short-written exercise which is marked on a pass/resubmission basis.
- Two 5,000-word essays. One is submitted at the end of Michaelmas Term the other at the end of Lent Term. These relate to the work pursued in the seminars taken and contribute 25% each to the final mark.

Continuing

If you wish to continue from the MPhil to the PhD you must obtain a minimum of 70 across the coursework with a minimum of 70 for the dissertation.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The M.Phil. Programme is a full-time course occupying one year and is structured as follows. 1. Read more
The M.Phil. Programme is a full-time course occupying one year and is structured as follows:

1. Michaelmas Term Students come into College residence in Cambridge in late September/early October, and take three core Chemical Engineering modules and start one core Management of Technology and Innovation (MoTI) module (run by the Judge Business School). In addition, students are expected to take two elective modules taught by other departments within the University.

2. Lent Term Students take one core Chemical Engineering module and three elective modules, and complete the MoTI module by undertaking a consultancy project for a UK client organisation.

3. March - August During this period students undertake a full-time research project within the Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, the results of which are submitted as a dissertation. The research projects are supervised by University staff members, and students will be required to plan and execute their own work. The projects may include extensive industrial collaboration.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/egcempace

Course detail

The objectives of this Programme are to:

1. provide students with advanced technical skills in chemical engineering;
2. enable students to solve problems within a technical consulting environment;
3. provide students with business skills and a knowledge of entrepreneurship; and
4. provide training in research.

Format

Modules are taught by a combination of formal lectures, demonstrations, discussion classes and example problems, and students are expected to devote at least four evenings per week to private study. The taught material enhances basic knowledge on Chemical Engineering fundamentals, as well as offering experience of other science and business based disciplines. The courses are assessed by both unseen examination and written coursework.

During the first two Terms, students take ten taught modules. Each module usually contains at least 16 hours of contact time (lectures, tutorials, etc.) and students are expected to spend at least four evenings per week on private study and coursework preparation.

During the taught component, students may normally receive up to 2 hours of supervision per core module taken. During the research component, students will normally meet with their supervisor for at least one hour per week.

Students are asked to attend studies meetings with the Programme Manager at the end of Michaelmas Term to discuss any academic-related issues. During the taught component, students are normally provided with feedback on any coursework assignments submitted for assessment. During the research component, feedback is normally provided on a continual basis by the research supervisor.

Assessment

- Thesis -

Students undertake a full-time research project within the Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, the results of which are submitted as a dissertation. An oral examination may also be held.

The assessment of taught modules involves a combination of some or all of the following:

- Coursework - individual or group
- Class participation
- Written and oral examinations
- Presentations - individual or group.

Continuing

The one year M.Phil. ACE course cannot be counted as one year of a Ph.D. research degree, although continuing students wishing to apply for a Ph.D. are normally expected to obtain at least 70% overall for the M.Phil. ACE course.

How to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/egcempace/apply

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow this link: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The M.Phil. in 18th-Century and Romantic Studies provides a nine-month course of literary study in 'the long eighteenth century' (roughly 1688 to 1832), the period of Enlightenment and the rise of Romanticism, during which many of the structures of our modern world were formed. Read more
The M.Phil. in 18th-Century and Romantic Studies provides a nine-month course of literary study in 'the long eighteenth century' (roughly 1688 to 1832), the period of Enlightenment and the rise of Romanticism, during which many of the structures of our modern world were formed. The course, which consists of seminars and classes together with individual study and supervision, allows students to range widely across a rich array of literary and intellectual sources.

Training in relevant research skills is included. Students will have access to the magnificent resources of the Cambridge University Library, one of the few copyright libraries in the UK, as well as to many special holdings in College libraries. They will be able to take courses from other selected MPhils and to attend lectures in the English Faculty and in related faculties such as History, Classics, Modern Languages, History of Art, Philosophy, and History and Philosophy of Science.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/elelmpesr

Course detail

By the end of the course students should have:

- developed a deeper knowledge of British 18th century and romantic literature in general, and of their chosen area of research in particular;

- developed an understanding of critical debates which allows the evaluation of current research in their dissertation field

Format

The required elements of the course consist of two seminars in both Michaelmas and Lent term selected from the course-options offered. Students may substitute one of the two courses required per term from another M.Phil. in the English Faculty or from another Faculty subject to the approval of the convenor.

In addition to the mandatory seminars students must attend the Resources and Methods classes in Michaelmas and Lent Term and the Dissertation Workshops in Lent Term:

Participants on the M.Phil are required to attend a minimum of ten sessions selected from the fortnightly Graduate Research Seminars for the year which must include the Eighteenth-Century and Romantic Graduate Seminar

Each student has a supervisor who gives advice on planning the year’s work and the dissertation in particular. Supervision on the coursework essays is offered by the convenor of the appropriate class. Documentation offering specifications and guidance in relation to each element of assessed work is provided to students. Progress is monitored through the discussion with each student of draft sections of their dissertations by their supervisor and through submitted work: The short-written exercise, which is submitted in Michaelmas Term, receives feedback from the supervisor; the first course-work which is submitted at the end of Michaelmas term is returned with examiner’s comments at the beginning of Lent term; the Lent-term course-work essay returned with comments at the beginning of Easter term. Supervisors write termly reports online which can be accessed by the student.

Assessment

- A 12,000 – 15,000 word dissertation submitted at the end of Easter term which contributes 50% to the final mark.
- A short-written exercise which is marked on a pass/resubmission basis.
- Two 5,000-word essays. One is submitted at the end of Michaelmas Term the other at the end of Lent Term. These relate to the work pursued in the seminars taken and contribute 20% and 30% respectively to the final mark.

Continuing

If you wish to continue from the MPhil to the PhD you must obtain a minimum of 70 across the coursework with a minimum of 70 for the dissertation.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MPhil in Criticism and Culture is an innovative nine-month course of literary study with an interdisciplinary and comparative focus, running from October until the end of June. Read more
The MPhil in Criticism and Culture is an innovative nine-month course of literary study with an interdisciplinary and comparative focus, running from October until the end of June. It aims to provide an introduction to and training in different aspects of contemporary literary criticism and literary and cultural theory.

You will be encouraged to develop a critical and methodological framework, and to pursue questions relating to literary and cultural production alongside your individual research project. Within a flexible framework, you will be able to study particular areas in depth or explore topics broadly relevant to your intended research. Each student works closely with a member of the Faculty on his or her chosen dissertation topic while participating in collaborative seminars and classes.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/elelmpecc

Course detail

By the end of the course students should have:

- developed a deeper knowledge of contemporary literary criticism and literary and cultural theory in general, and of their chosen area of research in particular.

- developed an understanding of critical debates which allows the evaluation of current research in their dissertation field.

Format

The required elements of the course consist of two seminars in both Michaelmas and Lent term selected from the course-options offered. In Michaelmas Term students must take the core course. Students may substitute one of the two courses required per term from another M.Phil. in the English Faculty or from another Faculty subject to the approval of the convenor. Pre-existing exchange arrangements have been set up with the following M.Phils. in the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages (MML) (NB Lent term courses only): European Literature & Culture ; Russian Studies ; Screen Media and Cultures, and with the Faculties of History of Art and Architecture and History and Philosophy of Science (HPS). Courses may also be taken from other M.Phils. by special arrangement.

In addition to the two taught seminars students will be expected to attend the Pre-Dissertation Workshop in Lent Term, followed by the student-facilitated Dissertation-Writing Groups in Easter Term. Students will also be expected to attend training sessions provided by the University Library on bibliographical and library skills, along with sessions on electronic resources such as LION and the MLA bibliography .

Students are required to attend a minimum of ten sessions a year of any of the following fortnightly Graduate Research Seminars: the Criticism and Culture Graduate Seminar (a speaker series); the Postcolonial Graduate Seminar, and the Twentieth Century Graduate Seminar.

Each student has a supervisor who gives advice on planning the year’s work and the dissertation in particular. Supervision on the coursework essays is offered by the convenor of the appropriate class. Documentation offering specifications and guidance in relation to each element of assessed work is provided to students. Progress is monitored through the discussion with each student of draft sections of their dissertations by their supervisor and through submitted work: The short-written exercise, which is submitted in Michaelmas Term, receives feedback from the supervisor; the first course-work which is submitted at the end of Michaelmas term is returned with examiner’s comments at the beginning of Lent term; the Lent-term course-work essay returned with comments at the beginning of Easter term. Supervisors write termly reports online which can be accessed by the student.

Assessment

- A 12,000 – 15,000 word dissertation submitted at the end of Easter term which contributes 50% to the final mark.
- A short-written exercise which is marked on a pass/resubmission basis.
- Two 5,000-word essays. One is submitted at the end of Michaelmas Term the other at the end of Lent Term. These relate to the work pursued in the seminars taken and contribute 20% and 30% respectively to the final mark.

Continuing

If you wish to continue from the M.Phil. to the Ph.D. you must obtain a minimum of 70 across the coursework with a minimum of 70 for the dissertation.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MPhil course of study includes lectures, seminars and individual supervision, with teaching provided by University and College Lecturers. Read more
The MPhil course of study includes lectures, seminars and individual supervision, with teaching provided by University and College Lecturers. The MPhil comprises a Core Course and two taught modules of your choice. Assessment takes the form of three assessed essays of 5,000 words and a 15,000-word thesis. A background in literature, anthropology, modern languages, area studies, history or the social sciences is useful but not essential. Evidence of interest in or commitment to Latin America is expected. Students already at Cambridge applying to continue from the MPhil to the PhD should have attained, or be expecting to obtain, an overall mark of 73% with at least 75% in the thesis or the coursework.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hslamplas

Course detail

By the end of the course students will have:

- developed a critical view of the contribution made by the academic study of Latin America and of some of its specific disciplines to the humanities and the social sciences;
- become familiar with some of the main themes of contemporary debate;
- presented their own ideas in a public forum;
- developed intellectual and practical research skills;
- tested their ability to produce a piece of advanced scholarship in conformity with the research techniques, standards of argument and accepted style of presentation of an academic discipline.

Format

The MPhil course of study includes lectures, seminars and individual supervision, with teaching provided by University and College Lecturers. The MPhil comprises a Core Course and two taught modules of your choice. Assessment takes the form of three assessed essays of 5,000 words and a 15,000-word thesis. A background in literature, anthropology, modern languages, area studies, history or the social sciences is useful but not essential. Evidence of interest in or commitment to Latin America is expected. Students already at Cambridge applying to continue from the MPhil to the PhD should have attained, or be expecting to obtain, an overall mark of 73% with at least 75% in the thesis or the coursework.

Not applicable, although you may wish to carry out some research / fieldwork towards your thesis in Latin America during the Easter vacation period, depending upon your research topic. Fieldwork is expensive, however, and although some funding sources are available to offer small travel grants, students should expect to incur some costs themselves.

Students will receive feedback via individual essay and thesis supervisions, with detailed feedback provided by examiners for all coursework.

Students should expect to receive formal termly progress reports from their Principal Supervisor on their thesis writing and research, with more regular feedback provided on an ongoing basis via email or in face-to-face meetings.

Assessment

Each candidate for the M.Phil is required to submit an original thesis on an approved topic. On application students are asked to submit a thesis proposal (500 words) and, subject to the success of an application, will be assigned a thesis supervisor as part of the admissions process. In some cases further study may lead to a change of topic and even to a consequential change of supervisor. The provisional title for the thesis must be agreed between candidate and supervisor by the end of Lent Term (mid-March). Theses submitted for the M.Phil in Latin American Studies must not exceed 15,000 words, including footnotes, tables, and any appendices but excluding the bibliography and must be written in English.

Students write one essay over the course of the first term and two essays during the second term. Each essay must be no more than 5,000 words long, including notes, but excluding bibliography, tables, and appendices, and a word-count must be provided at the end. The first essay will usually be related to a topic covered in the Core Course whilst the second and third essays will relate closely to topics explored in the two option modules.

An oral examination must take place if the thesis is in danger of failing or if the Examiners and External Examiner cannot agree on a recommendation. Moreover, an oral examination must be held in any case where a candidate who, because of a borderline or failing performance in the compulsory essay examinations, needs to achieve a high performance in the thesis examination in order to qualify for award of the M.Phil degree.

Continuing

Candidates who achieve an average of 73 (High Pass) on the MPhil course, with a 75 (Distinction) either in the thesis or across the three essays (averaged), may apply to be registered for the PhD. Students who wish to apply for provisional leave to continue to the PhD will be given full information on how to apply during Michaelmas Term (October-December).

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Please consult the Centre's website for detailed information on funding available to both prospective and current students (http://www.latin-american.cam.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding).

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MPhil in Medieval and Renaissance literature is one of the most successful courses of its kind. Each year it attracts a first-class intake of students from the UK and abroad, and its graduates have an outstanding record in gaining employment in the academic world and outside. Read more
The MPhil in Medieval and Renaissance literature is one of the most successful courses of its kind. Each year it attracts a first-class intake of students from the UK and abroad, and its graduates have an outstanding record in gaining employment in the academic world and outside. Each student works closely with a member of the Faculty on his or her chosen dissertation topic, as well as participating in seminars and classes. Training in how to read manuscript and early printed materials ensures that every student on the course is able to make use of the extensive collections in the University Library and in College libraries.

Cambridge has a distinguished international reputation in English and in many other fields in the humanities (for example, Classics, Modern and Medieval Languages, History, Philosophy, and History of Art), and students on this course may be able to attend lectures offered by any Faculty within the school. This creates a learning environment which naturally enables interdisciplinary work. The course lasts nine months, with the last few months being devoted to intensive work on the dissertation.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/elelmpmrl

Course detail

By the end of the course students should have developed:

- a comprehensive knowledge of their chosen area of research and of the critical debates within it;
- a wider knowledge of the literary writing of the period and the traditions that inform scholarship devoted to that writing.

Format

Students must attend regular seminars in Michaelmas and Lent terms on the Interpretation of Literary Texts (Medieval strand of the M.Phil) / Texts, Context, and Methods (Renaissance strand), and weekly classes on Textual and Related Studies in Michaelmas Term.

Participants on the M.Phil are required to attend a minimum of ten sessions selected from the fortnightly Graduate Research Seminars for the year which must include the Renaissance seminar or the Medieval Seminar as appropriate.

Students are also welcome to attend lectures in the English Faculty, as well as, if they wish, lectures in other adjacent Faculties whose teaching might be of interest and relevance.

Each student has a supervisor who gives advice on planning the year’s work and the dissertation in particular. Supervision on the coursework essays is offered by the convenor of the appropriate class. Documentation offering specifications and guidance in relation to each element of assessed work is provided to students.

Progress is monitored through the discussion with each student of draft sections of their dissertations by their supervisor and through submitted work: The short written exercise, which is submitted in Michaelmas Term, is also returned with feedback through the supervisor; the first course work which is submitted at the end of Michaelmas term is returned with examiner’s comments at the beginning of Lent term; the Lent-term course-work essay and the TRS exercises are returned with comments at the beginning of Easter term. Supervisors write termly reports online which can be accessed by the student.

Assessment

A 12,000 – 15,000 word dissertation submitted at the end of Easter term which contributes 50% to the final mark.

A short-written exercise which is marked on a pass/resubmission basis.
Two 4,000-word essays. One is submitted at the end of Michaelmas Term the other at the end of Lent Term. These relate to the work pursued in the seminars taken which contribute 15% each to the final mark.
A Textual and Related Exercise submitted at the end of Lent Term which contributes 20% to the final mark.

Continuing

If you wish to continue from the M.Phil. to the Ph.D. you must obtain a minimum of 70 across the coursework with a minimum of 70 for the dissertation.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MPhil in American Literature will consist of an intensive foundation course, taught in the Michaelmas term by a team of specialists, which combines detailed attention to specified primary texts with broader investigations into the conceptual, theoretical, and cultural parameters of the literary history of the United States. Read more
The MPhil in American Literature will consist of an intensive foundation course, taught in the Michaelmas term by a team of specialists, which combines detailed attention to specified primary texts with broader investigations into the conceptual, theoretical, and cultural parameters of the literary history of the United States.

Students will be free in the Lent term to choose two from a range of optional courses offered by the MPhils in American Literature, Modern and Contemporary Literature, and Criticism and Culture. The MPhil will be examined by means of two pieces of coursework and a dissertation on a topic of the student's choosing. Students will research and write their dissertations over the course of the three terms in close consultation with supervisors.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/elelmpmal

Course detail

By the end of the course students should have:

1. developed a deeper knowledge of their chosen area within American literary studies and of the critical debates within that area;
2. developed an understanding of critical debates that enables the evaluation of current research in their specialist area;
3. developed an understanding of the broader field of American literary studies and the place of their specialist area within it.

Format

Students are required to attend the Foundation Course seminars and the Resources and Methods seminars in Michaelmas term, and in the Lent term two courses from a pool of options that is shared between the M.Phils. in American Literature, Modern and Contemporary Literature, Criticism and Culture and Eighteenth-century and Romantic Studies.

M.Phil. students are required to attend a minimum of ten sessions a year of any of the following fortnightly Graduate Research Seminars: the American Literature Graduate Seminar, the Nineteenth Century Graduate Seminar, the Twentieth Century and Contemporary Literature Graduate Seminar.

M.Phil. students are also required to attend the one-day American Literature Symposium which takes place during Easter term.

Assessment

- 12,000 – 15,000 word dissertation submitted at the end of Easter term and contributing 50% to the final mark.
- A short-written exercise which is marked on a pass/resubmission basis.
- Two 5,000-word essays. One is submitted at the end of Michaelmas Term the other at the end of Lent Term. These relate to the work pursued in the seminars taken and contribute 20% and 30% respectively to the final mark.

Continuing

Students wanting to continue from the MPhil to the PhD must obtain a minimum of 70 across the coursework with a minimum of 70 for the dissertation.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please see the following link: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Applications are co-ordinated by CRUK CI. Prior to submitting the on-line application form (GRADSAF), you should identify a supervisor in the Institute who is willing to host you for M.Phil study. Read more

Overview

Applications are co-ordinated by CRUK CI. Prior to submitting the on-line application form (GRADSAF), you should identify a supervisor in the Institute who is willing to host you for M.Phil study. The Institute accepts only a few M.Phil students every year, mainly because bench space is very limited and so competition for places is particularly fierce. In the main, applicants are successful if they are recognized as bringing a valuable technique or methodology to their host lab.

The MPhil course lasts for 12 months, during which time the student is expected to complete a research project, and write and submit a thesis of less than 20,000 words in length. The student will then be examined orally on the thesis and on the wider field of knowledge into which it falls. The students are provided with information which clearly sets out what is expected of them during their period of research in order to obtain their degree.

Each student has a principal supervisor and is also assigned an adviser who provides additional support. In addition, Ann Kaminski (Head of Scientific Administration) acts as the first point of contact for any student with a query or difficulty that is not directly related to their scientific work.

All student matters in the Institute are overseen by the Cancer Biology Graduate Education Committee, which has the well-being of our students at heart. All first year graduate students are required to attend a series of around 30 lectures on cancer biology which take place in the Institute. The lectures are given by specialists in their fields and they aim to provide all students with a comprehensive overview of cancer biology, ranging from basic cell biology through to cancer diagnosis and treatment. Throughout their period at the Institute, all students are expected to participate in journal clubs, lab meetings, lectures and seminars. They are also encouraged to take advantage of the numerous and varied types of transferable skills training offered by both the Institute and the University. Students are encouraged to attend scientific meetings relevant to their course of study. All students in the Institute are members of the student-run Graduate Society which organises regular scientific and social events.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvcrmpmsc

Teaching

The MPhil in Medical Science course is exclusively by research. The project and supervisor are determined during the application process. In addition to the principal supervisor, it is likely that the student will also be appointed a day-to-day supervisor who is able to provide hands-on assistance. Given the interdisciplinary nature of some of the projects, students will also be expected to seek guidance from other colleagues, including post-docs and core facility staff. Students will participate in the Institute's weekly seminar programme.

- One to one supervision
Formal supervision approximately one hour per week, plus also day-to-day supervision in the lab.

- Lectures
2 hours per week

- Journal clubs
5 hours per term

- Feedback
Students should expect to receive on-going feedback from all supervisors involved in their research project. In addition, the principal supervisor will write termly reports on Cambridge Graduate Supervision Reporting System.

Assessment

- Thesis
The student is expected to submit a thesis, which should be less than 20,000 words in length and post-submission, the student will be examined orally by two examiners on the content of the thesis and on the wider field of their research area.

- Other
The student is expected to give a brief presentation (15 - 20 minutes) to the Institute approximately 10 weeks after commencing study. This allows the student to introduce him/herself to all colleagues and to inform them of the nature of his/her project.

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvcrmpmsc/apply

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvcrmpmsc

Read less
Applications are co-ordinated by CRUK CI. Prior to submitting the on-line application form (GRADSAF), you should identify a supervisor in the Institute who is willing to host you for M.Phil study. Read more
Applications are co-ordinated by CRUK CI. Prior to submitting the on-line application form (GRADSAF), you should identify a supervisor in the Institute who is willing to host you for M.Phil study. The Institute accepts only a few M.Phil students every year, mainly because bench space is very limited and so competition for places is particularly fierce. In the main, applicants are successful if they are recognized as bringing a valuable technique or methodology to their host lab.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvcrmpmsc

Course detail

The MPhil course lasts for 12 months, during which time the student is expected to complete a research project, and write and submit a thesis of less than 20,000 words in length. The student will then be examined orally on the thesis and on the wider field of knowledge into which it falls. The students are provided with information which clearly sets out what is expected of them during their period of research in order to obtain their degree.

Each student has a principal supervisor and is also assigned an adviser who provides additional support. In addition, Ann Kaminski (Head of Scientific Administration) acts as the first point of contact for any student with a query or difficulty that is not directly related to their scientific work.

All student matters in the Institute are overseen by the Cancer Biology Graduate Education Committee, which has the well-being of our students at heart. All first year graduate students are required to attend a series of around 30 lectures on cancer biology which take place in the Institute. The lectures are given by specialists in their fields and they aim to provide all students with a comprehensive overview of cancer biology, ranging from basic cell biology through to cancer diagnosis and treatment. Throughout their period at the Institute, all students are expected to participate in journal clubs, lab meetings, lectures and seminars. They are also encouraged to take advantage of the numerous and varied types of transferable skills training offered by both the Institute and the University. Students are encouraged to attend scientific meetings relevant to their course of study. All students in the Institute are members of the student-run Graduate Society which organises regular scientific and social events.

Format

The MPhil in Medical Science course is exclusively by research. The project and supervisor are determined during the application process. In addition to the principal supervisor, it is likely that the student will also be appointed a day-to-day supervisor who is able to provide hands-on assistance. Given the interdisciplinary nature of some of the projects, students will also be expected to seek guidance from other colleagues, including post-docs and core facility staff. Students will participate in the Institute's weekly seminar programme.

Students should expect to receive on-going feedback from all supervisors involved in their research project. In addition, the principal supervisor will write termly reports on Cambridge Graduate Supervision Reporting System.

Assessment

The student is expected to submit a thesis, which should be less than 20,000 words in length and post-submission, the student will be examined orally by two examiners on the content of the thesis and on the wider field of their research area.

The student is expected to give a brief presentation (15 - 20 minutes) to the Institute approximately 10 weeks after commencing study. This allows the student to introduce him/herself to all colleagues and to inform them of the nature of his/her project.

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities: http://www.2016.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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