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The Graduate Entry Medicine course is delivered by the University of Nottingham in partnership with Derby Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, and is based in a purpose built medical school on the Royal Derby Hospital’s site. Read more

Overview

The Graduate Entry Medicine course is delivered by the University of Nottingham in partnership with Derby Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, and is based in a purpose built medical school on the Royal Derby Hospital’s site.

The four-year medical course commenced in September 2003 and is open to graduates of any discipline. There is an annual intake of 87 home/EU students who are based in Derby for the first 18 months of their course. For the Clinical Years, these students will combine with the students from the five-year course and whilst on placement will rotate around many of the teaching hospitals in Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire and Lincolnshire, and in the community. Experiencing different sites across the counties is an educational and desirable feature of your training. Currently our students are on placements at the following hospitals:

Nottinghamshire

Queens Medical Centre, City Hospital and Highbury Hospital, Nottingham
Kingsmill Hospital and Highbury Hospital, Mansfield
Newark Hospital, Newark-on-Trent
Derbyshire

Royal Derby Hospital, Derby
Chesterfield Royal Hospital, Chesterfield

Lincolnshire
Lincoln County Hospital, Lincoln
Grantham Hospital, Grantham
Pilgrim Hospital, Boston
The course aims to widen access to a broader range of applicants than school leavers with A levels. It is intended to build on the intellectual skills acquired by students who have undertaken a first degree.

After successful completion of the Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery (BM BS) degree, graduates are required to undergo a further two years of foundation doctor training. Full registration is granted by the GMC at the end of the first year of this training. Non-British nationals graduating from UK medical schools are subject to work-permit restrictions.

Eligibility

Graduates will need a minimum of a lower second-class degree and must apply through UCAS, course code A101.

In addition you must have sat the GAMSAT examination (which is designed to ensure the entrants have the requisite knowledge and reasoning skills) in either September 2014 or September 2015.

NB: registration for GAMSAT and application to the School of Medicine via UCAS are separate processes and both are required for admission to the graduate entry course.

A great deal of emphasis is placed on work experience, as we want to ensure that you are making a well-informed choice about your future career, something which a few days shadowing would not provide. Relevant experience could include volunteering in a care home, working as a healthcare assistant within a hospital.

You also need to complete a satisfactory health check and criminal records checks - for more information see our "Fitness to Practise" information.

English language requirements

IELTS 7.5 (no less than 7.0 in any element)
Pearson Test of English (Academic) 74
Certificate of Proficiency in English: Grade B
Further help

If you require any further help, please contact:

Derby Course and Student Centre,
Graduate Entry Medicine, Royal Derby Hospital,
Uttoxeter Road,
Derby DE22 3DT
t: +44 (0)1332 724 900
e:

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There are two routes through the programme. The Research Route . is designed for students whose focus is mainly academic research, and who are likely to want to go on to study at doctoral level. Read more

There are two routes through the programme:

The Research Route is designed for students whose focus is mainly academic research, and who are likely to want to go on to study at doctoral level. You will receive training in doing research at postgraduate level, and your degree will comprise two subject-based taught modules, the research skills module, and a substantial research dissertation.

The Professional Route is designed for students who may not necessarily want to go on to an academic career, but who want to develop their academic skills and professional practice. You will develop a small project related to religion in society, which you may use as part of a dissertation-based research project. You will be taught skills of project management and reflective practice and your degree will comprise three subject-based taught modules, the professional skills module, and a dissertation.

For full-time students modules are delivered on two days of the week. The contact hours for taught modules are usually two hours a week over a ten week period.  

Course structure

Research route: You must take the 30-credit Researching Religion module (delivered over three terms), two 30-credit taught modules (normally one in term 1 and one in term 2), and dissertation modules amounting to 90 credits.

Professional route. You must take the 30-credit Professional Development module (delivered over three terms), three 30-credit taught modules over two terms, and a 60- credit dissertation.

The taught modules currently on offer include:

  • Religion in the Public Sphere
  • Religion and Philosophy in Contemporary Life
  • Religion and Peace-Building

Which of the 30-credit taught modules are delivered in normal teaching hours will depend on staff availability and student demand, and so they may vary from year to year.

The course is mainly aimed at full-time students (though a part-time route is available).

Teaching and learning

Teaching will come in different forms:

Skills modules (Researching Religion and Professional Development) will employ a 'hands on' approach by getting you to do short tasks and exercises in class and between sessions. Some of these will be linked to the taught modules for full time students. You will learn by having to work out how to solve problems and find the information you need in a guided and supported environment.

Taught modules will introduce you to relevant ideas and key theoretical frameworks, exposing you to current research, and helping you to develop independence of thought and self-directed learning. Teaching will involve some lecturing but also extended discussions and debates.

Research modules (dissertations) will be supervised by someone with knowledge in the topic. This kind of teaching offers in-depth individual tutoring that will guide your work on a particular research project.

The University also offers a range of additional learning support services to assist students throughout their studies.

Assessment and feedback

A range of assessment methods are used during the programme. These include:

1. Written assignments for taught modules and independent studies.

2. Dissertations.

3. Proposals.

4. Portfolios.

5. Presentations.

Written feedback will be given as part of the required assessments which are specified for each module. This will be available three weeks after the assessed work is submitted. In addition, informal feedback (i.e. comment on work that does not include a pass/fail assessment or mark) will be offered in a variety of ways according to the module. For most modules this will be comments on drafts of essays, but for some it might be verbal feedback on class presentations or class exercises.

Research opportunities

Postgraduate students will have the opportunity to engage with a diverse range of research interests by participating in the research seminars which take place regularly within the School of Humanities, Religion and Philosophy. 

Programme specification

Further information on this course is available in the programme specification. Please note that the programme specification relates to course content that is currently being studied by students at the University. For new programmes, the programme specification will be made available online prior to the start of the course.

Learning support

York St John University works hard to create an inclusive environment for all our students. We offer a range of learning support services to assist students throughout their studies.



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The International Planning MSc provides a strong international and comparative focus on planning, urban theory and practice. The scope of the programme primarily encompasses Europe, North America, Australia, South Africa and the Far East, and increasingly China and South-East Asia. Read more

The International Planning MSc provides a strong international and comparative focus on planning, urban theory and practice. The scope of the programme primarily encompasses Europe, North America, Australia, South Africa and the Far East, and increasingly China and South-East Asia.

About this degree

Students develop an appreciation of planning approaches and systems, alongside an understanding of planning as a culturally specific, context-dependent activity taking different forms in different countries and regions. The programme aims to provide students with a broad range of skills and knowledge in planning and urban theory in a global context while offering them the opportunity to develop a specialisation.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), one specialism with two modules (30 credits), a research dissertation (60 credits), and a field trip (not credit bearing).

A Postgraduate Diploma, six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules from the list of possible specialisms available (30 credits), full-time nine months, is offered.

Core modules

  • Urban Design: Place Making
  • Pillars of Planning
  • Comparative Planning Systems and Cultures
  • Critical Debates in International Planning
  • Dissertation
  • International Planning Project

Optional modules

Students choose two linked modules from the following to form a specialist study area:

  • Communities and Planning
  • Planning for Housing
  • Infrastructure Planning
  • Sustainable Governance
  • Urban Design
  • Urban Regeneration
  • Historic Cities
  • Smart City Theory and Practice

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of individual and group project work, skills-based practical and IT work, traditional lectures, tutorials and seminars, field trips and direct practitioner involvement. Student performance is assessed through individual and group work, essays, examination, and skills-based practical work.

Fieldwork

There is a field study trip in Reading Week in term two (which is part of assessed module BENVGPLG. (View the video of 2015/16 cohort's trip to Barcelona.)

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: International Planning MSc

Careers

International Planning graduates have been very successful in gaining subsequent employment in various sectors. At present, there is a growing demand for our graduates from a wide range of both public and private employers in the UK and abroad. They are employed in both local and central government internationally, in global planning-related consultancies, as well as in a wide range of other related sectors, such as housing, transport and urban regeneration, as well as in public and private utility companies, teaching and research.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Planning Officer, London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham
  • Project Manager, Ministry of National Development, Republic of Singapore
  • Graduate Transport Planner, Parsons Brinckerhoff
  • Town Planning Graduate Professional, Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region
  • PhD in Geographic Research, King's College London

Employability

Recent graduates of the MSc in International Planning have gone on to work in a variety of international contexts and roles including leading London-based planning, design and architecture consultancies; UK-based local authorities and government offices; overseas government offices and ministries; overseas private sector consultancies in planning, design, construction and development; non-for-profit organisations and charities worldwide; academic research and teaching.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL's Bartlett School of Planning has a strong history of teaching and research. The school has been at the forefront of planning research and teaching for nearly 100 years and is one of the foremost planning schools in the United Kingdom, with an international reputation.

This MSc programme is fully accredited by the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI) and the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS).

Based in the heart of London there is much for students to learn from being at the forefront of policy-relevant critical debate, empirical study and research-led teaching. The staff profile is multidisciplinary and teaching staff are actively involved in shaping the theories and debates covered in their teaching. Our annual public lectures attract pre-eminent speakers from around the world and our student body has a broad, international profile.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Bartlett School of Planning

81% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The MSc in Facility and Environment Management is Europe's longest-established programme for facility managers, providing a first-class education and training for the fast-moving field of the built environment. Read more
The MSc in Facility and Environment Management is Europe's longest-established programme for facility managers, providing a first-class education and training for the fast-moving field of the built environment. Directors of facilities management at most of the recent landmarks on London are likely to have graduated from this programme.

Key Information

- Application dates
All applicants:
Open: 5 October 2015
Close: 29 July 2016

As the programme is designed to enhance the knowledge base of practitioners in facility management, it is useful for candidates to have some knowledge, demonstrable competence, and a skill set related to facility management practice, in addition to the above requirements.

English Language Requirements

If your education has not been conducted in the English language, you will be expected to demonstrate evidence of an adequate level of English proficiency.
The English language level for this programme is: Standard
Further information can be found on http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/life/international/english-requirements .

International students

Country-specific information, including details of when UCL representatives are visiting your part of the world, can be obtained from http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/international .

Degree Information

Our philosophy is to base our teaching on real-world issues in facilities management (FM) at high-performing organisations in both the private and public sectors. Our students develop the ability to think critically about all facets of the FM services - maintenance, engineering, projects, catering, cleaning, security and property management, by considering engineering and management theories and concepts and their applications to FM situations in these service lines. This allows our students to use their experience to explore these applications in their current or future careers.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and an original dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months) is offered.

- Core Modules
Introduction to Facility Management
Management Concepts for Facilities
Environment Management and Sustainability
Service Operations Management
Space and Workplace Management
Facility Management Law

- Options
Asset Management and Capital Projects
Facility Management Finance and Governance
Building Information Modelling and Management for Sustainability
Or any other MSc module from the extensive list within the faculty.

- Dissertation/report
All MSc students submit a 10,000-word report on a topic related to the main themes of the programme. The topic can be chosen to enhance career development or for its inherent interest.

Teaching and Learning

The programme is delivered through interactive, small-group discussions, seminars, visits and self-directed work, all supported by UCL's Moodle-based e-learning portal. There are parallel programmes in London and Singapore and students in the two locations can meet virtually and share leading-edge perspectives on green and sustainable FM operations.

Further information on modules and degree structure available on the department web site Facility and Environment Management MSc http://www.bartlett.ucl.ac.uk/iede/programmes/postgraduate/mscdiploma-facility-environment-management

Funding

The International Facility Management Association (IFMA) provides scholarship opportunities, which can be reviewed on their website at: http://www.ifma.org.
Scholarships relevant to this department are displayed (where available) below. For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/scholarships .

Careers

The majority of graduates are engaged at a senior level in facility management operations, consultancy or design. Some students use the MSc as a foundation for subsequent MPhil/PhD research. The programme has helped participants to improve career prospects and keep ahead of developments in this field.

The students from this programme move into a variety of facility positions, ranging from assistant facility managers, property managers, contract managers, consultants (normally engineering based students) to directors of facilities (both public and private sector). For overseas students the degree normally leads to taking positions with international property management companies or multi national companies, depending on the level of experience.

Top career destinations for this degree:
- Software Engineer, BSkyB (2013)
- Assistant Facility Manager, Cushman and Wakefield (2013)
- Facilities Manager, Shell (2011)
- Facilities Manager, Transport of London (2011)
- Environmental Logistics Manager, NHS King's College Hospital (2012)

- Employability
The students from this programme move into a variety of facility positions, often depending on their previous work experience and management capabilities, these jobs range from Assistant Facility Managers, Property Managers, Contract Managers, Consultants (normally Engineering based students) to Director of Facilities (both public and private sector). For Overseas students the degree normally allows them to take positions with international property management companies or multi-national companies, again depending on the level of experience. The more successful students do go on to become Facility Directors in the public and private sectors.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Bartlett is the UK's largest multi-disciplinary Faculty of the Built Environment, bringing together dozens of scientific and professional specialisms required to research, understand, design, construct and operate the buildings and urban environments of the future.

This programme is accredited by: the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and the International Facility Management Association (IFMA). RICS provides free student membership to those joining the programme for the duration of their studies.

UCL Bartlett staff are assisted by distinguished external contributors and students gain a multi-disciplinary perspective in facility management.

Student / staff ratios › 25 staff including 10 postdocs › 100 taught students › 45 research students

Application and next steps

- Applications
Students are advised to apply as early as possible due to competition for places. Those applying for scholarship funding (particularly overseas applicants) should take note of application deadlines.

- Who can apply?
The programme is directed at facility professionals, as well as architects, service engineers, surveyors, building scientists, interior designers, management professionals and property administrators wishing to acquire a specialist qualification within facility management. It attracts participants from a wide range of professional backgrounds at all management levels, including office, healthcare, retail, education and residential.

What are we looking for?
When we assess your application we would like to learn:
- why you want to study Facility and Environment Management at graduate level
- why you want to study Facility and Environment Management at UCL
- what particularly attracts you to the chosen programme
- how your academic and professional background meets the demands of this challenging programme
- where you would like to go professionally with your degree

Together with essential academic requirements, the personal statement is your opportunity to illustrate whether your reasons for applying to this programme match what the programme will deliver.

For more information see the Applications page http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/apply .

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There is an international need for professionals who can provide sustainable and resilient infrastructure to help alleviate poverty in low- to middle-income countries. Read more

There is an international need for professionals who can provide sustainable and resilient infrastructure to help alleviate poverty in low- to middle-income countries. This programme will create future engineers who can work in a global context and with the skills and understanding to address the challenges of poverty worldwide.

About this degree

Students gain understanding of infrastructure design and delivery processes in resource-limited settings, and learn how to mobilise technical expertise to develop solutions with local stakeholders in a global context. The wide range of taught modules also provides opportunity to critically engage with the complexities and ethical dilemmas of working as an engineer internationally.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), a collaborative project (30 credits). three optional modules (45 credits), and a dissertation/report (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits), full-time nine months, part-time two years, flexible up to five years is offered

Core modules

  • Appropriate Technologies in Practice
  • Collaborative Project International Development
  • Engineering and International Development
  • Conflict, Humanitarianism and Disaster Risk Reduction

Optional modules

  • Students choose a minimum of two* and a maximum of three optional modules from the following (subject to availability):
  • Environmental GIS
  • Environmental Modelling
  • Environmental Systems Engineering
  • GIS Principles and Technology
  • Natural and Environmental Disasters
  • Urban Flooding and Drainage
  • Water and Wastewater Treatment
  • *Students who choose two optional modules may choose one elective module in addition from the following:
  • Critical Urbanism Studio I – Learning from Informality: Case Studies and Alternatives
  • Critical Urbanism Studio II – Learning from Informality: Investigative Design
  • Disaster Risk Reduction in Cities
  • Food and the City
  • Post Disaster Recovery: Policies, Practicies and Alternatives
  • Sustainable Infrastructure and Services in Development
  • Urban Water and Sanitation, Planning and Politics
  • Clean Energy and Development
  • Water and Development in Africa
  • Housing as Urbanism
  • Urban and Peri-Urban Agriculture

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 to 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning

This programme will be delivered by a selection of taught modules, collaborative project with overseas clients and practical activities, including a site visit to the Centre for Alternative Technologies in Wales. While most of the field trip costs are met by the department, students are required to pay £300 towards the trip which contributes to accommodation and food. Assessment will range from group project presentations, coursework, and examinations to essays and a compulsory dissertation over the last term.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Engineering for International Development MSc

Careers

Graduates can expect to find employment in the following areas:

  • the Department for International Development
  • international development agencies and engineering consultancies
  • organisations such as the United Nations, the World Bank, and the European Union
  • non-governmental agencies worldwide, such as Practical Action, WaterAid, and Water & Sanitation for the Urban Poor.

Employability

MSc Engineering for International Development graduates will be able to pursue a career in the field of engineering, working on projects in low-middle income, developing countries, as well as the broader international development sector in different capacities and within various organisations currently operating in the field, such as the UN, the EU or NGOs such as WaterAid, Practical Action, Habitat for Humanity and more.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Civil, Environmental & Geomatic Engineering is an energetic and exciting department with well-established research projects and networks in environmental engineering, transportation, urban resilience, wastewater provision, human settlements and renewable energy.

UCL is also home to Engineers Without Borders UCL, the international development organisation's largest UK branch and the Engineering for International Development which is an umbrella entity for student activities in relation to international development. A self-financed summer school can be organized to Ethiopia to gain exposure to the water supply, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) programme of the UN.

Students benefit from UCL's strong links with industry-leading partners in the heart of London, through collaborative projects with businesses, charities and utility companies who work in low-middle income regions such as Water Aid, and renewable energy start-ups such as BBOXX.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Civil, Environmental & Geomatic Engineering

60% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Why this course?. The School of Psychological Sciences & Health, in collaboration with the globally renowned Strathclyde Business School is offering a unique new Masters programme. Read more

Why this course?

The School of Psychological Sciences & Health, in collaboration with the globally renowned Strathclyde Business School is offering a unique new Masters programme. The distinctive nature of the programme lies in its flexible online mode of delivery.

Successful completion of this course, accredited by the British Psychological Society, will provide students with either no background, or an unaccredited background in psychology, the route to gain Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) with the British Psychological Society (BPS).

It also provides opportunities to develop specialist knowledge in modules provided for the programme in Psychology for Business.

The programme will aim to provide you with:

  • a broad-based conceptual knowledge of the core domains of psychology, covering both historical and contemporary issues
  • an understanding of the relevance and applications of psychology to real life, particularly business contexts
  • the opportunity to undertake a supervised empirical research project
  • various intellectual and practical skills that are attractive to graduate employers

What you’ll study

Class content and student participation in our new Masters in Psychology with a specialisation in Business will be delivered entirely online across a wide range of formats.

The course features 180 credits of study in total, available either full time over 12 months or part time over two years.

Full-time students will complete the equivalent of 60 credits taught classes in semesters 1 and 2. You'll begin working on the empirical project in semester 2, with the majority of the empirical project work being completed over the summer months.

Part-time students will complete 90 credits by the end of Year 1, and the remaining 90 credits in Year 2. The course includes 80 credits of the core domains of Psychology, 40 credits of specialist modules delivered by organisational psychologists in Strathclyde Business School, and a 60 credit empirical research project.

Facilities

The University of Strathclyde is a leading international technological university. The University’s commitment to ‘useful learning’ underpins our approach to research, learning, and teaching. This will be evidenced in our approach to teaching and learning where students will be supported in their exploration of the practical and policy impacts of psychological research. The course will be delivered through our online learning system, Myplace, as well as a suite of powerful software platforms.

As a Strathclyde student you will have access to a library providing more than 400,000 electronic books and 26,000 e-journals, that you can access 24/7 from any device. Electronic resources include e-books, e-journals, digitised collections of exam papers and other learning materials, alongside electronic databases such as Nexis® and Web of Science.

Learning & teaching

The course will be delivered both by internationally recognised Psychology researchers from the School of Psychological Sciences & Health and staff from the Strathclyde Business School who are organisational psychologists and chartered members of the British Psychological Society (BPS).

Approaching an entirely new subject should be stimulating, not daunting. At every step of the way we have designed our Masters course with the student new to the topic in mind. Carefully scripted and prepared learning tasks and objectives will incrementally build your knowledge, structure your learning, and build your confidence in each topic we cover, empowering you to achieve in a supportive environment.

Each module in the Masters in Psychology with a specialisation in Business is centred round a suite of studio-based lectures, which are studied online. While module subjects will be supplemented by further assigned individual reading and reflection, opportunities for student engagement will be frequent, varied, stimulating and challenging.

Student-centred activities may feature individual or group-based online activities, quizzes, discussion boards, wiki creation verbal reports and podcasts. You'll have the opportunity participate in online and webcam-based tutorial meetings throughout the course, interacting with their fellow students and lecturers.

Assessment

Our approach to assessment in the course is varied, with different approaches being adopted both within and across modules.

Assessment will be through a mixture of course work, for example individual essays or reports, or perhaps a collaborative writing task with other students, or in some cases an online quiz or a verbal presentation. Additionally some modules will feature class exams. 

At every step of the way we have designed our Masters course to support student learning, and you'll be carefully guided through each assessment activity, with continuous feedback on your progress.

Careers

A degree in psychology, accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS), is the first step towards the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership of the BPS, and is a prerequisite for entry onto professional postgraduate psychology training programmes (eg MSc Organisational Psychology, Doctorate in Clinical Psychology, MSc Educational Psychology). A number of graduates will use their accredited degree to pursue future professional training, following gaining relevant experience. An accredited Masters in Psychology is a mark of quality, meaning the course and institution has achieved the high standards of quality in its provision that the British Psychological Society demands. Psychology graduates have a lot of options open to them. Many go on to further study or to careers in teaching, human resource management, social work, as well as many other areas.

The knowledge, understanding, and skills acquired by psychology graduates are highly valued by employers in the graduate job market. The psychology degree is unique amongst social science disciplines in the extent to which it fosters both a scientific approach to enquiry (including the ability to employ evidence-based reasoning, and the ability to collect and interpret both quantitative and qualitative data) and the writing and research skills most prevalent in humanities and/or other social science disciplines. It is anticipated that a proportion of graduates of this programme will enter the graduate job market, in private, public, or third sectors.



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This MA Landscape Architecture course incorporates a conversion course in year one, providing a foundation programme that enables applicants who don’t have a degree in Landscape Architecture an opportunity to enter year two of the programme, where you will join students who have previously completed a degree in Landscape Architecture. Read more

Summary

This MA Landscape Architecture course incorporates a conversion course in year one, providing a foundation programme that enables applicants who don’t have a degree in Landscape Architecture an opportunity to enter year two of the programme, where you will join students who have previously completed a degree in Landscape Architecture.

The conversion year is a studio based learning environment that delivers a combination of key skills that support the communication of projects, investigating the idea that our laboratory is a designed ecology and that you will learn about the landscape across its range of scales.

The second part of the year looks at the idea that landscape is a sequence of interrelated designed environments connected by land, ecology, water, climate and infrastructure, sitting in a cultural context that extends from Parish to global political and economic systems.

Students can choose to study towards a Postgraduate Diploma, or a Master's qualification.

Modules

The PG Diploma modules are: professional practice; critical urbanism; critical design; designed ecologies; research methods: dissertation/thesis design project; design thesis project 1; design thesis project 2; design thesis project 3: technology.

Master’s award modules: The above modules along with a dissertation.

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework in all modules except for professional practice, which is partly assessed by a written exam; the majority of coursework is related to design projects, although some modules require the submission of written papers, drawn theoretical analysis and construction and planting design workbooks or studies.

Career prospects

On successful completion of the PgDiploma you can apply to become a licentiate member of the Landscape Institute (LI), the chartered body for landscape architecture in the UK. Full chartered status is gained following completion of the LI’s Professional Practice Examination after a further two years in practice. Students have found employment both during and on completion of the course, in a wide range of design practices in the UK and overseas.

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Cyber threats are on the increase and have been highlighted by the UK government as one of the four main threats to the UK. Read more
Cyber threats are on the increase and have been highlighted by the UK government as one of the four main threats to the UK. There is an increasing demand from business and government for individuals skilled in computer science and cyber security who can design, build, and maintain secure software and systems that can protect people, business and data from malicious attack.

This programme builds on the knowledge gained in a first degree to equip you with advanced computer science and cyber security skills necessary to produce modern secure systems. The theory taught in the lectures is reinforced in the practicals where you have the opportunity to use industry standard tools and techniques in our dedicated security, server and networking laboratories which provide a safe space for you to practice both offensive and defensive security techniques.

Why choose this course?

Dedicated security, server and networking laboratories with enterprise equipment including Cisco switches, routers, firewalls and Dell servers. Small, dedicated private cloud that allows you to create more complex cyber security scenarios and to investigate cloud security issues. Access to a wide range of enterprise software to ensure realistic deployment environments.

An emphasis on live projects, alongside group work modelled on industry standard working patterns, giving you the opportunity to develop skills that are directly applicable to the workplace. Staff with a wide range of expertise in computer science and cyber security. An opportunity to apply to undertake a placement which enables you to practice and refine your skills within a company or organisation.

This course in detail

The MSc in Computer Science for Cyber Security has a modular course-unit design providing you with maximum flexibility and choice. To qualify for a master’s degree without placement, you must pass modules amounting to 180 credits. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits). To qualify for a master's degree with placement you need to undertake a one-year placement in between the taught component and the dissertation.

The Postgraduate Diploma in Computer Science for Cyber Security allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people working in the computing industry who wish to brush up their skills. To qualify for a Postgraduate Diploma, you must pass modules amounting to 120 credits. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each). In some cases, it may be possible for a student on a Postgraduate Diploma to do 3 taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits).

The Postgraduate Certificate in Computer Science for Cyber Security allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people working in the computing industry who wish to learn a specific area in this rapidly changing discipline. To qualify for a Postgraduate Certificate, you must pass modules amounting to 60 credits. This comprises three taught modules (20 credits each).

Semester 1 has the following modules:
-Research and Scholarship Methods (compulsory for MSc)
-Network Principles (compulsory for MSc)
-Secure Systems Architecture (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip)

Semester 2 has the following modules:
-Operating Systems Development (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip)
-Secure Programming (compulsory for MSc)
-Low level Techniques and Tools (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip)

If you are studying for an MSc you will also take:
-MSc Dissertation (completed over summer)

MSc students have the option to apply to undertake a placement. Placement positions are not guaranteed, however the department will help and support students in finding a placement.

Please note: as our courses are reviewed regularly as part of our quality assurance framework, the list of taught modules offered may vary from the list here.

Teaching and learning

The taught modules include lectures, seminars, library and internet research, and practical design and experimentation.

Teaching staff include experienced academic staff and practitioners in the field of Computer Science and Cyber Security. Visiting speakers from business and industry help to maintain relevance to the evolution of the industry.

Laboratory facilities include dedicated security, server and networking laboratories.

Careers and professional development

This programme allows graduates to undertake a wide range of roles in IT and cyber security. Common careers in this area are IT security professionals, penetration testers, digital forensic investigators, software developers, systems engineers, technical analysts, IT managers, and consultants.

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This MSc, designed by a panel of academic departments, industrial partners and law enforcement and security agencies, introduces students to the fundamental knowledge, core expertise and advanced, evidence-driven methodological tools and approaches required to understand, analyse, prevent, disrupt and detect organised crime and terrorism. Read more

This MSc, designed by a panel of academic departments, industrial partners and law enforcement and security agencies, introduces students to the fundamental knowledge, core expertise and advanced, evidence-driven methodological tools and approaches required to understand, analyse, prevent, disrupt and detect organised crime and terrorism.

About this degree

Students develop an understanding of how science, engineering and a variety of professional disciplines can contribute to tackling organised crime and terrorism. By the end of the programme, they will be able to apply appropriate scientific principles and methods to security problems, think strategically to develop and implement countermeasures, and appreciate the complexity involved in the design and implementation of organised crime and terrorism threat-reduction technologies.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

Students are required to complete five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma comprising five core modules (75 credits) and three optional modules (45 credits), and which may lead to the MSc, is offered.

Core modules

  • Perspectives on Organised Crime
  • Perspectives on Terrorism
  • Foundations of Security and Crime Science
  • Designing and Doing Research
  • Quantitative Methods

Optional modules

Students choose three of the following:

  • Qualitative Methods
  • Crime Mapping and Spatial Analysis
  • Investigation and Detection
  • Cybercrime
  • Intelligence Gathering and Analysis
  • Risk and Contingency Planning
  • Introduction to Cybersecurity
  • Prevention and Disruption
  • Terrorism (UCL Political Science, not available for distance learning students)

NB: places for optional modules are awarded on a first-come first-served basis.

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, projects and laboratory classes. Student performance is assessed through laboratory and project reports, unseen written examination, coursework, presentations, and the research project and dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Countering Organised Crime and Terrorism MSc

Careers

This unique linking of organised crime and terrorism, and the study of methodologies that can practically tackle both of these areas, means that this MSc holds appeal for employers across a broad range of industries.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Police Officer, Metropolitan Police Service
  • Threat Assessor, Imperial Protective Service
  • Criminal Intelligence Analyst, Avon and Somerset Constabulary
  • Field Intelligence Officer, West Mercia Police
  • Intelligence Analyst, Cambridgeshire Constabulary

Employability

This programme equips students with the knowledge to develop operational strategies to counter organised crime and terrorism. This unique linking of organised crime and terrorism, and the study of methodologies that can practically tackle both of these areas, means that this MSc holds appeal for employers across a broad range of industries.

Each year we ask our graduates to tell us about their experience of the programme and their career after leaving UCL and we include some real-life graduate profiles on our website.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Jill Dando Institute, of which UCL Security & Crime Science is the core component, is the first research institution in the world devoted specifically to reducing crime through teaching, research, public policy analysis and by the dissemination of evidence-based information on crime reduction.

This MSc programme is delivered by experienced practitioners and researchers working in counter-terrorism, intelligence, law enforcement, risk assessment and security technology. It boasts a unique multidisciplinary platform, being the only postgraduate programme of its kind in the world taught in a faculty of engineering sciences, integrating the cutting-edge of the social and engineering sciences in the security domain.

Our graduate students come from varied backgrounds; many are practitioners and are encouraged to contribute their experience in and out of the classroom.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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This exciting course combines an in-depth study of leading-edge media technology with hands-on experience of film production and film-making. Read more
This exciting course combines an in-depth study of leading-edge media technology with hands-on experience of film production and film-making.

Whether you dream of being a cinematographer, studio camera operator or a film editor, this course will give you an excellent grounding in both the theory and the practice of media technology.

You will enjoy realistic opportunities to engage with the industry - during your studies you will be visiting leading post-production facilities in London in order to develop your professional network and gain first-hand experience of what life as a professional is really like.

Intermediate qualifications available:

• Postgraduate certificate – 60 credits at Masters level
• Postgraduate diploma – 120 credits at Masters level

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/digital-film-technologies-and-production-15month#entry

Course detail

• Study a specialist course in digital film technologies, taught by an experienced team of industry professionals including acclaimed film-makers and published scholars, which gives you the opportunity to focus on practical production and post-production techniques
• Explore production roles and the wider context of the contemporary film business through participating in media-related research seminars, events and conferences
• Develop your practical skills using our excellent media production facilities
• Gain in-depth knowledge of areas including: production roles and responsibilities; digital film production technologies; practical production techniques; insights and interviews; the film business; studio technologies and techniques; project development and practical post-production and digital effects
• Benefit from a degree that prepares you for roles in broadcasting, journalism, arts and the media, administration, governmental regulation of the media, research, marketing, sales and advertising, cinematography, editing, directing, and independent film production or allows you to continue to MPhil and PhD research degrees

Modules

• Production Roles and Responsibilities
• Digital Film Production Technologies
• Practical Production Techniques
• Insights and Interviews
• The Film Business: Current Issues and Debates
• Studio Technologies and Techniques
• Project Development
• Practical Post-Production and Digital Effects
• Digital Film Technology Project

Assessment

The core units contain both formative and summative assessments, and it is during these units that you should learn the range of competencies and knowledge necessary to succeed on the course.

For your project work you can undertake either an extended digital film technology project (working in groups or individually) or a dissertation on relevant theoretical topic. The course utilises: oral presentations of academic arguments; oral pitches of stories; essays; case study projects; self-reflective logs and a wide range of practical work.

The assessment philosophy of the MSc begins with understanding your individual starting position. Hence work will be diagnostic (often at the outset, as with proficiency in academic practice and writing), formative, summative and evaluative. The procedures used for the assessment of your achievements will correspond with the knowledge, abilities and skills developed through your degree programme.

Careers

You will be encouraged to identify your strengths, interests and development needs in relation to the practices and conventions of both the media industry and of scholarship and research.

You will also be encouraged to seek out active engagement with industry, which might lead to either freelance jobs or employment.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

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Study the cinema phenomenon in its global context and explore the complex relationships between national film industries. This course enables you to build your critical and analytical understanding of production and marketing processes, as well as patterns of consumption in a continuously evolving cultural landscape. Read more
Study the cinema phenomenon in its global context and explore the complex relationships between national film industries.

This course enables you to build your critical and analytical understanding of production and marketing processes, as well as patterns of consumption in a continuously evolving cultural landscape.

You will study with experts in film analysis, looking at aesthetics and economics, the work of filmmakers around the world, and developing your understanding of the place of cinema in global media industry as a whole.

Intermediate qualifications available:

• Postgraduate certificate – 60 credits at Masters level
• Postgraduate diploma – 120 credits at Masters level

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/international-cinema#about

Course detail

• Study with experts in film analysis, and enjoy regular seminars, screenings, film festivals and guest speakers
• Explore areas of study including: cultural theories; European cinema; film analysis; representation and reality; post-colonial and ‘third’ cinema and world cinema and global media
• Develop your ability to communicate effectively in writing, through new technologies and in oral presentation; and to adapt to different cultural environments and conditions
• Gain a thorough grounding in media as a whole, with a clear picture of the place of cinema in the global media and related industries
• Benefit from a degree ideal if you are seeking a job in a cinema-related field such as programming, marketing or administration, wish to teach film studies or continue to an MPhil or PhD research degree.

Modules

• Research Methods
• Practical Post-Production and Digital Effects
• Film Analysis
• European Cinema Since 1945
• The Film Business: Current Issues and Debates
• World Cinema and Global Media Since 1975
• Project (A)
• Digital Film Project

Assessment

The units contain both formative and summative assessments, and it is during these units that you will learn the range of competences and knowledge necessary to succeed on the course.

For your project work you can undertake a traditional dissertation, a piece of practical video work, a portfolio of diverse practical work, or some combination of these.

The units utilise essays, special exercises, case studies, projects, dissertations and practical work for assessment as appropriate to the topic.

Careers

This course is ideal for students seeking a job in cinema-related fields in areas such as programming, marketing or administration. It provides an understanding of film in relation to global cultural industries.

It is also a valuable academic qualification for people teaching film studies at all levels.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

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If your first degree is not in computing but you want to move into IT then our BCS accredited MSc in Computing is designed for you. Read more
If your first degree is not in computing but you want to move into IT then our BCS accredited MSc in Computing is designed for you. Our course provides the basis for starting a career in computing and IT; teaching you the fundamentals of programming, hardware, networks and software engineering.

The course will enable you to develop a sound knowledge of computer software development for a range of problem areas, such as interactive websites, stand-alone applications and network systems. Because of its emphasis on software system construction and management, and data organisation, the qualification is applicable to a wide variety of fields concerned with using computers, as well as directly to the computer industry itself.

Why choose this course?

This programme is rooted in real-world and industry-relevant experiences. Lecturing staff have extensive experience in research and university teaching, as well as a wide range of previous industrial and commercial backgrounds. You will have the opportunity to put the skills you have gained into practice if you choose to undertake our 1 year optional placement.

You will be joining a department with a diverse and truly international postgraduate community. The universal nature of the technical skills developed in our programmes means our courses are of equal relevance to both new graduates and those with many years of industrial experience.

Professional accreditation

BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT. The MSc in Computing is accredited as partially meeting the requirements for CITP and have been awarded the EQANIE (European Quality Assurance Network for Informatics Education) label.

This course in detail

The MSc in Computing has a modular course unit design providing you with maximum flexibility and choice. To qualify for a master’s degree, you must pass modules amounting to 180 credits. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits).

The MSc in Computing with placement enables you to work in industry for a year in the middle of your course to give valuable workplace experience. Placements are not guaranteed, but the Department's dedicated placement team will help with the process of finding and applying for placements. To qualify for a Master’s degree with placement, you must pass modules amounting to 180 credits plus the zero credit placement module. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits).

The Postgraduate Diploma in Computing allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people working in the computing industry who wish to brush up their skills. To qualify for a Postgraduate Diploma, you must pass modules amounting to 120 credits. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each). In some cases, it may be possible for a student on a Postgraduate Diploma to do 3 taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits).

The Postgraduate Certificate in Computing allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people working in the computing industry who wish to learn a specific area in this rapidly changing discipline. To qualify for a Postgraduate Certificate, you must pass modules amounting to 60 credits. This comprises three taught modules (20 credits each).

We also offer a Postgraduate Certificate Computing Research Project.

Part-time students normally distribute the work evenly over a two-year period.

Semester 1 - You can choose from the following modules:
-Research and Scholarship Methods (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip)
-Object-Oriented Programming (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip)
-Structured Data (compulsory for MSc)

Semester 2 - You can choose from the following modules:
-Computer Systems and Networks (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip)
-Software Production (compulsory for MSc)
-Cyber security and the web (Compulsory for MSc)

As courses are reviewed regularly as part of our quality assurance framework, the list of taught modules you choose from may vary from the list here.

Students undertaking an MSc with placement will do a 1 year placement in industry. The placement will be undertaken after the taught component and before doing the dissertation.

Students studying for an MSc will also take:
-MSc Dissertation (completed over summer)

Careers and professional development

Our MSc students come from all over the world and graduate to follow careers in technical, business-related and creative roles, for example as developers, engineers, IT managers or web developers. Whatever their interest, our graduates tell us that the relevance of our courses and the skills they've learnt enable them to achieve their goals and build their careers.

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This MSc equips students with the analytical, methodological and practical expertise needed to positively contribute to development in countries where they are actively involved. Read more

This MSc equips students with the analytical, methodological and practical expertise needed to positively contribute to development in countries where they are actively involved. Students acquire the tools necessary to respond to a diverse range of problems including productive capacity, intersectoral integration, economic and social diversification, and self-sufficiency.

About this degree

Students develop the ability to analyse the development process and to formulate appropriate policies for meeting development goals. The field trip, conducted in a developing country, provides the opportunity to study the problems encountered in development, and the cultural, administrative and institutional context in which decisions are made.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (90 credits), either one or two optional modules (30 credits) and dissertation (60).

A Postgraduate Diploma, four core modules (90 credits), optional modules (30 credits), full-time nine months, is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate, four optional modules (60 credits), full-time 15 weeks or flexible study over a period of up to two years, is offered.

Core modules

Four core modules 

  • Contemporary Approaches to Development Management
  • Development in Practice
  • Critical Ideas of Development Conceptions and Realities
  • Society and Market: Private Agency for Development

Recommended optional modules include:

  • Adapting Cities to Climate Change in the Global South
  • Cost Benefit Analysis: Theory and Practice
  • Critical Urbanism Studio I - Learning from Informality: Case Studies and Alternatives
  • Critical Urbanism Studio II - Investigative Design Strategies for Contested Spaces
  • Disaster Risk Reduction in Cities
  • Food and the City
  • Gender in Policy and Planning
  • Housing as Urbanism: Housing Policy and the Search for Scale
  • Housing Policies: Practical Dimensions and Alternative Options
  • Industrialisation and Infrastructure
  • Land, Food and Agriculture
  • Neo-Structuralism and the Developmental State
  • Social Diversity, Inequality and Poverty
  • Social Policy and Citizenship
  • The City and Its Relations: Context, Institutions and Actors in Urban Development Planning
  • The Political Ecology of Environmental Change
  • Transport Equity and Urban Mobility
  • Transforming Local Areas: Urban Design for Development
  • Urbanisation and Development
  • Urban and Peri-Urban Agriculture: Knowledge Systems in the Global South

Or any other open MSc module in The Bartlett School of Planning.

Please note: not all optional modules listed above may be available.

Dissertation/report

All MSc students submit a 10,000-word paper on a topic related to the main themes of the programme. The topic is chosen by the student in dialogue with the Programme Director.

Teaching and learning

The programme consists of reading, essay writing and individual and group project work, in the context of lectures, seminars, workshops, case study analysis, and a field trip abroad. In recent years field trip destinations have included Uganda and Ethiopia. Student performance is assessed through coursework, unseen examinations and a final dissertation report.

Fieldwork

The overseas fieldwork trip is a practical research-based residential that helps draw the various elements of the degree together.

The DPU will cover the following costs of the field trip: return flights, visas, travel insurance, accommodation and fees, and costs of local experts and inputs. However, food, local travel and incidental expenses of a personal nature will not be covered by the DPU.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Development Administration and Planning MSc

Careers

Graduates are engaged in a diversity of professional activities including local, regional and national government, consultancy firms, national and international NGOs, United Nations programmes and international aid agencies. A small proportion of graduates pursue advanced research degrees while several work as academics in leading universities or as independent consultants.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Economic Development Intern, African Development Bank
  • Policy Making Intern, UNDP (United Nations Development Programme)
  • Policy Research Officer, Department for International Development (DFID)
  • Trade Negotiator, Ministry of Commerce of the Kingdom of Thailand
  • Consultant, United Nations Development Program (UNDP)

Employability

The central objective of this programme is to equip participants with the analytical, methodological and practical expertise necessary to make a positive contribution to the development effort in countries with which they are engaged. 

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Development Planning Unit (DPU) at UCL is an international centre concerned with promoting sustainable forms of development, understanding rapid urbanisation and encouraging innovation in the policy, planning and management of cities and regions, especially in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Its programmes are supported by international agencies and by national and provincial governments.

This MSc examines and analyses the theory and practice of development administration at international, national and regional levels to provide participants with an understanding of the processes generating social change and with the skills and abilities to respond.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Development Planning Unit

81% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Graduates who are able to fully exploit the potential of computing and information systems by combining specialist technical skills with other knowledge and experience are highly sought after. Read more

Graduates who are able to fully exploit the potential of computing and information systems by combining specialist technical skills with other knowledge and experience are highly sought after.

If your first degree contained little or no technical experience, but you’re now looking to change direction or enhance your employability by developing your skills in this area, then this programme (commonly referred to as a ‘conversion course’) is for you.

Guided by academics with a wealth of industrial experience, this is an intensive MSc programme for highly motivated graduates of any discipline with little prior experience of computer science.

Our research-led approach

Your tuition will be delivered by field leading academics engaged in world-class research projects in collaboration with industry, external institutions and research councils.

Our strong links with industry

  • We have collaborations, partnerships, industrial placement schemes and public engagement programmes with a variety of organisations, including Vodafone, Google, IBM, BT, NASA, BBC and Microsoft
  • Full-time MSc with Industrial Experience option available on our taught MSc programmes. You have the option to complete over two years, with a year of work experience in industry.
  • Industrial projects scheme - To support industrial experience development, you can do your final project in collaboration with an industrial partner.

Structure

MSc Computing and Information Systems is currently available for one year full-time study, two years part-time study.

Full-time

Undertaking a masters programme is a serious commitment, with weekly contact hours being in addition to numerous hours of independent learning and research needed to progress at the required level. When coursework or examination deadlines are approaching independent learning hours may need to increase significantly. Please contact the course convenor for precise information on the number of contact hours per week for this programme.

Part-time

Part-time study options often mean that the number of modules taken is reduced per semester, with the full modules required to complete the programme spread over two academic years. Teaching is generally done during the day and part-time students should contact the course convenor to get an idea of when these teaching hours are likely to take place. Timetables are likely to be finalised in September but you may be able to gain an expectation of what will be required.

Important note regarding Part Time Study

We regret that, due to complex timetabling constraints, we are not able to guarantee that lectures and labs for part time students will be limited to two days per week, neither do we currently support any evening classes. If you have specific enquiries about the timetabling of part time courses, please contact the MSc Administrator.

Semester 1

  •  IT Programming
  •  Information Systems

Semester 2

  •  Databases

Select three options from:

  •  Security and Authentication
  • Bayesian Decision and Risk Analysis
  • Business Information Systems
  • Business Technology Strategy
  • Cloud Computing
  • Distributing Systems
  • Graphical User Interfaces
  • Mobile Services
  • Security and Authentication

Semester 3

  • MSc Project


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This professionally accredited postgraduate programme has been carefully designed as a 'fast-track' conversion course for graduates of any discipline who wish to make a career in planning or in related fields. Read more

This professionally accredited postgraduate programme has been carefully designed as a 'fast-track' conversion course for graduates of any discipline who wish to make a career in planning or in related fields. It aims to broaden students' appreciation of planning and urban theory whilst providing them with the necessary skills to engage in critical and creative problem-solving.

About this degree

Students analyse the definition of, and solutions to, urban and regional planning problems and the nature of existing planning systems and practices. Emphasis is placed on the importance of a spatial and comparative perspective to planning and the need for integrated solutions to planning problems and the achievement of sustainable development.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (90 credits), one specialism with two modules (30 credits), and a research dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, five core modules (90 credits), two optional modules from the list of possible specialisms available (30 credits), full-time nine months, is offered.

Core modules

  • Urban Design: Place Making
  • From Strategic Vision to Urban Plan
  • Pillars of Planning
  • Spatial Planning: Concepts and Contexts
  • Spatial Planning: Critical Practice

Optional modules

Students choose two linked modules from the following to form a specialist study area:

  • Communities and Planning
  • Housing for Planning
  • Infrastructure Planning
  • Governance for Sustainability
  • Urban Design
  • Urban Regeneration
  • Historic Cities
  • Smart City Theory and Practice

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an independent research project, closely related to the specialist option chosen and linked to UK spatial planning. The project culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through individual and group project work, skills-based practical and IT work, lectures, tutorials and seminars. A short field course based in a European city outside the UK will take place in the second term. Assessment is through individual and group work, essays, examination, skills-based practical work, and the dissertation.

Fieldwork

Students undertake two field trips (if studying on a part-time basis, both in the first year); one two-day trip in November to a British city and one five-day trip in February to a continental European city to learn about planning policies and issues in different contexts.

The cost of the field trip (flights and accommodation) is included in the programme fee.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Spatial Planning MSc

Funding

There are a number of sources of funding available specifically for students in The Bartlett School of Planning.

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Graduates have been very successful in gaining subsequent employment, including core public and private sector planning careers (such as local government and local, national and international consultancies), as well as the housing and transport sectors; planning, urban regeneration and environmental agencies; public and private utility companies; think tanks and public policy organisations; environmental campaign groups; and teaching and research.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Graduate Town Planner, Savills
  • Urban Planner, Arup
  • MA in Landscape Architecture, Architectural Association School of Architecture
  • Planning Adviser, The Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI)
  • PhD in Environmental Management, Seoul National University

Employability

The programme equips graduates with a wide range of skills beneficial to employability including planning specific skills (an appreciation of policy-making and implementation, of spatial analysis, basic principles of urban design, social research and plan-making and decision-making processes) as well as more generic skills (group work, independent research, communication skills including presentation and writing, and problem solving skills).

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL's Bartlett School of Planning (BSP) has a strong history of teaching and research. It has been at the forefront of planning research and teaching for 100 years and is one of the foremost planning schools in the United Kingdom, with an international reputation. Based in the heart of London there is much for students to learn from being at the cutting-edge of policy-relevant critical debate, empirical study and research-led teaching. The staff profile is multidisciplinary and teaching staff are actively involved in shaping the theories and debates covered in their teaching. Our annual public lectures attract pre-eminent speakers from around the world and our student body has a broad, international profile.

Although situated within global and European contexts, the focus for the programme is primarily the UK, and particularly London. London is a complex setting that provides the natural and most accessible laboratory for BSP students. An emphasis on understanding the social and physical world will lead to a greater appreciation of how action or intervention shapes place. But at the same time, there is a concern with ethical issues as a framework for planned intervention.

This MSc programme is fully accredited by the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI) and the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS).

Accreditation:

The programme is fully accredited by both the RTPI and RICS. Students successfully completing the MSc in Spatial Planning are eligible for licentiate membership of either or both bodies, regardless of the subject focus of their undergraduate degree.



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