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The MA in Creative Writing (Distance Learning) at Kingston University provides the opportunity to work with a wide range of well-established and award-winning writers in the most dynamic writing environment in the UK without having to relocate or give up your current job. Read more
The MA in Creative Writing (Distance Learning) at Kingston University provides the opportunity to work with a wide range of well-established and award-winning writers in the most dynamic writing environment in the UK without having to relocate or give up your current job.

Developed to complement the University's growing and acclaimed suite of courses in creative writing, the course allows you to complete your credits through distance learning. Taught in our virtual forums and classrooms, modules can be accessed at a time of the week to suit your schedule.

The non-compulsory campus days in mid-October and early January give you a chance to visit the campus and attend a relevant lecture, as well as to meet fellow workshop students. Those travelling longer distances who wish to stay longer and explore the cultural opportunities that London offers, or simply to write, are also welcome to attend events taking place on campus for the rest of the week by colleagues, writers in residence, students and guests.

What will you study?

The Creative Writing Low Residency MA follows the same course structure as the successful and popular Creative Writing MA.
Full-time students take two 30-credit modules in semester 1, combining the first residency module with a Writers' Workshop module. In semester 2, they will take two more 30-credit modules, this time following their choice of a Special Study workshop with their second residency module in June. During this time they will complete work on structure and style begun online during the semester, while participating in general workshops and reading sessions and tutorials with their assigned dissertation supervisor.

Students may then choose to complete a 15,000-word 60-credit dissertation accompanied by a 3,000-word critical review. They will begin to plan this as part of the June residency and will receive one-to-one supervision as they work towards a September completion.

Instruction during the residency periods will combine small group workshops and reading classes along with readings by colleagues, writers-in-residence, students and guests. Modules delivered by distance learning will be organised with staff student ratios of 8:1 at the most and will include individual tutorials. Students will be able to access supporting materials, including streamed lectures and readings held at or sponsored by the University.

Assessment

Continuous assessments in individual accredited modules plus assessment of final dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Creative Writing Dissertation (Low Residency)
-Critical Challenges for Creative Writers ( Residency Module 1)
-Special Study: Workshops in Popular Genre Writing (Distance Learning)
-Structure and Style ( Residency Module 2)
-Writers' Workshop (Low Residency)

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Communities have a key role to play in the development of a low carbon society. Are you keen to discover more about how renewable and low-carbon energy production can play a central role in community development? Do you want to be at the centre of and lead these developments?. Read more
Communities have a key role to play in the development of a low carbon society. Are you keen to discover more about how renewable and low-carbon energy production can play a central role in community development? Do you want to be at the centre of and lead these developments?

This Developing Low-Carbon Communities course will enable you to do exactly that and, taught by recognised experts, you can be confident you will graduate armed with the most up-to-date information and highest quality skills.

Studying online, on a full-time or part-time basis, you will critically analyse the theories, principles and concepts of renewable energy, carbon budgeting and community development.

Special Features

• A limited number of funded places are available for full-time, Scottish or EU fee status students.
• Loans for tuition fees are available from the Students Award Agency for Scotland (SAAS) for eligible Scotland domiciled and EU students, and loans for living costs for eligible Scottish students.
• Modules are led by recognised experts in the field of community development and low carbon technologies
• You will study by way of online distance learning, full time or part time, which means you can fit your studies around your professional and personal life
• You can study individual modules for personal or professional development (CPD), or work towards the PgCert, PgDip, or full Masters degree

Modules

PgCert

Core modules are: Sustainable development; Transition to a low carbon society; Renewable energy technologies

PgDip

Option modules, from which you will choose three, include: Energy, climate and carbon; Participatory approaches to community consultation; Developing a community energy project; Local economic development; Developing communities; Research methods (strongly recommended to continue to MSc)

Option modules available subject to previous qualification/experience: Energy modelling for buildings; Tidal, wind and future energy

MSc

To achieve the award of MSc Developing Low-Carbon Communities you must complete the PgDip and a research dissertation.

Locations

This course is available at North Highland College UHI, Ormlie Road, Thurso, KW14 7EE

Start Dates

Part-time students can start at variable times throughout the year. Please use the apply link for applications for January, for more information on other start dates please contact North Highland College UHI.

Access routes

BSc (Hons) Environmental Sciences
BSc (Hons) Sustainable Rural Development
BSc (Hons) Archaeology and Environmental Studies
BEng (Hons) Energy Engineering

Funding

The University of the Highlands and Islands is pleased to offer a limited number of places with full tuition fee support for Scottish-domiciled/EU students, studying full time, on this course starting in September 2017 to help talented students join this key growth sector for the Scottish economy. Fees will be funded by the European Social Fund and Scottish Funding Council as part of Developing Scotland’s Workforce in the Scotland 2014-2020 European Structural and Investment Fund Programmes.

From 2017, eligible Scotland domiciled students studying full time can access loans up to 10,000 from the Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS).This comprises a tuition fee loan up to £5,500 and a non-income assessed living cost loan of £4,500. EU students studying full time can apply for a tuition fee loan up to £5500.

Part-time students undertaking any taught postgraduate course over two years up to Masters level who meet the residency eligibility can apply for a for a tuition fee loan up to £2,750 per year.

See Scholarships tab below for full details

Top five reasons to study at UHI

1. Do something different: our reputation is built on our innovative approach to learning and our distinctive research and curriculum which often reflects the unique environment and culture of our region and closely links to vocational skills required by a range of sectors.
2. Flexible learning options mean that you can usually study part time or full time. Some courses can be studied fully online from home or work, others are campus-based.
3. Choice of campuses – we have campuses across the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. Each campus is different from rich cultural life of the islands; the spectacular coasts and mountains; to the bright lights of our city locations.
4. Small class sizes mean that you have a more personal experience of university and receive all the support you need from our expert staff
5. The affordable option - if you already live in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland you don't have to leave home and incur huge debts to go to university; we're right here on your doorstep

How to apply

If you want to apply for this postgraduate programme click on the ‘visit website’ button below which will take you to the relevant course page on our website, from there select the Apply tab to complete our online application.
If you still have any questions please get in touch with our information line by email using the links beow or call on 0845 272 3600.

International Students

An exciting and diverse student life awaits our international students. Choose to study in one of the larger urban centres of the region, such as Perth, Inverness or Elgin, or in one of the smaller towns or island communities, including the Western and Northern Isles. http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international

English Language Requirements

Our programmes are taught and examined in English. To make the most of your studies, you must be able to communicate fluently and accurately in spoken and written English and provide certified proof of your competence before starting your course. Please note that English language tests need to have been taken no more than two years prior to the start date of the course. The standard English Language criteria to study at the University of the Highlands and Islands are detailed on our English language requirements page http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international/how-to-apply-to-uhi/english-language-requirements

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Our postgraduate Professional Master’s Programme (PMP) has been designed to offer professional learning related to general and specialist fields of education and training. Read more
Our postgraduate Professional Master’s Programme (PMP) has been designed to offer professional learning related to general and specialist fields of education and training. We offer flexible study on a range of work-based, independent study, taught and core modules, leading to Grad Cert, PG Cert, PG Dip or Master’s degree qualifications.

PMP Awards

The PMP has a selection of both specialised and general professional learning awards, some of which can be studied as a full-time programme.

Specialised awards:
These awards include specific modules for study:
• Education Studies (full & part-time options)
• Specific Learning Difficulties/Dyslexia (full & part-time options)
• Counselling and Psychotherapy Practice (part-time option)

General awards:
These flexible awards reflect the general focus of independent or work-based study undertaken. Participants undertaking general awards are initially registered to the 'Educational Practice' award. Based on the focus of their study, they may choose from a number of different titles for their final award.

The awards offered are:
• Early Childhood Studies
• Educational Practice
• Educational Leadership and Management
• Learning and Knowledge Technology
• Mentoring and Coaching
• Tertiary and Adult Education
• Vulnerable Learners and Inclusion

Qualifications within the programme

The range of qualifications offered have different requirements in terms of the number of module credits involved:

Graduate Certificate (Grad Cert)
This involves the study and completion of 60 credits at Level 6 (Honours).

Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert)
This involves the study and completion of 60 credits, a maximum of 15 at Level 6 (Honours) and a minimum of 45 credits at Level 7 (Master’s).

Postgraduate Diploma (PG Dip)
This involves the completion of 120 credits. At least 90 credits must be at Level 7 with a maximum of 30 at Level 6.

Master of Arts or Teaching (MA/MTeach)
The MA or MTeach qualification is gained through the completion of 180 credits that includes a final dissertation of 60 credits. The final stage 60 credits dissertation research project is 15,000-20,000 words or equivalent.

The period of registration for part-time students is usually a minimum of two (maximum of six) whereas full-time this is generally from one year up to two years maximum.

Elective and Core Modules within the programme

Flexible and Distance Learning Modules for General and some Specialist Awards:
For students working at a distance from the Bath Spa campuses we offer several flexible and distance learning low residency modules for a range of credits: 15, 30, 45, 60 at either level 6 or 7. Students registered onto each module are allocated a personal supervisor with an allocated number of support hours and can gain up to 90 credits following this pathway. The flexible modules offered:

• Independent Study Module
• Work-based Action Enquiry

Elective Modules for General Awards:
These 30 credit modules are intended for new participants who need to gain 60 to 120 credits within the General Awards. They are independent study options, and generally involve four or more evening sessions. They are additionally supported by Educational Context Seminars. The elective modules offered cover the following areas of study:

• Coaching
• Introduction to Distributed Leadership
• Learning in Mathematics
• Special Education Studies
• Early Years
• Including Vulnerable Learners
• Leading & Coaching
• Learning & Knowledge Technology
• Education, Politics & Society

Note: The above elective modules may be added to on an ongoing basis

PMP Core Research Modules for Master’s Awards:
The core modules that all participants must complete to progress towards a Master’s dissertation are:
• Research and the Professional: Part 1 – Research Methodology (15 credits)
• Research and the Professional: Part 2 – Project Preparation (15 credits)

This then leads to:
• Master’s Research Project (60 credits)

Assessment methods

Assessment for most modules is based on completing assignments related to relevant professional learning tasks. An innovative range of assessment modes have been designed to reflect a diversity of professional needs and experience.

Valuing Previous Learning (APL)

Accreditation of Prior certificated Learning (APL) can be offered if you have successfully completed previous Level 6 or 7 modules at another university. We accept APL for our PGDip or Master’s qualifications. As a guide, up to a maximum of 90 credits may be credited towards a Master’s Degree and 75 credits towards a PGDip. We will require a full transcript from the awarding university.

It is also possible to gain accreditation for other kinds of professional development by compiling an independent study portfolio of professional development (APEL - Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning).

School-Based CPD and Consultancy

At Bath Spa University we offer a wide range of school-based CPD opportunities. We are keen to provide professional development which reflects the changing contexts and priorities of schools and our current involvement ranges from specific CPD programmes for individual schools, or networks and clusters, through to strategic partnerships with Local Authorities and/or Teaching School Alliances. Timings for bespoke school/LA centre based modules will be individually negotiated to meet the group’s needs. These development projects might typically include:

Learning and Teaching in the 21st Century
Your project focuses might include:
• Creative approaches to curriculum design
• The central role of talk and collaborative learning in the classroom
• Promoting and teaching learning to learn dispositions
• The place of Web 2.0 technologies to enhance learning

Mentoring and Coaching
Your mentoring and coaching project could include:
• Exploration of the similarities and differences between mentoring and coaching
• The place of mentoring and coaching in the workplace
• Development and consolidation of skills and knowledge associated with mentoring and coaching
• Strategies to support the development of a coaching culture in your school/ setting.

Leadership Development
Your leadership development module could include:
• Personal reflections on what informs your leadership aspirations and practice
• Understanding different leadership styles and their impact upon school climate
• The leadership of learning.
• Strategies to develop and support the leadership of change
• Critical understanding of building and leading effective teams

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This is a professional training course for working writers. Most scriptwriters work across several media, and the course reflects this. Read more
This is a professional training course for working writers. Most scriptwriters work across several media, and the course reflects this. All our tutors are award winning writers with an insight into what it takes to make it in the industry. We aim to turn out writers who understand the structure and craft of drama, have a finished script they can use as a calling card, know the industry in all its variety, and can pitch and sell their work.

The MA is taught in seventeen weekends of intensive workshops. It is not, however, ‘low residency’. There are as many hours of teaching as on Bath Spa University’s established MA in Creative Writing.

The course is taught at our beautiful Corsham Court campus where we have state of the art performance, capture and editing facilities. Our students also have opportunities to see their work for the stage performed and to shoot excerpts from their screenplays. We work closely with the School of Music and Performing Arts, and their students will have the opportunity to help act in and produce our work.

Although this is an intellectually challenging postgraduate course, there is no ‘academic’ side detached from the working side. Everything theoretical is geared to help the students as writers.

The MA in Scriptwriting also offers each of its students a free copy of Final Draft scriptwriting software, a must for professional Scriptwriters.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

The course is full-time from October to September, or part-time over two years, and is taught in modules. The first trimester runs from October to January and there are two modules, each delivered in three intensive weekends.

One is the module on Dramatic Structure. This aims to give you an understanding of the full range of ways that plays and scripts can work. You are introduced to dialogue, character, genre, and the different media. But the emphasis is on how to tell a story - a well made plot. Students will read and view widely, but the academic side is not separate from the working side. This module is to help you write.

The other module in the first trimester is a workshop in Writing Theatre and Radio. This is delivered in three intensive weekends. All of the time is devoted to the students’ own work, and much of the time we work on our feet. At the end of the trimester each student finishes a 45 to 60 minute play or radio script, and a 3,000 word essay that explains the structure of that script.

The second trimester, from February to June, also has two modules. One is Professional Skills, again over three intensive weekends. All our experience is that the ability to write alone is not enough to make your way in the various industries of theatre, television, film and radio. You also need to be able to pitch, and to talk intelligently and flexibly about your own work and others’. One of our tutors facilitates this module, and various industry professionals come in for a day each to inform, rehearse and challenge you.

The other module this trimester is Workshop in Screenwriting, also over three weekends. Here you write a script for film or television. We pay particular attention to genre, to the visual and time requirements of the screen, and to writing for particular markets. At the end of this trimester each student finishes 50 to 60 minutes of TV, or a short film script, or a treatment for a full-length film plus at least 45 minutes of polished script.

The third trimester runs from June to the end of September. Here there is only one double module, the Final Script Workshop. The workshops meet over five intensive Saturdays.

In this module each student writes a full length play, a full length film script, or the equivalent in television or radio. This script can be a development and reworking of earlier pieces, but will often be completely new work. At the end of September students submit this script.

The final assessment is based on four things. The most important is this script. The second is a 1,500 word essay explaining exactly where in the market it is aimed and how it is shaped to fit that niche. The third is a cold pitch for this script. When we speak of the market, we are thinking quite broadly. Some students will want to write for Hollywood, British independent films, soap operas, or theatre. Others will want to write radio plays, documentaries, puppet shows, theatre in education, training videos or school plays. The emphasis is, however, always on getting your work to a stage where it is ready to be produced. The fourth is a practical realisation of a short excerpt of an original work stage, screen or radio play. Students are expected to co ordinate this realisation themselves with advice and support from their tutor and using the University’s resources.

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

All courses will be taught by intensive workshops. Over the years we have found this is far and away the most productive way of teaching writing. It is particularly suited to scriptwriting, which is very much a social and collective art.

Tutors and visiting professionals:
All of our tutors are writers working in the industry. Among those working on the course will be:

• Ursula Rani Sarma (Course Director) writer for theatre, radio and screen
• Steve May who writes radio and novels
• Lucy Catherine who writes theatre, television and film
• Robin Mukherjee who writes theatre, television and film
• Hattie Naylor who writes film, theatre, radio and opera libretti
• Jonathan Neale who writes theatre, radio and novels

In the second semester we have visits from several professionals in the industry. Each conducts a one-day workshop with students, outlining the industry and giving them rigorous practice in pitching their work. Typically, we will have an agent, a TV producer, a radio producer, a theatre director or literary manager, and a film script editor.

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The Master of Arts in Travel and Nature Writing is designed for writers seeking advanced skills in the growing field of creative non-fiction inspired by the natural world and contemporary journeying. Read more
The Master of Arts in Travel and Nature Writing is designed for writers seeking advanced skills in the growing field of creative non-fiction inspired by the natural world and contemporary journeying. The course focuses on the application of writing skills to match the requirements of the travel and nature writing sector. To this end, students will learn from engagement, encounter, workshop, tuition and mentoring; they will develop their professional practice and produce a portfolio of work to help establish their careers in this highly competitive field.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

This is a low residency course over three semesters. It will normally consist of three week-long residential sessions, meeting visiting writers and industry specialists; distance learning modules designed to familiarise participants with the standards, interests and publishing requirements of the sector; one-to-one tutorials and mentoring providing the opportunity to turn experience into well-crafted writing of publication standard.

MODULES

The course begins with an intense six-day residential session for induction, introduction to distance learning, taught modules and mentoring sessions. The first two semesters involves writing regular pieces which are critiqued by tutors and peers. Through a business and context module, students can explore the ethics, history and development of a particular area of travel or nature writing. The second residency takes place in January or February. Throughout the course students will develop a portfolio of their best work and a journal tracking their submissions to publications; in this they will be supported by a mentor. The third residency will involve fieldwork, normally outside the UK.

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

Face-to-face seminars during intensive residency weeks, individual tutorials, directed study in writing and rewriting, online tutorials, Wikis, discussion boards, tutorial and peer critiques. Students will read extensively and are expected to be familiar with the subject and its contextual literature.

TUTORS

Bath Spa University can draw on the experience of professional writers, tutors and industry professionals of the highest standard.

ASSESSMENT METHODS

The course totals 180 credits: modules in the first semester account for 30 credits, the second semester also accounts for 30 credits, professional practice develops through semesters one and two accounting for 30 credits and the portfolio amassed throughout all three semesters accounts for 90 credits.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

The course is designed to introduce students to the workings of various travel and nature writing publishing opportunities and prepare them for the submission of their own work. It will also equip them with the practical and business skills to operate as freelance writers.

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The MA Education. International Education offers the opportunity to work with researchers who have developed leading perspectives in understanding comparative and international education policy and practice. Read more
The MA Education: International Education offers the opportunity to work with researchers who have developed leading perspectives in understanding comparative and international education policy and practice. The programme is particularly relevant to students from developed and developing countries who plan to work in professional, management, and education roles in both national education systems and internationally.

The programme situates the study of international education within a complex and changing world where education and education professionals are called upon to play equally complex and challenging roles in promoting economic growth and competition, while at the same time supporting the development of sustainable and cohesive societies and promoting equity and social justice.

Course structure

The course is structured over three trimesters and totals 180 credits (90 ECTS). It is available in campus-based mode, low-residency mode or online-only. You can start in September or February and will study for 60 credits per trimester. In your first trimester you will study the MA Education core module Education: Economics, Politics and Society (30 credits) plus your award core module (30 credits). In the second trimester you will study the core module Social Science Research (30 credits), plus two 15-credit elective modules, one of which may be a shared elective from another MA award. In your third trimester you will research and write your Dissertation (60 credits) on a topic relevant to your award. If you take the low residency option, the face-to-face teaching of all modules will take place during two 2-week intensive blocks (typically in September and February).

Modules

Trimester 1
In your first trimester you will study two compulsory core modules totalling 60 credits.
Core Module:
Education: Economics, Politics and Society (30 credits) explores how education can be understood in a complex and globalised world where it is seen by many governments as a significant factor in economic growth and competition. You will learn how to question the policies and organisations involved in defining the purposes, content and outcomes of education.
Award Core Module:
International Education and Globalisation (30 credits) looks at education within a global context and deals with issues such the role of international organisations, anti-globalisation critiques, cultural hegemony and the political economy of education within the global knowledge economy.
Trimester 2
In your second trimester you will study one compulsory core module, and two 15 credit elective modules, one of which may be a shared elective from another MA award. This will total 60 credits.
Compulsory Core Module:
Social Science Research (30 credits) sets educational research within the broader context of the social sciences and introduces a range of qualitative and quantitative methodologies and methods from which you can select the most appropriate for your dissertation.
Elective Modules:
Education and Development (option 15 credits) considers the relationship between education and international economic, social and human development. It focuses on patterns of international investment in education, key aspects of the discourses of education policy and key challenges to ensuring a quality education for all in both developed and developing countries.
Education, Conflict and Peace (option 15 credits) looks at the role of education in violent conflict before moving on to consider humanitarian and development initiatives to deliver education in conflict and emergencies. It explores issues of gender, displacement, children’s experience of conflict, and educational policy for peace and citizenship.
International Higher Education (shared option 15 credits) develops understanding of contemporary international higher education. Specific aspects of policy (widening participation; research, creativity and innovation; New Public Management) are explored through case studies of international Higher Education reform and management.
Trimester 3
In your third trimester you will research and write your Dissertation (60 credits) on a topic relevant to your award.
Dissertation (60 credits) enables you to study and research an aspect of education theory, policy or practice in depth, guided by an expert to arrive at your own synthesis of a topic to take forward into your career.

Teaching methods

For the campus-based mode of study, some lectures and seminars will take place during the day, whilst others may be in the evening or at weekends. For low-residency students the teaching will be concentrated into two 2-week blocks (typically around 6 hours per day). The course also makes extensive use of online teaching, particularly for the low-residency and online only modes. This will include a combination of individual and shared learning using the Bath Spa University virtual learning environment.

Staff / Tutors

-Dr Peter Jones: Senior Lecturer in International and Global Education: Peter has an extensive research and teaching background in International and Comparative Education. His research has addressed the role of the European Union in developing education policy for Higher Education, Early School Leaving and the Knowledge Economy. He is interested in Education in Post-Socialist and Transition Countries as well as the role of the EU in Central Asia.

-Dr. Julia Paulson: Lecturer in Education Studies: Julia’s research interests are in education and conflict and in education and development. She has worked on these issues with NGOs in Latin America, West Africa, the UK and Canada. She has also worked as an education consultant for international organisations like UNICEF, UNESCO and the World Bank. She has published on education and reconciliation, transitional justice, teaching about violent conflict and education in emergencies. She is editor of Education and Reconciliation published by Bloomsbury in 2012 and she completed her doctoral research at the University of Oxford on the role of Peru’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission in educational reform in 2011.

Course assessment

There are no written exams on this course; each module is assessed through coursework. This typically involves an essay of 2,500 words for a 15-credit module or 5,000 words for a 30-credit module. For some modules assessment may be by verbal presentation or online activity. The dissertation is 15,000 – 20,000 words and focuses on an area agreed with a specialist tutor.

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This course will enable you to develop expertise in this growing area of education and become a specialist in promoting high quality practice in early years settings. Read more
This course will enable you to develop expertise in this growing area of education and become a specialist in promoting high quality practice in early years settings. Early Years Education is now recognised globally as crucial for laying the foundation for lifelong learning and development. Critical aspects of social, emotional and cognitive development are established in the first five years of life emphasising the importance of this phase of education.

You will develop your knowledge and understanding of how children develop and learn, along with the most effective ways to create an enabling learning environment. You will be introduced to different pedagogical approaches, including international perspectives, which will include a critical analysis of the role of the adult in supporting young childrens’ learning. The course incorporates various elective modules which will enhance your skills and insights into developing quality educational provision for young children.

COURSE STRUCTURE

The course is structured over three trimesters (thirds) and totals 180 credits (90 ECTS). It is available in campus-based mode, low-residency mode or online-only. You can start in September or February and will study for 60 credits per trimester. In your first trimester you will study the MA Education core module Education: Economics, Politics and Society (30 credits) plus your award core module (30 credits). In the second trimester you will study the core module Social Science Research (30 credits), plus two 15-credit elective modules, one of which may be a shared elective from another MA award. In your third trimester you will research and write your Dissertation (60 credits) on a topic relevant to your award. If you take the low residency option, the face-to-face teaching of all modules will take place during two 2-week intensive blocks (typically in September and February).

MODULES

Trimester 1

In your first trimester you will study two compulsory core modules totalling 60 credits.

Core Module:
Education: Economics, Politics and Society (30 credits) explores how education can be understood in a complex and globalised world where it is seen by many governments as a significant factor in economic growth and competition. You will learn how to question the policies and organisations involved in defining the purposes, content and outcomes of education.

Award Core Module:
Early Childhood Care and Education (30 credits) updates and extends your critical knowledge and understanding of how young children develop and create a foundation for all future learning and will develop your skills and expertise in creating high quality learning environments.

Trimester 2

In your second trimester you will study one compulsory core module, and two 15 credit elective modules, one of which may be a shared elective from another MA award. This will total 60 credits.

Compulsory Core Module:
Social Science Research (30 credits) sets educational research within the broader context of the social sciences and introduces a range of qualitative and quantitative methodologies and methods from which you can select the most appropriate for your dissertation.

Elective Modules:
Outdoor Play and Learning (option 15 credits) supports you in leading and researching young children's learning and development in the context of outdoor play and the Forest School experience.
Including Vulnerable Learners (option 15 credits) explores the wider issues of vulnerability and the concept of ‘inclusion’, particularly noting the socio-cultural influences that might impact on children and young people’s engagement with education systems.
Leadership and Team Work (shared option 15 credits) extends your critical knowledge and understanding of the principles and theories of leadership in early childhood settings and will develop your skills and expertise in a range of leadership practices and effective ways of leading a pedagogical team.

Trimester 3

In your third trimester you will research and write your Dissertation (60 credits) on a topic relevant to your award.

Dissertation (60 credits) enables you to study and research an aspect of education theory, policy or practice in depth, guided by an expert to arrive at your own synthesis of a topic to take forward into your career.

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

All modules are taught through lectures, small-group seminars and individual tutorials. For the campus-based mode of study, some lectures and seminars will take place during the day, whilst others may be in the evening or at weekends. For low-residency students the teaching will be concentrated into two 2-week blocks (typically around 6 hours per day). The course also makes extensive use of online teaching, particularly for the low-residency and online only modes. This will include a combination of individual and shared learning using the Bath Spa University virtual learning environment.

STAFF / TUTORS

Dr Janet Rose: Senior Lecturer and the Early Years Award Leader.
Janet has over 20 years’ experience of working in this specialist area of education both in the UK and internationally. Her publications include The Role of the Adult in Early Years Settings (2012) and her research interests currently focus on supporting children’s well-being and resilience.

Several colleagues co-teach on various modules and are all early years specialists with particular expertise in a range of aspects of early years provision such as symbolic representation (Lone Hattingh), social and emotional development (Hilary Smith) and leadership (Sara Layan).

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Governments worldwide are now making early years education a priority and increasing their investment in early years provision. Therefore, you will acquire specialist expertise in an area of education that is rapidly expanding and opening up new career opportunities. You will be equipped to take on a leadership position or an advisory role in supporting the development of early years provision in your own country.

ASSESSMENT METHODS

There are no written exams on this course; each module is assessed through coursework. This typically involves an essay of 2,500 words for a 15 credit module or 5,000 words for a 30 credit module. For some modules assessment may be by verbal presentation or online activity. The dissertation is 15,000 – 20,000 words and focuses on an area agreed with a specialist tutor, who will offer guidance on structure and academic writing.

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In a globally connected and rapidly changing world the skills needed in the future are very different to those needed today. It is argued that education offers each individual and nation the best chance of navigating an unknown future. Read more
In a globally connected and rapidly changing world the skills needed in the future are very different to those needed today. It is argued that education offers each individual and nation the best chance of navigating an unknown future. This course explores the unique challenges facing educational leaders in the 21st century as they learn to cope with uncertainty and adapt to evolving conditions.

The MA Education: Leadership and Management is designed for those who are interested in becoming, or presently working as, middle and senior managers and leaders in schools and other educational organisations in the UK and internationally. Drawing on internationally based research this course offers a critical and culturally based understanding of leadership as a social and ethical practice.

This course promotes the development of leadership competencies through practice based inquiry in which theories may be applied, or developed, within the workplace. The course will develop individual leadership skills and competencies as well as the capacity to lead and manage change

The course is structured over three trimesters (thirds) and totals 180 credits (90 ECTS). It is available in campus-based mode, low-residency mode or online-only. You can start in September or February and will study for 60 credits per trimester. In your first trimester you will study the MA Education core module Education: Economics, Politics and Society (30 credits) plus your award core module (30 credits). In the second trimester you will study the core module Social Science Research (30 credits), plus two 15-credit elective modules, one of which may be a shared elective from another MA award. In your third trimester you will research and write your Dissertation (60 credits) on a topic relevant to your award. If you take the low residency option, the face-to-face teaching of all modules will take place during two 2-week intensive blocks (typically in September and February).

Modules

Trimester 1
In your first trimester you will study two compulsory core modules totalling 60 credits.
Core Module:
Education: Economics, Politics and Society (30 credits) explores how education can be understood in a complex and globalised world where it is seen by many governments as a significant factor in economic growth and competition. You will learn how to question the policies and organisations involved in defining the purposes, content and outcomes of education.
Award Core Module:
Leadership in Practice: part 1. (30 credits) explores how leadership is exercised in your own educational setting through analysing a specific example of improvement and change. Taught sessions will provide an understanding of the ways in which leadership impacts on the climate and culture of a school or educational setting you will explore theories of organizational change. You will then undertake a work-based action research project in order to critically evaluate a chnage initiative and your impact as a leader.
Trimester 2
In your second trimester you will study one compulsory core module, and two 15 credit elective modules, one of which may be a shared elective from another MA award. This will total 60 credits.
Compulsory Core Module:
Social Science Research (30 credits) sets educational research within the broader context of the social sciences and introduces a range of qualitative and quantitative methodologies and methods from which you can select the most appropriate for your dissertation.
Elective Modules:
Leadership in Practice: part 2. (option 15 credits). An important aspect of leadership development is concerned with the way that our life experiences influence our values, beliefs and practice as a leader. This module explores the narratives that we tell as leaders and how our educational vision is shaped by our past experiences. Drawing on research into ‘learning lives’ you will be supported to write a reflective case study of self that articulates the influences that have shaped your professional identity and will inform your future development.
Leadership principles: context and challenges. (option 15 credits). This module will develop your critical thinking and practical understanding of the principles of leadership. Time will be spent in sessions exploring current international research and thinking in order to challenge and develop an understanding of what consittutes effective leadership within particular contexts.
Leadership and coaching. (shared option 15 credits). Coaching is recognised as a significant, and distinctive, leadership style. This module will help you to gain an understanding of the differences between coaching, mentoring and leadership. You will have an opportunity to develop your coaching skills in your school or setting. These experiences will enable you to reflect critically on what constitutes effective coaching and its value as a leadership style.
Trimester 3
In your third trimester you will research and write your Dissertation (60 credits) on a topic relevant to your award.
Dissertation (60 credits) enables you to study and research an aspect of education theory, policy or practice in depth, guided by an expert to arrive at your own synthesis of a topic to take forward into your career.

Teaching methods

For the campus-based mode of study, some lectures and seminars will take place during the day, whilst others may be in the evening or at weekends. For low-residency students the teaching will be concentrated into two 2-week blocks (typically around 6 hours per day). The course also makes extensive use of online teaching, particularly for the low-residency and online only modes. This will include a combination of individual and shared learning using the Bath Spa University virtual learning environment.

Course assessment

There are no written exams on this course; each module is assessed through coursework. This typically involves an essay of 2,500 words for a 15 credit module or 5,000 words for a 30 credit module. For some modules assessment may be by verbal presentation or online activity. The dissertation is 15,000 – 20,000 words and focuses on an area agreed with a specialist tutor, who will offer guidance on structure and academic writing

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Description. This four semester, one residency course of study (60 credit hours) MFA is a low residency, hands on, projects driven program for the aspiring director / writer / producer who recognizes story is king. Read more
Description:
This four semester, one residency course of study (60 credit hours) MFA is a low residency, hands on, projects driven program for the aspiring director / writer / producer who recognizes story is king. Whether making a feature, documentary, web-series or corporate video, it is story that intrigues us.

This program takes a holistic approach and seeks to train the complete creative filmmaker and then empower that filmmaker, using the most current marketing and distribution technologies, to market and distribute his or her independent productions.

Program Director and award-winning indie filmmaker Wayne Crawford has combined 30 years of filmmaking with 10 years of university teaching and devised this one of a kind, creative laboratory program.

What’s different about this online film program?

Firstly, there aren’t many online film programs. So I think we can even ask a broader question—how is the Horizons Film Program different from most all film programs—whether online or on campus? Well, we’re different in a variety of ways.

1. We’re affordable.

2. We don’t train specialists. We train complete filmmakers to write, direct and produce. All of your skills are integrated so you become empowered to create your own opportunities.

3. The program is focused on story and story structure and all of out courses are cross-linked. For example, we introduce a concept in your directing class, reinforce that concept while analyzing a film in producing, practice that concept in screenwriting and perform it in your productions.

4. And maybe most importantly, Program Director Wayne Crawford, an experienced writer/director/producer is taking you through the entire process. Wayne has made more than 20 feature films and created three TV series—almost 100 episodes.

5. Since this is a hands-on program, our class sizes are small. This means your creative work receives maximum attention.

6. Our 10 day residency is held on our campus outside of Paris and includes art excursions into Paris—a cultural oasis like no other.

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The MA Professional Practice in Dance Technique Pedagogy is a highly flexible postgraduate qualification designed for newly qualified or experienced dance teachers working in and beyond schools. Read more
The MA Professional Practice in Dance Technique Pedagogy is a highly flexible postgraduate qualification designed for newly qualified or experienced dance teachers working in and beyond schools. This is a low residency programme using on-line / distance learning, with the opportunity to visit Middlesex University's London campus. The programme has been developed especially to allow you to continue working, integrating your professional expertise with academic learning.

The development of 'self' as a practicing artist/educator is a central focus of this programme, alongside critical reflection on and advancement of one's individual pedagogic practice.

As a core part of the programme you will make a claim for academic credits for your professional experience including Professional Development courses, and / or your professional qualifications, whether credit bearing or not. This then forms the basis for a major project with a focus on dance technique pedagogy.


Why study MA Professional Practice Dance Technique Pedagogy at Middlesex?

As one of the top universities in the UK for dance, we are recognised worldwide for our high calibre of teaching and innovative research. Our department's student satisfaction rating is one of the best in the UK at 94% (NSS, 2013), with academics who are renowned experts in their fields. It is this level of excellence and pioneering approach to the subject of dance that led us to develop the MA Professional Practice in Dance Technique Pedagogy, the first course of its kind in the UK.

Designed to allow you to explore your teaching practice in depth, our course takes dance professionals in the early, middle or later stages of their career and harnesses their experience so that they can evolve their teaching practice with expert guidance from some of the UK's leading dance academics and practitioners.

Developed in collaboration with The Imperial Society of Teachers of Dancing (ISTD), our course begins by reflecting on your prior learning before supporting you to explore a chosen area of dance technique teaching in more depth leading to the development of a major work-based learning project. Delivered part-time through distance learning, we ensure that you are able to develop as a practitioner and maintain your work commitments while you study.

Course highlights:

- Flexibility to shape your studies around your work commitments, individual needs and interests, so you can pursue your ambitions with structured support from experienced practitioners
- You are placed at the centre of your research investigation, making your findings applicable within your own profession and of value to your colleagues, employers and students
- Vibrant dance research culture on campus and online, with influential and internationally respected work in dance pedagogy, contemporary dance technique and choreographic practices and dance fitness.
- Valuable opportunity to make a claim for academic credits against prior formal and informal learning

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The MA Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) programme is for people who wish to teach English as a second or foreign language, or further develop their TESOL career prospects. Read more
The MA Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) programme is for people who wish to teach English as a second or foreign language, or further develop their TESOL career prospects. The MA TESOL at Bath Spa University is one of the few TESOL programmes in the UK which incorporates a teaching practice component and is designed for both experienced teachers and those with little or no previous teaching experience.

The programme aims to develop confident, well informed, resourceful language teaching practitioners who are capable of designing and teaching comprehensive language programmes. At the same time you will extend your own knowledge base by engaging in independent research into your own practice and setting.

The programme recognises and values your professional, cultural and life experiences and you will develop and explore these experiences during the programme. This will enhance your professional knowledge and understanding through reflection, aided by theoretical input and practical application.

Context specific professional development is an important element in the programme as we prepare you to return to your home country with an adaptable knowledge base for your particular setting.

COURSE STRUCTURE

The MA TESOL is available both full and part-time, and for international students there is a low residency option.

The one year full-time route has taught modules (totalling 120 credits) being taken for the first two trimesters with the dissertation (60 credits) being completed in the third trimester. The part-time route is taken over two years, completing one module per trimester.

There are two modules in the first trimester, one covers the practical skills of language teaching and includes teaching practice in an appropriate school setting, the other analyses language from a discourse perspective and incorporates practical analysis tasks.

Suitably experienced teachers may choose an Independent Study module over the practical Theory and Practice of TESOL module in this trimester. The Independent Study module is negotiated with the award leader and allows for a more personalised learning experience.

The programme continues the practical and theoretical mix in trimester two while fostering independent study skills and culminates with the dissertation in the third trimester.

Throughout the programme the amount of independent study gradually increases, both within and across modules, in order to build your confidence and self-reliance. As your future continuing professional development is also important to us, reflection, as a key skill, is interwoven into all modules to nurture your ability to continue learning beyond the MA TESOL.

Low-residency
We offer a low-residency option for international students. You will attend Bath Spa University twice a year for one or two intensive weeks of teaching input (usually September and February). This is followed by a period of study in which assignments are completed and submitted before the next face-to-face teaching block. This route for the MA TESOL will take one or two years depending on the number of modules taken during the face-to-face blocks.

MODULES

Trimester 1
The first trimester begins with Theory and Practice of TESOL and Language Analysis for TESOL. These modules include theoretical knowledge and practical skills both for classroom practice and language analysis. Observed teaching placement runs throughout the trimester for module one, with the latter module focusing on practical language analysis tasks and reflection on language analysis approaches. Reflection, as a core knowledge area for the degree, is firmly set into the learning and assessment for both modules. For suitably experienced teachers the Independent Study module is an option to be discussed with the Award Leader.

Trimester 2
The second trimester builds on the first with a more critical and in-depth focus on TESOL theories of learning and teaching in Second Language Learning and Teaching. This module incorporates further observed teaching practice and reflection on theory and practice. The research module, Research Methods in Social Science, allows for an individual focus on research methods and begins the thinking for the dissertation. This is a key trimester for the dissertation where reflection and discussion on research ideas and core TESOL areas is encouraged.

Trimester 3
In your third trimester you will continue your studies through researching and writing your Dissertation (60 credits). Your dissertation topic is chosen in consultation with a nominated supervisor. This process begins in trimester two allowing for ideas to develop and time to explore alternative concepts and methodologies before fully embarking on your research. Trimester three is primarily independent study with support from your supervisor through various channels such as face-to-face and skype discussions, with online and/or email feedback.

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

Teaching and learning methods utilised include lectures, seminars, workshops, directed classroom-based activities and discussion to promote and enhance reflection. Peer-teaching opportunities, presentations and student led workshops are also employed throughout the programme. You are encouraged to keep a journal for teaching practice which enhances and supports reflection on your experience. This aids continuation of discussions linking theory to practice which begin in class and continue throughout the programme on an individual self-reflection and peer reflection basis.

Your fellow course participants are an important resource to draw on through shared experience and stories as you build a community of practice. The university offers many supportive resources including a virtual learning environment, which will support your online discussions and knowledge enhancement, and various library resources. There is also a Writing and Learning Centre offering academic support for writing and independent study skills.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Students who complete the MA TESOL will have many career opportunities including: English language teaching (general or specialised), language teacher trainer, materials writing, curriculum development, language textbook editor, Director of Studies/Assistant Director of Studies, PhD studies.

ASSESSMENT METHODS

Both formative and summative assessment is built into each core module with no written exams utilised in any module. Summative assessment takes the form of a portfolio of tasks which may include oral presentations, reflection on module learning and teaching practice, essays and analysis tasks. All summative assessment is supported by formative work during the module which includes discussions with tutors and colleagues, feedback on presentations and assignment drafts, journal reflections and class activities.

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From all over the world! From Den Haag in the Netherlands to Santiago in Chile; from Gabriola Island, BC to Halifax, NS; from Brooklyn, NY to Portland, OR, we have students across North America and beyond. Read more

Optional-Residency MFA Program

Where are our students writing from?

From all over the world! From Den Haag in the Netherlands to Santiago in Chile; from Gabriola Island, BC to Halifax, NS; from Brooklyn, NY to Portland, OR, we have students across North America and beyond. They may live miles apart, yet they’re all intimately connected to a community of fellow writers through the Optional-Residency MFA program.
Join our community, wherever you’re writing from.
Take distance education classes online while remaining at home. Optional summer intensives on the Vancouver campus of UBC enable you to meet faculty and other students face-to-face, and provide a complement to the work performed online.
The Optional-Residency MFA Program mirrors our highly-regarded on-campus MFA. You graduate with the same degree, and are evaluated by the same criteria and standards.

The Optional-Residency Advantage

A Focus on Writing

We emphasize the creation and critical discussion of original writing rather than the study of literature or literary criticism. Readings are assigned or suggested by instructors where appropriate, but there is not a significant reading or criticism component to the degree.

Nine Genres of Study

More than any other Low Residency program. Study fiction, non-fiction, poetry, screenwriting, playwriting, writing for children, graphic novel, songwriting and translation. Students are required to work in at least three separate genres during the course of their degree – literary cross-training that makes our graduates more well-rounded writers and opens more doors for teaching and publication.

Study full-time or part-time

You can take up to five years to complete your degree, taking as little as one course per year if that’s all your schedule will allow.

Summer Residency

The residencies anchor the online courses, bringing students and faculty together at the beautiful Vancouver campus of UBC each July for ten days of workshops, seminars and community. The residencies are great experiences, but they are entirely optional. Some students complete their entire degree at a distance.

Workshops Online

The workshop format is at the core of the study of creative writing; online workshop critique is a powerful way for students to learn critical reading and writing skills and to make connections with other writers that will last beyond your time in school.
At the end of it all, you will emerge with a body of work in at least three different genres as well as your thesis, a book-length manuscript (or full length production) of your original creative work.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Fine Arts
- Specialization: Creative Writing
- Subject: Creative and Performing Arts
- Mode of delivery: Online / Distance (100%)
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Registration options: Full or Part-time
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts

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We are now reading applications for the January 2017 residency. The application deadline is Nov. 20, 2016. We are pleased to continue our merit-based scholarship program for incoming students. Read more
We are now reading applications for the January 2017 residency. The application deadline is Nov. 20, 2016.

We are pleased to continue our merit-based scholarship program for incoming students. Before the January 2017 residency, we will award merit-based scholarships in three separate rounds. In order to be considered for the first round, submit your application and supporting documents before Sept. 30, 2016.

Visit the website http://www.ut.edu/mfacw/

MFA in Creative Writing

The University of Tampa Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing is a low-residency program designed to help poets, fiction writers and creative nonfiction writers advance their command of craft through exposure to literature from a writerly perspective and with supportive critique and mentoring. The course of individualized study covers four semesters over two calendar years, followed by a fifth culminating residency. Our program focuses on individualized instruction, while fostering the rich interplay of participation in an extended literary community; as working writers, all of us seek to deepen the understanding of writing as an ongoing engagement with discovery and transformation.

Students attend four, 10-day working residencies on UT’s historic campus in downtown Tampa, on the banks of the Hillsborough River. Each residency is followed by a semester-long one-on-one tutorial with a faculty mentor focused on the student’s written work and readings as negotiated in an individual plan of study. View a photo gallery of the inaugural class (http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.336373403051241.78945.268982289790353&type=1).

As part of the requirements for the degree, the student completes many drafts and revisions, resulting in the master's thesis, a substantial manuscript of original work in the selected genre. Along the way, the student reads and comments on works that have shaped the genre, completes a 25-page critical essay in the third semester and assembles an annotated bibliography that conveys the importance and influence of great writers on their own work. In the fifth, culminating residency, the student teaches a seminar on a pre-arranged topic of interest and gives a public reading of his/her own work. Each semester grade is pass/fail accompanied by a narrative evaluation composed by the student’s mentor. All students have the opportunity to serve in an editorial capacity on Tampa Review Online, the 100 percent MFA student-edited cousin of the award-winning Tampa Review.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ut.edu/apply

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As the renewable energy sector continues to grow there is a need for trained individuals to plan, implement and manage new renewable energy projects. Read more
As the renewable energy sector continues to grow there is a need for trained individuals to plan, implement and manage new renewable energy projects. This course will provide you with the theoretical and practical tools to place you at the centre of such ventures.

If you are already working in or are interested in a career in the renewable energy or low-carbon technology sectors, this dynamic course will provide you with the knowledge and skills required to critically analyse the theories, principles and concepts of low-carbon energy production and sustainability.

Additionally the course will give you a firm understanding of the technical and economic case for renewables along with confidence to tackle the calculations required to assess their viability.

Special Features

• A limited number of funded places are available for full-time, Scottish or EU fee status students.
• Loans for tuition fees are available from the Students Award Agency for Scotland (SAAS) for eligible Scotland domiciled and EU students, and loans for living costs for eligible Scottish students.
• You will be taught by recognised experts in the field of renewable energy
• You can study full time or part time
• The course is delivered through online distance learning with support from expert staff at UHI, which means that you can fit your studies around your personal and professional commitments
• You can choose to study individual modules for personal or professional development, or work towards the PgCert, PgDip or full Masters degree

Modules

PgCert

Core modules are: Energy, climate and carbon; Transition to a low-carbon society; Renewable energy technologies

PgDip

Option modules, from which you will choose three, include: Sustainable rural land use and energy in rural Scotland; Energy modelling for building; Tidal, wave and future energy; Developing a community energy project; Sustainable development; Local economic development; Research methods (strongly recommended to continue to MSc.)

Msc

To achieve the award of MSc Sustainable Energy Solutions you must complete the PgDip plus a research dissertation

Access Routes

BSc (Hons) Environmental Sciences
BSc (Hons) Sustainable Development
BSc (Hons) Archaeology and Environmental Studies
BEng (Hons) Energy Engineering

Locations

This course is available online with support from North Highland College UHI, Ormlie Road, Thurso, KW14 7EE

Study Options

You will study through supported online learning using the University's Virtual Learning Environment (VLE)
This method of flexible study enables you to fit your course and your professional development around your personal and professional life.
You will have support from your tutors and studies advisor.

Part-time students can start at variable times

For more information on other start dates please contact North Highland College UHI.

Funding

The University of the Highlands and Islands is pleased to offer a limited number of places with full tuition fee support for Scottish-domiciled/EU students, studying full time, on this course starting in September 2017 to help talented students join this key growth sector for the Scottish economy. Fees will be funded by the European Social Fund and Scottish Funding Council as part of Developing Scotland’s Workforce in the Scotland 2014-2020 European Structural and Investment Fund Programmes.

From 2017, eligible Scotland domiciled students studying full time can access loans up to 10,000 from the Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS).This comprises a tuition fee loan up to £5,500 and a non-income assessed living cost loan of £4,500. EU students studying full time can apply for a tuition fee loan up to £5500.

Part-time students undertaking any taught postgraduate course over two years up to Masters level who meet the residency eligibility can apply for a for a tuition fee loan up to £2,750 per year.

See Scholarships tab below for full details

Top five reasons to study at UHI

1. Do something different: our reputation is built on our innovative approach to learning and our distinctive research and curriculum which often reflects the unique environment and culture of our region and closely links to vocational skills required by a range of sectors.
2. Flexible learning options mean that you can usually study part time or full time. Some courses can be studied fully online from home or work, others are campus-based.
3. Choice of campuses – we have campuses across the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. Each campus is different from rich cultural life of the islands; the spectacular coasts and mountains; to the bright lights of our city locations.
4. Small class sizes mean that you have a more personal experience of university and receive all the support you need from our expert staff
5. The affordable option - if you already live in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland you don't have to leave home and incur huge debts to go to university; we're right here on your doorstep

How to apply

If you want to apply for this postgraduate programme click on the ‘visit website’ button below which will take you to the relevant course page on our website, from there select the Apply tab to complete our online application.
If you still have any questions please get in touch with our information line by email using the links beow or call on 0845 272 3600.

International Students

An exciting and diverse student life awaits our international students. Choose to study in one of the larger urban centres of the region, such as Perth, Inverness or Elgin, or in one of the smaller towns or island communities, including the Western and Northern Isles. http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international

English Language Requirements

Our programmes are taught and examined in English. To make the most of your studies, you must be able to communicate fluently and accurately in spoken and written English and provide certified proof of your competence before starting your course. Please note that English language tests need to have been taken no more than two years prior to the start date of the course. The standard English Language criteria to study at the University of the Highlands and Islands are detailed on our English language requirements page http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international/how-to-apply-to-uhi/english-language-requirements

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Bath Spa has pioneered the teaching of songwriting, and launched the world's first Songwriting Master’s degree in 2007. Its blend of practical, theoretical and scholarly practice is taught by published, practicing songwriters and academics. Read more
Bath Spa has pioneered the teaching of songwriting, and launched the world's first Songwriting Master’s degree in 2007. Its blend of practical, theoretical and scholarly practice is taught by published, practicing songwriters and academics. The course is aimed at unpublished songwriters wishing to develop their craft to a professional level, or published songwriters wishing to achieve academic accreditation whilst continuing their creative development. Based at our postgraduate centre at Corsham Court, and also offered as a distance learning option, the course maintains strong links with industry through publishers, guest artists and guest lecturers, and offers the chance to consolidate and focus your creative output whilst developing a perspective on your work informed by research. You'll study with us on Mmus Songwriting so that you can:

• Comment critically upon your own and others’ material
• Examine the musicological roots of your craft
• Consider the commercial value of your songs in the marketplace
• Rewrite and collaborate
• Conduct academic research
• Develop technical skills
• Create a professional-standard portfolio of your work
• Establish networks, collaborators and contacts

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

The course is available on either a full-time (typically one year) or part- time (typically two year) basis. We also offer a low-residency ‘distance learning’ option that will be open to both UK and overseas applicants. The course aims:

• To enable you to write and record songs to a professional level
• To develop critical awareness relating to your own songs and others'
• To develop your ability to perform/present your songs
• To inform you of historical and musicological developments in songwriting
• To enhance your understanding of the market value ((and artistic value) of your own work
• To provide opportunities for you to discuss current developments in songwriting with songwriters, producers and publishers
• To encourage you to develop re-writing and collaborative songwriting skills
• To help you to develop technical skills relevant to songwriting practice
• To develop your academic writing skills at level 7

MODULES

Songwriting Skills: As an essential component of this module you will engage weekly with a series of preparatory creative writing and compositional exercises designed to supply you with the raw creative material from which to increase your lyrical, harmonic and melodic range. These exercises are technique-based and serve to extend your creative palette and songwriting choices. Tutorial and group-playback support engage real-time with critical feedback and professional advice. Online virtual classroom exercises are supported by instruction videos and examine imagery, metaphor, narrative, rhyme, meter, melody, harmonic construction, narrative perspectives, intertextuality and rhetorical principles.

History of Song: Through this module you will gain a systematic and comprehensive knowledge of strategies and form used in popular songwriting. You will also develop an advanced ability to contextualize your own songs. With reference to popular songs written between 1920 and the present day, a series of lectures examines key developments in the musical, lyrical and structural development of song. The teaching approach is analytical and particular attention is paid to strategies used by songwriters to convey ideas.

Context and Methodology: In this module, visiting professional practitioners deliver master-classes to explore particular ecologies within the songwriting profession. In master-classes and seminars, students explore diverse songwriting contexts such as writing for musical theatre, writing for the charts, writing to pitch-sheets and writing for an original performer. Research methods and postgraduate research methodology skills are then utilised to explore a possible blend of contexts identified by the student as being potential markets for their music. Becoming aware of the modalities and nuances of these cultures is the key to successful songwriting. In preparation for the Major Project portfolio, this module serves to refine your eventual work by investigating the cultural, semiotic, linguistic, musicological, economic and pragmatic structures of your intended song culture. This is a key Level 7 module, with a generic research emphasis designed to prepare the student for further postgraduate and doctoral study.

Collaborative Songwriting: This module aims to develop skills in collaborative songwriting, enabling you to experience a variety of collaborative methods, and to explore the relationship between collaborative process and final song product. Although primarily based around a systematic understanding of the creative process of collaboration, the module also helps students to explore collaborative works in their cultural and economic context, including royalty splits, publishing implications, and issues of shared Intellectual Property between joint creators.

Major Project: This double module represents the culmination of the MMus, and a chance for you to work on a substantial album/portfolio project. The module will be largely student-led, with most of the work centered on individual practice. You will receive tutorial support.

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

Bath Spa’s approach to the teaching of songwriting combines analysis of existing repertoire with a focus on song crafting technique and students are encouraged to develop by writing new songs throughout the course. Lectures, seminars and tutorials combine to offer a range of expert and peer critique that seeks to enable the student to examine original and known works in a range of critical and technical contexts. Students have access to laptop-based recording equipment and the programme has its own dedicated facilities. The curriculum is supported by a Virtual Learning Environment, so course materials can be accessed from any web link.

Recording Facilities - while our studio facilities are designed to enable the capture of high quality recordings, in keeping with contemporary songwriting industry practice it is anticipated that learners will become self-sufficient in the sense that, following completion of the course, they will be able to repeat the core processes of writing, planning and recording without incurring recording studio expenses. To enable mastery of the home recording process, students have access to laptop based ‘notepad’ setups and industry-standard plug-ins (Stylus, MachFive, BFD, Trilogy, Waves etc) throughout their studies.

ASSESSMENT METHODS

Assessment takes the form of individual assignments for each module. Typical assessments include audio CD, presentation, essay, and evaluative account. Assessment is continuous and there are no written exams.

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