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This Distance Learning programme is ideal for engineers and scientists who want to improve the delivery of water and environmental services in low- and middle-income countries. Read more
This Distance Learning programme is ideal for engineers and scientists who want to improve the delivery of water and environmental services in low- and middle-income countries. You will develop knowledge, expertise and skills in many aspects of inclusive and sustainable public health infrastructure and services.

Modules are taught by experts in a broad range of disciplines who have considerable experience of working in low- and middle- income countries. Classes include a mix of nationalities and past experiences, providing both a stimulating learning experience and a valuable future network.

Externally accredited, WEDC programmes are well-established, and held in high regard by practitioners and employers from both the emergency and development sectors.

Key Facts

- Research-led teaching from international experts. 75% of the School’s research was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in the latest Government Research Excellence Framework.

- An outstanding place to study. The School of Civil and Building Engineering is ranked in the UK top 10 in the Guardian Good University Guide.

- A well respected programme. Many of our participants are employed by relief and development agencies.

- Professionally accredited. The Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM) have accredited this programme. Students registered for this programme are eligible for free student membership of CIWEM. The Joint Board of Moderators (JBM) has also accredited all WEDC MSc degrees as meeting requirements for Further Learning.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/water-waste-dl/

Programme modules

Core modules:
- Management of Water and Sanitation
The aim of this module is to introduce the principles, concepts and key issues of managing sustainable water and environmental sanitation services for low-income consumers in developing countries.

- Water and Environmental Sanitation
The aim of this module are for the student to understand the range of suitable technologies for water supply and engineering management of liquid and solid wastes in low- and middle-income countries.

- Data Collection, Analysis and Research
The aims of this module are to introduce the principles and approaches for doing research and studies on infrastructure and services in low- and middle-income countries and to prepare students to undertake the research dissertation module.

- Case Study
The aims of this module are to give participants a basic understanding of a complete project cycle for infrastructure and services; and to consolidate and integrate material contained in earlier modules.

- Research Dissertation
The aim of this module is to provide the student with experience of the process and methodology of research by defining and studying (on an individual basis) a complex problem in a specialised area relating to their degree.

Optional Modules (choose 4):
- Wastewater Treatment
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the various stages, and unit operation and process options, for treatment of wastewaters, particularly in low- and middle-income countries; and to understand the principles for planning and design of wastewater treatment facilities, particularly in low- and middle-income countries.

- Urban Infrastructure
The aim of this module is for the student to understand the key issues in the planning and conceptual design of infrastructure improvements for low income urban communities.

- Water for Low-Income Communities
The aim of this module is for the student to understand important aspects of the design, construction, operation and maintenance of small water supplies for low-income communities.

- Integrated Water Resources Management
The aim of this module is for participants to understand the concepts used in integrated planning and management of water resources in low and middle-income countries.

- Solid Waste Management
The aim of this module is to introduce participants with available and possible options in solid waste management for low and middle income countries. To make participants familiar with the key issues for low income countries.

- Low-Cost Sanitation
The aim of this module is to increase the student's knowledge of all aspects of low-cost human excreta disposal.

- Water Utilities Management
The aim of this module is to better enable participants to plan for and manage urban water and sanitation services in developing countries.

Facilities

Distance Learning students study from home but are welcome to visit the Loughborough campus. They can make remote use of the University Library’s electronic search facilities. They can also remotely access the WEDC ‘Knowledge Base’, which has links to many sources of useful and relevant information.

Facilities on campus include our laboratory which houses equipment for field sampling and analysis of water and wastewater, and some of the largest hydraulics equipment in the UK. Although Distance Learners will not normally have access to this equipment they can ask the advice of laboratory staff if they are carrying out fieldwork as part of their dissertation.

How you will learn

Distance Learning students study from home but are welcome to visit the Loughborough campus. They can make remote use of the University Library’s electronic search facilities. They can also remotely access the WEDC ‘Knowledge Base’, which has links to many sources of useful and relevant information.

The programme comprises both compulsory core modules, and optional modules which may be selected. The Case Study module draws together material from across the programme. A research dissertation between 75 and 150 pages long on a chosen topic relevant to interests or career development concludes the programme. Many of the Distance Learning modules have web-based discussion forums, where Distance Learners can choose to interact with each other and Module Tutors.

The method of delivery for the learning materials is mainly portable and paper-based, to suit students who are living or working in areas of the world with poor internet connectivity, or those who travel frequently. We also arrange some webinars which are recorded for students who are unable to participate.

During the programme students build up an excellent library of well-produced bound module notes, additional resources and relevant text books. In addition to the printed version we are developing and planning to provide e-reader versions of some module notes to enhance portability.

- Assessment
For most modules, students are assessed by two written assessments (three items for core modules). The Case Study module relates to a given scenario for which the student has to produce pre-feasibility and feasibility reports. The individual research dissertation module is assessed on the basis of a written dissertation and an oral when a student discusses their submitted dissertation with their supervisor and a second member of staff. For students who cannot visit the UK this oral takes place over Skype.

Careers and further study

NGOs (MSF, Oxfam, SCF, GOAL, WaterAid, etc.) and agencies (such as UNICEF), or National Governments. Distance Learning students already working in these sectors find their new skills to be directly relevant and readily applicable to their jobs.
Graduate job titles include Sanitation Technical Manager, Water and Sanitation Consultant, Project Manager, Technical Adviser, Environmental Engineering Consultant and Civil Engineering Specialist

Scholarships

On occasion we offer specific full-fee and partial-fee scholarships for distance learning applicants.

Why choose civil engineering at Loughborough?

As one of four Royal Academy of Engineering designated Centres of Excellence in Sustainable Building Design, the School of Civil and Building Engineering is one of the largest of its type in the UK and holds together a thriving community of over 60 academic staff, 40 technical and clerical support staff and over 240 active researchers that include Fellows, Associates, Assistants, Engineers and Doctoral Students.

Our world-class teaching and research are integrated to support the technical and commercial needs of both industry and society. A key part of our ethos is our extensive links with industry resulting in our graduates being extremely sought after by industry and commerce world-wide,

- Postgraduate programmes
The School offers a focussed suite of post graduate programmes aligned to meet the needs of industry and fully accredited by the relevant professional institutions. Consequently, our record of graduate employment is second to none. Our programmes also have a long track record of delivering high quality, research-led education. Indeed, some of our programmes have been responding to the needs of industry and producing high quality graduates for over 40 years.

Currently, our suite of Masters programmes seeks to draw upon our cutting edge research and broad base knowledge of within the areas of contemporary construction management, project management, infrastructure management, building engineering, building modelling, building energy demand and waste and water engineering. The programmes are designed to respond to contemporary issues in the field such as sustainable construction, low carbon building, low energy services, project complexity, socio-technical systems and socio-economic concerns.

- Research
Drawing from our excellent record in attracting research funds (currently standing at over £19M), the focal point of the School is innovative, industry-relevant research. This continues to nurture and refresh our long history of working closely with industrial partners on novel collaborative research and informs our ongoing innovative teaching and extensive enterprise activities. This is further complemented by our outstanding record of doctoral supervision which has provided, on average, a PhD graduate from the School every two weeks.

- Career Prospects
Independent surveys continue to show that industry has the highest regard for our graduates. Over 90% were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. Recent independent surveys of major employers have also consistently rated the School at the top nationally for civil engineering and construction graduates.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/water-waste-dl/

Read less
This Distance Learning programme is ideal for engineers and scientists who want to improve the delivery of water and environmental services in low- and middle-income countries. Read more
This Distance Learning programme is ideal for engineers and scientists who want to improve the delivery of water and environmental services in low- and middle-income countries. You will develop knowledge, expertise and skills in many aspects of water, sanitation and environmental management. The programme focuses on the conditions and aspirations of communities in low- and middle-income countries.

Modules are delivered by experts in a broad range of disciplines who have considerable experience of working in low- and middle- income countries. Participants have a mix of nationalities and past experiences, providing opportunities for learning from them and development of a valuable future network.

Externally accredited, WEDC programmes are well-established, and held in high regard by practitioners and employers from both the emergency and development sectors.

Key Facts

- Research-led teaching from international experts. 75% of the School’s research was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in the latest Government Research Excellence Framework.

- An outstanding place to study. The School of Civil and Building Engineering is ranked in the UK top 10 in the Guardian Good University Guide.

- Excellent graduate prospects. Many of our participants are employed by relief and development agencies.

- Professionally accredited. The Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM) have accredited this programme. Students registered for this programme are eligible for free student membership of CIWEM. The Joint Board of Moderators (JBM) has also accredited all WEDC MSc degrees as meeting requirements for Further Learning.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/water-environmental-management-dl/

Programme modules

Core modules:
- Management of Water and Sanitation
The aim of this module is to introduce the principles, concepts and key issues of managing sustainable water and environmental sanitation services for low-income consumers in developing countries.

- Water and Environmental Sanitation
The aim of this module is for participants to understand the range of suitable technologies for water supply and engineering management of liquid and solid wastes in low- and middle-income countries.

- Data Collection, Analysis and Research
The aims of this module are to introduce the principles and approaches for doing research and studies on infrastructure and services in low- and middle-income countries and to prepare students to undertake the research dissertation module.

- Environmental Assessment
The aim of this module is for participants to develop a broad understanding of both the needs for and the mechanisms of environmental assessment and management, with emphasis on aquatic environments, in low and middle-income countries.

- Integrated Water Resources Management
The aim of this module is for participants to understand the concepts used in integrated planning and management of water resources in low and middle-income countries.

- Case Study
The aims of this module are to give participants a basic understanding of a complete project cycle for infrastucture and services; and to consolidate and integrate material contained in earlier modules.

- Research Dissertation
The aim of this module is to provide the student with experience of the process and methodology of research by defining and studying (on an individual basis) a complex problem in a specialised area relating to their degree.

Optional Modules (choose 2):
- Wastewater Treatment
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the various stages, and unit operation and process options, for treatment of wastewaters, particularly in low- and middle-income countries.

- Water for Low-income Communities
The aim of this module is for the student to understand important aspects of the design, construction, operation and maintenance of small water supplies for low-income communities.

- Solid Waste Management
The aim of this module is to introduce participants with available and possible options in solid waste management for low and middle income countries. To make participants familiar with the key issues for low income countries.

- Low-cost Sanitation
The aim of this module is to increase the student's knowledge of all aspects of low-cost human excreta disposal.

- Water Utilities Management
The aim of this module is to better enable participants to plan for and manage urban water and sanitation services in developing countries.

Facilities

Distance Learning students study from home but are welcome to visit the Loughborough campus. They can make remote use of the University Library’s electronic search facilities. They can also remotely access the WEDC ‘Knowledge Base’, which has links to many sources of useful and relevant information.

Facilities on campus include our laboratory which houses equipment for field sampling and analysis of water and wastewater, and some of the largest hydraulics equipment in the UK. Although Distance Learners will not normally have access to this equipment they can ask the advice of laboratory staff if they are carrying out fieldwork as part of their dissertation.

How you will learn

Distance Learning students study from home but are welcome to visit the Loughborough campus. They can make remote use of the University Library’s electronic search facilities and the WEDC ‘Knowledge Base’, which has links to many sources of useful and relevant information.

The programme comprises both compulsory core modules, and optional modules which may be selected. The Case Study module draws together material from across the programme. A research dissertation between 75 and 150 pages long on a chosen topic relevant to interests or career development concludes the programme. Many of the Distance Learning modules have web-based discussion forums, where Distance Learners can choose to interact with each other and Module Tutors.

The method of delivery for the learning materials is mainly portable and paper-based, to suit students who are living or working in areas of the world with poor internet connectivity, or those who travel frequently. We also arrange some webinars which are recorded for students who are unable to participate.

During the programme students build up an excellent library of well-produced bound module notes, additional resources and relevant text books. In addition to the printed version we are developing and planning to provide e-reader versions of some module notes to enhance portability.

- Assessment
For most modules, students are assessed by two written assessments (three items for core modules). The Case Study module relates to a given scenario for which the student has to produce pre-feasibility and feasibility reports. The individual research dissertation module is assessed on the basis of a written dissertation and an oral when a student discusses their submitted dissertation with their supervisor and a second member of staff. For students who cannot visit the UK this oral takes place over Skype.

Careers and further study

Many WEDC students and alumni work for international NGOs (MSF, Oxfam, SCF, GOAL, WaterAid, etc.) and agencies (such as UNICEF), or National Governments. Distance Learning students already working in these sectors find their new skills to be directly relevant and readily applicable to their jobs.
Graduate job titles include Technical Manager, Programme Engineer, Water and Sanitation Consultant, Project Manager, Environmental Health Officer and WASH Coordinator.

Scholarships

On occasion we offer specific full-fee and partial-fee scholarships for Distance Learning applicants.

Why choose civil engineering at Loughborough?

As one of four Royal Academy of Engineering designated Centres of Excellence in Sustainable Building Design, the School of Civil and Building Engineering is one of the largest of its type in the UK and holds together a thriving community of over 60 academic staff, 40 technical and clerical support staff and over 240 active researchers that include Fellows, Associates, Assistants, Engineers and Doctoral Students.

Our world-class teaching and research are integrated to support the technical and commercial needs of both industry and society. A key part of our ethos is our extensive links with industry resulting in our graduates being extremely sought after by industry and commerce world-wide,

- Postgraduate programmes
The School offers a focussed suite of post graduate programmes aligned to meet the needs of industry and fully accredited by the relevant professional institutions. Consequently, our record of graduate employment is second to none. Our programmes also have a long track record of delivering high quality, research-led education. Indeed, some of our programmes have been responding to the needs of industry and producing high quality graduates for over 40 years.

Currently, our suite of Masters programmes seeks to draw upon our cutting edge research and broad base knowledge of within the areas of contemporary construction management, project management, infrastructure management, building engineering, building modelling, building energy demand and waste and water engineering. The programmes are designed to respond to contemporary issues in the field such as sustainable construction, low carbon building, low energy services, project complexity, socio-technical systems and socio-economic concerns.

- Research
Drawing from our excellent record in attracting research funds (currently standing at over £19M), the focal point of the School is innovative, industry-relevant research. This continues to nurture and refresh our long history of working closely with industrial partners on novel collaborative research and informs our ongoing innovative teaching and extensive enterprise activities. This is further complemented by our outstanding record of doctoral supervision which has provided, on average, a PhD graduate from the School every two weeks.

- Career Prospects
Independent surveys continue to show that industry has the highest regard for our graduates. Over 90% were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. Recent independent surveys of major employers have also consistently rated the School at the top nationally for civil engineering and construction graduates.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/water-environmental-management-dl/

Read less
Communities have a key role to play in the development of a low carbon society. Are you keen to discover more about how renewable and low-carbon energy production can play a central role in community development? Do you want to be at the centre of and lead these developments?. Read more
Communities have a key role to play in the development of a low carbon society. Are you keen to discover more about how renewable and low-carbon energy production can play a central role in community development? Do you want to be at the centre of and lead these developments?

This Developing Low-Carbon Communities course will enable you to do exactly that and, taught by recognised experts, you can be confident you will graduate armed with the most up-to-date information and highest quality skills.

Studying online, on a full-time or part-time basis, you will critically analyse the theories, principles and concepts of renewable energy, carbon budgeting and community development.

Special Features

• A limited number of funded places are available for full-time, Scottish or EU fee status students.
• Loans for tuition fees are available from the Students Award Agency for Scotland (SAAS) for eligible Scotland domiciled and EU students, and loans for living costs for eligible Scottish students.
• Modules are led by recognised experts in the field of community development and low carbon technologies
• You will study by way of online distance learning, full time or part time, which means you can fit your studies around your professional and personal life
• You can study individual modules for personal or professional development (CPD), or work towards the PgCert, PgDip, or full Masters degree

Modules

PgCert

Core modules are: Sustainable development; Transition to a low carbon society; Renewable energy technologies

PgDip

Option modules, from which you will choose three, include: Energy, climate and carbon; Participatory approaches to community consultation; Developing a community energy project; Local economic development; Developing communities; Research methods (strongly recommended to continue to MSc)

Option modules available subject to previous qualification/experience: Energy modelling for buildings; Tidal, wind and future energy

MSc

To achieve the award of MSc Developing Low-Carbon Communities you must complete the PgDip and a research dissertation.

Locations

This course is available at North Highland College UHI, Ormlie Road, Thurso, KW14 7EE

Start Dates

Part-time students can start at variable times throughout the year. Please use the apply link for applications for January, for more information on other start dates please contact North Highland College UHI.

Access routes

BSc (Hons) Environmental Sciences
BSc (Hons) Sustainable Rural Development
BSc (Hons) Archaeology and Environmental Studies
BEng (Hons) Energy Engineering

Funding

The University of the Highlands and Islands is pleased to offer a limited number of places with full tuition fee support for Scottish-domiciled/EU students, studying full time, on this course starting in September 2017 to help talented students join this key growth sector for the Scottish economy. Fees will be funded by the European Social Fund and Scottish Funding Council as part of Developing Scotland’s Workforce in the Scotland 2014-2020 European Structural and Investment Fund Programmes.
See https://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/first-steps/how-much-will-it-cost/funding-your-studies/funded-postgraduate-places/

From 2017, eligible Scotland domiciled students studying full time can access loans up to 10,000 from the Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS).This comprises a tuition fee loan up to £5,500 and a non-income assessed living cost loan of £4,500. EU students studying full time can apply for a tuition fee loan up to £5500.

Part-time students undertaking any taught postgraduate course over two years up to Masters level who meet the residency eligibility can apply for a for a tuition fee loan up to £2,750 per year.

See Scholarships tab below for full details

Top five reasons to study at UHI

1. Do something different: our reputation is built on our innovative approach to learning and our distinctive research and curriculum which often reflects the unique environment and culture of our region and closely links to vocational skills required by a range of sectors.
2. Flexible learning options mean that you can usually study part time or full time. Some courses can be studied fully online from home or work, others are campus-based.
3. Choice of campuses – we have campuses across the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. Each campus is different from rich cultural life of the islands; the spectacular coasts and mountains; to the bright lights of our city locations.
4. Small class sizes mean that you have a more personal experience of university and receive all the support you need from our expert staff
5. The affordable option - if you already live in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland you don't have to leave home and incur huge debts to go to university; we're right here on your doorstep

How to apply

If you want to apply for this postgraduate programme click on the ‘visit website’ button below which will take you to the relevant course page on our website, from there select the Apply tab to complete our online application.
If you still have any questions please get in touch with our information line by email using the links beow or call on 0845 272 3600.

International Students

If you would like to study in a country of outstanding natural beauty, friendly communities, and cities buzzing with social life and activities, the Highlands and Islands of Scotland should be your first choice. We have campuses across the region each one with its own special characteristics from the rich cultural life of the islands to the bright city lights of Perth and Inverness. Some courses are available in one location only, for others you will have a choice; we also have courses that can be studied online from your own home country. .http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international

English Language Requirements

Our programmes are taught and examined in English. To make the most of your studies, you must be able to communicate fluently and accurately in spoken and written English and provide certified proof of your competence before starting your course. Please note that English language tests need to have been taken no more than two years prior to the start date of the course. The standard English Language criteria to study at the University of the Highlands and Islands are detailed on our English language requirements page http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international/how-to-apply-to-uhi/english-language-requirements

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This course will enhance your understanding of international development, cross-cultural communication, entrepreneurship and education. Read more
This course will enhance your understanding of international development, cross-cultural communication, entrepreneurship and education. You will develop an awareness of the role of government and markets in education. You will also explore the links between communication, culture and cultural identification.

Our course will appeal to anyone concerned about development issues, government policy and the reduction of poverty using entrepreneurial ideas. You'll develop your understanding of:
-How cultures and human behaviour reflexively interconnect
-School provision in developing countries
-The behaviours of key players in international development
-Developments in education provision relating to the interactions of entrepreneurs, governments and international agencies
-Philosophical and historical debates on the role of government and markets in education

Our teaching is informed by research conducted by the:
-EG West Centre
-SOLE Central
-North Leadership Centre
-Research Centre for Learning and Teaching

The EG West Centre is the world's leading authority on the advancement of affordable private schools serving low income communities across the developing world. Research has focused on post conflict countries such as South Sudan, Liberia and Sierra Leone. It has also explored the growth and expansion of low cost private school chains in countries around the world.

Over the last decade, Professor James Tooley has conducted extensive research across the globe. This has documented the enormous potential of private schools. It showed that how they can serve the educational needs of the poor had been neglected and underestimated.

A key focus of the centre is Professor Sugata Mitra's research. This explores the potential of self organised learning in communities around the world. His earlier work includes the Hole in the Wall experiments. These experiments involved children with access to shared digital resources. It showed that with such access, they can learn to use computers and the internet. Furthermore, they can learn much more than what we thought possible without adult supervision.

Placements

Our two to four week placement module offers an exciting opportunity to visit a developing country. This self-funded visit will provide you with an invaluable experience. It will also bring issues learnt on the course to life.

You can choose to visit Omega Schools in Ghana or schools across India. The schools in India are taking part in Sugata Mitra's TED Prize 'Schools in the Cloud' project.

Alternatively, you can take the placement in the UK, across Europe, or in your country of origin. This requires the approval of the Degree Programme Director.

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Modern aircraft are a complex combination of aerodynamic performance, lightweight durable structures and advanced systems engineering. Read more
Modern aircraft are a complex combination of aerodynamic performance, lightweight durable structures and advanced systems engineering. Air passengers demand more comfort and more environmentally friendly aircraft. Hence many technical challenges need to be balanced for an aircraft to economically achieve its design specification. This course trains engineers to meet these challenges, and prepares them for careers in civil and military aviation.

Aircraft Design is an option for the MSc Aerospace Vehicle Design. Aircraft Design aims to provide a comprehensive overview of aircraft performance, structures and systems. A holistic teaching approach is taken to explore how the individual elements of an aircraft can be designed and integrated using up-to-date methods and techniques. You will learn to understand how to select specific systems such as fuel systems, and their effect on the aircraft as a whole.

This course is suitable for students with a background in aeronautical or mechanical engineering or those with relevant industrial experience, and prepares graduates for careers as project design engineers, systems design, structural design or avionic engineers in aerospace or related industries, with the aim of progressing to technical management/chief engineer.

Course overview

The Aircraft Design option consists of a taught component, a group design project and an individual research project.

In addition to management, communication, team work and research skills, each student will attain at least the following outcomes from this degree course:

To build upon knowledge to enable students to enter a wide range of aerospace and related activities concerned with the design of flying vehicles such as aircraft, missiles, airships and spacecraft.
To ensure that the student is of immediate use to their employer and has sufficient breadth of understanding of multi-discipline design to position them for accelerated career progression.
To provide teaching that integrates the range of disciplines required by modern aircraft design.
To provide the opportunity for students to be immersed in a 'Virtual Industrial Environment' giving them hands-on experience of interacting with and working on an aircraft design project.

Group project

The extensive group design project is a distinctive and unique feature of this course. This teamwork project takes place from October to March, and recreates a virtual industrial environment bringing together students with various experience levels and different nationalities into one integrated design team.

Each team member is given responsibility for the detailed design of a significant part of the aircraft, for example, forward fuselage, fuel system, or navigation system. The project will progress from the conceptual phase through to the preliminary and detail design phases. You will be required to run project meetings, produce engineering drawings and detailed analyses of your design. Problem solving and project coordination must be undertaken on a team and individual basis. At the end of the project, groups are required to report and present findings to a panel of 200 senior engineers from industry.

This element of the course is both realistic and engaging, and places the student group in a professional role as aerospace design engineers. Students testify that working as an integrated team on real problems is invaluable and prepares them well for careers in a highly competitive industry.

Watch past presentation videos to give you a taster of our innovative and exciting group projects (YouTube)

Blended Wing Body Aircraft
A9 Dragonfly Box Wing Aircraft
MRT7 Tanker Aircraft
A-13 Voyager
SL-12 Vimana

Individual Project

The individual research project aims to provide the training necessary for you to apply knowledge from the taught element to research, and takes place from March to September. The project may be theoretical and/or experimental and drawn from a range of topics related to the course and suggested by teaching staff, your employer or focused on your own area of interest.

Recent Individual Research Projects include:

Ultra Long Range Science UAV Structure / Systems Development
Conceptual Design of a Hypersonic Space Launcher and Global Transportation System
Effect of Aerodynamics on the Conceptual Design of Blended Wing Body Aircraft
Review, Evaluation and Development of a Microlight Aircraft
Feasibility of the Application of Low Cost Scaled Aircraft Demonstrators.

Assessment

The taught modules (10%) are assessed by an examination and/or assignment. The Group Project (50%) is assessed by a written technical report and oral presentations. The Individual Research Project (40%) forms the remainder of the course.

Career opportunities

The MSc in Aircraft Design is valued and respected by employers worldwide. The applied nature of this course ensures that our graduates are ready to be of immediate use to their future employer and has provided sufficient breadth of understanding of multi-discipline design to position them for accelerated career progression.

This course prepares graduates for careers as project design engineers, systems design, structural design or avionic engineers in aerospace or related industries, with the aim of progressing to technical management/chief engineer. Graduates from the MSc in Aircraft Design can therefore look forward to a varied choice of challenging career opportunities in the above disciplines.

Many of our graduates occupy very senior positions in their organisations, making valuable contributions to the international aerospace industry. Typical student destinations include BAE Systems, Airbus, Dassault and Rolls-Royce.

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Study petroleum geophysics in Thailand and benefit from modern training by leading international researchers and industry specialists at Chiang Mai University in a newly renovated and equipped facility. Read more
Study petroleum geophysics in Thailand and benefit from modern training by leading international researchers and industry specialists at Chiang Mai University in a newly renovated and equipped facility. The courses will be taught in English.

The Department of Geological Sciences, sponsored by Thailand's major oil company PTT Exploration and Production provides a one year four months full time Petroleum Geophysics MSc. for international students.

The course is designed for students with English as a second language, and provides instruction for improving English, and as well as extra time from the usual 1 year course to help accommodate the difficulties of learning in a second language. Few scholarships are available.
The course runs from 14th August through to December (16 month period), and is offered annually. There is 1 year of class work given in 4 week modules, a geological fieldtrip, and a 4 months research project.
http://www.petroleumgeophysicscmu.com/

Scholarships

We would also be willing to help students meeting the Program and SEAPEX requirements to apply for a Dick Murphy Scholarship. Please find more details from the following link:
http://www.seapex.org/dick-murphy-scholarship

Further Information

The course is offered annually. It benefits from close links with the petroleum industry, including donation of software, data examples for coursework, and the provision of scholarships.
Open to international students.
Teaching medium – English

Deadline for application: 31st March 2017

Application

Application forms and details on how to apply can be obtained online at:
http://www.petroleumgeophysicscmu.com/
Or by contacting Dr. Christopher K. Morley at

About living in Chiang Mai and northern Thailand

‌•Well known tourist destination, (24th on Trip advisors 25 world best destinations).
‌•Old Medieval city walls.
‌•Relatively small but cosmopolitan city.
‌•Beautiful hills – many outdoor activities.
‌•Cool climate in winter.
‌•Many shopping malls, including two large new malls completed in the vicinity of the University.
‌•Very diverse range of food available in supermarkets and restaurants,
‌•Including all kinds of regional Thai food, halal food, Vietnamese, Western, Chinese, Indian, Myanmar, Mexican.
‌•Low cost of living.
‌•Lodging ~ 3,000-6,000 baht month, (100-200 USD)
‌•University international students building ~6,000 baht month (possibility to split cost by sharing room).
‌•Electric vehicles run by the university, and covered pick-ups (Song Taews) provide cheap transport around the university and off campus, ‌•Uber taxi service, private transport such as Tuk Tuks is also available. Much of the private accommodation offered for university students is within about 15 min walk of Department of Geological Sciences.
Please find more information from the following link:
http://www.petroleumgeophysicscmu.com/life-in-chaing-mai.html

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The Biotechnology MSc within the Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences (IBERS) provides you with key skills, specialist knowledge and essential training for a career in industrial or academic bioscience. Read more

Overview

The Biotechnology MSc within the Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences (IBERS) provides you with key skills, specialist knowledge and essential training for a career in industrial or academic bioscience. Increasingly, biotechnology companies are recruiting Master’s students with specialised skills to perform jobs previously the reserve of Doctorate level scientists https://www.sciencemag.org/careers/features/2012/01/wanted-bs-and-ms-scientists-life-sciences-industries.

At the end of the course you will be able to meet the challenges of biotechnology, demonstrate critical thinking and solve problems, exploit opportunities, and know how ideas can be turned into viable businesses or a successful grant application.

Why study Biotechnology at IBERS?

• You want specialist experience and knowledge in biotechnology research and commercial application to give you a competitive edge in the job market and underpin your successful career.
• IBERS has the credentials to deliver these goals.
• With 360 members of staff, 1350 undergraduate students and more than 150 postgraduate students IBERS is the largest Institute within Aberystwyth University, and we regard teaching as particularly important to our mission https://youtu.be/gU5Kd-vlglQ. Our excellence in teaching was recognised by outstanding scores in the National Student Satisfaction Survey 2016 https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/ibers/ug-study/ugrad-courses/nss/, with three courses recording 100% student satisfaction and a further 10 scoring above the national average. The latest employability data shows that 92% of IBERS graduates were in work or further study six months after leaving Aberystwyth University.
• IBERS is internationally-recognised for research excellence and works to provide solutions to global challenges such as food security, sustainable bioenergy, and the impacts of climate change. IBERS hosts 2 National bioscience facilities: The National Plant Phenomics Centre https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8qBsVP0j70k&feature=youtu.be is a state of the art automated plant growth facility that allows the high throughput evaluation of growth and morphology in defined environments, and the BEACON Centre of Excellence for Biorefining http://www.beaconwales.org/ is a £20 million partnership between Aberystwyth, Bangor and Swansea Universities set up to help Welsh businesses develop new ways of converting biomass feedstocks and waste streams into products for the pharmaceutical, chemicals, fuel and cosmetic industries.
• IBERS has a track record of working with academic and industrial partners to develop and translate innovative bioscience research into solutions that help mitigate the impacts of climate change, animal and plant disease, and deliver renewable energy and food and water security. The economic and social impact of IBERS research was recognised in 2011when the institute won the national BBSRC Excellence with Impact.

Course Content

In the first 2 semesters the course focuses on 2 key areas of biotechnology: industrial fermentation (manufacturing processes, feedstock pretreatment, fermentation, and the biorefining of low cost feedstocks to high value products) and plant biotechnology (synthetic biology, gene editing, precision genome modification, transformation technologies, up and down gene regulation and silencing, and gene stacking). In addition you will receive practical training in state of the art molecular and analytical bioscience techniques and technologies, you will learn of marine, food and health biotechnology, and sustainable use of bio-resources and bioscience to help meet the needs of an ever growing human population. All course modules are delivered by academics and professional practitioners at the forefront of activity in the field.
In the final semester you will work on your own research project with your dissertation supervisor. This could be a project of your own design and will focus on an aspect of biotechnology that you found particularly interesting; it may even be something that you want to develop as a business idea in the future. During your dissertation project you will use the knowledge and the skills that you gained during the first 2 semesters. Your dissertation project will give you an opportunity to become an expert in your topic and to develop research skills that will prepare you for your future career in biotechnology. Your tutor will mentor you in hypothesis driven experimental design, train you in analytical techniques e.g. gas and liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, vibrational spectroscopy, fermentation, product isolation, biomass processing, the analysis of complex experimental data, and the formation of robust conclusions. You will also be guided in writing your dissertation.

Examples of past dissertation topics

1. Optimisation of ethanol production, xylose utilisation and growth of Candida shehatae 661 on absorbent hygiene product sourced cellulosic material using Taguchi methodology
2. Bioactive compounds in invasive species
3. Designing a system for industrial production of recombinant protein using grass juice as a fermentation medium

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A Message from the Graduate Coordinator. The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Windsor offers an excellent environment for the pursuit of a graduate education. Read more
A Message from the Graduate Coordinator

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Windsor offers an excellent environment for the pursuit of a graduate education. Our Department is enthusiastic, friendly, cooperative and rejuvenated. Of our 23 faculty, nine have been hired since 2000 to complement the established faculty. As summarised in this brochure, our Department has research groups active in all of the traditional areas of Chemistry and Biochemistry and we have also recently formed several new multi-disciplinary research programmes, including The Centre for Catalysis and Materials Research (CCMR) and The Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research (GLIER). We invite you to join our exciting and growing department.

In addition to our people, the Department’s state-of-the-art equipment and completely renovated laboratories provide us with research facilities that are comparable to, or even exceed, those found in the Chemistry Departments of much larger universities. In addition to a complete array of spectrometers and other standard synthetic and characterisation equipment, we have many instruments that are not typically available in a single department. To give only a few notable examples: we have two CCD-equipped X-ray diffractometers; solid-state NMR facilities; an AFM imaging system; Raman and IR microscopes; a fluorescence imaging system; and much more! Furthermore, our geographic location puts us in close proximity to Wayne State University and other large American research universities such as the University of Michigan and Michigan State University. This situation allows the members of our Department convenient access to the other institutions’ facilities, conferences, and visiting speakers.

The greater Windsor region has a highly-diverse population of around 325,000 people. The city boasts dozens of excellent and unique restaurants, a thriving night-life, numerous festivals and events on the waterfront, and a variety of parks and outdoor recreation areas. Windsor has a remarkably low cost of living and has one of warmest climates in the country. In addition, our proximity to the Detroit metropolitan area (pop. ca. 5 million) and the United States provides us with numerous unique advantages over other cities in southern Ontario. For example, one can conveniently attend professional sporting events, major concerts, world-class art galleries, and numerous other attractions that are all located less than one hour drive from the University of Windsor. Furthermore, the Detroit International Airport has flights around the globe and provides us with an often less expensive alternative to flying via Toronto. Overall, Windsor has the benefits of a major metropolis combined with the advantages of a smaller city.

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Cloud computing offers scalable computing resources on demand, providing solutions and challenges for science and business. Amongst others, the opportunities include a low cost entry point for small companies, more economical use of computing resources and the capability of handling very large data sets. Read more
Cloud computing offers scalable computing resources on demand, providing solutions and challenges for science and business. Amongst others, the opportunities include a low cost entry point for small companies, more economical use of computing resources and the capability of handling very large data sets. Challenges for practitioners include the design and use of suitable algorithms, the design and implementation of suitable architectures and understanding of risks and opportunities. This MSc will provide a sound understanding of designing, analysing and engineering of systems for handling big data in a distributed environment based on dynamically scalable architectures.

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This course provides education and training in selected weapons systems. The course is intended for officers of the armed forces and for scientists and technical officers in government defence establishments and the defence industry. Read more

Course Description

This course provides education and training in selected weapons systems. The course is intended for officers of the armed forces and for scientists and technical officers in government defence establishments and the defence industry. It is particularly suitable for those who, in their subsequent careers, will be involved with the specification, analysis, development, technical management or operation of weapons systems.

The course is accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers and will contribute towards an application for chartered status.

Overview

The Gun System Design MSc is part of the Vehicle and Weapons Engineering Programme. The course is designed to provide an understanding of the technologies used in the design, development, test and evaluation of gun systems.

This course offers the underpinning knowledge and education to enhance the student’s suitability for senior positions within their organisation.

Each individual module is designed and offered as a standalone course which allows an individual to understand the fundamental technology required to efficiently perform the relevant, specific job responsibilities. The course provides students with the depth of knowledge to undertake engineering analysis or the evaluation of relevant sub systems.

Duration: Full-time MSc - one year, Part-time MSc - up to three years, Full-time PgCert - one year, Part-time PgCert - two years, Full-time PgDip - one year, Part-time PgDip - two years

English Language Requirements

If you are an international student you will need to provide evidence that you have achieved a satisfactory test result in an English qualification. The minimum standard expected from a number of accepted courses are as follows:

IELTS - 6.5
TOEFL - 92
Pearson PTE Academic - 65
Cambridge English Scale - 180
Cambridge English: Advanced - C
Cambridge English: Proficiency - C

In addition to these minimum scores you are also expected to achieve a balanced score across all elements of the test. We reserve the right to reject any test score if any one element of the test score is too low.

We can only accept tests taken within two years of your registration date (with the exception of Cambridge English tests which have no expiry date).

Course overview

This MSc course is made up of two essential components, the equivalent of 12 taught modules (including some double modules, typically of a two-week duration), and an individual project.

Modules

MSc and PGDip students take 11 compulsory modules and 1 optional module.
PGCert students take 4 compulsory modules and 2 optional modules.

Core:
- Element Design
- Fundamentals of Ballistics
- Finite Element Methods in Engineering
- Gun System Design
- Light Weapon Design
- Military Vehicle Propulsion and Dynamics
- Modelling, Simulation and Control
- Solid Modelling CAD
- Survivability
- Vehicle Systems Integration

Optional:
- Guided Weapons
- Military Vehicle Dynamics
- Reliability and System Effectiveness
- Uninhabited Military Vehicle Systems

Individual Project

In addition to the taught part of the course, students can opt either to undertake an individual project or participate in a group design project. The aim of the project phase is to enable students to develop expertise in engineering research, design or development. The project phase requires a thesis to be submitted and is worth 80 credit points.

Examples of recent titles are given below.
- Use of Vibration Absorber to help in Vibration
- Validated Model of Unmanned Ground Vehicle Power Usage
- Effect of Ceramic Tile Spacing in Lightweight Armour systems
- Investigation of Suspension System for Main Battle Tank
- An Experimental and Theoretical Investigation into a Pivot Adjustable Suspension System as a Low Cost Method of Adjusting for Payload
- Analysis of Amphibious Operation and Waterjet Propulsions for Infantry Combat Vehicle.
- Design of the Light Weapon System
- Analysis of the Off-road Performance of a Wheeled or Tracked Vehicle

Group Project

- Armoured Fighting Vehicle and Weapon Systems Study
To develop the technical requirements and characteristics of armoured fighting vehicles and weapon systems, and to examine the interactions between the various sub-systems and consequential compromises and trade-offs.

Syllabus/curriculum:
- Application of systems engineering practice to an armoured fighting vehicle and weapon system.
- Practical aspects of system integration.
- Ammunition stowage, handling, replenishment and their effects on crew performance and safety.
- Applications of power, data and video bus technology to next generation armoured fighting vehicles.
- Effects of nuclear, biological and chemical attack on personnel and vehicles, and their survivability.

- Intended learning outcomes
On successful completion of the group project the students should be able to –
- Demonstrate an understanding of the engineering principles involved in matching elements of the vehicle and weapon system together.
- Propose concepts for vehicle and weapon systems, taking into account incomplete and possibly conflicting user requirements.
- Effectively apply Solid Modelling in outlining proposed solutions.
- Interpret relevant legislation and standards and understand their relevance to vehicle and weapon systems.
- Work effectively in a team, communicate and make decisions.
- Report the outcome of a design study orally to a critical audience.

Assessment

Continuous assessment, examinations and thesis (MSc only). Approximately 30% of the assessment is by examination.

Career opportunities

Many previous students have returned to their sponsor organisations to take up senior programme appointments and equivalent research and development roles in this technical area.

For further information

On this course, please visit our course webpage - https://www.cranfield.ac.uk/Courses/Masters/Gun-Systems-Design

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This course provides education and training in military vehicle systems. The course is intended for officers of the armed forces and for scientists and technical officers in government defence establishments and the defence industry. Read more

Course Description

This course provides education and training in military vehicle systems. The course is intended for officers of the armed forces and for scientists and technical officers in government defence establishments and the defence industry. It is particularly suitable for those who, in their subsequent careers, will be involved with the specification, analysis, development, technical management or operation of military vehicles.

It will provide students with the technical knowledge and understanding of weapon systems and military vehicles to make them effective in their specification, design, development and assessment.

The course is accredited by the Institute of Mechanical Engineers and will contribute towards an application for chartered status.

Course overview

This course is made up of two essential components, the equivalent of 12 taught modules (including some double modules, typically of a two week duration).

In addition to the taught part of the course, students undertake an individual project . The aim of the project phase is to enable students to develop expertise in engineering research, design or development. The project phase requires a thesis to be submitted and is worth 80 credit points.

Earning the appropriate credits can lead to the following academic awards:

- Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) – any combination of modules (building a total of 60 credits).
- Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip) – all modules (120 credits).
- Master of Science (MSc) – all modules (120 credits) plus project (80 credits).

The Military Vehicle Technology MSc is part of the Vehicle and Weapons Engineering Programme. The course is designed to provide an understanding of the technologies used in the design, development, test and evaluation of military vehicle systems. Both armoured and support vehicles are covered within the course.

This course offers the underpinning knowledge and education to enhance the student’s suitability for senior positions within their organisation.

Each individual module is designed and offered as a standalone course which allows an individual to understand the fundamental technology required to efficiently perform the relevant, specific job responsibilities. The course also offers a critical depth to undertake engineering analysis or the evaluation of relevant sub systems.

Individual Project

In addition to the taught part of the course, students undertake an individual project. The aim of the project phase is to enable students to develop expertise in engineering research, design or development. The project phase requires a thesis to be submitted and is worth 80 credit points.

Examples of current titles are given below:

- Use of Vibration Absorber to help in Vibration
- Validated Model of UGV Power Usage
- Effect of Ceramic Tile Spacing in Lightweight Armour systems
- Investigation of Suspension System for Main Battle Tank
- An Experimental and Theoretical Investigation into a Pivot Adjustable Suspension System as a Low Cost Method of Adjusting for Payload
- Analysis of Amphibious Operation and Waterjet Propulsions for Infantry Combat Vehicle.
- Optimisation of the suspension system for a vehicle.
- Analysis of the off-road performance of a wheeled or tracked vehicle.

Modules

Core -

Introductory Studies
Solid Modelling CAD
Finite Element Methods in Engineering
Modelling, Simulation and Control
Weapon System Technology
Survivability
Vehicle Systems Integration
Armoured Fighting Vehicle and Weapon Systems Study
Military Vehicle Dynamics
Military Vehicle Propulsion

Optional -

Fundamentals of Ballistics
Military Vehicle Propulsion and Dynamics
Gun System Design
Element Design
Guided Weapons
Uninhabited Military Vehicle Systems
Reliability and System Effectiveness
Light Weapon Design
Rocket Motors and Propellants

Assessment

Continuous assessment, examinations and thesis (MSc only). Approximately 30% of the assessment is by examination.

Funding

For more information on funding please contact

Career opportunities

Many previous students have returned to their sponsor organisations to take-up senior programme appointments and equivalent research and development roles in this technical area.

Further Information

For further information on this course, please visit our course webpage - http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/courses/masters/military-vehicle-technology.html

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On this MA you will interrogate digital culture as you develop and think through your own projects in our bespoke Centre for Cultural Studies media lab. Read more
On this MA you will interrogate digital culture as you develop and think through your own projects in our bespoke Centre for Cultural Studies media lab. You will undertake research and writing that incorporates contemporary art, software studies, critical theory, philosophy and cultural studies. http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-digital-culture/

Our modes of art, experimentation, work, sociability, politics and economies are changed in tandem with the development of digitality. Many of us are now continuously wired into our networks for fun, at work, and at home. We often find ourselves at the margins of networked relationships where different flows of power form from the residue we leave behind in electronic memories. On one hand we find ourselves policed by the ability to sort large amounts of information on the move, on the other, new spaces grow from technical innovation, experimentation and artistic methods.

Join our MA Digital Culture and help create new insights within these logics. Your writing and projects will be supported in an interdisciplinary environment. You do not necessarily need to have an initial project in mind, nor a technical background, just an enthusiasm for learning and experimentation. Each year we have a very lively mix of students who bring prior experience from across the arts, humanities, and sciences.

The MA in Digital Culture helps students develop and realize innovative projects and prepare for, or to create a bridge towards, a critical career in the cultural, creative, educational, analytical, and computational sectors.

This program is based on the research excellence in cultural studies (Scott Lash), software studies (Matthew Fuller), media philosophy (Luciana Parisi) and critical practices (Graham Harwood).

The MA in Digital Culture grew out of the prior MA Interactive Media: Critical Theory and Practice.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Centre for Cultural Studies.

Modules & Structure

We use art methodologies alongside those from computing and cultural theory. A key method adopted in the Lab is to make the space between theory and practice ambiguous. The class makes and explores things, attempting to explain the phenomena being looked at or thought about. Explanation in this context is not necessarily a reduction of phenomena to literature or a system of logics, but can instead be thought of as knowledge incorporated into a thing that we create, look at or point to, through figuring out a proposition.

In practice this means we may:

-Learn MySQL databases and explore how their integral model of entities and relations create new forms of governance and aid in the performance of different scales of power
-Build simple telephony systems while taking inspiration from early/current data networks and their relationship to cultural change, resource wars and political insurrection
-Explore systematic failure within computation by exploring hacking and security issues such as creating fork bombs, doing penetration testing and reviewing the need for cryptography post-Snowden

We actively work with cultural theory in a world with computation as a central pillar. The Digital Culture Unit in the Centre for Cultural Studies, under whose auspices this programme is run, has been a pioneer of practice-led theory. This method pursues a form of working on projects that at the same time undertakes research and writing that incorporates contemporary cultural theory, philosophy and cultural studies. The Masters, therefore, is also ideal for students with primarily theoretical interests who wish to ground these with concrete knowledge and experience.

Building on the Digital Culture Unit's research excellence in software studies, media philosophy and digital art, students will learn to employ cutting edge research and practice-based methodologies to enhance their own skill set. The programme gives you the opportunity to develop critical and speculative theoretical and practice-based research on the ways computational media technologies are embedded in the technical, cultural, aesthetic, and political structures of society and how we interact with them. The applications of such work are highly diverse. The degree helps students to prepare for or to create a bridge towards a critical career in the cultural, creative, educational, analytical, and computational sectors.

Skills

You'll develop skills in:

Theoretical and practice-based research methodologies
Software and hardware production including basic electronics, programming, networking, telephony, relational database analyses
Group working skills
Event planning and production

Careers

The programme helps students to prepare for a critical career in the cultural, creative, educational, analytical, computational sectors.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths.

What our alumni are doing now

-Joao Wilbert (2008/9) has a background in web design and is now a Creative Technologist working at Google Creative Labs. http://www.jhwilbert.com
-Maria Beatrice Fazi (2008/9) has a BA in Philosophy and is now completing her PhD on Computation and Aesthetics at the Centre for Cultural Studies.
-Lisa Baldini (2010/11) is a New York based curator. In 2012 she has curated Code of Contingency.
-Loes Borges (2010/11) has a BA in Media and Cultural Studies and is now lab manager at the Digital Art Lab in Zoetermeer, (NL). http://www.loesbogers.com
-Tom Keene (2011/12) has a BA in Fine Arts and is now collaborating with Furtherfield, London-based media arts organisation, co-director of Brixton Remakery, a community-led recycling initiative. http://www.theanthillsocial.co.uk
-Marcos Chitelet (2011/12) has a BA in Design and is co-founder of the design agency DID, as well as political web platform Sentidos Comunes, and FaceEnergy, a start-up developing projects on energy efficiency for the city of Santiago, Chile.

Prizes and awards

In 2011, Alexandra Sofie Joensoon and Cliff Hemmet – both students from the MA – won a prestigious prize at the media arts festival Ars Electronica. Alex and Cliff created a low cost DIY telephony server together with sex workers activist group X-talk. Today the project is a platform for critical reflection on how communication practices and structures are materialised in the sex industry.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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NOTE. Are you a student from outside the EU? If you are an International student we have designed a version of this award especially for you! It is called the Extended International Master in Aeronautical Engineering. Read more
NOTE: Are you a student from outside the EU? If you are an International student we have designed a version of this award especially for you! It is called the Extended International Master in Aeronautical Engineering. It includes an extra semester of preliminary study to prepare you for postgraduate learning in the UK. We strongly recommend that all international students take this option as it is proven to improve your chances of success. Take a look at this alternative course here.

About the Course A focus on the practical application of the advanced theories learnt. Familiarisation with a range of industry standard design and analysis software. The opportunity to undertake low cost gliding, with reduced price club membership for students. Good career prospects. The aerospace industry is one of the UK's most successful industrial sectors, with its involvement in major international project groups including Airbus, Rolls Royce, British Aerospace to name but a few. Not every university that teaches engineering includes Aeronautical Engineering in its portfolio, but Staffordshire University is proud to be running a new and innovative MSc award in this area which started September 2012.

The MSc in Aeronautical Engineering builds upon the success of the undergraduate Aeronautical programme which has been running at Staffordshire for over ten years. The MSc is an award for the graduate engineer (who will have usually studied a BEng(hons) in Mechanical or Aeronautical Engineering or equivalent, or possibly a BSc(hons) in Aeronautical Technology) and who wishes to expand and deepen their knowledge of aeronautical engineering.

The MSc covers a broad range of areas including fixed wing and rotary aircraft, subsonic and supersonic flight regimes, aircraft propulsion systems, aircraft control systems, materials, etc. As well as taught classes, students use our extensive range of laboratories which include industry standard design and analysis software, including Pro Engineer, Phoenix CFD, ANSYS FEA, etc.

Course content

Students study eight taught modules then undertake a research-based dissertation, the length of the course being about 12 months in total.

Modules studied include: ​​​
-Technical and Study Skills
-Research Methods and Project Management
-Control Systems for Aeronautics
-Structural Integrity
-Aircraft Propulsion Systems
-Advanced Aeronautics
-Advanced Vehicle Aerodynamics
-MSc Project the 60 credit dissertation module, student centred but with close staff guidance.

Options include:
-MSc Project by Distance Learning (as an alternative to the MSc Project)
-Advanced Engineering Materials
-Technical Paper Authoring
-Industrial Responsibility

Employment opportunities

It is envisaged that graduates from the MSc in Aeronautical Engineering will be in a position to apply for a large range of technical, engineering, analytical, operation or management jobs within the aerospace and airline industries.

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The International Development and Education MA will give you a better understanding of the future of learning. The course will appeal to anyone concerned about development issues, government policy and the reduction of poverty using entrepreneurial ideas. Read more
The International Development and Education MA will give you a better understanding of the future of learning. The course will appeal to anyone concerned about development issues, government policy and the reduction of poverty using entrepreneurial ideas.

You'll be debating challenging questions such as:
-What is the future of learning in the 21st century?
-How can we guarantee education for all across the developing world?
-What is the future role of international agencies, national governments and the private sector in education?
-Is the traditional model of schooling still fit for purpose?
-What alternative solutions are available and what role will technology play in the future of learning?

On this course you will get the opportunity to discuss these topics with our world class faculty, which includes:
-Professor Sugata Mitra
-Professor Pauline Dixon
-Dr James Stanfield
-Professor James Tooley

The course is for graduates from education, information technology, economics, politics, geography or business backgrounds. In turn, our graduates go on to pursue careers in:
-Education in developing countries
-The global education industry
-National governments
-International aid agencies
-Non-governmental organisations and charities

Our teaching is informed by research conducted by the EG West Centre. It is the world's leading authority on the growth and development of affordable private schools serving low income communities across the developing world. Recent research has focused on post conflict countries such as South Sudan, Liberia and Sierra Leone and on the growth and expansion of chains of low cost private schools in different countries around the world.

Over the previous decade extensive and detailed research, directed by Professor James Tooley, has been carried out across all five continents, documenting the enormous and previously neglected potential of private schools to serve the educational needs of the poor.

Placements

The two to four week placement module offers an exciting opportunity to visit a developing country.

You can visit Omega Schools in Ghana or schools across India which are taking part in Sugata Mitra's TED Prize 'Schools in the Cloud' project. This self-funded visit will provide you with an invaluable experience that will bring issues learnt on the course to life.

The placement module can also be taken in the UK, across Europe or in your country of origin, with the agreement of the Degree Programme Director.

Facilities

As a student in the School of Education, Communication and Language Sciences you'll have access to facilities and a growing collection of online resources, including:
-A well-stocked Education Resource Centre
-Language Analysis Lab
-A phonetics lab
-An audio-video lab
-A recording studio

You will have access to a range of IT systems and software, and library resources including electronic journals and databases.

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The Aircraft Design option of the MSc in Aerospace Vehicle Design (AVD) aims to provide a comprehensive overview of aircraft performance, structures and systems. Read more

Course Description

The Aircraft Design option of the MSc in Aerospace Vehicle Design (AVD) aims to provide a comprehensive overview of aircraft performance, structures and systems. A holistic teaching approach is taken to explore how the individual elements of an aircraft can be designed and integrated using up-to-date methods and techniques. You will learn to understand how to select specific systems such as fuel systems, and their effect on the aircraft as a whole.
This course is suitable for students with a background in aeronautical or mechanical engineering or those with relevant industrial experience.

Overview

Modern aircraft design focuses on the integration of new technologies and systems, with current and advanced configurations to lead us towards environmentally friendly and cost effective aviation in the civil arena and high performance and effective aviation in the military arena. This includes new structures, materials and manufacturing processes. New aircraft design is essential to address issues such as carbon footprint reduction, lower noise pollution and improved passenger comfort as well as contributing to national security.

Our work in this field covers all flying vehicles including civil and military aircraft, helicopters, Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Systems (UAVS), ultra-high capacity airlines and space vehicles. Current research being undertaken includes:

Advanced Configurations – such as blended wing and morphing wing aircraft design. This includes both fixed wing and rotorcraft vehicles.

Advanced Systems Integration – such as Distributed Propulsion using hydrogen or alternative fuels for power and high temperature superconducting materials technology.

Advanced Materials and Manufacturing Processes – exploring the benefits achieved through the application of advanced composite materials.

Advanced Design Methodologies – developing techniques to ensure that optimum designs are achieved.

Airworthiness Compliance – ensuring new designs demonstrate the same safety requirements as traditional aircraft.

Operational Aspects – cost, performance, reliability and maintainability are important features of aircraft design as well as advanced techniques such as Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM). Vulnerability and susceptibility also have a major impact.

Biomimetics – taking lessons from nature for example insects and birds, and their application in aviation such as launch, recovery and flight.

English Language Requirements

If you are an international student you will need to provide evidence that you have achieved a satisfactory test result in an English qualification. The minimum standard expected from a number of accepted courses are as follows:

IELTS - 6.5
TOEFL - 92
Pearson PTE Academic - 65
Cambridge English Scale - 180
Cambridge English: Advanced - C
Cambridge English: Proficiency - C

In addition to these minimum scores you are also expected to achieve a balanced score across all elements of the test. We reserve the right to reject any test score if any one element of the test score is too low.

We can only accept tests taken within two years of your registration date (with the exception of Cambridge English tests which have no expiry date).

Structure

The Aircraft Design option consists of a taught component, a group design project and an individual research project.

In addition to management, communication, team work and research skills, each student will attain at least the following outcomes from this degree course:

•To build upon knowledge to enable students to enter a wide range of aerospace and related activities concerned with the design of flying vehicles such as aircraft, missiles, airships and spacecraft
•To ensure that the student is of immediate use to their employer and has sufficient breadth of understanding of multi-discipline design to position them for accelerated career progression
•To provide teaching that integrates the range of disciplines required by modern aircraft design
•To provide the opportunity for students to be immersed in a 'Virtual Industrial Environment' giving them hands-on experience of interacting with and working on an aircraft design project

Modules

The taught programme for the Aircraft Design masters is generally delivered from October to March. As well as completing the 12 compulsory taught modules, students have an extensive choice of optional modules to match their specific interests.

Core:
- Airframe System Design
- Design and Analysis of Composite Structures
- Initial Aircraft Design (including Structural Layout)
- Loading Actions
- Aircraft Stability and Control
- Aircraft Performance
- Design for Manufacture and Operation
- Fatigue Fracture Mechanics and Damage Tolerance
- Aeroelasticity
- Reliability, Safety Assessment and Certification
- Flight Experimental Methods (Jetstream Flight Labs)
- Detail Stressing

Optional:
- Computing Aided Design (CATIA)
- Aircraft Aerodynamics
- Structural Dynamics
- Structural Stability
- Aircraft Accident Investigation
- Aircraft Power Plant Installation
- Avionic System Design
- Aerospace System Development and Life Cycle Model
- Integrated Vehicle Health Management
- Sustaining Design (Structural Durability)
- Finite Element Analysis (including NASTRAN/PATRAN Workshops)
- Crashworthiness

Individual Project

The individual research project aims to provide the training necessary for you to apply knowledge from the taught element to research, and takes place from March to September. The project may be theoretical and/or experimental and drawn from a range of topics related to the course and suggested by teaching staff, your employer or focused on your own area of interest.

Recent Individual Research Projects include:
- Ultra Long Range Science UAV Structure / Systems Development
- Conceptual Design of a Hypersonic Space Launcher and Global Transportation System
- Effect of Aerodynamics on the Conceptual Design of Blended Wing Body Aircraft
- Review, Evaluation and Development of a Microlight Aircraft
- Feasibility of the Application of Low Cost Scaled Aircraft Demonstrators.

Group Project

The extensive group design project is a distinctive and unique feature of this course. This teamwork project takes place from October to March, and recreates a virtual industrial environment bringing together students with various experience levels and different nationalities into one integrated design team.

Each team member is given responsibility for the detailed design of a significant part of the aircraft, for example, forward fuselage, fuel system, or navigation system. The project will progress from the conceptual phase through to the preliminary and detail design phases. You will be required to run project meetings, produce engineering drawings and detailed analyses of your design. Problem solving and project coordination must be undertaken on a team and individual basis. At the end of the project, groups are required to report and present findings to a panel of 200 senior engineers from industry.

This element of the course is both realistic and engaging, and places the student group in a professional role as aerospace design engineers. Students testify that working as an integrated team on real problems is invaluable and prepares them well for careers in a highly competitive industry.

Assessment

The taught modules (10%) are assessed by an examination and/or assignment. The Group Project (50%) is assessed by a written technical report and oral presentations. The Individual Research Project (40%) forms the remainder of the course.

Career opportunities

The MSc in Aircraft Design is valued and respected by employers worldwide. The applied nature of this course ensures that our graduates are ready to be of immediate use to their future employer and has provided sufficient breadth of understanding of multi-discipline design to position them for accelerated career progression.

This course prepares graduates for careers as project design engineers, systems design, structural design or avionic engineers in aerospace or related industries, with the aim of progressing to technical management/chief engineer. Graduates from the MSc in Aircraft Design can therefore look forward to a varied choice of challenging career opportunities in the above disciplines.

Many of our graduates occupy very senior positions in their organisations, making valuable contributions to the international aerospace industry. Typical student destinations include BAE Systems, Airbus, Dassault and Rolls-Royce.

For further information

on this course, please visit our course webpage http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/Courses/Masters/AVD-Option-Aircraft-Design

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