• University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
  • Anglia Ruskin University Featured Masters Courses
  • Goldsmiths, University of London Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine Featured Masters Courses
Middlesex University Featured Masters Courses
Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
Queen Mary University of London Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
"love"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Love)

We have 128 Masters Degrees (Love)

  • "love" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 128
Order by 
Course Outline. Read more
Course Outline
If you...have a passion for children's books, love reading literature for children, have written or would love to have a go at writing children's literature, have a desire to learn what books children like reading, would love the chance to explore your own ideas about childhood and learn how different societies, histories and critics have defined it, want to learn how publishers produce children's books and produce one yourself, want to be involved in a rapidly growing area of academic study, and need to learn about different careers in writing for children...then this exciting new programme is for you.

You will have the chance to study classic and contemporary children's literature and writing and produce your own, with input from some of the most well known authors and publishers of today.


Course Content
7 taught modules plus a Dissertation:

Histories of Children's Literature
An introduction to Children's Literature You will investigate Classic British, American and International Children's literatures before choosing an individual topic on any historical selection of Children's literature to research.

Reading Crossover Fiction
You will explore contexts of crossover fiction such as age-banding, genre, education and new ways of marketing fiction in this relatively new field.

Creative Writing for Children Workshop
A chance to develop your own voice and style by producing creative writing for children in any genre, including the fairy-tale, fantasy, social realism, non-fictional prose, drama or poetry with help from established authors.

Scriptwriting for Children
Run by professionals with experience in commissioning work for children's television and in partnership with the BBC (the BBC Children's Division will shortly be moving to Salford), these workshops will show you how to write for children's television and film and how to present your work to the industry.

Reading the Child
This module will seek to understand what we mean by the "child" and "childhood" by exploring the theoretical approaches to the study and practice of writing for children over the last 100 years.

Children's Writing and Publishing
An opportunity to work in a group to produce/publish a new children's book with the help of experts. You will begin by focusing on the age ranges, educational edicts, series fiction, niche markets, "pester power" and digital and online publishing, ebooks and downloads.

Planning Your Career in Writing for Children
You will be given access to career case studies and trends in publishing, writing, teaching, academia and other areas of graduate recruitment which will enable you to produce your own action plan.

Writing for Children Dissertation
You will be able to choose between a traditional literature dissertation, a creative writing dissertation, one that combines literature and creative writing, or a work-related dissertation.

The programme uses a wide range of teaching and learning strategies. As well as interactive lectures all modules have seminar or workshop elements where you will be encouraged to engage in critical reading and writing exercises. Seminar discussion and, in some modules, formal presentations, will enable you to further develop your subject-specific knowledge and understanding, strengthen your communicative skills, and pursue research projects either independently or in teams. Tutorials enable you to discuss issues and ideas with your tutors either individually or in small groups.

Creative Writing Workshops will offer you the opportunity to give and receive peer critique and support. As an individual you will keep learning journals or logs for some modules. You will spend a substantial amount of time on independent research but you will be supported by one-to-one supervision from tutors.

Read less
Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study English Literature at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study English Literature at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in English Literature offers an exciting array of modules from the traditional core of English studies in the context of contemporary approaches to the subject.

Key Features of MA in English Literature

The MA in English Literature allows you to range widely across English studies rather than confine yourself to a narrow field and draws on the individual research expertise of members of staff.

From the student’s point of view the MA in English Literature is openly structured. As a student enrolled in the English Literature programme, you define your own pathway through the Department’s MA provision. This means that as well as choosing modules from the MA in English, you can select modules in any combination from the other specialist MAs offered by the Department, such as the MA in Welsh Writing in English and the MA in Gender and Culture.

As a MA in English Literature student, you develop your dissertation project on a topic of your own choosing in consultation with a supervisor.

The full-time English Literature course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. The dissertation component draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year, or emerges from a topic of the student's proposing in English Literature. Part-time study is available for the MA in English Literature.

Students of the MA in English Literature will benefit from the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

Modules

Modules on the MA in English Literature typically include:

• Practising Ideas: Advnaced Research Skills

• ‘The Unsex’d Females’: Women Writers and the French Revolution

• Women Writing India

• The Romantic Sublime

• Gender and Culture: An Introduction

• The Modernist Novel: James Joyce

• Angela Carter

• Dylan Thomas and the Idea of Welsh Writing in English

• Locating Wales: Comparative Perspectives

• ‘American Wales’: Writing the Transatlantic

• Welsh Identities: Literature and Nationhood

• Saints and Sinners in Christian Late Antiquity

• Fin’Amor and Marriage in the Medieval English Secular Lyric

• Gender and Humour in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

• Lost in Europe: History, Biography, Ideology through the Short twentieth Century (1914-89)

• Neo-Victorian Mutinies: Gender & Racial Trauma in Neo-Victorian Fiction (& Film)

• Writing Poetry

• Writing the Self

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for English Literature graduates. Our Graduates enter careers in education, professional and creative writing, publishing, global marketing and advertising, media, international and national recruitment, heritage and tourism, and relief/humanitarian organisations. Some Graduates go on to pursue further postgraduate study leading to a PhD and a career in Academia.

Research Interests

The Department of English Language and Literature is home to three research centres and groupings:

• the Centre for the Research in the English Literature and Language of Wales (CREW)

• the Centre for the Research into Gender in Culture and Society (GENCAS)

• the Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Research (MEMO)

All staff in the Department are research active and publish books and articles in their areas of expertise. Books published by staff in recent years include studies of medieval women’s writing, William Blake, Dylan Thomas, American fiction, Walt Whitman, narratives of the European border, Angela Carter, contemporary English language studies and many other areas. Regular research seminars

and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Student Quote

"The MA in English Literature at Swansea offers students a unique opportunity to expand their intellectual horizons in an environment that brings people together from across the globe. I've had the chance to study with people from Ireland, England, America, and Germany and the differing views and experiences that each of us bring to our classroom discussions have been an invaluable part of my education here. One of the other enormous benefits of studying in Swansea is its location. In few other places can a student read a poem by Dylan Thomas or William Wordsworth and then walk through the same streets and countryside that inspired that poet. At Swansea University a student can find a learning experience that breaks free of the confines of the classroom and that may lead them out into all the beauty and history of the city and its surrounding areas. To top it off the small class sizes create an intimate and informal atmosphere where passionate professors challenge you to make the most of your love of literature. In all I'd describe my time here at Swansea as an experience that has both deepened my love of literature while allowing me to come to view it from a more global perspective."

Robert Tretin, English Literature, MA



Read less
Train to teach English with media to 11 to 16-year-olds with our National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL)-accredited course and begin your fulfilling career as a secondary school teacher. Read more
Train to teach English with media to 11 to 16-year-olds with our National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL)-accredited course and begin your fulfilling career as a secondary school teacher. You’ll learn the principles of effective English teaching and how to develop school pupils’ love of literature. A dedicated tutor will provide you with support throughout your training, while school placements will provide you with hands-on practical experience in the classroom. Successful graduates of our PGCE Secondary courses achieve high results, with 95% receiving an Ofsted good or outstanding grade by the end of the course and 96% going on to obtain employment, often with one of their placement schools.

More about this course

This NCTL-accredited PGCE Secondary English with Media course leads to Qualified Teacher Status and prepares you to teach 11 to 16-year-olds, while also giving you the opportunity to teach at a college level.

You’ll learn to equip pupils with a strong command of the spoken and written word, and to promote high standards of language and literacy. This will also help develop school pupils’ love of literature and reading for their own enjoyment.

We run this course in collaboration with the English and Media Centre (EMC), an award-winning educational charity. EMC tutors will provide you with support throughout the course, drawing on their extensive experience of consultancy for schools and running Continuing Professional Development (CPD) for teachers. You’ll continue to receive support from a dedicated EMC tutor throughout your school experience.

This PGCE course benefits from our London location and will broaden your understanding of teaching in multicultural and diverse urban environments. Through study, discussion and teaching you’ll develop an understanding of how children learn and the methods you can use to help them to effectively develop their English and media skills.

We place great emphasis on sharing feedback with your peers and colleagues. You’ll complete a weekly reflection and contribute to discussions online in order to further develop your understanding of the role of a secondary teacher.

Although this PGCE course is directed at teaching 11 to 16-year-olds, we seek to provide opportunities for teaching older children wherever possible.

Your assessment will consist of four elements:
-School placement A
-School placement B, where your teaching ability will be assessed in relation to the standard for Qualified Teacher Status
-A Professional Practice Portfolio, which is compiled across the year, detailing personal experiences and reflections on your development as a teacher, largely in relation to your practical teaching experience
-The Educational Research Assignment, which allows you to explore an educational issue

There are no examinations.

Professional accreditation

This course is accredited by the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL).

Modular structure

This is a year long course.

Module 1, Curriculum Studies, includes:
-The theoretical underpinning of the practice that students take into the classroom
-Access to the pedagogical knowledge and understanding required to effectively plan and teach well structured lessons in the secondary curriculum
-Sessions on pedagogy, English language and literature, mathematics, science and foundation subjects
-Training to assess school pupils’ progress in each of the these curriculum areas

Module 2, Professionalism and Inclusive Practice (PIP), includes:
-Support for the wider professional development of each student teacher
-Discussion of the role of children’s rights and how this underpins effective learning relationships
-Understanding of different aspects of inclusive education
-Introduction to the whole school and wider children’s workforce
-Teamwork and collaborative discussion across different subject areas

Work placement:
-120 days spread across two London placements learning to teach with a mentor in secondary schools

In both university and classroom contexts, your self-directed study is extremely important in order to support your development of purposeful educational enquiry, preparing effective teaching resources and ensure your subject knowledge is up-to-date.

After the course

This intensive PGCE School Direct course leads to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS), which enables you to teach 11 to 16-year-olds. Our trainees have gone on to secure secondary teacher roles at schools including Ark Academy, East Barnet School, Kingsford Community School and more.

Funding

Funding is available for many postgraduate courses leading to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). Depending on your teaching subject and degree classification, you may be eligible for a bursary or scholarship of up to £30,000 through the teacher training bursary.

PGCE School Direct

The School Direct school placements work around the training calendar for the student teacher with the PGCE offered at the university. This means we can only offer places in Early Years / Primary and in Secondary teaching Maths, Modern Languages and Science with a specialism in Biology, Chemistry or Physics.

You will attend the training workshops at the university with other regular PGCE students and carry out placements of 120 days in a school or consortium of schools with a School Direct allocation. This time could be divided between two schools with some flexibility.

London Met has School Direct partnership with nearly 100 schools. This large body of schools have joined with us to build a cross-capital alliance, providing diverse contexts in which to train the new generation of London teachers.

Most of our trainees follow a programme modelled on the traditional PGCE, with time spent under tutor supervision at London Metropolitan University and the school placement divided between two partner schools.

Read less
Do you love your subject, but want the breadth of teaching that primary teaching offers? Do you love working with the primary age range, but also want to develop a specialist subject which will enable you to teach in both primary and secondary schools? If so, then this may be the PGCE course for you. Read more
Do you love your subject, but want the breadth of teaching that primary teaching offers? Do you love working with the primary age range, but also want to develop a specialist subject which will enable you to teach in both primary and secondary schools? If so, then this may be the PGCE course for you.

The PGCE 7-14 trains teachers to teach in both primary and secondary schools. It will train student teachers to:

• be primary subject specialists who can also teach across the curriculum at a time when many primary schools are utilising subject specialists in their timetabling and teaching at Key Stage 2;
• be secondary subject specialists with a sound knowledge of primary practice, matching the direction in which curriculum at Key Stage 3 is traveling
• be specialists who can teach across the whole age range (e.g. as required in international or independent schools)
• understand and manage transition from Key Stage 2 to Key Stage 3;
• be flexible enough to move between phases of education.

We believe that the course offers an exciting opportunity for those who qualify to make a unique contribution to the education of children and young people. Indeed, part of the mission of the course is to enable teachers who qualify to ease the transition of pupils between these two stages, and to help policy and practice in both stages come closer together.

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/pgce-7-14-years.aspx

Course detail

This is a one year, full-time course that aims to enable student teachers to become confident, competent classroom practitioners. The 7-14 PGCE is ideal for those students who are particularly interested in this particular age group which spans the older years of primary education i.e. 7-11 and the younger years of secondary education i.e. 11-14. It is ideal for those who:

• have a strong interest in their specialist subject, but also like the idea of working with primary children;
• are concerned about the smoothing the transition of pupils from primary to secondary education;
• are interested in working across this age group such as in innovative state models of schooling; continental or independent schools;
• want to train as a teacher, but do not want to specialise in a particular phase of education at this stage.

The course has been designed for all students to meet the Teaching Agency (TA) Standards for Qualified Teacher Status.

The course runs in partnership with local primary and secondary schools. Students spend 120 days in school as part of this course and 60 days at the University.

Content

All PGCE courses cover three main areas: Curriculum Studies, Professional Studies and Enhanced Studies. However, all learning on the course is designed to complement professional practice and the academic study will be informed by and inform practice. PGCE students will be placed in two schools for a mixture of blocked time and serial (e.g. one day a week) time adding up to meet the current Government requirement for a minimum 120 days in school.

Format

University time is spent in lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials. Tutors model methods that they would expect students to adopt in school. School placements demand full attendance in school during each day, Monday to Friday, with additional time devoted to assessment and preparation. You will need to make arrangements to ensure you can be in school by 8.15am at the latest.

Across the PGCE year there is the equivalent of 24 weeks spent in school. Student teachers will learn in a variety of ways in school, including from experienced mentors, through observing others and through experience. There is also a degree of individual support for learning offered in this course provided by mentors in school and the university tutors.

Tutors and mentors who lead the learning on this course are all qualified teachers.

Assessment

Students will be assessed in two main ways ­via academic assignments and assessment of their teaching.

Students will submit academic assignments for 20 credits in each curriculum, professional and enhanced studies modules. Each submission will include a written element, but students may also be assessed via presentations or practical performances as relevant to their chosen subject options.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

Read less
Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Health Informatics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Health Informatics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The Health Informatics programme is designed for healthcare professionals and those who want to increase their knowledge and skills in health informatics. Accredited by the UK Council for Health Informatics Professions (UKCHIP), the programme uses state-of-the-art technologies and has a strong focus on practical experience is strongly linked with National Health Service (NHS) organisations, other research institutes and industry within the Life Science sector in Wales, UK.

Key Features of the Health Informatics Programme

- A one year full-time taught masters programme in Health Informatics that has been running successfully since 2001 and has an international reputation.

- The Health Informatics course is also available for three years part-time study with minimum attendance requirements.

- Accredited by the UK Council for Health Informatics Professions Education Quality Assurance Scheme.

- Uses state-of-the-art technologies and has a strong focus on practical experience.

- Strongly linked with National Health Services organisations and industry within the Life Science sector in Wales, UK.

- The Health Informatics course is based within the award winning Centres for Excellence for Administrative Data and eHealth Research of Swansea University, awarded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and Medical Research Council (MRC), enhancing the quality of the course.

Who should study MSc Health Informatics?

The Health Informatics course is suitable for current informaticians, those working in the health and healthcare sector, and graduates preparing for a career in health informatics. Applicants from non-graduates with domain experience are welcome.

Course Structure

Health Informatics students must complete 6 modules (5 core and 1 further module from a choice of two) to earn a minimum of 120 credits in total in Part One and produce a dissertation of not more than 20,000 words on a relevant health informatics topic in Part Two to graduate. Each module for this course requires five days of intensive study in Swansea. This will be augmented by preparatory and reflective material supplied via the course website before and after your visit.

Attendance Pattern

Health Informatics students are required to attend the University for 1 week (5 consecutive days) for each module in Part One. Attendance during Part Two is negotiated with the supervisor.

Modules

Modules on the Health Informatics programme typically include:

• Health Informatics in Context

• Communications and Coding

• Using Secondary Health Data

• Systems and Technologies

• Knowledge Management

• Understanding Health Informatics Research

The Health Informatics course introduces two pathways for health informaticians who wish to specialise in one of the following areas:

1. Health Informatics Research

2. Leadership in Project Management

Research Opportunities

In partnership with the National Health Service (NHS) Wales Informatics Service and Health Boards in Wales, the Health Informatics course is able to offer NHS research opportunities within local NHS facilities and the NHS Wales Informatics Research Laboratories based at Swansea University.

Industry Links

In collaboration with the e-Health Industries Innovation Centre UK, this course offers you a unique opportunity to work with the industries to develop your work-based project that will give you the competitive edge and enhance your future employability.

Career Prospects

Health Informatics remains one of the fastest growing areas within healthcare in the UK and US.

In the UK working as a professional health informatician, you could be introducing electronic health records for every person in the country or exploring patient data to identify trends in disease and treatment. If you love working with computers or have an analytical and inquisitive mind, then there is a job for you in health informatics as the NHS Careers in Health Informatics has demonstrated.



Read less
Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Professional Translation at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Professional Translation at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Professional Translation MAPT (previously Translation with Language Technology) is an integrated programme designed to turn entrants with proven excellence in foreign languages into successful and marketable professional linguists.

Key Features of MA in Professional Translation

The MA in Professional Translation belongs to the European Master's in Translation Network which currently has 64 members throughout Europe with Swansea University being the only EMT member in Wales.

At the core of the MA in Professional Translation lies advanced translation work on general, administrative and technical text types, and training in industry-standard Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) tools. Part 1 of the Professional Translation degree also includes opportunities to develop specialised skills in Public Service Interpreting, audiovisual translation, machine translation (MT) and software localization, terminology management, video making or digital publishing, while in the Translation Work Experience module students form simulated translation companies, working with local translation businesses, and undertake real commissions to professional standards and deadlines.

These different skills come together in a choice of Part 2 projects: either two Extended Translations of the student’s choice, or an academic Dissertation, or a 13-week Internship in a translation company, in the UK or abroad.

Course Content

Part One – Full-time Professional Translation students take three 20-credit (10 ECTS) modules in each of two academic semesters, while part-time students can distribute the same work flexibly over four semesters. There are three compulsory modules: Foundations of Translation and Interpreting, Translation Tools, and one Advanced Translation module from the range of language pairs listed above. Professional Translation students then choose three optional modules. These include: a second Advanced Translation module, History and Theory of Translation, one or two modules in Interpreting, Translation Technologies, Audiovisual Adaptation (subtitling, dubbing, audio description), Terminology Management, Translation Work Experience, or (subject to numbers) Video and Documentary Making, or Visual Communication and Media Design. There is also the option to study a new language intensively (French, German, Italian, Mandarin or Spanish), or to pick up again at intermediate level a language (French, German, or Spanish) not studied since secondary school.

Part Two - An individual project of 60 credits (30 ECTS) which full-time Professional Translation students undertake over the summer (by 15 September), while part-time students have up to a further year. The project can take three forms:

- Two Extended Translations with commentary. These are chosen by the Professional Translation student and offer the opportunity to develop domains of specialisation. At least one must be technical and must be performed using a major CAT tool; or

- Dissertation (15,000-20,000 words). This can be, for instance, on a topic in Translation Studies, a comparison of two or more published translations, terminology research in a specialised domain, or an investigation into aspects of translation technology. The dissertation offers excellent preparation for PhD work, but can also be a valuable indicator of professional expertise (e.g. in terminology or CAT tools); or

- Internship (13 weeks full time, part time pro rata). This is the most vocational option and can be undertaken either in the UK or abroad. We make our extensive list of professional contacts available to students but they must make their own application to companies and pass admissions tests. A successful internship may turn into a first job.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Professional Translation include:

Foundations of Translation and Interpreting

Advanced Translation

Translation Tools

Translation Technologies

Translation Work Experience for MA Students

Terminology Management

Beginners' Language

Intermediate Language

Extended Translations

Translation/Interpreting Internship

Student Quote

“After graduating from Swansea University with a First Class Honours BA Translation degree, I decided to study the MA in Professional Translation (previously Translation with Language Technology) and I also set up a translation business, Veritas, with a fellow graduate. Our business was successful from the outset, and we have experienced high rates of growth year on year. Veritas has won numerous awards, including the HSBC International Business Award in 2010, and we work with companies such as the British Red Cross, Nokia and the NHS. We now employ 9 members of staff and are still growing rapidly. Companies love to work with us, as they can see our passion for language and communication with other cultures. For me, it was a dream to study near the sea, and I loved Swansea so much that I made it a permanent home for my family”.

Rachel Bryan, Professional Translation, MA



Read less
The Masters in Film Studies is a unique and stimulating programme that allows you to explore central concepts in the development of film theory and film-philosophy with an emphasis on European and American auteur cinema. Read more

The Masters in Film Studies is a unique and stimulating programme that allows you to explore central concepts in the development of film theory and film-philosophy with an emphasis on European and American auteur cinema. Our students engage seriously with the analysis of film and the history of cinema aesthetics and interpretation.

The programme will provide you with the analytical and critical tools for the investigation of individual films and the opportunity to discuss these in relation to auteurs, film movements and genres as well as contexts of production and reception.

No previous film or philosophical study is required, but a love of cinema and an appreciation of its importance as an art form is crucial.

Edinburgh is an ideal environment for the study of film as it is home to outstanding art-house cinemas, a lively cinephile culture and the world-renowned Edinburgh International Film Festival.

Programme structure

Over two semesters, taught in small seminars, you will complete two compulsory and two option courses, and will be trained in research methods and skills. You will then complete a dissertation project under individual supervision.

Compulsory courses:

  • Film Theory
  • Film-Philosophy

Option courses may include:

  • Cinema Auteurs
  • Cinema and Society in South Asia
  • Contemporary Japanese Cinema
  • Film Adaptation
  • Film and Gender
  • Film and Religion
  • Gender, Revolution and Modernity in Chinese Cinema
  • Mediating Film
  • Music on Screen

Career opportunities

This programme is an excellent chance to develop your cinematic interests and knowledge and to build your CV with a view to a career in academia, or in any film or media related field.

You will be introduced to Scotland’s lively film culture, with exceptional opportunities to network within the field.

You will also gain transferable skills in communication, research and project management that can be applied to any career you decide to pursue.



Read less
This varied degree will allow you to explore the cultural, social, political, theological and other aspects of medieval history while gaining valuable skills for further research. Read more

This varied degree will allow you to explore the cultural, social, political, theological and other aspects of medieval history while gaining valuable skills for further research.

Core modules will allow you to gain an understanding of medieval Latin and palaeography so you can work with primary sources. You’ll also study research methods and bibliography to sharpen your research skills – all of which will allow you to make the most of the fantastic archives, library resources and collections both within the University and in the region.

You’ll also choose from a range of optional modules offered by our School of History and Institute for Medieval Studies, allowing you to gain specialist knowledge in the areas that interest you while cutting across disciplines and using different critical approaches. You could study a broad range of topics, reflecting the diverse research interests across the University which is home to the International Medieval Congress.

The Institute for Medieval Studies (IMS) has access to excellent resources, both in the University and beyond. The world-class Brotherton Library contains extensive facsimiles and microfilms of primary materials as well as a wide range of online resources. Its Special Collections also contain a wide range of manuscript, archive and early printed material, including the Melsteth Icelandic Collection, archives of the Yorkshire Archaeological Society, the old library of Ripon Cathedral, and the manuscripts and incunabula of the Brotherton Collection.

Leeds is also home to the Royal Armouries and its extensive medieval collections, while the West Yorkshire Archives are dotted around the region and the British Library has a Document Supply Centre in nearby Boston Spa.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

Core modules throughout the degree will allow you to develop important research skills, equipping you to work with primary sources. You’ll gain a working knowledge of medieval Latin, look at research methods in historical study and learn to read and transcribe medieval manuscripts by studying palaeography.

Then you’ll build on this foundation with your choice of optional modules. You’ll choose at least one module offered by the School of History, but you could also choose from the range of interdisciplinary modules offered by IMS. You’ll also specialise further when you complete your dissertation, allowing you to conduct independent research on a specific topic of your choice to showcase the skills you’ve acquired.

If you choose to study this programme part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Details of compulsory modules can be found in the table below; for details of optional modules please see the online module catalogue.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation (Medieval History) 30 credits
  • Introduction to Medieval Latin 30 credits
  • Intermediate Medieval Latin 30 credits
  • Research Methods and Bibliography 15 credits
  • Palaeography: Reading Medieval Manuscripts 15 credits

Optional modules

  • Making History: Archive Collaborations 30 credits
  • Bede's Northumbria 30 credits
  • Christian Society and the Crusades, 1185-1230 30 credits
  • Gender, Sex, and Love: Byzantium and the West, 900-1200 30 credits
  • Lifecycles: Birth, Death and Illness in the Middle Ages 30 credits
  • Warfare in the Age of the Crusades (1095-1204) 30 credits
  • How to be a Saint in the Middle Ages: Saints' Cults and their impact on culture and society (500-1500) 30 credits
  • Religious Communities and the Individual Experience of Religion, 1200-1500 30 credits
  • The Medieval Tournament: Combat and Spectacle in Western Europe, 1100-1600 30 credits
  • The Holy Land under the Franks: The Kingdom of Jerusalem and its Enemies, 1099-1187 30 credits
  • Medieval Bodies 30 credits
  • Preaching History: Understanding Sermons as Literature and Historical Source 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Medieval History MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Medieval History MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

IMS tutors are experts in their fields, and their cutting-edge research will inform your teaching. To help you make the most of their expertise, all IMS modules are taught in small groups.

You may study skills in seminar groups of 12 or more students, but languages and other interdisciplinary options are usually taught in tutorials of up to eight students. You’ll also have one-to-one meetings with your supervisor during your dissertation.

Assessment

Depending on the modules you choose, you’ll be assessed by a range of methods to develop skills that are useful across the field of medieval studies. These will include transcriptions, bibliographies, essays, reports, translations and occasionally exams.

Career opportunities

This degree is excellent preparation for further study in related fields. It will also equip you with advanced research, communication and analytical skills that are valuable to employers in a wide range of careers such as in museums and business.

We offer a range of paid opportunities for you to gain experience that can really help with your career plans. You’ll be able to provide a mock tutorial for first-year undergraduates during their induction week, or become an academic mentor for final-year students as they complete their dissertations to gain experience of teaching, one-to-one communication and people management.

We also run several paid one-year internships throughout the year on projects such as the International Medieval Bibliography, IMS website and the International Medieval Congress to gain practical experience.

Read more about Employment in IMS.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



Read less
The MA in English and American Studies prepares students for undertaking further research in the discipline, but it is also aimed at those who wish to broaden and deepen their critical engagement with English and American literature and culture. Read more
The MA in English and American Studies prepares students for undertaking further research in the discipline, but it is also aimed at those who wish to broaden and deepen their critical engagement with English and American literature and culture. The structure of the MA is flexible, which means that you can choose to combine your interests in English and American culture, or you can choose to focus more exclusively on one or the other . The division of English, American Studies and Creative Writing at the University of Manchester provides a thriving environment, with its vibrant research culture, its close links to the Centre of New Writing, its involvement in the Manchester Literature Festival and its access to the world-class John Rylands research library.

While this MA offers you a range of exciting modules that are chronologically or geographically specific, all modules are informed by recent theoretical and historical developments that allow you to think about categories like `literature', `culture' and `history' in nuanced and fresh ways.

You can also choose 30 credits from our MA Modern and Contemporary Literature (subject to availability) to further extend the scope of your study.

Teaching and learning

In your first semester, you will choose 2 of 3 core modules (30 credits each), which will lay the groundwork for your coursework as well as preparing you to think about your dissertation. The core modules address questions that are at the heart of literary and cultural studies, and will give you conceptual tools relevant to all of the modules offered in the second semester. The core modules are entitled:
-The Times of Literature
-Space, Place and Text
-American Studies: Theories, Methods, Practice.

In the second semester, you will choose 4 out of 6 modules, each of which is weighted at 15 credits, allowing you the choice of a greater number of courses. You diversify your engagement with the field with these courses, each of which tackles a range of periods and literary/cultural productions. Some of the courses offer you the chance to engage with the holdings of the John Rylands Library. Each focuses on a body of work, or on a topic or critical question, situated in a particular context. The courses are:
-Treacherous Love: Translating the Medieval Past
-Shakespeare: Theory and Archive
-Before Sexuality: Bodies, Desires and Discourses, 1660-1900
-Revolutionary Poetics: 1789-1840
-Radical Subcultures
-Doing History in Public: Struggling over the American Past.

Students with an interest in American Studies take 6 modules in total, including, in semester one, the core course 'American Studies: Theories, Methods, Practice' plus the choice of one of the other core courses (as listed above).

Finally, students will write a 15,000-word dissertation, worth 60 credits, supervised by an academic member of staff.

Coursework and assessment

Students are required to take 180 credits of units as listed above.

The list of units on offer will be updated annually. Students may also choose up to 30 credits worth of units from another MA programme in place of one of their optional units, subject to the approval of the Programme Director.
Students will also attend seminars on such topics as how to study at MA level, how to research and write a Master's thesis, and career options.

Read less
Pursue your love of literature at an advanced level, study modules on topics from the Renaissance to the modern day, and gain research skills that will help you stand out to employers or progress to a PhD. Read more
Pursue your love of literature at an advanced level, study modules on topics from the Renaissance to the modern day, and gain research skills that will help you stand out to employers or progress to a PhD. Our Master’s course is ideal if you want to advance your teaching career or begin the move into academia.

Overview

This course will extend your knowledge of English literature, focusing on the Renaissance, the 'long' 19th century, and the 20th and 21st century.

On each of these period-based modules, you’ll explore canonical and non-canonical texts and investigate their social and cultural contexts.

Meanwhile, on our research methods module, you’ll examine topical literary issues, such as the role of archives and digital editions, and develop essential research skills like how to formulate research questions and methodologies.

You can tailor the course to meet your own interests, with optional modules from novel writing to publishing.

You’ll study in a lively and intellectual department with a long tradition of teaching excellence and an international reputation for research.

Teaching times: Mondays and Thursdays from 6-8pm (full-time); Mondays 6-8pm or Thursdays 6-8pm during semester 1 and 2, depending on whether you are in Year 1 or 2 (part-time)

Careers

This course will give you the higher-level skills to stand out in today’s competitive job market.

If you’re a teacher, you could study with us to update your knowledge and further your existing career, or even move into another discipline. Or, if you’re hoping to move on to an academic post, this course will give you the research skills you’ll need to take a PhD, such as our PhD English Literature.

We think you’ll benefit from our links with industry and professional bodies, including Cambridge University Press, Windhorse Publishing, Sayle Literary Agency, Bloomsbury, CAMPUS (the Cambridge Publishing Society), and the Cambridge Literary Festival.

Modules

Core modules:
Major Project

Optional modules:
Renaissance Drama and Cultures of Performance
Re-reading Modernism, Practising Postmodernism
Workshop: the Short Story
Research Methods - English Literature
The Long 19th Century: Controversies and Cities
Workshop: the Novel
Special Topic in Creative Writing/English Literature
Independent Learning Module

Assessment

You’ll show your progress through a combination of essays, critical reviews and presentations, as well as a 15,000-word dissertation.

You can get advice on essay writing at consultation workshops which are built into the course.

Specialist facilities

You’ll be able to access the world-class library at the University of Cambridge as well as our own campus library, plus electronic resources including Early English Books Online and JSTOR, an interdisciplinary archive of academic journals, books and primary sources.

Activities and events

Our many extra-curricular activities include an annual three-day trip to Stratford-upon-Avon, poetry and writing evenings, Literary Society events, and research symposia and conferences. You’ll also be able to take some of our publishing and editing short courses at a discounted price.

Read less
The main formative objective of the Master Course in Fashion Design is to acquire an in-depth knowledge of the fashion sector in all of its aspects, through an integrated approach between creative, cultural, productive marketing and communication aspects. Read more

Overview

The main formative objective of the Master Course in Fashion Design is to acquire an in-depth knowledge of the fashion sector in all of its aspects, through an integrated approach between creative, cultural, productive marketing and communication aspects.

The path of the Master in Fashion Design is a path of experience, research and project making, created combining the theoretic patrimony of innovative and expert didactics with the fundamental contribution of a close and concrete collaboration with prestigious companies and professionals, who chose to follow the students during their training.

Studying Fashion Design in Italy is a unique experience that allows being in direct contact with this world, its protagonists and events, and the constant dialogue with professionals, contribute to the development of professional characters able to successfully express their creativity and to face effectively the evolution of the challenges presented by the field.

The Master is patrocinated by the Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana (National Chamber of Italian Fashion).

The program includes an internship in a company working in the disciplinary field.

Audience

Candidates holding a first-level academic diploma or BA degree, or about to graduate and with a knowledge of the English language (IELTS 5.0 academic or equivalent certificate).
The program is addressed to graduates in fashion design, architecture and art schools as well as to people with a suitable background and professional experience in the fashion field.

Job Opportunities

The aim of the Master is to train professionals who have the ability to combine their creativity and their organizational skills with theoretical and knowledge with the world of production. Among employment opportunities: Fashion Designer, Art Director, Textile Designer, Trend Searcher and Product Manager, Cool Hunter or Fashion Editor in fashion brands, design offices, magazines or establishing their own business.

Companies

A network of professionals and leaders of different areas of interest are in constant and proficient interaction and collaboration with the Master in Fashion Design at Domus Academy, actively participating in educational programming, workshops and international competitions organized by the department.

The Master has worked with:

Trussardi, Muuse, 7 For AllMankind, Alessandro Dell’Acqua, Antonio Berardi, Costume National, Eastpak, Fay, Fiorucci Love Therapy, Fondazione Gianfranco Ferrè, Frankie Morello, Havaianas, Hogan, Maurizio Galante – Tal Lancman, Interware, Meltin ’Pot, Napapijri, Neil Barrett, Nike, SAOBC (South AfricanOstrich Business Chamber), Stefanel, Ter et Bantine, Versace, Veuve Clicquot, Ermenegildo Zegna.

For more information please visit http://www.domusacademy.com/

Read less
The MA in Classics is our core research training degree, suitable for anyone wishing to pursue doctoral work in a branch of Classics. Read more
The MA in Classics is our core research training degree, suitable for anyone wishing to pursue doctoral work in a branch of Classics. The programme places a strong emphasis on language training, on theoretically informed approaches to Classical texts, and on practical engagement with your chosen specialism. The course is composed of a core research training module, a module in a relevant language (ancient or modern), a 15,000 word dissertation, and two elective modules, which are offered in the areas of current research interests of members of staff.

Course Structure

For information on the structure of the course, please see our department web pages (https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=9532&title=Classics&code=Q8K307&type=MA&year=2016#coursecontent)
Core Modules:
-Dissertation
-Classical Research Methods and Resources
-Compulsory language module (Latin for research/Ancient Greek for research/another ancient language/modern language)

In previous years, optional modules available included:
-Forms After Plato
-Latin Text Seminar
-Greek Text Seminar
-Akkadian
-Latin Love Elegy
-Religious Life in The Roman Near East
-Monumental Architecture of The Roman East
-Vitruvius, On Architecture: The First Treatise On Architecture, Its Significance and Legacy
-Greek Sacred Regulations
-Ancient Philosophers On Necessity, Fate and Free Will
-The Classical Tradition: Art, Literature, Thought
-Comparative Approaches to Homeric Epic
-Greek Text Seminar On Homeric Epic
-Latin Text Seminar On Roman Epic
-Life and Death On Roman Sarcophagi
-Juvenal's Satires in Context
-Ancient Philosophers On Origins
-Animals in Graeco-roman Antiquity
-The Queen of The Desert: Rise and Decline of Palmyra's Civilization
-The Roman Republic: Debates and Approaches
-Rewriting empire: Eusebius of Caesarea and the First Christian History

Not all modules will be offered every year, and new modules (both elective and core) are added regularly. Students may also substitute modules offered in other departments, such as Theology, Philosophy, English, Archaeology, or History.

Learning and Teaching

The MA in Classics is principally conceived as a research training programme which aims to build on the skills in independent learning acquired in the course of the student’s first degree and enable them to undertake fully independent research at a higher level. Contact time with tutors for taught modules is typically a total of 5 hours per week (rising to 7 for someone beginning Latin or ancient Greek at this level), with an emphasis on small group teaching, and a structure that maximises the value of this time, and best encourages and focuses the student’s own independent study and preparation. On average, around 2 hours a week of other relevant academic contact (research seminars, dissertation supervision) is also available.

At the heart of the course is a module focused on the range of research methods and resources available to someone working in the field of Classics. This is run as a weekly class, with a mixture of lectures and student-led discussions. Four further elective modules deal with particular specialised subjects. Students must choose one module involving work with a relevant foreign language (ancient or modern). All those offered will form part of the current research activity of the tutor taking the module. Numbers for each module are typically very small (there are rarely more than five in a class). Typically, classes are two hours long and held fortnightly, and discussion is based on student presentations. (Modules for those beginning ancient Latin or Greek are typically more heavily subscribed, but their classes also meet more often: 3 hours per week.) All students write a 15,000-word dissertation, for which they receive an additional five hours of supervisory contact with an expert in their field of interest.

All staff teaching on the MA are available for consultation by students, and advertise office hours when their presence can be guaranteed. The MA Director acts as academic adviser to MA students, and is available as an additional point of contact, especially for matters concerning academic progress. MA students are strongly encouraged to attend the Department’s two research seminar series. Although not a formal (assessed) part of the MA, we aim to instil the message that engagement with these seminars across a range of subjects is part of the students’ development as researchers and ought to be viewed as essential to their programme. In addition, MA students are welcomed to attend and present at the ‘Junior Work-in-Progress’ seminar series organised by the PhD students in the Department. Finally, the student-run Classics Society regularly organises guest speakers – often very high-profile scholars from outside Durham.

Other admission details

*Note that this need not be 'Classics' (so named). If your plan is to specialise in ancient history, literature, or philosophy, for example, it might be perfectly natural to apply with a first degree in History, or English, or Philosophy; or you might just have taken a substantial range of Classical options along the course of your previous studies.

Read less
Train to teach Modern Languages to 11 to 16-year-olds with London Metropolitan University and begin your fulfilling career in secondary schools. Read more
Train to teach Modern Languages to 11 to 16-year-olds with London Metropolitan University and begin your fulfilling career in secondary schools. You’ll learn the principles of effective Modern Languages teaching and how to develop school childrens’ love of the foreign word. Your placements at our partnership schools will back up what you have learnt with hands-on practical experience. Attendees of our National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL) accredited PGCE Secondary courses attain high results, with 95% achieving an Ofsted good or outstanding grade by the end of the course and 96% going on to obtain employment, often with their placement schools.

More about this course

This NCTL accredited PGCE Secondary Modern Languages course leads to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) and prepares you to teach 11 to 16-year-olds (Key Stages 3 and 4) in a secondary school environment. It also gives you the opportunity to teach the 16-18 age range.

The modern languages included are French, Spanish and German, and you will be developing pupils’ skills in speaking, reading, listening and writing the language they choose to learn.

If you only speak German or Spanish, we offer a 12-week Subject Knowledge Enhancement (SKE) in French, enabling you to teach French up to Key Stage 3. The SKE is fully funded and bursaries are available to eligible applicants.

At the University, you’ll study teaching methodology, pupil assessment and how children learn. There will also be collaborative and school-based projects with other trainees.

Based in London, this PGCE course will broaden your understanding of teaching in multicultural urban environments. Through your two school placements, you’ll learn how to help 11-16-year-olds develop their foreign languages effectively and fluently.

This commitment to high standards has led to positive reviews from Ofsted:

"Headteachers are particularly complimentary about the fact that the trainees and Newly Qualified Teachers are well prepared to meet the specific challenges of teaching pupils in the London environment."
Ofsted 2015

Your assessment will consist of four elements:
-School placement A
-School placement B, where your teaching ability will be assessed in relation to the standard for Qualified Teacher Status
-A Professional Practice Portfolio which is compiled throughout the year, detailing personal experiences and reflections on your development as a teacher, largely in relation to your practical teaching experience
-The Educational Research Assignment which allows you to explore an educational issue

There are no examinations.

You'll share feedback with your peers and colleagues on the placement, completing weekly reflections and contributing to online discussions in order to further develop your understanding of the secondary teacher role.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Curriculum Studies (core, 30 credits)
-Professionalism and Inclusive Practice (core, 30 credits)
-School Experience to Progress Point 2 (core, 15 credits)
-School Experience to Progress Point 5 (core, 45 credits)

What our students say

"I personally believe that London Met is an excellent PGCE course provider and the Modern Languages course prepares students very well for a teaching career in this subject. What I appreciated the most was the tutors and the relationships they were able to build with the students. The PGCE year can be a stressful one and it is very important for student teachers to feel supported. The tutors at London Met do this. They teach that in order to be a good teacher you have to encourage pupils and they do it with their student teachers as well. Excellent!" Former PGCE Secondary Modern Languages trainee

After the course

This intensive PGCE leads to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS), which enables you to teach Modern Languages to 11 to 16-year-olds. Our trainees have gone on to secure secondary teacher roles at schools including Ark Academy, Ralph Allen School, Bushey Academy and more.

Funding

Funding is available for many postgraduate courses leading to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). Depending on your teachng subject and degree classification, you may be eligible for a bursary or scholarship of up to £30,000 through the teacher training bursary.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Read less
Learn how to teach science and biology to 11 to16 -year-olds with these National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL)-accredited academic sessions at London Met and hands-on practical experience at our partnership schools. Read more
Learn how to teach science and biology to 11 to16 -year-olds with these National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL)-accredited academic sessions at London Met and hands-on practical experience at our partnership schools. You’ll explore the principles of teaching biology the most up-to-date methods of how to develop pupils’ love of this scientific field. Trainees on our PGCE Secondary courses attain high results, with 95% achieving an Ofsted good or outstanding grade by the end of the course and 96% going on to obtain employment, often with their placement schools.

More about this course

This NCTL-accredited PGCE Secondary Science with Biology course will help you gain the skills to become a competent teacher of science for students up to 14 years old, biology for 15 to 16-year-olds and achieve Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). You’ll also have the opportunity to work with the 16 to 18 age range.

In the sessions at London Met you’ll develop your teaching strategies and pedagogical techniques, as well as discovering the fundamentals of how children learn. These sessions include collaborative projects and school-based projects with other trainees, as well as learning the principles of teaching and pupil assessment.

This PGCE School Direct course takes advantage of its London location to broaden your understanding of teaching in multicultural and diverse urban environments. Through your two placements at one of our partnership schools, you’ll help develop lesson plans and contribute to the development of pupils’ scientific skills and knowledge. London Met also provides you with the opportunity for post-16-year-old teaching experience where possible.

Our commitment to high standards that has lead to high quality reviews from Ofsted:

"Headteachers are particularly complimentary about the fact that the trainees and Newly Qualified Teachers are well prepared to meet the specific challenges of teaching pupils in the context of London schools."
Ofsted 2015.

There are four formal elements:
-School placement A
-School placement B, where your teaching ability is assessed in relation to the Standards for Qualified Teacher Status
-The Educational Research Assignment, which allows you to explore an educational issue
-The Professional Practice Portfolio, which is compiled throughout the year, detailing personal experiences and reflections on your development as a teacher, largely in relation to your practical teaching experience

There are no examinations.

We place great emphasis on feedback from your peers and colleagues on the placement. You’ll complete a weekly reflection and contribute to discussions online in order to further develop your understanding of the role of a secondary teacher.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Curriculum Studies (core, 30 credits)
-Professionalism and Inclusive Practice (core, 30 credits)
-School Experience to Progress Point 2 (core, 15 credits)
-School Experience to Progress Point 5 (core, 45 credits)

What our students say

“I get so much support from my tutor, colleagues and the London Met team. The University itself has a great vibe, is highly social and very welcoming. I’m grateful to everyone at the University for all their help.” Zeinab Al-Ali, PGCE Secondary Science with Biology trainee

After the course

This intensive PGCE leads to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS), which enables you to teach biology to 11 to 16-year-olds. Our trainees have gone on to secure secondary teacher roles at schools including Ark Academy, Harris Girls Academy and more. Whether you have applied through London Met or School Direct, you’ll have the same opportunities for employment upon successful completion of the course.

Funding

Funding is available for many postgraduate courses leading to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). Depending on your teaching subject and degree classification, you may be eligible for a bursary or scholarship of up to £30,000 through the teacher training bursary.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Read less
The MA in Cultural Astronomy and Astrology is a unique course which deals with the ways in which human beings attribute meaning to the planets, stars and sky, and construct cosmologies which provide the basis for culture and society. Read more
The MA in Cultural Astronomy and Astrology is a unique course which deals with the ways in which human beings attribute meaning to the planets, stars and sky, and construct cosmologies which provide the basis for culture and society.

Course Overview

The MA focuses on Cultural Astronomy and Astrology. We define Cultural Astronomy as the study of the application of beliefs about the stars to all aspects of human culture, from religion and science to the arts and literature. It includes the new discipline of archaeoastronomy: the study of astronomical alignments, orientation and symbolism in ancient and modern architecture. Astrology is the practice of relating the heavenly bodies to lives and events on earth. We therefore examine the relationship between astrological, astronomical and cosmological beliefs and practices, and society, politics, religion and the arts, past and present.

The MA is a hybrid of history and anthropology. As historians we pay attention to documentary evidence but are heavily influenced by recent trends in anthropology; this means that modern western culture can be subjected to the same academic scrutiny as pre-modern or non-western cultures, and by questions such as the requirement for the scholar or researcher to engage in practice as part of their study of practice.

The words astronomy and astrology have distinct meanings in modern English. Astronomy is the scientific study of the physical universe. Astrology is more akin to a study of the psychic universe. The split between the two, though, is a feature of modern western thought.

Both words are of Greek origin: astronomy means the ‘law’ of the stars, while astrology is best translated as the ‘word’, or ‘reason’, of the stars, so in the classical world their meanings overlapped. To the Greek scholar Claudius Ptolemy, writing in the second century CE, there were two forms of astronomy: one dealt with the movement of the stars, the other (which we would call astrology) with their effects or significance. From then until the 17th century, the two words were interchangeable. In ‘King Lear’, Shakespeare had Edgar refer to his brother Edmund, who had been posing as an astrologer, as a ‘sectary astronomical’.

Other terms Shakespeare might have used included mathematician (the astronomer Johannes Kepler studied astrology as part of his duties as ‘Imperial Mathematician’) or Chaldean (both astrology and astronomy were commonly traced to Chaldea, another term for Mesopotamia). Neither do most non-western countries employ different words to distinguish traditional astronomy from astrology.

In India both are jyotish, the ‘science of light’. In Japan they are onmyōdō, the ‘yin-yang way’. In China, the observation and measurement of celestial phenomena was inseparable from their application to human knowledge which, in turn, was divided into two, li, or li fa, calendar systems, and tian wen, or sky patterns. All cultures have ways of visualising the stars, many without a single name for the practice. The title of the MA, whose subject matter includes the beliefs and practices of pre-modern and non-western cultures, as well as contemporary worlds, is therefore necessarily ‘Cultural Astronomy AND Astrology’.

Modules

Students take six modules, and then write a 15,000-word dissertation based on independent research. There are three compulsory modules and students then take one ‘pathway’ of two optional modules, and any third optional module.

Assessment

Each module is assessed by 5,000 words of written work or the equivalent. For example, some modules require one short essay of 1,000 words and a longer, 4,000-word essay, normally due in week 10 to 12. Assessment requirements, lengths and due dates can vary from module to module. The shorter essays may be a critical review of a piece of writing, or be picked from a choice of two titles. For the longer essays there is a wider choice of titles. In some modules, the title and subject is negotiated with the course tutor. Each is then returned with comments from either one or two tutors, and students are offered the chance to have a tutorial via Skype in order to discuss the comments.

Students who take the entire MA then go on to write a 15,000-word dissertation based on a piece of independent research on a topic chosen by the student in discussion with the module tutor, and other appropriate members of staff. Each student is allocated a supervisor who can guide them through the research and writing process.

Career Opportunities

Most of our students take the MA as an end in itself because they love the subject. Some go on to study for PhDs, either with us, or at other universities.

The relationship between all academic work and non-academic employment is always based on potential employers’ appreciation of the generic skills acquired in MA study. Typically, these include critical thinking, communication skills, time-management and the ability to take on and complete independent projects. The latter quality is particular prized by many employers. One graduate is teaching at undergraduate level while another, a school teacher, was awarded a promotion and pay rise on her graduation.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X