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Masters Degrees (Loss)

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Please note that this course is not recruiting for May 2018. Read more
Please note that this course is not recruiting for May 2018
Professional Development (Loss Adjusting) has been developed with the Chartered Institute of Loss Adjusters (CILA) and provides an opportunity for eligible CILA members to top-up their existing professional CILA qualifications in order to obtain a Master's (MSc) qualification.

This course is part of our Continuing Professional Development (CPD) scheme, which will allow you to maintain your knowledge and skills related to your professional life.

The content is open and flexible as the course consists of a single Extended Project on a loss adjusting topic of your choice.

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Accredited by the the Institution of Chemical Engineers. Whether you’re already working in the field or just starting out, this course will deepen your understanding and equip you with skills and expertise in process safety, loss prevention and risk assessment. Read more

About the course

Accredited by the the Institution of Chemical Engineers

Whether you’re already working in the field or just starting out, this course will deepen your understanding and equip you with skills and expertise in process safety, loss prevention and risk assessment. You’ll be ready for a career in the oil and gas, chemical, nuclear and pharmaceutical industries, or with any of the consultancies that service them.

Take advantage of our expertise

Our teaching is grounded in specialist research expertise. Our reputation for innovation secures funding from industry,
UK research councils, the government and the EU. Industry partners, large and small, benefit from our groundbreaking work addressing global challenges.

You’ll have access to top facilities, including modern social spaces, purpose-built labs, the Harpur Hill Research Station for large-scale work, extensive computing facilities and a modern applied science library. There are high-quality research facilities for sustainable energy processes, safety and risk engineering, carbon capture and utilisation, and biological processes and biomanufacturing.

Studentships

Contact us for current information on available scholarships.

Course content

Diploma: three core modules and five optional modules. MSc(Eng): one core module, major research project, and five optional modules.

Core modules

Process Safety Management and Loss Prevention
Introduction to Hazard Analysis and Risk Assessment
Hazards in Process Plant Design and Operation
Dissertation (for MSc)

Examples of optional modules

Process Plant Reliability and Maintainability
Human Error and Human Behaviour
Applied Hazard and Operability Studies (HAZOP)
Safety in Nuclear Operations
Computer Control: Safe Practice
Process Safety in the Oil and Gas Industry
Process Safety in the Pharmaceutical, Food and Consumer Products

Full-time or part-time

This course is available full-time over a year, or part-time over two or three years. Each module can be taken as a short course – useful if you’re already working in industry.

Part-time students need to complete all modules within two years. You can take an extra third year to complete your dissertation if you need to – we won’t charge fees for that year. Modules are delivered about once per month from September to June. Each module is four days long. You must therefore attend for 32 days in total.

Teaching and assessment

We use a mixture of lessons and discussions, real-life case studies, workshops and hands-on computer sessions. Continuous assessment is based on assignments for each module, and a dissertation.

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This module enables students to examine a range of issues related to supporting those facing loss within contemporary society, using personal and clinical experience, supported by theoretical knowledge and research based evidence. Read more
This module enables students to examine a range of issues related to supporting those facing loss within contemporary society, using personal and clinical experience, supported by theoretical knowledge and research based evidence.

It will also enable students to consolidate and enhance communication with clients and families facing loss and professionals involved in the delivery of palliative care.

Why Bradford?

At the Faculty of Health Studies, University of Bradford, you can choose to study for individual modules, a named award or build module credits through the SSPRD Framework for Flexible Learning to achieve an award relevant to your professional needs.

The Framework for Flexible Learning in Health and Social Care is a Faculty-wide academic structure for Specialist Skills and Post-Registration Development. It offers students increased flexibility and choice in the modules and courses that can be undertaken and it is also responsive to employer needs. The flexibility also allows you to move from one award to another if your career changes or you take time out from regular studying. Shared teaching and research expertise from across the Faculty is offered through interdisciplinary teaching across our core research modules.

The Faculty of Health Studies is regionally, nationally and internationally recognised for its teaching and research, and works with a number of healthcare partners to ensure clinical excellence.

Modules

This module is provided as part of this interdisciplinary Framework within the Faculty of Health Studies. The Framework enables students to create an individualised programme of study that will meet either their needs and/or the employers’ needs for a changing diverse workforce within a modern organisation.

The modules and academic awards are presented in areas representing employment practice or work based or clinical disciplines.

Whilst some students can build their own academic awards by choosing their own menu of module options, other students will opt for a named academic award. The Framework also provides the option for students to move from their chosen named award to another award if their job or personal circumstances change and they need to alter the focus of their studies. The majority of named awards also offer students, the option of choosing at least one module, sometimes more, from across the Faculty module catalogue enabling them to shape their award more specifically to their needs.

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

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The MPhil degree in Conservation Leadership is a full-time, 11-month, Masters course aimed at graduates of leadership potential with usually at least three to five years of relevant professional experience, either in employment or in a voluntary capacity. Read more
The MPhil degree in Conservation Leadership is a full-time, 11-month, Masters course aimed at graduates of leadership potential with usually at least three to five years of relevant professional experience, either in employment or in a voluntary capacity. The unique features of this course are its delivery by a partnership between several university departments and conservation organisations based around Cambridge, and its focus on issues of management and leadership. Consequently, the course aims to deliver a world-class and interdisciplinary education in Conservation Leadership that is not available elsewhere.

The MPhil in Conservation Leadership aims to train students to address the challenges of biodiversity conservation in an integrated and interdisciplinary manner, by focusing on an understanding of the root causes of ecosystem change and biodiversity loss. The goal is not only to develop conservationists with greater awareness of the complex drivers of biodiversity loss, but to develop the ability to act and lead effectively. This includes the development of professional management and leadership skills including strategic planning, finance and accounting, HR management/planning, innovation, entrepreneurship and the management of change. The course fosters and develops the leadership of its students by promoting their capacity to understand the links among the drivers of biodiversity loss, and to think creatively about conservation solutions across organizational and political boundaries and economic sectors, and by developing their confidence and maturity of judgment.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/eaggmpmcl

Course detail

The course has two taught elements: (i) course work modules; and (ii) professional placement.

Learning Outcomes:

- To foster and develop leadership skills including strategic planning, finance and accounting, and HR management/planning, innovation, entrepreneurship and the management of change.

- To train students to address the challenges of biodiversity conservation in an integrated and interdisciplinary manner, by focusing on an understanding of the root causes of ecosystem change and biodiversity loss

Format

Formal coursework (6 core modules) is concentrated in the Michaelmas and Lent Terms, from October to March, and students follow six substantive modules spread over these two terms. Assessed course work relating to these modules is completed by the start of the Easter Term. The taught elements of the course offer: (i) inter-disciplinarity across the social and biological sciences; (ii) integration with management and leadership skills; and (iii) an emphasis on practice through engagement with conservation professionals.

Professional placements start to be developed during the first two terms in collaboration with their supervisors. Students work on a specific project which addresses a carefully defined conservation leadership challenge. The professional placement is undertaken over the Easter Term from April to June, and Summer, from July to August, and an assessed Placement Report is submitted at the end of this period.

Placements

The Placements on this MPhil aim (i) to give students the opportunity to develop applied conservation leadership skills, (ii) to put into practice some of the ideas and methods learned during the taught component of the course, and (iii) to allow students to follow their personal interests by carrying out an in-depth piece of work on an issue or problem that particularly interests them.

Students can either select their placement from a list of ideas provided by the CCI partner organisations and circulated in the Michaelmas term, or develop their own ideas and approach potential supervisors directly. Placements can be within a University department or a conservation organisation, and can include fieldwork away from Cambridge. Students will be expected to make a presentation on their proposed work to a forum during the Lent Term, and to produce a detailed logframe for their placement during the Easter Term.

Assessment

- Placement report of not more than 10,000 words. (40% of the marks)
- 4 essays (4,000 words each)
- 2 coursework (project) submissions.
- 1 group presentation and associated essay
- A discretionary oral examination on any or all of the assessed components of the MPhil

Continuing

70% or more overall score in MPhil.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

International students from cash poor, but biodiversity-rich countries, attract a range of scholarships. These scholarship may originate either from the applicants’ home country, or from sources available in Cambridge. Please see the Masters in Conservation Leadership website for further details http://www.geog.cam.ac.uk/graduate/mphil/conservation/funding.html

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Part 1 (120 credits). runs from September to May and consists of four taught modules, a Field Visit, and a Research Methods module component. Read more
Part 1 (120 credits): runs from September to May and consists of four taught modules, a Field Visit, and a Research Methods module component. They must be completed successfully before proceeding to Part 2.

Part 2 (60 credits): is the dissertation phase and runs from end of May to September. This is a supervised project phase which gives students further opportunity for specialisation in their chosen field. Dissertation topics are related to the interests and needs of the individual and must show evidence of wide reading and understanding as well as critical analysis or appropriate use of advanced techniques. The quality of the dissertation is taken into account in the award of the Masters degree. Bangor University regulations prescribe a maximum word limit of 20,000 words for Masters Dissertations. A length of 12,000 to 15,000 words is suggested for Masters programmes in our School.

Summary of modules taken in Part 1:

All students undertake 6 modules of 20 credits each which are described below.

Conservation Science considers questions such as ‘in a post-wild world what should be the focus of conservation attention?’ ‘What are the relative roles of ecology, economics and social science in conservation?’ ‘What are the advantage and disadvantages of the introduction of market-like mechanisms into conservation policy?’ We look closely at the current and emerging drivers of biodiversity loss world-wide, while carefully analysing the range of responses.

Insect Pollinators and Plants is at the interface between agriculture and conservation, this module introduces students to plant ecology and insect pollinators. Students will gain unique understanding of the ecological interactions between plants and insect pollinators including honey-bees to implement more sensitive conservation management. The module explores the current conservation status of insect pollinators and their corresponding plant groups; how populations are monitored, and how interventions in the broader landscape can contribute to improving their conservation status. Module components relate specifically to ecosystem pollination services, apiculture and habitat restoration and/or maintenance. The module has a strong practical skills focus, which includes beekeeping and contemporary challenges to apiculture; plant and insect sampling and habitat surveying. Consequently, there is a strong emphasis on “learning by doing.

Agriculture and the Environment reviews the impact of agricultural systems and practices on the environment and the scientific principles involved. It includes examples from a range of geographical areas. It is now recognised that many of the farming practices adopted in the 1980’s and early 1990’s, aimed at maximising production and profit, have had adverse effects on the environment. These include water and air pollution, soil degradation, loss of certain habitats and decreased biodiversity. In the UK and Europe this has led to the introduction of regulatory instruments and codes of practice aimed at minimising these problems and the promotion of new approaches to managing farmland. However, as world population continues to rise, there are increased concerns about food security, particularly in stressful environments such as arid zones where farmers have to cope with natural problems of low rainfall and poor soils. Although new technologies including the use of GM crops have potential to resolve some of these issues, concerns have been expressed about the impact of the release of these new genetically-engineered crops into the environment.

Management Planning for Conservation provides students with an understanding of the Conservation Management System approach to management planning. This involves describing a major habitat feature at a high level of definition; the preparation of a conservation objective (with performance indicators) for the habitat; identification and consideration of the implications of all factors and thus the main management activities; preparation of a conceptual model of the planning process for a case study site and creating maps using spatial data within a desktop GIS.

Research Methods Module: this prepares students for the dissertation stage of their MSc course. The module provides students with an introduction to principles of hypothesis generation, sampling, study design, spatial methods, social research methods, quantitative & qualitative analysis and presentation of research findings. Practicals and field visits illustrate examples of these principles. Course assessment is aligned to the research process from the proposal stage, through study write up to presentation of results. The module is in two phases. The taught content phase is until the period following Christmas. This is followed by a project planning phase for dissertation title choice and plan preparation.

Field Visit Module: this is an annual programme of scientific visits related to Conservation and Land Management. The main purpose of the trip will be to appreciate the range of activities different conservation organisations are undertaking, to understand their different management objectives and constraints. Previous field trips have visited farms, forests and reserves run by Scottish Wildlife Trust, National Trust, RSPB, local authorities, community groups and private individuals.

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Social Policy has been defined as the study of the collective and individual procedures through which people gain access to life-enhancing and sustaining experiences such as education, health care, housing, income during periods of cessation and interruption of earnings, and the care associated with the loss of autonomy and independence. Read more
Social Policy has been defined as the study of the collective and individual procedures through which people gain access to life-enhancing and sustaining experiences such as education, health care, housing, income during periods of cessation and interruption of earnings, and the care associated with the loss of autonomy and independence. UCLan's MA Social Policy postgraduate degree will be of benefit to professionals working in the world of social welfare, to graduates in Social Policy or a related discipline, and to the interested citizen. There are core modules in poverty and social inequality; comparative social policy and social change; social theory and social policy; the making of social policy; introduction to social research. Newly-introduced modules include a work placement module: social policy in practice, with an alternative choice of a reflecting on policy and practice module for those students already in work who may wish to focus analysis on their current professional role.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

Students will be taught in a combination of lecture, seminar and workshop settings. The research module makes extensive use of eLearn. Full-time students will normally have six hours per week class contact time (3 taught modules per semester), whilst part-time students will normally have between two to four hours per week class contact time (One-two modules per semester, depending on the student's chosen programme of study). Students also receive additional tutorial support in negotiation with their personal tutor.

The course employs a variety of assessment methods including essays, seminar presentations, data analysis and a 15000 word dissertation that is the biggest single component (worth three modules) of the MA target award. There are no examinations. All forms of assessment have been designed to test the extent to which learning outcomes have been achieved.

There is also a dissertation (triple module) on a topic of the student’s choice. The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and supervised self-directed study. It is assessed through coursework and a dissertation. There are no examinations.

FURTHER INFORMATION

Social Policy has been defined as the study of the collective and individual procedures through which people gain access to that range of life enhancing and life sustaining experiences, whose distribution lies at the heart of welfare states. These include education, health care, housing, and income during periods of cessation and interruption of earnings and the care associated with the experience of contingencies which lead to a loss of independence and autonomy. There can be little doubt that social policy issues are now at the centre of political debate in Britain and much of the rest of the industrialised world.

The New Labour government of 1997-2010 made the ‘modernisation’ of these services and the improvement in the quality of users' experiences the test by which it wishes to be judged: in what directions has the new Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition taken social policy since the defeat of New Labour?

The MA Social Policy is a modular course that offers the opportunity to engage in a discussion of some of the most important issues of a world characterised by profound cultural, demographic, economic, political and technological change. It will be of relevance and benefit to professionals who work in one or other sector of the mixed economy of welfare, to graduates in Social Policy or a related discipline such as Economics, Health Studies, History, Philosophy, Politics and Sociology, and to the interested citizen.

The course aims to:
-Provide an intellectually challenging range of modules that focus on a number of the most important theoretical perspectives at the "cutting edge" of the subject
-Apply an advanced critical perspective to social policy issues relevant to your professional and/or academic situation
-Encourage you to develop a framework of knowledge, critical understanding and analytical skills that can be used as a basis for both professional and personal development

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Process engineering often involves close collaboration between engineers and scientists from a variety of disciplines. Read more
Process engineering often involves close collaboration between engineers and scientists from a variety of disciplines. The Chemical Process Engineering MSc at UCL is specifically designed to facilitate this collaboration and provides graduates from a variety of engineering and science disciplines with the advanced training necessary to enter the chemical or biochemical industries.

Degree information

The programme covers core chemical engineering subjects alongside a wide range of options. Students choose either a research or an advanced design project. The advanced design project option is aimed at students who have not undertaken a design project during their undergraduate degree and eventually seek to become Chartered Engineers.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six optional modules (90 credits) and a project (90 credits).

Optional modules 1 (15 credits each) - students must choose three optional modules from the list below (45 credits in total).
-Advanced Process Engineering
-Advanced Safety and Loss Prevention
-Chemical Reaction Engineering II
-Electrochemical Engineering and Power Sources
-Energy Systems and Sustainability
-Fluid-Particle Systems
-Molecular Thermodynamics
-Nature Inspired Chemical Engineering
-Process Systems Modelling and Design (students taking this module must have passed the equivalent of Process Dynamics and Control in their first degree)
-Process Dynamics & Control
-Separation Processes
-Transport Phenomena II

Optional modules 2 (15 credits each) - students must choose three optional modules from the list below (45 credits in total).
-Advanced Bioreactor Engineering
-Environmental Systems
-Mastering Entrepreneurship
-Project Management
-Water and Wastewater Treatment

Research project/design project
All MSc students undertake either a Research Project (90 credits) or an Advanced Design Project (90 credits) that culminates in a project report and oral examination. Students who have already passed a Design Project module in their first degree cannot select the Advanced Design Project module.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, tutorials, and individual and group activities. Invited lectures delivered by industrialists provide a professional and social context. Assessment is through written papers, coursework, a report on the research or design project and an oral examination.

Careers

Upon completion, our graduates can expect to play a major role in developing the technologies that make available most of the things that we use in everyday life and provide the expertise and technology to enhance our health and standard of living. These activities may involve the development of new materials, food processing, water treatment, pharmaceuticals, transport and energy resources as well as being at the frontline, addressing present environmental issues such as climate change.

Typical destinations of recent graduates include: Amec Process and Energy, British Petroleum, Royal Dutch Shell, National Grid, Health & Safety Executive. Career profiles of some of our recent MSc graduates are available on our website.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Project Engineer, Global Energy
-Process Engineer, Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation
-Process Engineer, Petrofac
-Project Control Administrator, Mott MacDonald
-Project Engineer, Kinetics Process Systems Pte Ltd

Employability
Students gain in-depth knowledge of core chemical engineering subjects and of the advanced use of computers in process design, operation and management. They receive thorough training in hazard identification, quantification and mitigation, as well as in risk management and loss prevention, and also learn how to design advanced energy systems, with emphasis on sustainability, energy efficiency and the use of renewable energy sources. Students learn how to make decisions under uncertain scenarios and with limited available data and receive training on how to plan, conduct and manage a complex (design or research) project.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Chemical Engineering, situated in the heart of London, is one of the top-rated departments in the UK, being internationally renowned for its outstanding research.

The programme is the first of its kind in the UK and is accredited by the Institution of Chemical Engineers (IChemE) as meeting IChemE's requirements for Further Learning to Master's Level. This recognition will fulfil an important academic qualification for MSc graduates with suitable first degrees in eventually becoming Corporate Members of IChemE.

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The M.Phil. course in Public History and Cultural Heritage is designed to provide students with a rigorous grounding in public history and to prepare high-calibre graduates in a unique and thorough fashion for the management of cultural heritage. Read more
The M.Phil. course in Public History and Cultural Heritage is designed to provide students with a rigorous grounding in public history and to prepare high-calibre graduates in a unique and thorough fashion for the management of cultural heritage. We define ‘public history’ and ‘cultural heritage’ broadly. The course involves analysis of cultural memory, its construction, reception and loss; and study of the public status and consumption of history in modern society. Political issues surrounding public commemoration and ‘sites of memory’ are examined and the role of museums, galleries and the media in shaping public perceptions of the past is considered. The course also surveys the more concrete questions involved in the conservation, presentation and communication of the physical heritage of past cultures, particularly where interpretation and meaning are contested.

The M.Phil. course in Public History and Cultural Heritage is designed to provide students with a rigorous grounding in public history and to prepare high-calibre graduates in a unique and thorough fashion for the management of cultural heritage. We define 'public history' and 'cultural heritage' broadly. The course involves analysis of cultural memory, its construction, reception and loss; and study of the public status and consumption of history in modern society. Political issues surrounding public commemoration and 'sites of memory' are examined and the role of museums, galleries and the media in shaping public perceptions of the past is considered. The course also surveys the more concrete questions involved in the conservation, presentation and communication of the physical heritage of past cultures, particularly where interpretation and meaning are contested.

The course is taught in collaboration with the leading cultural institutions located in Dublin and several organisations offer internships to students. In recent years participating bodies have included Dublin City Gallery; Dublin City Library and Archive; Glasnevin Trust; Hugh Lane Gallery; The Little Museum of Dublin; Marsh's Library; the National Gallery of Ireland; the National Library of Ireland; the National Museum of Ireland; and St Patrick's Cathedral.

In a variety of modules, students are trained in the analysis and the presentation of their research findings. They are also introduced to the methodological challenges of advanced study and research at postgraduate level. The course comprises a core module, entitled Remembering, Reminding and Forgetting: Public History, Cultural Heritage and the Shaping of the Past, which runs across both terms. A suite of term-long electives is available on substantive themes. A three-month internship, located in one of our collaborating institutions, runs throughout the second term. Practitioner workshops are also held in the second term and provide an opportunity for national and international 'public historians' to discuss their work with the class. In any given year this may include novelists, artists, museum directors, or heritage and tourism policymakers. The course concludes with the production of a dissertation or major project, individually supervised by an member of staff.

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This new three year part-time Masters programme, taught entirely online, is jointly offered by the University of Edinburgh and the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh and leads to the degree of Master of Science (MSc). Read more

This new three year part-time Masters programme, taught entirely online, is jointly offered by the University of Edinburgh and the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh and leads to the degree of Master of Science (MSc). It has been developed in partnership with NHS Education for Scotland (NES).

Aimed primarily at optometrists seeking formal postgraduate training in community-based clinical care, this programme is also highly relevant for medical and surgical trainees entering specialty training in ophthalmology.

This degree is aligned with the curricula of both the FRCSEd and FRCOphth examinations in the United Kingdom and Ireland, making it very attractive to domestic and international students.

This programme is aimed at supporting optometrists seeking formal postgraduate training in community-based clinical care and also medical and surgical trainees entering specialty training ophthalmology.

This programme gives trainees first-rate preparation for the Fellowship of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (FRCSEd) and Fellowship of the Royal College of Ophthalmologists (FRCOphth) examinations or equivalent, with additional emphasis on acquired knowledge and its application.

The third-year MSc research project also serves as an opportunity to develop an academic career.

Online learning

The programme is taught entirely online. Students are supported by synchronous and asynchronous discussion with e-tutors - all leading clinicians in their field - and have access to a large learning resource, including subscriptions to key online books and journals. Students will be expected to lead e-seminars and e-journal clubs.

Our online learning technology is fully interactive, award-winning and enables you to communicate with our highly qualified teaching staff from the comfort of your own home or workplace.

Our online students not only have access to Edinburgh’s excellent resources, but also become part of a supportive online community, bringing together students and tutors from around the world.

The programme is headed up by Professor Baljean Dhillon.

Programme structure

Delivered through an online learning environment, this programme runs on a semester basis over three years and involves approximately 10-15 hours of study each week in a flexible, modular manner. All modules are compulsory and are taught and assessed using a clinical problem-based approach and involve participation in discussion boards and reflective portfolios.

Students accumulate credits by completing a series of modules leading to a Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma or Master of Science degree. The minimum time for completion of the full Masters programme is three years, and the maximum time for completion is six years.

At the certificate and diploma levels, students must attend an end-of-year examination, held in Edinburgh for UK-based students or with a pre-approved partner institution for international students.

Year 1: Certificate

  • Basic Ophthalmic Science: Anatomy, Pathology, Physiology of the Ocular Structures
  • Basic Examination & Investigation Techniques
  • Basic Glaucoma
  • Basic Macular Disease
  • Basic Acute Eye Disease & Vision Loss
  • eTriage and Referral Refinement

Year 2: Diploma

  • Advanced Ophthalmic Science: Anatomy, Pathology, Physiology of the Ocular Structures
  • Advanced Examination & Investigation Techniques
  • Advanced Glaucoma
  • Advanced Macular Disease
  • Advanced Acute Eye Disease & Vision Loss
  • Advanced eTriage and Referral Refinement

Year 3: Masters

The final year involves a supervised masters research project, which will be undertaken in an approved topic that reflects your subspecialty interest and will require the submission of a written project report.

Career opportunities

This programme is designed for:

  • optometrists who wish to enhance their knowledge with particular regard to diagnosis and treatment of ocular disease as they take on an increasingly expanding role in the management of eye disease as part of a multidisciplinary healthcare team
  • medical and surgical trainees who aspire to specialise in ophthalmology, enabling them to study towards their FRCSEd, FRCOphth, or equivalent, in a flexible way

The award of MSc will highlight the student’s commitment to continuing professional development in their chosen career and will ensure a competitive edge when applying for clinical positions. The MSc will also help prepare them for an academic or research career.

The MSc is also relevant to GPs and trainee GPs with a special Interest in ophthalmology, family medicine physicians, orthoptists, ophthalmic nurses and other eye healthcare professionals seeking to advance their understanding of primary care ophthalmology and its interface with secondary care.



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This course offers a wide ranging, in depth knowledge of oral biology in its broadest sense including relevant microbiology and disease processes. Read more
This course offers a wide ranging, in depth knowledge of oral biology in its broadest sense including relevant microbiology and disease processes. It also provides a sound educational background so that you can go on to lead academic oral biology programmes within dental schools.

Why study Oral Biology at Dundee?

This course is specifically designed for individuals who wish to pursue career pathways in academic oral biology, with a focus, though not exclusively, on developing individuals who can deliver and, more importantly, lead oral biology courses within dental schools.

Oral Biology is a significant subject area that is integral to undergraduate and postgraduate dental training worldwide. The scope of Oral Biology includes a range of basic and applied sciences that underpin the practise of dentistry. These subjects include: oral and dental anatomy; craniofacial and dental development; oral physiology; oral neuroscience; oral microbiology. These subjects will be integrated with the relevant disease processes, for example, craniofacial anomalies, dental caries and tooth surface loss.

What's so good about studying Oral Biology at Dundee?

This programme focuses on the research and education experience of the staff in the Dental School in Dundee. Such expertise lies in the fields of craniofacial development and anomalies; pain and jaw muscle control; salivary physiology; cancer biology; microbiology; cariology and tooth surface loss.

In addition it makes use of the extensive resources available for postgraduate programmes: extensive histological collections; virtual microscopy; oral physiology facilities; cell biology and dental materials laboratories.

Who should study this course?

The MSc in Oral Biology is for graduates who wish to pursue a career in academic oral biology. The course will be of particular interest for those wishing to establish themselves as oral biology teachers, innovators and course leaders within a dental school.

Teaching and Assessment

The Dental School is well placed to deliver such a course with an established staff of teaching and research active within oral biology, and its related fields, an in-house e-learning technologist and substantial links to the Centre for Medical Education in the School of Medicine. There will be an opportunity for students to exit with a PGCert in Oral Biology after successful completion of modules 1 -4 or a Diploma in Oral Biology after successful completion of modules 1 - 7.

How you will be taught

The programme will be delivered via a blend of methodologies including: face-to-face lectures / seminars / tutorials; on-line learning; directed and self- directed practical work; self-directed study; journal clubs.
What you will study

The MSc will be taught full-time over one year (September to August). Semester one (Modules 1 – 4) and Semester 2A, 2B (Modules 5 – 8) will provide participants with wide ranging, in-depth knowledge of oral biology, together with focused training in research (lab-base, dissertation or e- Learning) and its associated methodology. The MSc course is built largely on new modules (5) supported by 2 modules run conjointly with the Centre for Medical Education within the Medical School. All modules are compulsory:

Semester 1:

Module 1: Academic skills 1: principles of learning and teaching (15 credits)
Module 2: Cranio-facial development and anomalies (15 credits)
Module 3: Dental and periodontal tissues, development and structure (20 credits)
Module 4: Oral mucosa and disorders (10 credits)

Semesters 2A and 2B

Module 5a: Academic skills 2a: principles of assessment (15 credits)
Module 5b: Academic Skills 2b:educational skills
Module 6: Neuroscience (20 credits)
Module 7: Oral environment and endemic oral disease (20 credits)
Module 8: Project (60 credits)

The project is designed to encourage students to further develop their skills. This could take the form of a supervised laboratory research project, a literature based dissertation or an educational project. The educational project would be based around the development of an innovative learning resource utilising the experience of the dental school learning technologist.

How you will be assessed

Exams on the taught element of the programme will be held at the end of semester one. Essays and assignments will also contribute to the final mark, and the dissertation will be assessed through the production of a thesis and a viva exam.

Careers

The MSc Oral Biology is aimed at dental or science graduates who are either early in their careers or wish to establish themselves as oral biologists within dental schools. Oral Biology is a recognised discipline in many dental schools worldwide. Graduates will have gained sufficient knowledge and skills to enable them to be teachers, innovators and educational leaders in the field. In addition, successful graduates will be well placed to undertake further postgraduate study at PhD level. In some cases, this may possible within the existing research environments within the Dental School, the wider College of Medicine Dentistry and Nursing and the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification of the University of Dundee.

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Gain the expertise to determine if buildings are achieving their required energy efficiency targets, and how to go about improving them. Read more
Gain the expertise to determine if buildings are achieving their required energy efficiency targets, and how to go about improving them.

The energy performance of today's new buildings must withstand far more scrutiny than ever before. Those involved or investing in construction projects will need an increasing awareness of these factors to maintain compliance with the law, as tougher EU and UK directives for building performance are drawn up and legislated.

You will use the latest technologies to evaluate building performance, including software to model 2D thermal movement or track moisture. You will also visit real-life testing sites and help set up and carry out some of the procedures yourself, investigating heat loss, heat transfer, moisture development and thermal bridges.

Your course will provide an essential platform if you are wanting to evaluate the energy efficiency of buildings, or if you want to get involved in building forensics or surveying.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/buildingperformance_apd

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

New legislation and the need for more energy efficient buildings will ensure the demand for experts in the design and evaluation of high-performing homes and workplaces continues to grow. Specialist knowledge in this field should help if you already work in surveying, building forensics and energy efficient assessment to further your career.

- Sustainable Property Developer
- Energy Efficient Assessor
- Building Forensic Assessor
- Building Surveyor

Careers advice:
The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You'll be exposed to the latest techniques and technologies to measure heat loss and energy transfer, as well as the latest cutting-edge research from our Sustainability Institute and our School of Built Environment & Engineering.

Our teaching staff are involved in building performance evaluation on national research schemes. Our University is frequently commissioned by Innovate UK, a leading technology advisory body, to analyse the best energy performing buildings in the country, which underlines our expertise in this area. Our academics will feed these findings directly into your learning, giving you access to first-class research and a rich variety of contacts to network with.

You will also have access to our state-of-the-art building performance testing kits to analyse buildings in the field, such as thermal imaging cameras and drone technology, and you will work with the latest 2D and dynamic simulation modelling software to measure standards and sharpen your experience of working with the latest technology.

Core Modules

Building Performance & Evaluation
Develop the knowledge of a range of tools and techniques to analyse the energy performance of a building.

Building Environmental Science & Modelling
Gain an overview of the science that governs how buildings perform in relation to occupant comfort, health, energy use and service life.

Chris Gorse

Senior Lecturer

"You will be exposed to the latest methods of testing and monitoring buildings. We have researchers who have informed building performance evaluation and their knowledge feeds directly into this course."

Chris Gorse is Professor of Construction & Project Management and Director of Leeds Sustainability Institute. He leads projects in the areas of sustainability, low carbon and building performance and has an interest in domestic new builds, commercial buildings and refurbishment. Chris is an established author and has consultancy experience in construction management and law.

Facilities

- Design Studios
Our modern multi-media studios include a dedicated CAD suite and specialist software, such as REVIT, allowing you to develop skills in 3D design and building information modelling.

- Library
Our Library is one of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7, every day of the year. However you like to work, our Library has you covered with group and silent study areas, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Leeds Sustainability Institute
We offer the latest drone and thermal imaging technology to provide new ways of measuring and evaluating building sustainability.

- Broadcasting Place
Keeping fit is easy at Leeds Beckett - our fitness suites are easy to get to, kitted out with all the latest technology and available to all sports members.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Habitat loss, global climate change, water and air pollution, ozone depletion, species invasions, loss of biodiversity, and the accumulation of toxic wastes are among the many environmental dilemmas our society faces. Read more

Program overview

Habitat loss, global climate change, water and air pollution, ozone depletion, species invasions, loss of biodiversity, and the accumulation of toxic wastes are among the many environmental dilemmas our society faces. These complex problems pit environmental limits against economic development, diverse cultures, ethics, values, and social stability and therefore require an understanding of science, policy, society, history, and economics. Environmental scientists must use integrated and holistic approaches to understand and find sustainable solutions to these problems. Graduates of the environmental science program are well prepared for a variety of environmental careers including consulting, research, policy, and outreach, or further graduate work towards a doctoral degree.

Plan of study

Built on the concept that environmental issues are inherently interdisciplinary, the program is offered in collaboration with the College of Liberal Arts. The curriculum provides students with a deep understanding of the science behind our environmental problems, the complex set of circumstances that impact environmental issues, and how environmental decisions and policies must attempt to find a balance between environmental conservation, human well-being, and economic development. Students augment their hands-on classroom work with in-depth experiential learning through an individual thesis or project that provides students with the chance to work on real-world environmental problems under the guidance of skilled environmental scientists. The program includes a core curriculum and electives chosen to reflect the student’s background and career goals. A minimum of 34 semester credit hours beyond the bachelor’s degree is required. All students must propose, conduct, and report on an original research thesis or project.

Curriculum

Course sequence differs according to thesis/project option, see website for a particular option's modules
http://www.rit.edu/programs/environmental-science-ms

Other admission requirements

-Submit official transcripts (in English) from all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Have a minimum GPA of 3.0 (overall and in science/math).
-Submit a statement outlining the candidate's research/project interests, career goals, and suitability to the program.
-Submit three letters of recommendation, and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). A minimum score of 600 (paper-based) is required. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) scores are accepted in place of the TOEFL exam. Minimum scores will vary; however, the absolute minimum score required for unconditional acceptance is 7.0. For additional information about the IELTS, please visit http://www.ielts.org.
-The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is recommended but not required for applicants with an undergraduate degree from a US institution.The GRE is required for International applicants.
-Students are strongly encouraged to contact program faculty before applying to discuss thesis topics and research projects. Students will be matched with a potential thesis advisor at the time of admission.

Additional information

Facilities and equipment:
The program provides a wide range of research opportunities. Many faculty members are engaged in field-based projects and the college boasts excellent laboratory facilities that support field research, including wet laboratories and computer facilities (traditional and geographic information systems). For a list of past and present projects, and faculty research interests, please visit the program website.

Monitoring, mapping, and field equipment:
ArcGIS and IDRISI GIS software, ENVS and ERDAS Remote Sensing software, Garmin and Trimble GPS receivers, soil sampling and analysis equipment, water sampling devices, multisonde water quality probes and dissolved oxygen meters, SCT meter, ponar dredges, Li-Cor light meter, plankton samplers, macroinvertebrate nets/samplers, and a library of field reference texts.

Other equipment:
Fluorimeter, Raman Spectrometer, UV-Vis-IR, GC-MS, ICP, atomic absorption, polarimeter, centrifuge, electrochemical equipment, gas chromatographs, HPLC, viscometer, ESR (built in-house), confocal microscope, infrared carbon dioxide analyzer, Unisense microelectrode system, Lachat autoanalyzer, incubators, capillary electrophoresis, DSCs, DMA, NMR, drying oven, Wiley mill.

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This is an innovative programme based around the work of Professor Neil Thompson, a highly respected international thought leader who writes, educates and advises on a wide range of social well-being issues. Read more
This is an innovative programme based around the work of Professor Neil Thompson, a highly respected international thought leader who writes, educates and advises on a wide range of social well-being issues. As such this programme enables practitioners in social work, social care, youth and community work, probation studies, counselling and associated areas of professional practice to study online with Professor Neil Thompson, a leading author in the field.

The programme focus is on developing advanced practice – that is, enabling practitioners to take their knowledge, skills and values to an advanced level in order to maximise (i) their effectiveness as professionals; and (ii) their career opportunities.

The programme blends well-established wisdom with cutting-edge ideas, with a clear focus on how those ideas can be used in practice. Online discussion forums enable students to engage with Professor Thompson, other tutors and fellow students.

The multidisciplinary nature of the programme enables students to not only appreciate the perspectives of other professional groups, but also to learn from those perspectives by being exposed to a wide range of insights.

This course is delivered part-time and is delivered 100% online to allow flexibility for study. 2016/17 intake commences in January (September intake thereafter).

Key Course Features

- Based on the work of Professor Neil Thompson a leading, highly respected author in the field.

- On-line learning provides accessibility and flexibility – a) the programme is accessible to people internationally who would not otherwise have the opportunity to study with Professor Thompson and b) this allows excellent flexibility for times and days of study, making it appropriate for those in full-time employment.

- A stimulating blend of theory and practice - intellectually rigorous and stretching, while also retaining a clear focus on the requirements of practice.

- A supportive online learning community.

The programme aims to enable experienced professionals to:

- Engage critically with relevant theory, policy and practice issues in their respective professional fields.

- Develop a fuller understanding of what constitutes advanced practice and what steps are necessary to achieve it.

- Be better equipped to operate at an advanced level in terms of knowledge, skills, values and confidence.

What will you study?

YEAR 1
MODULES

- Critically Reflective Practice – developing an advanced–level approach to the use of theory and research in practice.

- Professionalism and Leadership – exploring and establishing (i) the importance of professionalism; and (ii) the relationship between professionalism and leadership.

- Research Methods – an introduction to what is involved in meeting the requirements of legitimate social science research (in preparation for the dissertation)

YEAR 2
MODULES

- Loss, Grief and Trauma – an innovative exploration of the significant, but often unrecognised) impact of loss, grief and trauma across all aspects of human services practice.

- Developing Advanced Practice – a detailed examination of the nature, significance, importance and impact of advanced practice.

YEAR 3
MODULES

- Final year dissertation – an opportunity to undertake either (i) an original small-scale research project; or (ii) a critical analysis of one or more aspects of human services practice.

The information listed in this section is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal academic framework review, so may be subject to change.

Assessment and Teaching

Assessment will include conventional essays, development of a portfolio, an organisational analysis, a reflective log and a dissertation.

Career Prospects

Successful completion of the programme will open the doors to potential roles as senior practitioners across various disciplines, plus consultant and management roles.

This programme is designed for those already in practice or who are looking to return to work after a career break.

The Careers & Zone at Wrexham Glyndŵr University is there to help you make decisions and plan the next steps towards a bright future. From finding work or further study to working out your interests, skills and aspirations, they can provide you with the expert information, advice and guidance you need.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.glyndwr.ac.uk/en/Howtoapply/Directapplicationform/

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The M.S. in Criminal Justice trains individuals through an interdisciplinary focus in an online environment. The program prepares students through the core curriculum and allows for specialty training through various concentrations. Read more

The M.S. in Criminal Justice trains individuals through an interdisciplinary focus in an online environment. The program prepares students through the core curriculum and allows for specialty training through various concentrations.

This facilitates choice for students and fosters the development of specialized expertise. Students will complete the thirty hour program that includes core courses, specialty concentrations, and electives.

Proudly Offering the Valor Award 20% Scholarship for Law Enforcement, Veterans, Military, and First Responders

This program is designed for individuals looking for careers in or as:

  • Police Officer
  • County Sheriff / Deputy Sheriff
  • State Trooper / Highway Patrol Officer
  • Game Warden / Conservation Officer
  • Detective
  • Canine Officer / K9 Handler
  • Animal Cruelty Investigator
  • Park Ranger
  • FBI Special Agent
  • DEA Agent
  • Secret Service Special Agent
  • ICE Special Agent
  • Federal Air Marshal
  • Correctional Officer
  • Correctional Counselor
  • Parole Officer
  • Legal Assistant or Legal Researcher
  • Bailiff
  • Pre-trial Officer
  • Loss Prevention Officer - Loss Prevention Manager
  • Bounty Hunter - Bail Enforcement Agent
  • Public Safety Officer
  • Community Liaison Officer

To see a complete list of possible career options, click here.

Program Format

The master's program is offered entirely online. The online format allows for students to participate in courses from anywhere in the world where internet access is available. In addition, it allows for the flexibility of completing your master's degree without interrupting your career. For information on the online/residential bachelor's program, click here. For information on the online doctoral program, click here.

Master's students are provided NSU computer accounts including email and Blackboard, but must obtain their own Internet service providers, use their own computer systems and have a usable web camera. Online students use the web to access course materials, announcements, email, distance library services, subscription library databases, and other information, and for interaction with faculty and fellow students. Online, interactive learning methods are based on the use of Blackboard as a course management system. Online activities facilitate frequent student-to-faculty and student-to-student interaction. They are supported by threaded discussion boards, white boards, chat rooms, email, and multimedia presentations. In addition, Blackboard enables students to submit assignments online in multimedia formats and to receive their professors' reviews of assignments online in the same formats.

Curriculum

The Master's program is comprised of 30 credits. The core curriculum is comprised of five courses (15 credits) and one elective course (3 credits). The specialty concentrations are comprised of four courses (12 credits).

Core Courses (15 Credits)

  • CJI 0510 Survey Issues in Criminal Justice (3 credits)
  • CJI 0520 Social Administration of Criminal Justice (3 credits)
  • CJI 0530 Legal Issues in Criminal Justice (3 credits)
  • CJI 0540 Program Evaluation in Criminal Justice (3 credits)
  • CJI 0550 Investigative Processes (3 credits)

Specialty Concentrations (12 Credits)

Students must choose one concentration below and complete 12 credits within the concentration. (The concentrations remain the same)

Electives (3 Credits)

Students must choose one or a combination of electives below to obtain a total of 3 credit hours.

  • One, three (3) credit class
  • Practicum Placement (3, 6, or 9 Credit options)
  • Master's Thesis (6 Credits)


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This award-winning programme combines the expertise of anthropologists and biologists to examine primate conservation biology in a broad context, with particular emphasis on the relationships between humans and wildlife in forest and woodland environments. Read more
This award-winning programme combines the expertise of anthropologists and biologists to examine primate conservation biology in a broad context, with particular emphasis on the relationships between humans and wildlife in forest and woodland environments. It provides an international and multidisciplinary forum to help understand the issues and promote effective action.

Whether working in the lab, with local conservation groups (including zoos and NGOs), or in the field, you will find yourself in a collaborative and supportive environment, working with international scholars in primate conservation and gaining first-hand experience to enact positive change.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/primate-conservation/

Why choose this course?

- A pioneering programme providing scientific, professional training and accreditation to conservation scientists

- Awarded the Queen's Anniversary Prize in 2008

- Opportunity to work alongside leading academics for example Professor Anna Nekaris, Professor Vincent Nijman and Dr Kate Hill

- Excellent learning resources both at Brookes and through Oxford’s museums and libraries including the Bodleian Library, the Radcliffe Science Library, and the Museum of Natural History

- Links with conservation organisations and NGOs, both internationally and closer to home, including Fauna and Flora International, TRAFFIC and Conservation International

- Field trips for MSc students to Apenheul Primate Park in the Netherlands as well as to sanctuaries and zoos in the UK

- A dynamic community of research scholars undertaking internationally recognised and world leading research.

Teaching and learning

Teaching is through a combination of lectures, research seminars, training workshops, tutorials, case studies, seminar presentations, site visits, computer-aided learning, independent reading and supervised research.

Each of the six modules is assessed by means of coursework assignments that reflect the individual interests and strengths of each student. Coursework assignments for six taught modules are completed and handed in at the end of the semester, and written feedback is given before the start of the following semester. A seventh module, the final project, must be handed in before the start of the first semester of the next academic year. It will be assessed during this semester with an examinations meeting at the beginning of February, after which students receive their final marks.

An important feature of the course is the contribution by each student towards an outreach project that brings primate conservation issues into a public arena. Examples include a poster, display or presentation at a scientific meeting, university society or school. Students may also choose to write their dissertation specifically for scientific publication.

Round-table discussions form a regular aspect of the course and enable closer examination of conservation issues through a sharing of perspectives by the whole group.

Careers

This unique postgraduate programme trains new generations of anthropologists, conservation biologists, captive care givers and educators concerned with the serious plight of non-human primates who seek practical solutions to their continuing survival. It provides the skills, knowledge and confidence to enable you to contribute to arresting and reversing the current devastating destruction of our tropical forests and the loss of the species that live in them.

You will be joining a supportive global network of former students working across all areas of conservation in organisations from the BBC Natural History Unit through to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and in roles from keeper and education officer in zoos across the UK and North America to paid researcher at institutes of higher education. Some of our students have even gone on to run their own conservation-related NGOs.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Our vibrant research culture is driven by a thriving and collaborative community of academic staff and doctoral students. In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) 70% of our work was judged to be of international quality in terms of originality, significance and rigour, with 5% "world leading".

Our strong performance in the RAE, along with our expanding consultancy activities, have enabled us to attract high quality staff and students and helped to generate funding for research projects.

Conservation Environment and Development, comprising several research clusters.

The Nocturnal Primate Research Group specialises in mapping the diversity of the nocturnal primates of Africa, Asia, Madagascar and Latin America through multidisciplinary teamwork that includes comparative studies of anatomy, physiology, behaviour, ecology and genetics. Field studies are helping to determine the origins and distribution of these neglected species, as well as indicating the conservation status of declining forests and woodlands. The NPRG has developed a widespread network of collaborative links with biologists, game wardens, forestry officers, wildlife societies, museums and zoos/sanctuaries.

The Human Interactions With and Constructions of the Environment Research Group develops and trains an interdisciplinary team of researchers to investigate priorities within conservation research - using an interdisciplinary framework in anthropology, primatology, rural development studies, and conservation biology.

The Oxford Wildlife Trade Research Group (OWTRG) aims to quantify all aspects of the trade in wild animals through multidisciplinary teamwork including anthropology, social sciences, natural resource management, biodiversity conservation, environmental economics, and legislation. Their strong focus is on wildlife trade in tropical countries –as this is where most of the world's biodiversity resides and where the impacts of the wildlife trade are arguably the greatest. Recognizing that the wildlife trade is a truly global enterprise they also focus on the role of consumer countries.

The Europe Japan Research Centre (EJRC) organises and disseminates the research of all Brookes staff working on Japan as well as a large number of affiliated Research Fellows.

The Human Origins and Palaeo Environments Research Cluster carries out ground-breaking interdisciplinary research, focussed on evolutionary anthropology and environmental reconstruction and change. The study published in the journal Science reports findings from an eight-year archaeological excavation at a site called Jebel Faya in the United Arab Emirates. Palaeolithic stone tools found at the Jebel Faya were similar to tools produced by early modern humans in east Africa, but very different from those produced to the north, in the Levant and the mountains of Iran. This suggested early modern humans migrated into Arabia directly from Africa and not via the Nile Valley and the Near East as is usually suggested. The new findings will reinvigorate the debate about human origins and how we became a global species.

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