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Masters Degrees (Logic)

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Logic and Computation at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Logic and Computation at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

Logic is the basis for reasoning about what we can express and compute, having a profound influence in philosophy, linguistics, mathematics, computer science, and electronics. Since the invention of computers, logic has always been the primary source of ideas and techniques for the theoretical and practical development of programming.

Today, as the scope of programming technologies expands, and the horizon of applications widens, research in logic and its applications in software and hardware development is booming. In industry, formal methods are an integral part of system development, e.g., in automotive electronics, avionics, and chip design.

The MRes Logic and Computation course will teach you about advanced techniques in logic and their applications in research problems in computer science. You will receive an elite education of direct relevance to research and development problems in contemporary information and communication technology (ICT).

Key Features

Teaching score of Excellent.

Highest percentage of top-class researchers of any Computer Science department in Wales – and only 12 in the UK have higher.

70% of the research activity assessed as world-leading or internationally excellent.

Our industrial programme IT Wales which can arrange vacation employment placements.

A state-of-the-art education.

Friendly staff, committed to the highest standards.

A university with high success rate, low drop-out rate, and excellent student support.

Swansea's Library spends more per student on books and other resources than any other university in Wales, and most in the UK.

Course Content

Research Component

The main part of the MRes in Logic and Computation is a substantial and challenging project involving cutting edge research. The completion of such a project will give you the ability and confidence to pursue a successful career in industrial research and development, or to proceed to academic PhD studies.

Taught Component

In seminars and reading courses you will enter the world of research by studying general topics in theoretical computer science as well as special topics for your research project. Guided by your supervisor you will conquer new technical subjects and learn to critically assess current research.

Lecturers and students will meet regularly to discuss recent developments and give informal talks. Topics of the seminars are chosen in accordance with the research projects, and will cover material such as:

Theorem proving techniques

Formal program verification

Algebraic and coalgebraic specification

Modelling of distributed systems

Advanced methods in complexity theory

Additionally you will choose selected taught modules covering important topics such as Critical Systems, IT Security, Concepts of Programming

Languages, Artificial Intelligence Applications, Design Patterns and Generic Programming.

Facilities

The Department is well equipped for teaching, and is continually upgrading its laboratories to ensure equipment is up-to-date – equipment is never more than three years old, and rarely more than two. Currently, students use three fully networked laboratories: one, running Windows; another running Linux; and a project laboratory, containing specialised equipment. These laboratories support a wide range of software, including the programming languages Java, C# and the .net framework, C, C++, Haskell and Prolog among many; integrated programme development environments such as Visual Studio and Netbeans; the widely-used Microsoft Office package; web access tools; and many special purpose software tools including graphical rendering and image manipulation tools; expert system production tools; concurrent system modelling tools; World Wide Web authoring tools; and databases.

Careers

All Computer Science courses will provide you the transferable skills and knowledge to help you take advantage of the excellent employment and career development prospects in an ever growing and changing computing and ICT industry.

90% of Swansea’s Computer Science graduates are in full-time employment or further study within six months of graduating (HESA June 2011).

Some example job titles from the HESA survey 2011:

Software Engineer: Motorola Solutions

Change Coordinator: Logica

Software Developer/Engineer: NS Technology

Workflow Developer: Irwin Mitchell

IT Developer: Crimsan Consultants

Consultant: Crimsan Consultants

Programmer: Evil Twin Artworks

Web Developer & Web Support: VSI Thinking

Software Developer: Wireless Innovations

Associate Business Application Analyst: CDC Software

Software Developer: OpenBet Technologies

Technical Support Consultant: Alterian

Programming: Rock It

Software Developer: BMJ Group

Research

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that Swansea Computer Science ranked 11th in the UK for percentage of world-leading research, and 1st in Wales for research excellence. 40% of our submitted research assessed as world-leading quality (4*).



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This programme provides a firm foundation in these core areas of contemporary philosophy, including philosophy of logic as well as formal methods. Read more

MLitt in Logic and Metaphysics

This programme provides a firm foundation in these core areas of contemporary philosophy, including philosophy of logic as well as formal methods. The programme offers students a specialist education in various topics within both logic and metaphysics, whilst encouraging connections between these specialisms, and equipping students with tools for future research at doctoral level.

Features

* In the latest Philosophical Gourmet Report produced by Brian Leiter the St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme was ranked the third best Philosophy programme in the UK http://www.philosophicalgourmet.com

* Between 40 – 50 taught postgraduate students are admitted each year, drawn from the UK and around the world.

* Over 35 dedicated full-time Philosophy staff in the SASP programme work in a broad spectrum of disciplines, from logic and metaphysics to moral philosophy and beyond.

* The SASP programme maintains a staff of authoritative researchers, a majority of whom have significant experience of teaching at leading international institutions, and which is large enough to teach a comprehensive and flexible range of graduate courses, and to supervise research projects.

* There is an annual reading party in the Scottish Highlands for all taught and research postgraduates and staff.

* Friendly and congenial atmosphere in which postgraduate students are encouraged to participate actively through, for example, the weekly Graduate Seminar and the Philosophy Club.

Postgraduate community

SASP is taught by the Philosophy departments in the universities of St Andrews and Stirling. The philosophy graduate programmes of St Andrews and Stirling are fully merged for all postgraduate degrees.

St Andrews and Stirling together form Scotland’s premier centre for philosophy and one of the top philosophy schools in the United Kingdom. The philosophical ambience is intense, friendly and co-operative.

The research programme is enhanced by a busy programme of conferences, workshops and visiting speakers from universities in the UK and from abroad. The St Andrews Philosophy Club meets several times each semester, usually on Wednesday afternoons, for papers by visiting speakers.

Every MLitt student is assigned an adviser at the beginning of the year. They provide you with individual guidance on essay planning, essay writing, academic conduct, and where appropriate, advice on how best to apply for a PhD place.

If you wish to brush up on your knowledge of logic, or if you have limited prior experience in this area, the SASP programme runs an additional weekly seminar, Basic Logic, throughout the year.

St Andrews also has a weekly seminar run by and for the research students, meeting Friday evenings, to which everyone is welcome. Arché (Philosophical Research Centre for the Philosophy of Logic, Language, Metaphysics and Epistemology) runs a variety of informal seminars and discussion groups. The programme also supports and encourages a wide range of student-led reading groups on topics relevant to their degree.

The student Philosophy Society (PhilSoc) is the most vibrant and active student-led society in the Faculty of Arts. It boasts a lively programme of stimulating talks and events throughout the year and attracts a regular following from across the University.

There is an annual reading party for postgraduate students and staff. The party provides an opportunity for you to present your work in an informal and relaxed setting. The reading party takes place at a country retreat in beautiful surroundings: a fine opportunity for seeing Scotland, hiking, and sampling Scottish food and drink, with the give and take of philosophy in the evenings.

The SASP programme has the most diverse postgraduate student population in the University. In addition to students from the UK, USA, Canada and across Europe, the programme has in recent years attracted students from areas such as China, Hong Kong, the Middle East and South America. This gives a uniquely international, cosmopolitan and welcoming feel to the philosophical community.

Careers

The SASP MLitt is a much sought after and highly desirable qualification which is greatly valued by leading employers nationally and internationally.

Structure of the MLitt programmes

The structure of our MLitt programmes is the same, regardless of which you choose to do.

Upon successful completion of the taught component of the programme you can progress to the MLitt dissertation which is completed during the summer. The current MLitt population is 40 students, drawn from the UK and around the world, and the annual intake is around 40 – 50 students. Many MLitt students progress to a PhD programme here or elsewhere, including some of the top institutions in the US. A first degree in or including philosophy is the normal pre-requisite. Postgraduates are taught in dedicated postgraduate classes.

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The Department of Philosophy has exceptional research strength in the fields of logic and the philosophy of mathematics, and very strong links with the School of Mathematics, including a joint position in both departments. Read more
The Department of Philosophy has exceptional research strength in the fields of logic and the philosophy of mathematics, and very strong links with the School of Mathematics, including a joint position in both departments. It is ranked by the Philosophical Gourmet Report as the strongest department in the UK for mathematical logic, and the second strongest for philosophical logic.

Our MA draws on these strengths and is open to students with first degrees in philosophy (subject to a suitable background in logic) or mathematics. It consists of six taught units, examined by essay, and a 15,000-word dissertation.

As a postgraduate student, you will be an active member of the department’s flourishing research culture. You will be encouraged to attend and participate in both the weekly departmental research seminar and in the Philosophy and History of Science seminars, which often feature well-known scholars in the field, from Bristol and beyond. There is also a weekly postgraduate seminar, where you may present your own work before your peers and learn to develop your argumentative strategies in a supportive environment.

Programme structure

The MA consists of taught components, examined by essay, and a dissertation. You will take six taught units, normally three in each semester.

Core units
-Philosophical Writing and Research
-Axiomatic Set Theory
-Epistemology and Metaphysics
-Philosophy and History of Mathematics
-Essay Unit

One optional unit
-Logic
-A second essay unit

Optional units can vary each year.

Dissertation
Satisfactory completion of semesters one and twp will allow you to progress to writing a dissertation of at most 15,000 words on an approved topic of your choice. The dissertation is your chance to produce an extended piece of philosophical research that can act as preparation for a graduate research degree.

Careers

Students who completed the MA in Logic and Philosophy of Mathematics have taken up careers as teachers and software developers. The IT industry has benefited from a number of graduates from this programme.

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Philosophy of Language and Logic involves the study of linguistic expressions such as words, sentences, texts and dialogues, where the emphasis is on the context in which these expressions are interpreted. Read more

Master's specialisation in Philosophy of Language and Logic (Research)

Philosophy of Language and Logic involves the study of linguistic expressions such as words, sentences, texts and dialogues, where the emphasis is on the context in which these expressions are interpreted.
The programme "Philosophy of Language and Logic" focuses on the development of analytical philosophy from Frege onwards and the rise of modern semantics in the last decades of the 20th century. Its main research interests are the context-dependent interpretation and its relation to formal semantics and pragmatics, and philosophy of mind. Typical themes that are addressed are context-dependence and presupposition, dynamic theories of meaning, discourse and discourse structure, the analysis of propositional attitudes and their relation to mental states, and the relation between interpretation and psychological processes.
Current research is connected with two NWO-funded projects that are being carried out within this section, namely "Information Integration in Discourse" and "Reasoning and the Brain" (in collaboration with the University of Amsterdam and the F.C. Donders Centre). Furthermore, together with the department of linguistics, this section organises the interdisciplinary "Semantics Colloquium".
The members of the section work together with several philosophical and semantic centres in the Netherlands, Germany, France and the United States.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/logic

Admission requirements for international students

1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Philosophy or in a related discipline (in the latter case, students must have acquired at least 60 EC in Philosophical disciplines).
The applicant must have a degree with merit or distinction or equivalent. Meaning: a student’s weighted grade-point average in philosophy in the 2nd and 3rd year of their Bachelor's programme must be the equivalent of 7.5 or more (on the Dutch scale of 10).
On the page "Conversions of international grades" you will find an indication of what the equivalent of a Dutch 7.5 or 8 might be in the country where you obtained your Bachelor’s degree.

2. A proficiency in English
In order to take part in this programme, you need to have fluency in both written and spoken English. Non-native speakers of English* without a Dutch Master's degree must either have obtained a higher diploma from an English-teaching institution or be in possession of one of the following certificates:
- A TOEFL score of >577 (paper based) or >233 (computer based) or >90 (internet based)
- An IELTS score of >6.5
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with a mark of C or higher

3. Highly motivated
An applicant must be able to demonstrate to the Examination Board that they have serious research interests and skills. Applicants must write a motivation letter and send a writing sample which can help evaluate their research and writing skills.

Career prospects

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess essential skills, namely the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually, and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate, they require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Job positions

This programme has been designed for people with the ambition to do research. Graduates tend to fall into three groups. A majority of the students continue their research within academia by applying for a doctoral programme in the Netherlands or abroad. We take particular pride in the fact that more than 75 percent of our graduates manage to obtain a PhD position within two years of graduating. A second group goes on to teach philosophy at secondary schools. And a third group enter research-related professions outside of education. Our graduates are also represented in journalism, science policy, and politics.

Our approach to this field

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess two essential skills, namely the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate. They require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Our research in this field

What makes this programme special?
The English-taught Research Master's programme in Philosophy is a two-year course that is meant for students of proven ability who wish to prepare for an academic career in philosophy. We offer the following to provide you with the best possible academic background:
- A combination of internationally acclaimed research and excellent teaching
- A big offer of research seminars in the history of philosophy, continental philosophy and analytic philosophy
- A broad range of specialisations in Philosophical Anthropology, Metaphysics, Philosophy of mind, Philosophy of language and Logic, Philosophical Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy and the History of Philosophy
- An emphasis on the training of research skills
- A personal supervisor who guides you throughout the programme
- An excellent preparation for post-graduate life by means of the specialised character of the Research Master's thesis, which is composed of a publishable article and of a PhD research proposal
- A high chance of obtaining a PhD position in the Netherlands or abroad
- An international climate.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/logic

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This one year taught postgraduate programme leads to the degree of MSc in Pure Mathematics and Mathematical Logic. Read more
This one year taught postgraduate programme leads to the degree of MSc in Pure Mathematics and Mathematical Logic. The programme is suitable not only for students who wish to improve their background knowledge prior to applying to undertake a PhD by research, but also for students who wish to enhance their knowledge of postgraduate-level abstract mathematics.

The MSc comprises of the taught component, running from the start of the academic year in September until the end of the second semester in late Spring, followed by the dissertation component running from May until September.

During the taught component of the course, you will normally take five units together with a written project. You may choose exclusively pure topics, exclusively logic topics, or, a mixture of both. The project is normally an expository account of a piece of mathematics and you will write this under the guidance of a supervisor. The taught component comprises of conventional lectures supported by examples classes, project work and independent learning via reading material.

After successfully completing the taught component, you will prepare a dissertation on an advanced topic in pure mathematics or mathematical logic, normally of current or recent research interest, chosen in consultation with your supervisor.

You can also take the programme part-time, over a period of two years. There is some flexibility in the precise arrangements for this programme, but you would normally attend two lecture courses each semester for three semesters before commencing work on your dissertation.

Aims

The aims of the programme are to provide training in a range of topics related to pure mathematics and mathematical logic, to encourage a sophisticated and critical approach to mathematics, and to prepare students who have the ability and desire to follow careers as professional mathematicians and logicians in industry or research.

Coursework and assessment

The taught component is assessed by coursework, project work and by written examination. The written exams take place at the end of January (for the first semester course units) and the end of May (for the second semester course units). The dissertation component is assessed by the quality and competence of the written dissertation.

The Postgraduate Diploma and Postgraduate Certificate exist as exit awards for students who do not pass at MSc level.

Course unit details

The taught courses cover material related to the research interests of the academic staff. Topics covered in lectured course units normally include: set theory, group theory, dynamical systems and ergodic theory, measure theory, functional analysis, algebraic topology, Godel's theorems, hyperbolic geometry, Lie algebras, analytic number theory, Galois theory, predicate logic, computation and complexity, and other topics relevant to current mathematics.

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In this Master's specialisation, mathematicians working in areas pertinent to (theoretical) computer science, like algebra and logic, and theoretical computer scientists, working in areas as formal methods and theorem proving, have joined forces to establish a specialisation in the Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science. Read more
In this Master's specialisation, mathematicians working in areas pertinent to (theoretical) computer science, like algebra and logic, and theoretical computer scientists, working in areas as formal methods and theorem proving, have joined forces to establish a specialisation in the Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science. The programme is unique in the Netherlands and will be built on the excellence of both research institutes and the successful collaborations therein.
The emphasis of the Master's is on a combination of a genuine theoretical and up-to-date foundation in the pertinent mathematical subjects combined with an equally genuine and up-to-date training in key aspects of theoretical computer science. For this reason, the mathematics courses in this curriculum concentrate on Algebra, Complexity Theory, Logic, Number Theory, and Combinatorics. The computer science courses concentrate on Formal Methods, Type Theory, Category Theory, Coalgebra and Theorem Proving.
Within both institutes, ICIS and WINST, there is a concentration of researchers working on mathematical logic and theoretical computer science with a collaboration that is unique in the Netherlands. The research topics range from work on algebra, logic and computability, to models of distributed, parallel and quantum computation, as well as mathematical abstractions to reason about programmes and programming languages.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/mathematics/foundations

Admission requirements for international students

1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Mathematics or Computer Science
In order to get admission to this Master’s you will need a completed Bachelor's in mathematics or computer science that have a strong mathematical background and theoretical interests. We will select students based on their motivation and their background. Mathematical maturity is essential and basic knowledge of logic and discrete mathematics is expected.

2. A proficiency in English
In order to take part in the programme, you need to have fluency in English, both written and spoken. Non-native speakers of English without a Dutch Bachelor's degree or VWO diploma need one of the following:
- TOEFL score of ≥575 (paper based) or ≥90 (internet based)
- IELTS score of ≥6.5
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE), with a mark of C or higher

Career prospects

There is a serious shortage of well-trained information specialists. Often students are offered a job before they have actually finished their study. About 20% of our graduates choose to go on to do a PhD but most find jobs as systems builders, ICT specialists or ICT managers in the private sector or within government.

Our approach to this field

In this Master's specialisation, mathematicians working in areas pertinent to (theoretical) computer science, like algebra and logic, and theoretical computer scientists, working in areas as formal methods and theorem proving, have joined forces to establish a specialisation in the Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science. The programme is unique in the Netherlands and will be built on the excellence of both research institutes and the successful collaborations therein.

The emphasis of the Master's is on a combination of a genuine theoretical and up-to-date foundation in the pertinent mathematical subjects combined with an equally genuine and up-to-date training in key aspects of theoretical computer science. For this reason, the mathematics courses in this curriculum concentrate on Algebra, General Topology, Logic, Number Theory, and Combinatorics. The computer science courses concentrate on Formal Methods, Type Theory, Category Theory, Coalgebra and Theorem Proving.

Our research in this field

Within both institutes, ICIS and WINST, there is a concentration of researchers working on mathematical logic and theoretical computer science with a collaboration that is unique in the Netherlands. The research topics range from work on algebra, logic and computability, to models of distributed, parallel and quantum computation, as well as mathematical abstractions to reason about programmes and programming languages.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/mathematics/foundations

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This Conversion Diploma is designed for those who wish to pursue the study of philosophy at postgraduate level but have studied little or no philosophy in their undergraduate degree. Read more

Conversion Diploma

This Conversion Diploma is designed for those who wish to pursue the study of philosophy at postgraduate level but have studied little or no philosophy in their undergraduate degree. Satisfactory performance on the Diploma leads to entry to the SASP MLitt Programme. Many previous Conversion Diploma students have gone on to further study in philosophy at PhD level – either at St Andrews/Stirling or on another equally prestigious PhD programme.

Though Conversion Diploma students take only undergraduate modules (1000 - 4000 level), they nonetheless remain bona fide members of the large and vibrant postgraduate community at the universities of St Andrews and Stirling. You are invited to all postgraduate events, such as the various postgraduate reading parties, and are strongly encouraged to get fully involved with the many and various seminars, workshops, talks, and reading groups.

To complete the Conversion Diploma, you must take 60 credits in 3000-and/or 4000-level Philosophy modules (to include at least 30 credits of a compulsory 3000-level module) and 60 further credits which may be in 1000- through 4000-level Philosophy modules. (Most 3000-and 4000-level modules are 30 credits, so this usually means you will take four modules – two in each semester).

There is also the option of taking a not-for-credit MLitt module in Basic Logic which runs every Friday in Semester 1. This module is designed for those with little or no knowledge of logic, or for those who wish to brush up on their basic logic skills.

Features

* In the latest Philosophical Gourmet Report produced by Brian Leiter the St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme was ranked the third best Philosophy programme in the UK http://www.philosophicalgourmet.com

* Between 40 – 50 taught postgraduate students are admitted each year, drawn from the UK and around the world.

* Over 35 dedicated full-time Philosophy staff in the SASP programme work in a broad spectrum of disciplines, from logic and metaphysics to moral philosophy and beyond.

* The SASP programme maintains a staff of authoritative researchers, a majority of whom have significant experience of teaching at leading international institutions, and which is large enough to teach a comprehensive and flexible range of graduate courses, and to supervise research projects.

* There is an annual reading party in the Scottish Highlands for all taught and research postgraduates and staff.

* Friendly and congenial atmosphere in which postgraduate students are encouraged to participate actively through, for example, the weekly Graduate Seminar and the Philosophy Club.

Postgraduate community

SASP is taught by the Philosophy departments in the universities of St Andrews and Stirling. The philosophy graduate programmes of St Andrews and Stirling are fully merged for all postgraduate degrees.

St Andrews and Stirling together form Scotland’s premier centre for philosophy and one of the top philosophy schools in the United Kingdom. The philosophical ambience is intense, friendly and co-operative.

The research programme is enhanced by a busy programme of conferences, workshops and visiting speakers from universities in the UK and from abroad. The St Andrews Philosophy Club meets several times each semester, usually on Wednesday afternoons, for papers by visiting speakers.

Every MLitt student is assigned an adviser at the beginning of the year. They provide you with individual guidance on essay planning, essay writing, academic conduct, and where appropriate, advice on how best to apply for a PhD place.

If you wish to brush up on your knowledge of logic, or if you have limited prior experience in this area, the SASP programme runs an additional weekly seminar, Basic Logic, throughout the year.

St Andrews also has a weekly seminar run by and for the research students, meeting Friday evenings, to which everyone is welcome. Arché (Philosophical Research Centre for the Philosophy of Logic, Language, Metaphysics and Epistemology) runs a variety of informal seminars and discussion groups. The programme also supports and encourages a wide range of student-led reading groups on topics relevant to their degree.

The student Philosophy Society (PhilSoc) is the most vibrant and active student-led society in the Faculty of Arts. It boasts a lively programme of stimulating talks and events throughout the year and attracts a regular following from across the University.

There is an annual reading party for postgraduate students and staff. The party provides an opportunity for you to present your work in an informal and relaxed setting. The reading party takes place at a country retreat in beautiful surroundings: a fine opportunity for seeing Scotland, hiking, and sampling Scottish food and drink, with the give and take of philosophy in the evenings.

The SASP programme has the most diverse postgraduate student population in the University. In addition to students from the UK, USA, Canada and across Europe, the programme has in recent years attracted students from areas such as China, Hong Kong, the Middle East and South America. This gives a uniquely international, cosmopolitan and welcoming feel to the philosophical community.

Careers

The SASP MLitt is a much sought after and highly desirable qualification which is greatly valued by leading employers nationally and internationally.

Structure of the MLitt programmes

The structure of our MLitt programmes is the same, regardless of which you choose to do.

Upon successful completion of the taught component of the programme you can progress to the MLitt dissertation which is completed during the summer. The current MLitt population is 40 students, drawn from the UK and around the world, and the annual intake is around 40 – 50 students. Many MLitt students progress to a PhD programme here or elsewhere, including some of the top institutions in the US. A first degree in or including philosophy is the normal pre-requisite. Postgraduates are taught in dedicated postgraduate classes.

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Taught by experienced research staff from the Centre for Computational Intelligence (CCI), an internationally recognised centre highly rated in the most recent Government Research Assessment Exercise, you gain a professional qualification that gives substantially enhanced career and research prospects in both traditional computing areas and in the expanding area of computational intelligence. Read more

About the course

Taught by experienced research staff from the Centre for Computational Intelligence (CCI), an internationally recognised centre highly rated in the most recent Government Research Assessment Exercise, you gain a professional qualification that gives substantially enhanced career and research prospects in both traditional computing areas and in the expanding area of computational intelligence.

Computational Intelligence encompasses the techniques and methods used to tackle problems not well solved by traditional approaches to computing. The four areas of fuzzy logic, neural networks, evolutionary computing and knowledge based systems encompass much of what is considered to be computational (or artificial) intelligence. There are opportunities to use these techniques in many application areas such as robot control and games development depending on your interests.

Modules include work based on research by the Centre of Computational Intelligence. With an established international reputation, their work focuses on the use of fuzzy logic, artificial neural networks, evolutionary computing, mobile robotics and biomedical informatics, providing theoretically sound solutions to real-world decision making and prediction problems. Past students have published papers with their CCI project supervisors and gone on to PhD study.

Reasons to Study

• Internationally recognised reputation
our internationally recognised Centre of Computational Intelligence (CCI) inputs into the course allowing you to understand the current research issues related to artificial intelligence

• Benefit from our Research Expertise
modules include work-based on research by our Centre for Computational Intelligence (CCI) and focus on the use of fuzzy logic, artificial neural networks, evolutionary computing, mobile robotics and biomedical informatics; providing theoretically sound solutions to real-world decision making and prediction problems

• Flexible study options
full-time, part time or distance learning study options available; making the course suitable for recent graduates and professionals in work

• Dedicated robotics laboratory
have access to our Advanced Mobile Robotics and Intelligent Agents Laboratory. The laboratory contains a variety of mobile robots ranging from the Lego Mindstorms and Pioneers to the Wheelbarrow robot for bomb disposal

• Employment Prospects
artificial Intelligence is a growing industry worldwide, employment opportunities exist in areas such as games development, control systems, software engineering, internet businesses, financial services, mobile communications, programming, and software engineering

Course Structure

Modules

• Computational Intelligence Research Methods
• Artificial Intelligence (AI) Programming
• Mobile Robots
• Fuzzy Logic
• Artificial Neural Networks
• Evolutionary Computing
• Applied Computational Intelligence
• Intelligent Mobile Robots
• Individual Project

Optional placement
We offer a great opportunity to boost your career prospects through an optional one year placement as part of your postgraduate studies. We have a dedicated Placement Unit which will help you obtain this. Once on your placement you will be supported by your Visiting Tutor to ensure that you gain maximum benefit from the experience. Placements begin after the taught component of the course has been completed - usually around June - and last for one year. When you return from your work placement you will begin your project.

Teaching and Assessment

The course consists of an induction unit, eight modules and an individual project. The summer period is devoted to work on the project for full-time students. If you choose to study via distance learning, you would normally take either one module per semester for four years or two modules per semester for four years plus a further year for the project.

Teaching is normally delivered through lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, discussions and e-learning packages. Assessment is via coursework only and will usually involve a combination of individual and group work, presentations, essays, reports and projects.

Distance learning material is delivered primarily through our virtual learning environment. Books, DVDs and other learning materials will be sent to you. We aim to replicate the on-site experience as fully as possible by using electronic discussion groups, encouraging contact with tutors through a variety of mediums.

Contact and learning hours

On-site students will have the lessons delivered by the module tutors in slots of three hours. In the full-time route, you can expect to have around 12 hours of timetabled taught sessions each week, with approximately 28 additional hours of independent study. There are also three non-teaching weeks when fulltime students can expect to spend around 40 hours on independent study each week.

To find out more

To learn more about this course and DMU, visit our website:
Postgraduate open days: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/open-evenings/postgraduate-open-days.aspx

Applying for a postgraduate course:
http://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/entry-criteria-and-how-to-apply/entry-criteria-and-how-to-apply.aspx

Funding for postgraduate students
http://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/postgraduate-funding-2017-18/postgraduate-funding-2017-18.aspx

Read less
Taught by experienced research staff from the Centre for Computational Intelligence (CCI), an internationally recognised centre highly rated in the most recent Government Research Assessment Exercise, you gain a professional qualification that gives substantially enhanced career and research prospects in both traditional computing areas and in the expanding area of computational intelligence. Read more

About the course

Taught by experienced research staff from the Centre for Computational Intelligence (CCI), an internationally recognised centre highly rated in the most recent Government Research Assessment Exercise, you gain a professional qualification that gives substantially enhanced career and research prospects in both traditional computing areas and in the expanding area of computational intelligence.

Computational Intelligence encompasses the techniques and methods used to tackle problems not well solved by traditional approaches to computing. The four areas of fuzzy logic, neural networks, evolutionary computing and knowledge based systems encompass much of what is considered to be computational (or artificial) intelligence. There are opportunities to use these techniques in many application areas such as robot control and games development depending on your interests.

Modules include work based on research by the Centre of Computational Intelligence. With an established international reputation, their work focuses on the use of fuzzy logic, artificial neural networks, evolutionary computing, mobile robotics and biomedical informatics, providing theoretically sound solutions to real-world decision making and prediction problems. Past students have published papers with their CCI project supervisors and gone on to PhD study.

Reasons to Study

• Internationally recognised reputation
our internationally recognised Centre of Computational Intelligence (CCI) inputs into the course allowing you to understand the current research issues related to artificial intelligence

• Benefit from our Research Expertise
modules include work-based on research by our Centre for Computational Intelligence (CCI) and focus on the use of fuzzy logic, artificial neural networks, evolutionary computing, mobile robotics and biomedical informatics; providing theoretically sound solutions to real-world decision making and prediction problems

• Flexible study options
full-time, part time or distance learning study options available; making the course suitable for recent graduates and professionals in work

• Dedicated robotics laboratory
have access to our Advanced Mobile Robotics and Intelligent Agents Laboratory. The laboratory contains a variety of mobile robots ranging from the Lego Mindstorms and Pioneers to the Wheelbarrow robot for bomb disposal

• Employment Prospects
artificial Intelligence is a growing industry worldwide, employment opportunities exist in areas such as games development, control systems, software engineering, internet businesses, financial services, mobile communications, programming, and software engineering

Course Structure

Modules

• Computational Intelligence Research Methods
• Artificial Intelligence (AI) Programming
• Mobile Robots
• Fuzzy Logic
• Artificial Neural Networks
• Evolutionary Computing
• Applied Computational Intelligence
• Data Mining
• Individual Project

Optional placement
We offer a great opportunity to boost your career prospects through an optional one year placement as part of your postgraduate studies. We have a dedicated Placement Unit which will help you obtain this. Once on your placement you will be supported by your Visiting Tutor to ensure that you gain maximum benefit from the experience. Placements begin after the taught component of the course has been completed - usually around June - and last for one year. When you return from your work placement you will begin your project.

Teaching and Assessment

The course consists of an induction unit, eight modules and an individual project. The summer period is devoted to work on the project for full-time students. If you choose to study via distance learning, you would normally take either one module per semester for four years or two modules per semester for four years plus a further year for the project.

Teaching is normally delivered through lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, discussions and e-learning packages. Assessment is via coursework only and will usually involve a combination of individual and group work, presentations, essays, reports and projects.

Distance learning material is delivered primarily through our virtual learning environment. Books, DVDs and other learning materials will be sent to you. We aim to replicate the on-site experience as fully as possible by using electronic discussion groups, encouraging contact with tutors through a variety of mediums.

Contact and learning hours

On-site students will have the lessons delivered by the module tutors in slots of three hours. In the full-time route, you can expect to have around 12 hours of timetabled taught sessions each week, with approximately 28 additional hours of independent study. There are also three non-teaching weeks when fulltime students can expect to spend around 40 hours on independent study each week.

Academic expertise

Taught by experienced research staff from the Centre for Computational Intelligence (CCI), an internationally recognised centre highly rated in the most recent Government Research Assessment Exercise, you will gain a professional qualification that gives substantially enhanced career and research prospects in both traditional computing areas and in the expanding area of computational intelligence.

To find out more

To learn more about this course and DMU, visit our website:
Postgraduate open days: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/open-evenings/postgraduate-open-days.aspx

Applying for a postgraduate course:
http://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/entry-criteria-and-how-to-apply/entry-criteria-and-how-to-apply.aspx

Funding for postgraduate students
http://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/postgraduate-funding-2017-18/postgraduate-funding-2017-18.aspx

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This programme provides a firm foundation in three of the core areas of contemporary philosophy, namely the Philosophy of Mind, the Philosophy of Language and Epistemology. Read more

MLitt in Epistemology, Mind and Language

This programme provides a firm foundation in three of the core areas of contemporary philosophy, namely the Philosophy of Mind, the Philosophy of Language and Epistemology. These core areas share a number of central topics such as Normativity, Intentionality, Representation, Consciousness, Rules, Thought, and Reason and Rationality. The programme draws on these topics, to develop a distinctive approach to understanding the inter-connected questions, themes and topics in these core areas, providing in the process important research tools for future research at an advanced level.

Features

* In the latest Philosophical Gourmet Report produced by Brian Leiter the St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme was ranked the third best Philosophy programme in the UK http://www.philosophicalgourmet.com

* Between 40 – 50 taught postgraduate students are admitted each year, drawn from the UK and around the world.

* Over 35 dedicated full-time Philosophy staff in the SASP programme work in a broad spectrum of disciplines, from logic and metaphysics to moral philosophy and beyond.

* The SASP programme maintains a staff of authoritative researchers, a majority of whom have significant experience of teaching at leading international institutions, and which is large enough to teach a comprehensive and flexible range of graduate courses, and to supervise research projects.

* There is an annual reading party in the Scottish Highlands for all taught and research postgraduates and staff.

* Friendly and congenial atmosphere in which postgraduate students are encouraged to participate actively through, for example, the weekly Graduate Seminar and the Philosophy Club.

Postgraduate community

SASP is taught by the Philosophy departments in the universities of St Andrews and Stirling. The philosophy graduate programmes of St Andrews and Stirling are fully merged for all postgraduate degrees.

St Andrews and Stirling together form Scotland’s premier centre for philosophy and one of the top philosophy schools in the United Kingdom. The philosophical ambience is intense, friendly and co-operative.

The research programme is enhanced by a busy programme of conferences, workshops and visiting speakers from universities in the UK and from abroad. The St Andrews Philosophy Club meets several times each semester, usually on Wednesday afternoons, for papers by visiting speakers.

Every MLitt student is assigned an adviser at the beginning of the year. They provide you with individual guidance on essay planning, essay writing, academic conduct, and where appropriate, advice on how best to apply for a PhD place.

If you wish to brush up on your knowledge of logic, or if you have limited prior experience in this area, the SASP programme runs an additional weekly seminar, Basic Logic, throughout the year.

St Andrews also has a weekly seminar run by and for the research students, meeting Friday evenings, to which everyone is welcome. Arché (Philosophical Research Centre for the Philosophy of Logic, Language, Metaphysics and Epistemology) runs a variety of informal seminars and discussion groups. The programme also supports and encourages a wide range of student-led reading groups on topics relevant to their degree.

The student Philosophy Society (PhilSoc) is the most vibrant and active student-led society in the Faculty of Arts. It boasts a lively programme of stimulating talks and events throughout the year and attracts a regular following from across the University.

There is an annual reading party for postgraduate students and staff. The party provides an opportunity for you to present your work in an informal and relaxed setting. The reading party takes place at a country retreat in beautiful surroundings: a fine opportunity for seeing Scotland, hiking, and sampling Scottish food and drink, with the give and take of philosophy in the evenings.

The SASP programme has the most diverse postgraduate student population in the University. In addition to students from the UK, USA, Canada and across Europe, the programme has in recent years attracted students from areas such as China, Hong Kong, the Middle East and South America. This gives a uniquely international, cosmopolitan and welcoming feel to the philosophical community.

Careers

The SASP MLitt is a much sought after and highly desirable qualification which is greatly valued by leading employers nationally and internationally.

Structure of the MLitt programmes

The structure of our MLitt programmes is the same, regardless of which you choose to do.

Upon successful completion of the taught component of the programme you can progress to the MLitt dissertation which is completed during the summer. The current MLitt population is 40 students, drawn from the UK and around the world, and the annual intake is around 40 – 50 students. Many MLitt students progress to a PhD programme here or elsewhere, including some of the top institutions in the US. A first degree in or including philosophy is the normal pre-requisite. Postgraduates are taught in dedicated postgraduate classes.

Read less
This programme provides a firm foundation in the historical traditions of western philosophy and offers expertise across the full range of periods, from the classical period, via mediaeval philosophy, modern philosophy, including the Scottish Enlightenment and Kant, to early analytic philosophy. Read more

MLitt in History of Philosophy

This programme provides a firm foundation in the historical traditions of western philosophy and offers expertise across the full range of periods, from the classical period, via mediaeval philosophy, modern philosophy, including the Scottish Enlightenment and Kant, to early analytic philosophy. The programme develops a distinctive approach to understanding the inter-connected questions, themes and topics from these periods, equipping students with tools for future research at doctoral level.

Features

* In the latest Philosophical Gourmet Report produced by Brian Leiter the St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme was ranked the third best Philosophy programme in the UK http://www.philosophicalgourmet.com

* Between 40 – 50 taught postgraduate students are admitted each year, drawn from the UK and around the world.

* Over 35 dedicated full-time Philosophy staff in the SASP programme work in a broad spectrum of disciplines, from logic and metaphysics to moral philosophy and beyond.

* The SASP programme maintains a staff of authoritative researchers, a majority of whom have significant experience of teaching at leading international institutions, and which is large enough to teach a comprehensive and flexible range of graduate courses, and to supervise research projects.

* There is an annual reading party in the Scottish Highlands for all taught and research postgraduates and staff.

* Friendly and congenial atmosphere in which postgraduate students are encouraged to participate actively through, for example, the weekly Graduate Seminar and the Philosophy Club.

Postgraduate community

SASP is taught by the Philosophy departments in the universities of St Andrews and Stirling. The philosophy graduate programmes of St Andrews and Stirling are fully merged for all postgraduate degrees.

St Andrews and Stirling together form Scotland’s premier centre for philosophy and one of the top philosophy schools in the United Kingdom. The philosophical ambience is intense, friendly and co-operative.

The research programme is enhanced by a busy programme of conferences, workshops and visiting speakers from universities in the UK and from abroad. The St Andrews Philosophy Club meets several times each semester, usually on Wednesday afternoons, for papers by visiting speakers.

Every MLitt student is assigned an adviser at the beginning of the year. They provide you with individual guidance on essay planning, essay writing, academic conduct, and where appropriate, advice on how best to apply for a PhD place.

If you wish to brush up on your knowledge of logic, or if you have limited prior experience in this area, the SASP programme runs an additional weekly seminar, Basic Logic, throughout the year.

St Andrews also has a weekly seminar run by and for the research students, meeting Friday evenings, to which everyone is welcome. Arché (Philosophical Research Centre for the Philosophy of Logic, Language, Metaphysics and Epistemology) runs a variety of informal seminars and discussion groups. The programme also supports and encourages a wide range of student-led reading groups on topics relevant to their degree.

The student Philosophy Society (PhilSoc) is the most vibrant and active student-led society in the Faculty of Arts. It boasts a lively programme of stimulating talks and events throughout the year and attracts a regular following from across the University.

There is an annual reading party for postgraduate students and staff. The party provides an opportunity for you to present your work in an informal and relaxed setting. The reading party takes place at a country retreat in beautiful surroundings: a fine opportunity for seeing Scotland, hiking, and sampling Scottish food and drink, with the give and take of philosophy in the evenings.

The SASP programme has the most diverse postgraduate student population in the University. In addition to students from the UK, USA, Canada and across Europe, the programme has in recent years attracted students from areas such as China, Hong Kong, the Middle East and South America. This gives a uniquely international, cosmopolitan and welcoming feel to the philosophical community.

Careers

The SASP MLitt is a much sought after and highly desirable qualification which is greatly valued by leading employers nationally and internationally.

Structure of the MLitt programmes

The structure of our MLitt programmes is the same, regardless of which you choose to do.

Upon successful completion of the taught component of the programme you can progress to the MLitt dissertation which is completed during the summer. The current MLitt population is 40 students, drawn from the UK and around the world, and the annual intake is around 40 – 50 students. Many MLitt students progress to a PhD programme here or elsewhere, including some of the top institutions in the US. A first degree in or including philosophy is the normal pre-requisite. Postgraduates are taught in dedicated postgraduate classes.

Read less
This programme provides a firm foundation in these three areas of contemporary philosophy. The programme offers students the opportunity to study specific areas in depth, whilst encouraging connections between these various specialisms, and equipping students with tools for future research at doctoral level. Read more

MLitt in Moral, Political and Legal Philosophy

This programme provides a firm foundation in these three areas of contemporary philosophy. The programme offers students the opportunity to study specific areas in depth, whilst encouraging connections between these various specialisms, and equipping students with tools for future research at doctoral level.

Features

* In the latest Philosophical Gourmet Report produced by Brian Leiter the St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme was ranked the third best Philosophy programme in the UK http://www.philosophicalgourmet.com

* Between 40 – 50 taught postgraduate students are admitted each year, drawn from the UK and around the world.

* Over 35 dedicated full-time Philosophy staff in the SASP programme work in a broad spectrum of disciplines, from logic and metaphysics to moral philosophy and beyond.

* The SASP programme maintains a staff of authoritative researchers, a majority of whom have significant experience of teaching at leading international institutions, and which is large enough to teach a comprehensive and flexible range of graduate courses, and to supervise research projects.

* There is an annual reading party in the Scottish Highlands for all taught and research postgraduates and staff.

* Friendly and congenial atmosphere in which postgraduate students are encouraged to participate actively through, for example, the weekly Graduate Seminar and the Philosophy Club.

Postgraduate community

SASP is taught by the Philosophy departments in the universities of St Andrews and Stirling. The philosophy graduate programmes of St Andrews and Stirling are fully merged for all postgraduate degrees.

St Andrews and Stirling together form Scotland’s premier centre for philosophy and one of the top philosophy schools in the United Kingdom. The philosophical ambience is intense, friendly and co-operative.

The research programme is enhanced by a busy programme of conferences, workshops and visiting speakers from universities in the UK and from abroad. The St Andrews Philosophy Club meets several times each semester, usually on Wednesday afternoons, for papers by visiting speakers.

Every MLitt student is assigned an adviser at the beginning of the year. They provide you with individual guidance on essay planning, essay writing, academic conduct, and where appropriate, advice on how best to apply for a PhD place.

If you wish to brush up on your knowledge of logic, or if you have limited prior experience in this area, the SASP programme runs an additional weekly seminar, Basic Logic, throughout the year.

St Andrews also has a weekly seminar run by and for the research students, meeting Friday evenings, to which everyone is welcome. Arché (Philosophical Research Centre for the Philosophy of Logic, Language, Metaphysics and Epistemology) runs a variety of informal seminars and discussion groups. The programme also supports and encourages a wide range of student-led reading groups on topics relevant to their degree.

The student Philosophy Society (PhilSoc) is the most vibrant and active student-led society in the Faculty of Arts. It boasts a lively programme of stimulating talks and events throughout the year and attracts a regular following from across the University.

There is an annual reading party for postgraduate students and staff. The party provides an opportunity for you to present your work in an informal and relaxed setting. The reading party takes place at a country retreat in beautiful surroundings: a fine opportunity for seeing Scotland, hiking, and sampling Scottish food and drink, with the give and take of philosophy in the evenings.

The SASP programme has the most diverse postgraduate student population in the University. In addition to students from the UK, USA, Canada and across Europe, the programme has in recent years attracted students from areas such as China, Hong Kong, the Middle East and South America. This gives a uniquely international, cosmopolitan and welcoming feel to the philosophical community.

Careers

The SASP MLitt is a much sought after and highly desirable qualification which is greatly valued by leading employers nationally and internationally.

Structure of the MLitt programmes

The structure of our MLitt programmes is the same, regardless of which you choose to do.

Upon successful completion of the taught component of the programme you can progress to the MLitt dissertation which is completed during the summer. The current MLitt population is 40 students, drawn from the UK and around the world, and the annual intake is around 40 – 50 students. Many MLitt students progress to a PhD programme here or elsewhere, including some of the top institutions in the US. A first degree in or including philosophy is the normal pre-requisite. Postgraduates are taught in dedicated postgraduate classes.

Read less
This degree is primarily designed as a preparatory year for entry to postgraduate work in philosophy. It aims to provide a firm foundation of general understanding and skills in philosophy, as a basis for sound philosophical research. Read more

MLitt in Philosophy

This degree is primarily designed as a preparatory year for entry to postgraduate work in philosophy. It aims to provide a firm foundation of general understanding and skills in philosophy, as a basis for sound philosophical research. There is opportunity for you to specialise within the structure of the programme.

Features

* In the latest Philosophical Gourmet Report produced by Brian Leiter the St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme was ranked the third best Philosophy programme in the UK http://www.philosophicalgourmet.com

* Between 40 – 50 taught postgraduate students are admitted each year, drawn from the UK and around the world.

* Over 35 dedicated full-time Philosophy staff in the SASP programme work in a broad spectrum of disciplines, from logic and metaphysics to moral philosophy and beyond.

* The SASP programme maintains a staff of authoritative researchers, a majority of whom have significant experience of teaching at leading international institutions, and which is large enough to teach a comprehensive and flexible range of graduate courses, and to supervise research projects.

* There is an annual reading party in the Scottish Highlands for all taught and research postgraduates and staff.

* Friendly and congenial atmosphere in which postgraduate students are encouraged to participate actively through, for example, the weekly Graduate Seminar and the Philosophy Club.

Postgraduate community

SASP is taught by the Philosophy departments in the universities of St Andrews and Stirling. The philosophy graduate programmes of St Andrews and Stirling are fully merged for all postgraduate degrees.

St Andrews and Stirling together form Scotland’s premier centre for philosophy and one of the top philosophy schools in the United Kingdom. The philosophical ambience is intense, friendly and co-operative.

The research programme is enhanced by a busy programme of conferences, workshops and visiting speakers from universities in the UK and from abroad. The St Andrews Philosophy Club meets several times each semester, usually on Wednesday afternoons, for papers by visiting speakers.

Every MLitt student is assigned an adviser at the beginning of the year. They provide you with individual guidance on essay planning, essay writing, academic conduct, and where appropriate, advice on how best to apply for a PhD place.

If you wish to brush up on your knowledge of logic, or if you have limited prior experience in this area, the SASP programme runs an additional weekly seminar, Basic Logic, throughout the year.

St Andrews also has a weekly seminar run by and for the research students, meeting Friday evenings, to which everyone is welcome. Arché (Philosophical Research Centre for the Philosophy of Logic, Language, Metaphysics and Epistemology) runs a variety of informal seminars and discussion groups. The programme also supports and encourages a wide range of student-led reading groups on topics relevant to their degree.

The student Philosophy Society (PhilSoc) is the most vibrant and active student-led society in the Faculty of Arts. It boasts a lively programme of stimulating talks and events throughout the year and attracts a regular following from across the University.

There is an annual reading party for postgraduate students and staff. The party provides an opportunity for you to present your work in an informal and relaxed setting. The reading party takes place at a country retreat in beautiful surroundings: a fine opportunity for seeing Scotland, hiking, and sampling Scottish food and drink, with the give and take of philosophy in the evenings.

The SASP programme has the most diverse postgraduate student population in the University. In addition to students from the UK, USA, Canada and across Europe, the programme has in recent years attracted students from areas such as China, Hong Kong, the Middle East and South America. This gives a uniquely international, cosmopolitan and welcoming feel to the philosophical community.

Careers

The SASP MLitt is a much sought after and highly desirable qualification which is greatly valued by leading employers nationally and internationally.

Structure of the MLitt programmes

The structure of our MLitt programmes is the same, regardless of which you choose to do.

Upon successful completion of the taught component of the programme you can progress to the MLitt dissertation which is completed during the summer. The current MLitt population is 40 students, drawn from the UK and around the world, and the annual intake is around 40 – 50 students. Many MLitt students progress to a PhD programme here or elsewhere, including some of the top institutions in the US. A first degree in or including philosophy is the normal pre-requisite. Postgraduates are taught in dedicated postgraduate classes.

Read less
The MPhil in Philosophy is a two-year research degree that is awarded after successful completion of the taught element of the MLitt programme (see above) plus a supervised research thesis of 40,000 words. Read more

MPhil in Philosophy

The MPhil in Philosophy is a two-year research degree that is awarded after successful completion of the taught element of the MLitt programme (see above) plus a supervised research thesis of 40,000 words. The MPhil is primarily designed for those wishing to undertake an extra year of research study in preparation for PhD studies, although the MPhil remains a desirable independent qualification in its own right.

A distinctive feature of the SASP MPhil programme is that you have two academic supervisors to provide regular academic guidance and advice throughout the research project.

A further distinctive feature is that students in the second year of the MPhil programme are actively encouraged to participate and make presentations at the regular dedicated MPhil seminar hosted by senior members of staff.

The number of MPhil students is typically between five and ten, drawn from the UK and around the world. Many MPhil students progress to a PhD programme here or elsewhere, including some of the top institutions in the US.

- Entry to the MPhil
Entry to the programme is in the first instance via progression from the SASP MLitt programme. You must complete 120 credits of 5000-level modules, as in the MLitt regulations. If you meet the standard progression-to-dissertation requirements on the MLitt, you will have the option to write an MLitt dissertation of 15,000 words and either graduate with an MLitt degree or convert your MLitt dissertation into a 40,000-word MPhil thesis and graduate with an MPhil degree (subject to meeting all the requirements for the award of both qualifications).

Note that you can apply for admission to the MPhil programme as well as to the MLitt programme. You will still be required to complete the MLitt programme as detailed above in year 1 before progressing to the MPhil dissertation in year 2.

Features

* In the latest Philosophical Gourmet Report produced by Brian Leiter the St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme was ranked the third best Philosophy programme in the UK http://www.philosophicalgourmet.com

* Between 40 – 50 taught postgraduate students are admitted each year, drawn from the UK and around the world.

* Over 35 dedicated full-time Philosophy staff in the SASP programme work in a broad spectrum of disciplines, from logic and metaphysics to moral philosophy and beyond.

* The SASP programme maintains a staff of authoritative researchers, a majority of whom have significant experience of teaching at leading international institutions, and which is large enough to teach a comprehensive and flexible range of graduate courses, and to supervise research projects.

* There is an annual reading party in the Scottish Highlands for all taught and research postgraduates and staff.

* Friendly and congenial atmosphere in which postgraduate students are encouraged to participate actively through, for example, the weekly Graduate Seminar and the Philosophy Club.

Postgraduate community

SASP is taught by the Philosophy departments in the universities of St Andrews and Stirling. The philosophy graduate programmes of St Andrews and Stirling are fully merged for all postgraduate degrees.

St Andrews and Stirling together form Scotland’s premier centre for philosophy and one of the top philosophy schools in the United Kingdom. The philosophical ambience is intense, friendly and co-operative.

The research programme is enhanced by a busy programme of conferences, workshops and visiting speakers from universities in the UK and from abroad. The St Andrews Philosophy Club meets several times each semester, usually on Wednesday afternoons, for papers by visiting speakers.

Every MLitt student is assigned an adviser at the beginning of the year. They provide you with individual guidance on essay planning, essay writing, academic conduct, and where appropriate, advice on how best to apply for a PhD place.

If you wish to brush up on your knowledge of logic, or if you have limited prior experience in this area, the SASP programme runs an additional weekly seminar, Basic Logic, throughout the year.

St Andrews also has a weekly seminar run by and for the research students, meeting Friday evenings, to which everyone is welcome. Arché (Philosophical Research Centre for the Philosophy of Logic, Language, Metaphysics and Epistemology) runs a variety of informal seminars and discussion groups. The programme also supports and encourages a wide range of student-led reading groups on topics relevant to their degree.

The student Philosophy Society (PhilSoc) is the most vibrant and active student-led society in the Faculty of Arts. It boasts a lively programme of stimulating talks and events throughout the year and attracts a regular following from across the University.

There is an annual reading party for postgraduate students and staff. The party provides an opportunity for you to present your work in an informal and relaxed setting. The reading party takes place at a country retreat in beautiful surroundings: a fine opportunity for seeing Scotland, hiking, and sampling Scottish food and drink, with the give and take of philosophy in the evenings.

The SASP programme has the most diverse postgraduate student population in the University. In addition to students from the UK, USA, Canada and across Europe, the programme has in recent years attracted students from areas such as China, Hong Kong, the Middle East and South America. This gives a uniquely international, cosmopolitan and welcoming feel to the philosophical community.

Careers

The SASP MLitt is a much sought after and highly desirable qualification which is greatly valued by leading employers nationally and internationally.

Structure of the MLitt programmes

The structure of our MLitt programmes is the same, regardless of which you choose to do.

Read less
The Advanced Computer Science (Computational Intelligence) MSc programme combines a wide choice of advanced topics in computer science with specialist modules relating to computational intelligence, including logic-based, connectionist and evolutionary artificial intelligence, inspirations from the natural world, practical applications and the philosophy of machine reasoning. Read more
The Advanced Computer Science (Computational Intelligence) MSc programme combines a wide choice of advanced topics in computer science with specialist modules relating to computational intelligence, including logic-based, connectionist and evolutionary artificial intelligence, inspirations from the natural world, practical applications and the philosophy of machine reasoning.

While studying a taught Master’s programme at the School of Computing, you can gain work experience through our industrial placement scheme or with the Kent IT Consultancy (KITC), which provides a project-based consultancy service to businesses in the region. We have strong links with industry including Cisco, IBM, Microsoft and Oracle and are among the top ten in the UK for graduate employment prospects.

The programme is aimed at graduates considering a career in research and development. It would also provide an excellent foundation for PhD study.

This programme is available with an optional industrial placement.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/249/advanced-computer-science-computational-intelligence

About the School of Computing

Our world-leading researchers, in key areas such as systems security, programming languages, communications, computational intelligence and memory management, and in interdisciplinary work with biosciences and psychology, earned us an outstanding result in the most recent national research assessment.

In addition, two of our staff have been honoured as Distinguished Scientists by the ACM and we have also held Royal Society Industrial Fellowships.

As an internationally recognised Centre of Excellence for programming education, the School of Computing is a leader in computer science teaching. Two of our staff have received the ACM SIGCSE Award for Outstanding Contribution to Computer Science Education. We are also home to two National Teaching Fellows, to authors of widely used textbooks and to award-winning teaching systems such as BlueJ.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

CO885 - Project Research (15 credits)
CO880 - Project and Dissertation (60 credits)
CO881 - Object-Oriented Programming (15 credits)
CO871 - Advanced Java for Programmers (15 credits)
CO832 - Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery (15 credits)
CO836 - Cognitive Neural Networks (15 credits)
CO837 - Natural Computation (15 credits)
CO884 - Logic and Logic Programming (15 credits)
CO838 - Internet of Things and Mobile Devices (15 credits)
CO841 - Computing Law, Contracts and Professional Responsibility (15 credits)
CO846 - Cloud Computing (15 credits)
CO847 - Green Computing (15 credits)
CO528 - Introduction to Intelligent Systems (15 credits)
CO545 - Functional and Concurrent Programming (15 credits)
CO641 - Computer Graphics and Animation (15 credits)
CO645 - IT Consultancy Practice 2 (15 credits)
CO834 - Trust, Security and Privacy Management (15 credits)
CO874 - Networks and Network Security (15 credits)
CO876 - Computer Security (15 credits)
CO889 - C++ Programming (15 credits)
CO890 - Concurrency and Parallelism (15 credits)
CO892 - Advanced Network Security (15 credits)
CO894 - Development Frameworks (15 credits)
CO899 - System Security (15 credits)
PL583 - Philosophy of Cognitive Science and Artificial Intelligence (30 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is through a mixture of written examinations and coursework, the relative weights of which vary according to the nature of the module. The final project is assessed by a dissertation, except for the MSc in IT Consultancy for which the practical consultancy work is assessed through a series of reports covering each of the projects undertaken.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- enhance the career prospects of graduates seeking employment in the computing/IT sector

- prepare you for research and/or professional practice at the forefront of the discipline

- develop an integrated and critically aware understanding of one or more areas of computing/IT and their applications (according to your degree title)

- develop a variety of advanced intellectual and transferable skills

- equip you with the lifelong learning skills necessary to keep abreast of future developments in the field.

Careers

Students can gain practical work experience as part of their degree through our industrial placements scheme and Kent IT Consultancy. Both of these opportunities consolidate academic skills with real world experience, giving our graduates a significant advantage in the jobs market.

Our graduates go on to work for leading companies including Cisco, GlaxoSmithKline, IBM, Intel, Lilly, Microsoft, Morgan Stanley, Thomson Reuters and T-Mobile. Many have gone on to develop their careers as project leaders and managers.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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