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The MA in Local History offers students interested in the history, cultural and development of their local area the opportunity for advanced study and research within a collaborative and academic environment. Read more
The MA in Local History offers students interested in the history, cultural and development of their local area the opportunity for advanced study and research within a collaborative and academic environment.

Course Overview

In recent years, local history groups have flourished in our communities. This course offers the guidance and support of professional historians for such interests. Although it focuses upon the specific local history of South West Wales, it will also draw upon a general awareness of historical trends and a detailed working knowledge of Welsh history.

The practical research element will familiarise students with research strategies and resources and will encourage them to undertake their own individual original research based upon their personal interests. Successful presentations could be considered for publication in relevant local history journals or as monographs.

The course offers focused support in practical research skills and techniques and detailed analysis of primary material, much of it untapped, which exists in both Welsh and English. Students will be able to make use of the excellent facilities available in local county libraries and record offices.

The course will explore a range of questions that include : How do we define 'local history'? How does local history relate to the wider Welsh and British contexts? What factors forged the lives of the ordinary people of South West Wales in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries? What sources are available for in depth local history research? And what skills will be fostered by an MA in Local History?

Modules

-Agricultural Experiences
-Educational Experiences
-Industrial Experiences
-Popular Culture 1860 - 1960
-Social Experiences.
-Research Methods

Key Features

-Established in 1995 - this course is unique in Wales
-Experienced and dedicated staff
-An opportunity to pursue an individual, personal and original research project in local and regional history
-Attractive to anyone interested in the history of South West Wales, in the methodology of practical historical research and of course in historical debate and inquiry
-Ample library and archival resources in the locality
-An opportunity to submit work in Welsh and, if there is sufficient demand, to take certain modules through the medium of Welsh
-High success rate

Assessment

Assessment is usually based on written work in the form of long and short essays, reports, book reviews and reflective pieces.

Career Opportunities

This course is aimed at those with an interest in local and regional history and how it relates to the national and international perspective. It is ideal for the continuing professional develop of those working in the fields of teaching, research, librarianship, the Museum Service as well as the heritage and tourism industry.

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The Postgraduate Certificate in Family and Local History is an online distance learning course aimed at developing the skills needed to study family and local history. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Family and Local History is an online distance learning course aimed at developing the skills needed to study family and local history. The course helps you to identify and use archives and other resources which are an important and sometimes neglected aspect of researching family history. Archives will help you discover more about the world that your ancestors lived in.

Aims of the Programme

This programme teaches the skills and methodologies necessary to investigate the history of families and neighbourhoods within the wider context of social history.

The courses are online, easy to use and fully supported. You can do them wherever you live and can log onto the site at whatever time you wish to study. You will work your way through the courses with other students and will be able to discuss the topics on a discussion forum. Your tutor will provide support and guidance throughout.

If you want to go further with your family and local history research and to learn in a supportive, enjoyable and interactive environment, these courses are for you.

"Being able to take a program like this when one lives thousands of miles away from the school and fellow classmates is an incredible feeling. I have really enjoyed my time at Dundee."

This programme provides students with:
Skills in finding and interpreting archive sources for family and local history.
An understanding of how to read old handwriting and to recognise common forms of documents.
Knowledge of family history and archive websites and published sources that will help you with your research - for yourself or for others.
A thorough understanding of record types, the reasons for their creation, their location and the information they contain.
An expertise in finding, analysing and interpreting archival records for family and local history research.
An awareness of the historical context in which the records were created and used.
A knowledge of archival theory as it applies to research.
An understanding of the legal and ethical issues relating to research using archival records.

The course is available by distance learning to students off-campus, throughout the world.

Students study a series of core and optional modules which have full academic accreditation from the University of Dundee. The programme is delivered by distance learning via the University of Dundee's Virtual Learning Environment which ensures a supportive and interactive learning environment, with frequent contact between students and tutors.

Centre for Archive and Information Studies

The Centre for Archive and Information Studies (CAIS) is part of the University's Archive, Records Management and Museum Services (ARMMS) which is responsible for the care and development of the University's historical collections, the management of systems to control business records and compliance with information legislation across the University.

CAIS offers postgraduate and undergraduate distance learning programmes for information professionals and family and local historians, delivered in an interactive online environment and allowing flexible part time study.

CAIS also conducts a number of associated activities such as hosting a range of presentations, seminars and conferences, the attraction of external funding and occasional taught training courses in collaboration with experts in the field throughout the UK and beyond.

Course Content and Structure

Mlitt degree:

To qualify for the MLitt in Family and Local History, students must complete a total of 180 credits.
Compulsory modules total 40 credits:
Skills and sources for Family and Local History in Scotland or England - 20 credits
Scots or English Palaeography and Diplomatic - 20 credits
Students can then choose to study a selection of optional modules, to equal 80 credits.

The list of options can be found on the CAIS website. 20 credit modules last for 15 weeks, 10 credit modules last for 9 weeks. Finally, a dissertation of 18,000 words is completed (60 credits).

PG Certificate:
To qualify for the Certificate in Family and Local History, students must complete a total of 60 credits. Students must complete one of the following core modules, but they can elect to study both if they so desire:
Skills and Sources for Family and Local History in Scotland (20 credits)
Skills and Sources for Family and Local History in England (20 credits)
Students can then choose to study a selection of optional modules to complete their total of 60 credits.

Assessment

Essays/reports; contribution to module (through online tasks and discussion board debate), dissertation of 18,000 words for MLitt students.

Student Support

The programme is delivered by distance learning via the University of Dundee's web-based Virtual Learning Environment which ensures a supportive and interactive learning environment, with frequent contact between students and tutors. The VLE gives access to study materials, links to on-line journals, discussion boards and research guides. Module tutors provide regular feedback and support to the students.

Optional study days are available for some of the modules and optional student visits will be arranged.

Professional Accreditation

All CAIS programmes are accredited by the UK Archives and Records Association and The Records and Information Management (RIM) Professionals Australasia.

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This MA course is the most comprehensive of its kind in England. It is provided by the internationally famous Centre for English Local History, at the University of Leicester. Read more
This MA course is the most comprehensive of its kind in England. It is provided by the internationally famous Centre for English Local History, at the University of Leicester. This Centre was founded by Professor W.G. Hoskins in 1948, and has long been at the forefront of the discipline, having had huge experience of postgraduate training at MA, MPhil and PhD levels. Its staff (who currently include three professors) are leaders in their subjects, and the ex-staff include scholars such as Alan Everitt, Joan Thirsk, Charles Phythian-Adams, Margaret Spufford and other prominent historians. Its students progress into many types of employment in heritage-related sectors, museums, record offices, local government, landscape management, further research, academic jobs, adult education, teaching, and associated areas of work. Many others have done the MA course for their own pleasure, developing their interests in family or local history. Many MA students have also gone on to do PhDs in the Centre.

The MA course aims to provide students with a training in `the Leicester approach' to local and regional history, and to equip them with the historical skills necessary to pursue research in this field. The MA course is comparative across the nation, grounded in an interest in landscapes and the communities associated with them, cultural in its concerns, sensitive to long-term chronologies, conceptually aware, and interdisciplinary in its methods. It is designed to furnish an up-to-date springboard into careers involving local history. Yet it also appeals to many whose interests are recreational, genealogical or family-oriented, who have leisure interests linked to landscape appreciation, or those who find knowledge of local history essential as a way of enlarging their interpretation and understanding of the world and communities around them.

The Centre for English Local History is accommodated in The Marc Fitch Historical Institute, three attractive Victorian villas near the main university campus. It contains an important library covering most English regions, an impressive map room, and many other resources and collections essential for local historical studies. The main University Library houses an exceptional local history collection covering all counties of England and Wales. These facilities make Leicester unique among provincial universities for the comprehensiveness of its holdings in local and regional history. Grants are available from a number of sources to assist students studying at the Centre.

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Rapid technological and informational changes, an unprecedented drive towards globalisation of the world economy and the rapid expansion of world trade are among some of the changes affecting economic development today. Read more

About the MSc programme

Rapid technological and informational changes, an unprecedented drive towards globalisation of the world economy and the rapid expansion of world trade are among some of the changes affecting economic development today. In this context, local and regional economies increasingly need new responses and demand specialist skills to exploit the opportunities these changes offer. The MSc Local Economic Development, accredited by the Institute for Economic Development (IED), prepares students to meet these challenges.

You will focus on the variety of ways in which local and regional agencies can work with the private sector in order to stimulate local economies. You will also develop an understanding of the local, national and international trends in business organisation and a knowledge of the variety of local agents involved. The programme emphasises management issues of local capacity building, attracting investment, network building, infrastructure, human resources, and focuses as well on the rationale and impact of regional and local development policies and on the role of institutions.

Graduate destinations

Previous graduates are mainly working in international organisations (UN system [including ILO, UNDP, FAO], World Bank, OECD, European Union, World Trade Conference), national and regional governments, international consultancy, non-governmental organisations (NGOs), research centres and top universities. Further information about what previous students are doing can be found on our website.

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The MSc programme draws on knowledge and skills acquired in many years of providing specialist classes in local history, and profits from close links with local, social and economic historians elsewhere in the University. Read more
The MSc programme draws on knowledge and skills acquired in many years of providing specialist classes in local history, and profits from close links with local, social and economic historians elsewhere in the University. The programme is overseen by the University’s Continuing Education Board, and admission is through the Department for Continuing Education. All graduate students must apply also for membership of a college. Most choose to become members of Kellogg College, which caters particularly for part-time mature students and which is closely associated with the Department.

The Critchley Scholarship for 2015 entry:
We are pleased to announce a new scholarship which will be awarded to the applicant with the greatest academic potential who is applying for the course for entry in September 2015. The award will fund half of the EU/UK tuition fees for the course. All applicants will be considered for the award.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/msc-in-english-local-history

Introduction

Teaching and supervision on the MSc programme is provided by the Department’s University Lecturer, Dr Mark Smith, and specialist tutors from the Department and elsewhere in Oxford and further afield. An impression of the interests represented in the Department’s teaching and research supervision can be gained from the Advanced Papers currently offered as part of the Master’s course: Power and patronage in the later medieval localities; Kinship, culture and community: Provincial elites in early modern England; Poverty and the Poor Law in England, 1660-1800; Enclosure and rural change, 1750-1850; Religion and community in England, 1830-1914; The social history of English architecture, 1870-1940; the English suburb, 1800-1939.

The Department’s graduate students are members of the Continuing Education Graduate School and have access to the full range of Oxford University’s library, archive and computing facilities.

The course is designed to combine a systematic training in historical research techniques with the study of a range of major local historical themes and the chance to undertake an individually researched dissertation. It will be relevant to potential or practising teachers, archaeologists, environmental planners, archivists, librarians, museum professionals and teachers in adult education, and indeed anyone wishing to pursue the subject for its own sake.

IT skills

Please note that most Departmental courses require assignments to be submitted online, and although the online submission system is straightforward and has step by step instructions, it does assume students have access to a PC and a sufficient level of computing experience and skill to upload their assignments. Applicants should be familiar with the use of computers for purposes such as word-processing, using e-mail and searching the Internet.

College Affiliation

It is a requirement of Oxford University that Master of Science students are matriculated members of the University and one of its colleges. Masters students based in the Department for Continuing Education are encouraged to apply to become members of Kellogg College. In previous intakes almost all students on this course have chosen to join Kellogg. Continuing education and life-long learning in Oxford have been formally linked to the collegiate system of the University since 1990, when Kellogg College, the University’s 36th college, was established. Kellogg College is specifically geared to the needs of mature and part-time students

Libraries and computing facilities

Registered students receive an Oxford University card, valid for one year at a time, which acts as a library card for the Departmental Library at Rewley House and provides access to the unrivalled facilities of the Bodleian Libraries which include the central Bodleian, major research libraries such as the Sackler Library, Taylorian Institution Library, Bodleian Social Science Library, and faculty libraries such as English and History. Students also have access to a wide range of electronic resources including electronic journals, many of which can be accessed from home. Students on the course are entitled to use the Library at Rewley House for reference and private study and to borrow books. The loan period is normally two weeks and up to eight books may be borrowed. Students will also be encouraged to use their nearest University library. More information about the Continuing Education Library can be found at http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/conted

The University card also provides access to facilities at Oxford University Computing Service (OUCS), 13 Banbury Road, Oxford. Computing facilities are available to students in the Students'Computing Facility in Rewley House and at Ewert House.

Assessment

Assessment is based on a mix of coursework assignments and a dissertation. The assessment falls into two parts, the first of which is called by the University a Qualifying Test and the second of which is called the Final Examination.

The Qualifying Test

The Qualifying Test, which must be passed in order to proceed to the rest of the degree, consists of a total of three assignments related to the work of the first term.

Assignment 1: A review of a work of local history (500 words). 10% of the marks for the test.

Assignment 2: An essay on issues relating to the nature of local history (2,000-2,500 words). 40% of the marks for the test.

Assignment 3: An essay on issues relating to the sources and practices of local history, especially the relationship of fieldwork and/or quantification to other sources and approaches (2,500-3,000 words). 50% of the marks for the test.

The Final Examination
The second part of the assessment determines the final classification of the MSc and comprises eight written assignments and a dissertation.

There will be 2 x 2,500 word assignments for each of the Sources, Methods and Foundations papers. (In total the assignments for the Sources, Methods and Foundations papers comprise 10% of the marks for the final examination.)

There will be 2 x 5,000 word essays for each of the Advanced Papers. (In total the essays for the Advanced Papers comprise 40% of the marks for the final examination.)

There will be a dissertation of 15,000 words (The dissertation counts as 50% of the marks for the final examination.)

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Analysing and reflecting on sustainability transformations in cities and regions with regard to topics such as waste, energy, water, transportation and climate change. Read more

Master's in Local Environmental Change and Sustainable Cities

Analysing and reflecting on sustainability transformations in cities and regions with regard to topics such as waste, energy, water, transportation and climate change.

Cities around the world are dealing with environmental issues: air pollution, urban heat islands, stormwater flooding, the growing accumulation of solid waste. What can be done to keep citizens safe from environmental hazards and natural disasters? What is needed to ensure a pleasant living environment? And how can residents, commuters and businesses be stimulated – or if necessary, forced with legislation or financial sanctions – to do their bit? With the problems increasing, rather than diminishing, there’s a growing demand for professionals with an expertise in the development of sustainable cities.

The Master’s specialisation in Local Environmental Change and Sustainable Cities focuses on the local level of sustainability transformations. You’ll be introduced to the latest scientific insights, which will be illustrated with numerous examples of how cities and regions all over the world tackle these problems.

Waste, energy, water, transportation

A broad scope of environmental issues will be addressed, as well as existing measures and instruments. Stormwater management, forms of renewable energy and green roofs are just a small sample of what you can expect to encounter. You’ll also, for example, discover that waste management goes far beyond recycling schemes and how cradle-to-grave products are making way for cradle-to-cradle. In addition, we’ll be dealing with citizens’ initiatives in renewable energy as well as new focus areas, like the possible environmental advantages of community food systems.

This Master’s specialisation will teach you to become the bridge between science and society. What do the latest results in environmental research actually mean and how can that knowledge be converted into concrete plans and policies that will bring about the change needed? In this, it’s crucial that you understand how policymaking and legislation works as well as have some insight into human behaviour. For a plan to work, the people and businesses in the city need to collaborate. Environmental and behavioural psychology will therefore be addressed in various courses within this specialisation too.

See the website: http://www.ru.nl/masters/local

Why study Local Environmental Change and Sustainable Cities?

1. The specialisation strongly focuses on the local level of sustainability transformations, in particular sustainable cities.
2. The natural as well as social and political aspects of environmental issues will be addressed.
3. Related aspects of spatial planning will be incorporated in this specialisation. You can also take courses from the Master’s in Spatial Planning as electives for a multidisciplinary perspective.
3. Thanks to our extensive research, our staff members are among the leading experts when it comes to waterproofing and climate proofing cities.
4. You’ll gain insight on how to take scientific results and convert them into viable plans and policies.
5. Because the Netherlands is known for its expertise in water, climate and spatial planning, it offers a great atmosphere to study this field.
6. You’ll also benefit from the advantages of the Master’s programme in Environment and Society Studies in general.

See the website: http://www.ru.nl/masters/local

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This two-year International Master leverages the complementary expertise, resources and networks of four subject areas (Economic & Social History, Business, History, Economics) within four major European universities to provide a profoundly interdisciplinary programme and international learning experience. Read more
This two-year International Master leverages the complementary expertise, resources and networks of four subject areas (Economic & Social History, Business, History, Economics) within four major European universities to provide a profoundly interdisciplinary programme and international learning experience. The programme equips you with the analytical tools and critical skills necessary to make sense of the history, theory, institutions and cultures of global and local capitalism. Exploration and understanding of the intersecting complementarity of global and local is at the heart of this programme.

Why this programme

◾You will graduate with a multiple degree: one from each of the three universities at which they studied.
◾You will be encouraged to explore a variety of perspectives on the process and experience of globalisation, and to reflect on the relationship between global and local, in particular, of cities, creative industries and local cultures of entrepreneurship that have innovated at the local level to remain globally competitive.
◾Associate partners from around the world will provide specialist master classes and guest lectures, and make contributions to, or host, the annual summer school.
◾A variety of internships and industrial placements are available to all students in Barcelona, Rotterdam or Göttingen to enhance their learning experience.
◾You will receive a theoretical grounding in international business and the global economy, and be encouraged to think critically about the respective roles of individuals, firms, cities, regions, nations and supra-national bodies in determining the world in which we live.

Programme structure

This is a 2-year degree taught through a mix of lectures and seminars. You will take between eight and ten core and around eight optional courses, depending on which pathway you choose. The programme also includes internships and industrial placements. All teaching is in English; recommended additional language study will be provided throughout the two-year programme.

You will spend your first year in Glasgow (semester 1) and Barcelona (semester 2). The second year (semester 1) will be spent in either Rotterdam or Göttingen, depending on which pathway you choose.
◾Pathway 1 (Rotterdam) - Global History & Creative Cities Economies (the history of globalisation and the role of creative industries)
◾Pathway 2 (Göttingen) - Global Markets & Development (marketing, entrepreneurship and development)

The final semester will be spent researching and writing a dissertation

Core courses

University of Glasgow
◾Globalised economy
◾Global varieties of capitalism in historical perspective. (taught by Göttingen)

University of Barcelona
◾Companies in emerging sectors
◾Creative cities: Intervention models and entrepreneurial dynamics
◾Family business: Innovation and globalisation
◾Port cities in historical perspective. (taught by Rotterdam)

Erasmus University Rotterdam – pathway A
◾Creative industries in the global economy. (taught by Glasgow)
◾Mapping global order

Göttingen University – pathway B
◾Global history of marketing and mass consumption
◾Immigrant entrepreneurship
◾Topics in Globalisation (taught by Barcelona)
◾Excursion.

Optional courses

University of Glasgow
◾China in the international economy
◾Global cities
◾Globalisation and labour
◾Globalisation and the nation state
◾Governance and markets
◾Methods of social research.

University of Barcelona
◾Global Health
◾Latin America
◾Topics in international economics
◾Topics in international politics.

Erasmus University Rotterdam
◾International relations theory
◾Maritime history and port cities
◾Research workshops to prepare for master level thesis
◾Rise and fall of the American Empire.

Göttingen University
◾Development economics 1 - Macro issues
◾Development economics 3 - Regional perspectives
◾Globalisation and development
◾International Human Resource Management
◾Political construction of Europe
◾Sustainable development, trade and environment
◾Selected topics in Asian business and management.

Summer School

A two week summer school will take place in July at the end of year 1 and will be held with a different partner each year and this will include associate partners from around the world. The topic will be decided on an annual basis and relate to trends and issues of the moment.

Career prospects

The intertwining of academic analysis and practical engagement will provide a valuable range of well-rounded skills and experiences that develop active and informed graduates capable of operating at strategic levels in NGO and third-sector agencies, local economic development organisations, policy analysis and lobbying groups and corporations, or of undertaking further study. The programme is designed for students with a diverse range of prior knowledge and interests and will develop their understanding of the process, impact and responses to globalisation.

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This programme aims to provide students with a solid foundation in a broad range of social science research methods as well as basic research skills. Read more
This programme aims to provide students with a solid foundation in a broad range of social science research methods as well as basic research skills.

Students will acquire a general overview of the philosophy of social research, and understand how this informs research design, methods of data collection and analysis. They will also develop an ability to use a range of research methods, to communicate research findings effectively and an understanding of the potential use of and impact of their research within and beyond academia.

Core Modules

Philosophy of Social Science Research

The module considers fundamental philosophical debates about what counts as ‘knowledge’ across the social sciences. Teaching addresses (natural) science as a method of obtaining knowledge and the interpretative tradition in the social sciences. Students explore fundamental philosophical debates about what counts as ‘knowledge’ across the social sciences and apply these discussions to their own disciplines and field of study.

Research Design, Practice and Ethics

The module introduces students to social science research designs and ethical issues in research practice. Learning supports students to be able to make strategic choices when developing their own projects, and to assess the design and research ethics decision making in others’ published research work.

Fundamentals in Quantitative Research Methods

Concepts, methods and skills central to quantitative research, including data collection approaches and concept operationalization, are core throughout this module. Building on a grounding in ideas relating to probability sampling, sampling error and statistical inference, coverage of techniques extends from comparisons of means and simple cross-tabular analyses to a discussion of multivariate analysis approaches, focusing on linear and logistic regression.

Foundations in Qualitative Research

Qualitative research is examined across a range of topics, from different approaches and methods including ethnographic and observational research, discourse and conversation analysis, documentary and archival analysis, participatory research and the use of interviews. Ethics in qualitative research is specifically considered, as is the evaluation of qualitative research.

Advanced Training Programme

Unless stated, all advanced training courses run as 2-day intensive workshops from 10–4pm with breaks. This list is updated regularly as new courses are approved so do check this website from time to time to see what is on offer.

These advanced training courses are open to all research students in the College (and some departments in other Colleges, such as Geography, subject to the discretion of the Programme Team). However, places on each course are limited and priority will be given to MA Social Research students.

These advanced training courses are also open to all staff in the University who may wish to attend without completing the assessments. However, all doctoral researchers and staff who wish to do so will be placed on a waiting list. Confirmation will be sent a week before the course dates.

Advanced Training courses run in Semester 3, unless otherwise stated:

Analysing Hierarchical Panel Data
An Approach To Research On Discourse
Case Study Research Design
Documentary Research In Education
Factor Analysis
Introduction To Econometric Software
Introduction To Time Series Regression
Narrative Research
Multivariate Linear To Logistic Regression
Policy Evalution
Q Methodology - A Systematic Approach For Interpretive Research Design
Questionnaire Design
Researching Disability
Role Of Thinking: Philosophy Of Social Science Research
Visual Research Methods

NB: some courses have pre-requisites, e.g. to register on Multiple Linear and Logistic Regression, Factor Analysis, or Narrative Research, you will need to have passed Social Research Methods II (20 credits module), or equivalent. You will need to provide evidence that you have passed a similar course on quantitative/qualitative data analysis where appropriate.

To register for the above advanced training courses, please e-mail: specifying which courses you are interested in. When registering for courses, please provide your name, student ID, department/programme you are affiliated to, and your e-mail address.

In addition, you will write a 12,000-word dissertation (60 credits).

About the School of Government and Society

The School of Government and Society is one of the leading UK and International centres for governance, politics, international development, sociology, public management, Russian and European studies.
Established in 2008, the School comprises three Departments: Politics and International Studies (POLSIS); International Development (IDD) and Local Government Studies (INLOGOV).

POLSIS: The Department of Political Science and International Studies (POLSIS), one of the largest and most academically vibrant departments of Political Science and International Studies in the UK. In the latest Research Excellence Framework (REF) Politics and International Studies at Birmingham was ranked the 6th best in the power rankings highlighting the large number of staff in POLSIS producing world-leading and internationally excellent research.

IDD: Be part of global effort to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Contribute to conflict resolution and post-conflict reconstruction. Help build capacity of nations and communities to adapt to climate change. Study with us to gain the skills and knowledge essential for working in international development in the 21st Century.

INLOGOV: The Institute of Local Government Studies (INLOGOV) is the leading academic centre for research and teaching on local governance and strategic public management. We enrich the world of local public service with research evidence and innovative ideas, making a positive difference.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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The MA English Local History aims to provide training up to basic research level in the ‘Leicester’ approach to English Local History as a subject which is comparative across the nation; grounded in landscape history; cultural in its concerns; sensitive to long-term chronologies; conceptually aware and inter-disciplinary in its methodologies.. Read more
The MA English Local History aims to provide training up to basic research level in the ‘Leicester’ approach to English Local History as a subject which is comparative across the nation; grounded in landscape history; cultural in its concerns; sensitive to long-term chronologies; conceptually aware and inter-disciplinary in its methodologies.

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The PGCert is only available to qualified social workers currently employed by local authorities. It prepares experienced and qualified social workers, registered with the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC) to undertake the statutory role of Mental Health Officer (MHO). Read more

Why this course?

The PGCert is only available to qualified social workers currently employed by local authorities.

It prepares experienced and qualified social workers, registered with the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC) to undertake the statutory role of Mental Health Officer (MHO).

In undertaking the role of MHO, candidates are able to contribute positively to care and treatment of those experiencing mental disorder by ensuring an approach that recognises the impact of social as well as medical circumstances on their lives.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/mentalhealthsocialwork/

Key aim

The purpose is to train social workers for the role of MHO.

This is as defined in Section 32 of the Mental Health (Care and Treatment) (Scotland) Act 2003, and as qualified by the direction of the Scottish Ministers (Requirements for appointment as Mental Health Officers) Direction (January 2009).

In 2007, the SSSC published a new set of standards and practice competencies for MHO training. This stated that the certificate must be:
- provided by a university, within a programme provider partnership
- delivered at SCQF Level 11, which equates with Masters level
- be approved by the SSSC as a specialist course

The delivery partnership

A partnership was established to develop and deliver the new Postgraduate Certificate in Mental Health Social Work Award. It involves:
- the University of Strathclyde
- Glasgow Caledonian University
- 13 local authorities in the West of Scotland, represented by the Scottish Social Services Council Learning Network West

The University of Strathclyde is the administering university for the award.
You’ll be registered with us for the duration of the course, and will be subject to our rules and requirements.

You’ll study

The course is taught over the period of an academic year, normally August to June. You’ll complete two modules.

Work placement

An assessed period of practice is integral to each of the two modules on this course. The assessed practice runs through each module and runs from September to December in Module 1 and February to May in Module 2. The practice experience can only be undertaken in the candidates’ employing local authority supervised by a suitably qualified member of staff (Practice Assessor), supported by the course team.

Course awards

The course has been externally evaluated and assessed as producing Mental Health Officers who are competent to practice from the perspective of the local authorities who employ the candidates on completion of the award. In addition, the candidates, despite the intensity of the workload, praised the experience of undertaking the course. The course is the only MHO award in Scotland where recruitment remains high.

Open days and events

Workshops to prepare candidates for applying to the programme are provided in January each year. This includes an overview of the programme as well as a detailed explanation of what an application for the programme should contain. Information and selection handbooks are circulated to all local authorities in December each year to prepare candidates for the event.

Entry requirements

- Applicants must:
1. Be nominated by their employing local authority, be supported by their employing local authority and be provided with appropriate learning opportunities.

2. Hold a professional social work qualification recognised by SSSC. These include:
- BA (Hons) Social Work
- Diploma in Social Work (DipSW)
- Certificate of Qualification in Social Work (CQSW) together with its predecessor qualifications
- Certificate in Social Service (CSS)

If you trained abroad, a letter of comparability with the CQSW or a letter of verification issued by SSSC (or another registering Council in the UK) will be required.

3. Normally have a minimum of two years post-qualifying experience. You should be able to demonstrate that you've improved and extended the level of competence acquired when you qualified.

4. Satisfy the programme provider that you have the capacity to achieve the Mental Health Officer standards, that you can be competently demonstrated as eligible to be appointed as a Mental Health Officer, and can achieve the award at SCQF Level 11 by:
- critically reviewing your professional development since qualifying as a social worker. This should include issues of effective communication with adults who have individual communication support needs, and working with professional tensions, challenges and conflicts. Also included should be evidence from workload of challenging discrimination and demonstrating an understanding of what's meant by this

- analysing interest in, and motivation for, undertaking mental health work including the extensive networking and collaborative practice involved

- showing developed skills in empowering clients. This should be particularly in relation to developing their understanding of their rights to legal support and advocacy, and their views about how their needs may be more effectively met through complex decision making processes

- exploring current awareness of the Mental Health Officer role, the complexity of the power/control issues involved and how you would use Mental Health Officer training in your current work setting

Selection for the programme is a collaborative process across the provider partnership and consists of:
- application
- interview (if applicable)
- selection decision phases

These will verify your:
- eligibility in relation to registration as a social worker with the SSSC
experience
- preparedness and capacity for the specialist role
- eligibility for the programme of study within the universities

The process will also provide feedback to you and your agency about any further preparation or experience necessary before the programme starts.

Final decision on acceptance to the course within the parameters of the minimum standards described lies with the Joint Course Management Committee.

Careers

Successful graduates from this programme will immediately be appointed as Mental Health Officers (MHOs) by their local authority, negating the requirement to seek employment as an MHO.

This appointment can lead candidates into promoted posts, eg senior practitioner and management roles. As the role of the MHO is a statutory requirement for local authorities, graduates become members of a small but essential workforce that aims to promote the rights of people with mental disorders as well as ensuring appropriate access to treatment when required.

The MHO workforce is currently under resourced and, as such, qualified MHOs are in high demand across Scotland, obtaining the award, therefore, enhances the employability of all graduates.

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This course provides an opportunity to engage with contemporary debates in local and regional development theory and policy in an international context. Read more
This course provides an opportunity to engage with contemporary debates in local and regional development theory and policy in an international context. It fulfils the current demand to build capacity and skills for strategic analysis and policy-making. We place a distinctive emphasis on the links between theory, policy and practice.

The Centre for Urban and Regional Development Studies (CURDS), where you will be based, has played a leading role in contemporary academic and policy debates for over 35 years, and our research contributes directly to the teaching of this course. It offers you a great opportunity to engage with contemporary debates in local and regional development theory, governance and policy in an international context.

Delivery

You are taught by highly research active staff in a welcoming and supportive environment. We use interactive and participant focused teaching methods, including:
-Discussion of taught and read material
-Individual and group projects
-Case study analyses
-Practical projects
-External practitioner speakers

The course is comprised of 180 credits of compulsory core modules including the 15,000 word Research Dissertation.

Our teaching and learning strategy is seminar based, combining a mixture of sessions led by staff and course participants.

Facilities

This course is taught in dedicated Centre for Urban and Regional Development Studies (CURDS) seminar and meeting rooms.

The School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape has a range of facilities available to students including:
-A workshop
-Studios
-Exhibition spaces
-Crit rooms
-Seminar rooms
-IT suites

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The course aims to provide training up to basic research level in the ‘Leicester’ approach to English Local History as a subject which is comparative across the nation; grounded in landscape history; cultural in its concerns; sensitive to long-term chronologies; conceptually aware and inter-disciplinary in its methodologies.. Read more
The course aims to provide training up to basic research level in the ‘Leicester’ approach to English Local History as a subject which is comparative across the nation; grounded in landscape history; cultural in its concerns; sensitive to long-term chronologies; conceptually aware and inter-disciplinary in its methodologies.

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This MSc course addresses scientific, technological and legislative aspects of the diagnosis (analysis and assessment) and management (remediation and restoration) of important environmental issues concerned with contaminated land, water quality, air pollution and waste. Read more
This MSc course addresses scientific, technological and legislative aspects of the diagnosis (analysis and assessment) and management (remediation and restoration) of important environmental issues concerned with contaminated land, water quality, air pollution and waste.

It has been designed with industry advice to enable good science and engineering graduates begin and advance successful careers in the environmental sector, and pursue postgraduate scientific research. The MSc is delivered in first-class teaching and research facilities by a dedicated team of internationally renowned environmental scientists, and presents considerable interaction with environmental consultancies and engineers, industry, local and regulatory authorities, and research institutes.

During 2007-2011, the course was supported by 6 NERC studentships, the most awarded annually to an environmental MSc. Students on the course have won the most EMpower research projects funded by companies within the nuclear industry, and since 2008, a Prize for Best Performance Overall has been awarded annually by Arup, a global environmental engineering and consultancy company.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/earthsciences/coursefinder/mscenvironmentaldiagnosismanagement.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The quality of teaching and learning on the course is enhanced considerably by significant professional networking and interaction with leading experts from environmental consultants and engineers, industry, local and regulatory authorities, and universities and research institutes; who present seminars, host study visits, co-supervise research projects, and act as an advisory panel.

- Graduates of the course are skilled and knowledgeable scientists with excellent employment prospects within the environmental sector, particularly as environmental consultants and engineers, in local and regulatory authorities, industry, charitable trusts, and research institutes and universities.

- In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), the Department’s research was ranked equal 6th in the UK with 70% rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in terms of originality, significance and rigour.

Course content and structure

You will study seven taught modules, three case studies and complete an Independent Research Project:

- Communication & Co-operation Skills
Provides practical training in written and verbal communication media; project, team and time management; role playing in environmental impact assessment; careers advice and a mock job interview.

- Environmental Inorganic Analysis
A practical laboratory and field-work based introduction to quality assured sampling strategies, preparation processes and analytical methods for heavy metals in soils, surface waters, and vegetation.

- Diagnostic & Management Tools
Provides practical computer-based training in statistical analysis of environmental data, geographical information systems, and environmental risk assessment.

- Environmental Organic Chemistry Pathways Toxicology
Comprises physical and chemical properties, transport, fate and distribution, and toxicology of organic compounds in the environment.

- Contaminated Land Case Study
A practical laboratory and field-work based human health risk assessment of pollutant linkages at a former gravel extraction and landfill site. It comprises desk-top study, site investigation and sampling, laboratory analysis, data interpretation, quantitative risk assessment, and remediation options.

- Water Quality: Diagnosis & Management
A practical laboratory and field-work based introduction to aquatic science, hydrogeology, treatment of water and wastewater, and chemical, biological and physical monitoring of water quality. Includes a study visit to a global manufacturer of pesticides and herbicides.

- River Thames Basin Case Study
A combination of fieldwork, laboratory work and desk-top study to diagnose water quality in chemical and ecological terms, to identify industrial and agricultural pollutant linkages, and to determine environmental, ecological and health impacts.

- Air Pollution: Monitoring, Impacts & Management
Covers: sources, sinks, dispersion, conversion, monitoring, impacts and management of air pollutants with study visits to a local authority and a government research institute.

- Royal Holloway Campus Air Quality Case Study
Involves a consultancy company-style investigation of ambient and indoor air quality within the confines of RHUL campus; and combines desk-top research with practical fieldwork and laboratory analysis.

- Waste Management & Utilisation
Considers municipal, industrial and radioactive waste management options, with study visits to a landfill site, a waste incinerator, composting facility, recycling centre and nuclear power station.

- Independent Research Project
Consists of a four-month, independent scientific investigation, usually in collaboration with environmental consultants and engineers, local and regulatory authorities, industry, research institutes, and universities. Projects may comprise a desk-top study or practical laboratory and field investigation, they may be funded, and often lead to employment or to PhD research. Final results are presented at the Research Project Symposium to an audience from within the environmental sector

On completion of the course graduates will have acquired the experience, knowledge, and critical understanding to enable them to:

- Conduct themselves as professional environmental research scientists, consultants, and managers, convey in a professional manner, scientific, technical and managerial information, and manage projects and resources efficiently

- Apply quality assured sampling strategies, preparation procedures and analytical systems to quantify health risks posed by inorganic and organic pollutant linkages in soils, waters and air

- Apply statistical analysis, geographical information systems, and environmental impact and risk assessment to the interpretation of environmental data

- Appreciate the importance and impacts of hydro-geological, and bio- and physico-chemical processes on the treatment of water and wastewater, and on the quality of groundwater and aquatic ecosystems

- Appreciate the emissions, dispersion, conversion, and monitoring of natural and man-made gaseous and particulate air pollutants, their impacts on climate change, human health and vegetation, and management on local, regional and global scales

- Appreciate the prevention, re-use, recycling, recovery, disposal and utilisation of municipal and industrial waste and the management of nuclear waste within the constraints of national and international legislation

- Manage an independent environmental science research project, often with professional collaboration, and of significant value to their career development.

Assessment

- Written examinations test understanding of the principles and concepts taught in the modules and case studies, and the ability to integrate and apply them to environmental diagnosis and management.

- Assessment of module work and practical computing, laboratory and fieldwork evaluates critical understanding of the environmental science taught, and mastery of producing quality assured data, and its analysis, interpretation, presentation and reporting.

- Assessment also reflects the ability to work independently and in teams, and to learn during study visits.

- Assessment of research projects is based on the ability to manage and report on an original piece of independent scientific work.

- All assessed work has significant confidential written and verbal feedback.

Employability & career opportunities

94% of the graduates of the MSc from 2008 to 2013 either successfully secured first-destination employment as international environmental consultants and engineers, in industry, local and regulatory authorities and charitable trusts, or are conducting postgraduate research within international research institutes and universities.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Today's public practitioners must demonstrate clear understanding in the management of public services and contemporary public policy. Read more
Today's public practitioners must demonstrate clear understanding in the management of public services and contemporary public policy. They must also be able to offer confident leadership in formulating and implementing appropriate strategies to address them. For more than 40 years the Institute of Local Government Studies has been providing a range of programmes to meet these needs.

Participants choose either the core Public Management Programme or specialist streams in Public Management (Local Policy and Leadership) or Public Management (Health and Social Care).

The programme provides an opportunity for you to develop your understanding of democratic governance and the challenges of improving performance and co-ordinating public services and governmental processes. You will reflect on the changing demands affecting public organisations locally, regionally, nationally and internationally, building your knowledge base, leadership skills and self-confidence.

Who is the programme for?

Our Public Management programme is aimed at both experienced practitioners from the public and voluntary sectors and those wishing to embark on a career in public service.

This programme, builds knowledge, skills and confidence for careers in the public service, government and associated sectors. It is aimed at both experienced practitioners from the public and voluntary sectors and those wishing to embark on a career in public service. We also attract international students seeking to learn about modern public service delivery and recent graduates seeking a further career to underpin a future career in the public sector.

The programme can be studied part-time over two / three years or full-time in one year.

Pay-as-you-go

Participants may opt for a pay-as-you-go approach rather than apply for a whole programme. Providing you complete the requisite number of core modules, you can develop your programme as you progress through your study – adding flexibility of study with your ability to pay. All requisite modules must be completed within six years.

You can build up a programme by taking the appropriate number of credits for each type of programme: Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits); Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) or Masters Degree (180 credits).

If you have already completed individual modules as an 'occasional student', these can be counted towards further study.

Are you an employer?

If you are an employer seeking to send a group of participants or seeking to develop a version of this programme to be delivered at your own premises, please contact Philip Whiteman on special rates and specifications: .

Specialist pathways

Specialist pathways are also available for individuals seeking a more focussed programme in Public Management:

Public Management (Local Policy and Leadership)
Public Management (Health and Social Care)

About the School of Government and Society

The School of Government and Society is one of the leading UK and International centres for governance, politics, international development, sociology, public management, Russian and European studies.
Established in 2008, the School comprises three Departments: Politics and International Studies (POLSIS); International Development (IDD) and Local Government Studies (INLOGOV).

POLSIS: The Department of Political Science and International Studies (POLSIS), one of the largest and most academically vibrant departments of Political Science and International Studies in the UK. In the latest Research Excellence Framework (REF) Politics and International Studies at Birmingham was ranked the 6th best in the power rankings highlighting the large number of staff in POLSIS producing world-leading and internationally excellent research.

IDD: Be part of global effort to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Contribute to conflict resolution and post-conflict reconstruction. Help build capacity of nations and communities to adapt to climate change. Study with us to gain the skills and knowledge essential for working in international development in the 21st Century.

INLOGOV: The Institute of Local Government Studies (INLOGOV) is the leading academic centre for research and teaching on local governance and strategic public management. We enrich the world of local public service with research evidence and innovative ideas, making a positive difference.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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This course is designed for experienced teachers and graduate teaching assistants working with children and young people with literacy difficulties and is organised by Oxford Brookes in partnership with Oxfordshire Local Authority. Read more
This course is designed for experienced teachers and graduate teaching assistants working with children and young people with literacy difficulties and is organised by Oxford Brookes in partnership with Oxfordshire Local Authority.

The course meets the criteria for the taught elements of Associate Membership to the British Dyslexia Association (AMBDA). To apply for full AMBDA status you will need to do an additional observed and mentored practice with a qualified AMBDA practitioner. This can be organised through the course.

Associate Membership of the British Dyslexia Association (AMBDA)

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/pgcert-education-working-with-children-with-literacy-difficulties/

Why choose this course?

- This course has been specifically designed for those wishing to lead on work with children with literacy difficulties in primary and secondary schools and makes up the university component of Associate Membership of the British Dyslexia Association (AMBDA).

- The course is taught in collaboration with the Oxfordshire Local Authority and reflects a long standing and ongoing partnership with the authority and local practitioners.

- You will be able to network with other practitioners and and to have access to information about local jobs specialising in work with children with literacy difficulties.

- The School of Education at Oxford Brookes combines high quality teaching and significant research and consultancy activity.

- The school is a focal point for lively, informed debate on education through close partnership with local schools and colleges and our open seminar and lecture programmes.

Teaching and learning

The course takes place through lectures, seminars and workshops to support both the theoretical and practical elements of the course. This includes workshops that support the practical projects required in modules 2 and 3. For each module, the course contact time is typically:
- one whole day and five evenings (approx. 24 hours contact time)
- two online discussions (approx. six hours of contact time).

Approach to assessment

Each module is assessed by an essay / report of approximately 4,000 words. Assignments are based on work in your own professional context eg case studies of the assessment and intervention of two children. Assignment schedules are timed to meet the needs of busy practitioners.

How this course helps you develop

The course will develop your knowledge of working with children with literacy difficulties. As well as the input from course tutors the course is designed to enable you to network with other colleagues who have a wide range of experience of children with literacy difficulties and of managing literacy difficulties in schools.

Careers

The course is organised by Oxford Brookes in partnership with Oxfordshire Local Authority and meets the criteria for the taught elements of Associate Membership to the British Dyslexia Association (AMBDA). The PGCert enables teachers to assess people for exam concessions and the AMBDA qualification is the leading quality standard for specialist work in the field.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Sustained excellence in research and publication has ensured that a significant proportion of staff from the school were entered for the governments Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 exercise in the Education Unit of Assessment (UoA 25). Almost 90% of our research outputs were deemed to be of international merit, with around a half judged as either ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ in terms of originality, rigour and significance. Contributions to the REF return were spread across all five of our research groups.

In relation to literacy difficulties, Georgina Glenny is currently running a project investigating the use of text-to-speech software to support reluctant writers in local primary and secondary schools. Students on the literacy difficulties course this year have been involved in helping with this study.

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