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Important information. academic review of Manchester Metropolitan University Cheshire campus. Manchester Metropolitan University has been undertaking a review of the long-term future of academic provision at its Cheshire campus. Read more
Important information: academic review of Manchester Metropolitan University Cheshire campus

Manchester Metropolitan University has been undertaking a review of the long-term future of academic provision at its Cheshire campus. It has now been confirmed that the University will withdraw from the Cheshire campus. This means that we expect the campus to close in the summer of 2019.

As the withdrawal from the campus will be a phased process we are still pleased to receive applications for one year full time postgraduate taught courses starting in 2017 on the Cheshire campus. We also continue to welcome applications for part time postgraduate courses of two years in duration in the Exercise and Sport Science department starting in 2017. Applications for courses that are expected to take longer than two years to complete are currently on hold.

Please visit our website for the latest information on the review: http://www.cheshire.mmu.ac.uk/campusreview



MA by Research in Contemporary Arts suits artists (emergent and professional) from a range of disciplines – which may include dance, drama, live arts, theatre, music and creative writing – who wish to develop a focused critical inquiry around their practice. The scope of the proposed research project is aligned with specialist expertise of staff in the Contemporary Arts Department, and developed under supervision with an appropriate supervisory team. Whether your own practical work (practice-as-research) or the work of others becomes the focus of your research inquiry you will be supported in determining suitable research methods and methodologies towards the development of your Praxis project, which will also include critical and reflective writing. You can expect an exciting and varied arts environment with good facilities and excellent technical support. A large, mixed-disciplined student community and exemplary Contemporary Arts Centre provision add to our unique agenda.

With well-established links to the professional world, this versatile and effective programme has broad appeal. A suitable choice for professional practitioners wishing to develop their careers, its multi-disciplinary content coupled with practice based research is also ideal preparation for work in the arts in higher education.
In addition, it is highly appropriate for those wishing to engage in practice as research and to go on to study at MPhil or PhD level.
Contemporary Arts With routes in dance, drama, live art, theatre, music, visual arts and writing MA by research

Features and Benefits

•Track record of graduates producing innovative work within and between arts subject domains.
•Access to excellent drama/performance spaces, ranging from the intimate to the large-scale, plus dance studios, specialist music studios, writing rooms and a new media suite.
•Have a look at our excellent facilities and find out more about the department on our website

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This unique international laboratory programme brings diverse individuals into collaborative research, acknowledging the challenges of creating original, performer-driven theatre in today's complex, globalised culture- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-performance-making/. Read more
This unique international laboratory programme brings diverse individuals into collaborative research, acknowledging the challenges of creating original, performer-driven theatre in today's complex, globalised culture- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-performance-making/

In over 3 decades there has been a creative surge in hybrid live performance worldwide. This has been the work of solo artists, ensembles, auteurs and performer-directors across creative fields, who have redefined boundaries and stretched the artistic and social imagination into new spaces, both literally and figuratively.

Within the vibrant environment of Goldsmiths, and with all the stimulus that London offers culturally, practising or emerging practitioners develop compositional, critical, technical and management skills and strategies for forging independent and self-motivated careers. Our graduates work as practitioners, teachers and cultural leaders worldwide.

On the programme you will conceive, research, construct and deliver your ideas and articulate what motivates these. Teaching is rigorous and interdisciplinary. You study with distinguished international artists as well as scholars within a praxis ethos where theory informs creativity and vice versa. The emphasis throughout is on encouraging collaboration across disciplines and cultures, and on contextualising practice within its social, political and architectural environment.

Physical training, scenographic/environmental exploration and hands-on introduction to technologies (lighting, video and sound) support composition and artistic experimentation. You identify your own practice within the historical and contemporary field, and write critically and creatively. You archive your practice digitally, and on graduation will have developed a portfolio of projects. You are guided on professional development by the Live Art Development Agency (LADA) and the Institute for Cultural and Creative Entrepreneurship (ICCE) at Goldsmiths.

The programme enjoys a wide international professional network of organisations, commissions, venues and festivals of benefit to students. You study both at Goldsmiths and ArtsAdmin. Click here for a full list of artists associated with the programme as permanent and guest tutors.

"The MA in Performance Making at Goldsmiths attracts artists from all over the world seeking to develop their skills, creativity, pragmatics and independence. Taught by distinguished professionals, it encourages original, collaborative research into new forms, new imperatives and new contexts for live performance. As such it makes an invaluable contribution to the culture of performance."

Lois Keidan, Director: Live Art Development Agency, London

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Department of Theatre and Performance Office.

Modules & Structure

This is a praxis programme on which you gain 180 CATS (credits).

Practical Study- 30 credits
Performance Making A and B- 60 credits
MA in Performance Making Dissertation- 60 credits
Contextual Theory- 30 credits

Skills

You will become conversant, confident and skilled in a range of methodological practices as well as compositional strategies for independent theatrical, dance theatre and live art creation.

Your critical and analytical skills in interpreting artistic practice will be tested in a range of verbal, written and oral ways. Your study of your own body as a creative instrument will be complemented by learning the principles of scenography and film narrative.

You will research intellectually and produce theoretically informed writing. You will learn to contextualise your own practice and interests in the contemporary field of performance both in the UK and internationally, and to articulate such practice.

Overall you will learn how to research, construct and deliver your ideas performatively and how to advocate your own projects to producers, venues, funders and other agencies.

Careers

Graduates work in a wide variety of professional contexts globally as commissioned performance makers, directors, project leaders, programmers, teachers and academic researchers.

The programme has launched international production companies and collaborations whilst the many organisations employing them include:

Dreamthinkspeak
Station House Opera
Marie Gabrielle Rotie Productions
The Clod Ensemble
Corridor
Lift
The Royal Court Theatre
The Gate Theatre
The Globe Theatre
Goossun Art-Illery
Northern Stage
The Royal National Theatre
The Beijing Academy
BAC
Bernie Grant Arts Centre
Artsadmin
Shunt
Hackney Empire
Greenwich Dance Agency
The Convenor’s Company
Athletes of the Heart

And a range of international commissions and festivals including Edinburgh Festival and Brighton Fringe.

What some of our alumni are doing now

http://www.taniaelkhoury.com
http://www.niabarge.com
http://www.liveartgardeninitiative.org.uk/mariallanderas.html
http://www.2divide.weebly.com
http://www.palimpsest.weebly.com
hekayet.com/chirin.htm
http://www.zoukak.org

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This programme prepares you to teach art and design in secondary schools. You are shown how to plan, resource and organise art lessons, and how to monitor, record, evaluate and assess the art practices of students- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pgce/secondary-art-design/. Read more
This programme prepares you to teach art and design in secondary schools. You are shown how to plan, resource and organise art lessons, and how to monitor, record, evaluate and assess the art practices of students- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pgce/secondary-art-design/

We encourage you to create exciting, questioning and stimulating learning environments.

You'll explore how young people develop their own forms of exploration, expression and communication.

You'll learn about current educational initiatives and agendas and wider political and conceptual issues related to art and design education and how to design, develop, resource and organise art and design lessons, and how to monitor, record, evaluate and assess the art and design practices of young people.

A central philosophical position of the Goldsmiths PGCE is the importance and essential element of your practice as an artist/designer/craftsperson and how this can contribute to your development as an educator.

School Direct

It is also possible to study this course via our School Direct programme. Please visit our School Direct page to see which schools offer this subject.

Additional costs

As well as your PGCE fees, you will have to cover your travel costs to your school placements.

We produce reading packs electronically and in hard copy format. There’s a small charge for the hard copy reading packs. You may also be asked to contribute towards trips and some materials for your modules.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Department of Educational Studies.

Structure

College-based work
There are practice-based Art and Design workshops, lectures and seminars and individual and group tutorials, which are conducted by Goldsmiths lecturers, artist teachers and gallery/arts educators.

The content of the lectures and seminars focus on current issues including:

contemporary art and design practices
learner identities
visual and place-based pedagogies
inclusive strategies for learning
political and conceptual issues in art and design
artist teacher identities
assessment and evaluation of Art and Design
designing and developing opportunities for learning

School-based work

During the Autumn Term you are placed in a secondary school Art and Design department to observe, participate in and teach alongside experienced teachers.

You'll visit a primary school to develop an understanding of younger children’s work and how the Art and Design curriculum is taught.

During the Spring and Summer terms you are placed in a second school, where you will experience a sustained experience of teaching in which you develop competence in the Professional Standards.

Throughout the course you will develop and implement Art and Design practices in all Key Stages of the curriculum including post-16.

Department

We have been training teachers since 1904, and have established
a reputation for excellence in this field

Educational Studies

We see education as a window through which to view the world, and as something with the power to define who we are and how we live

As a department we’re interested in seeing what education can tell us about the social, political and economic forces of our times. And what these forces mean for the everyday lives of individuals and groups.

We place a strong emphasis on active and collaborative learning, and we'll train you to become a reflective and socially conscious teacher.

Teaching placements

We have partnerships with many London schools, offering you the chance to gain teaching practice in socially mixed, multi-ethnic urban classrooms.

Support

We offer a high level of support through a system of school and personal tutoring.

Research

Staff in the department carry out world-leading research – we're ranked 8th in the UK for the quality of this research.**

**Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

It delves into areas including culture and identity, gender, multilingualism, and youth cultures, and why we maintain a commitment to social justice and inclusion.

Learning & Teaching

A range of teaching methods are employed across the PGCE programmes, including:

• Taught subject sessions
• Taught General Professional Study sessions
• Practical workshops
• Core lectures
• Group tutorials/seminars
• Individual tutorials
• Individual and group presentations
• Supported self-study

As with the other PGCE courses, you’ll be given the opportunity to work with children in a wide range of contexts. These might include focused interventions with individuals or groups, or larger scale events for the community.

How to apply

You apply for this PGCE through the UCAS Teacher Training website. Our institution code is G56 GOLD.

Please take a look at the information on applying, including the specific qualifications or experience you need for this course.

There's no closing date for primary or secondary applications, but we advise you to apply early to avoid disappointment.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Prepare for a career as a professional artist. Independently develop your practical work, research skills and critical thinking, with support from our experienced staff and visiting artists. Read more
Prepare for a career as a professional artist. Independently develop your practical work, research skills and critical thinking, with support from our experienced staff and visiting artists. Test out your ideas in a professional environment and gain invaluable experience of exhibiting, curation and collaboration.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/fine-art

Overview

Our Master’s course will allow you to investigate a range of approaches used in fine art, from painting, sculpture, and printmaking, to more contemporary media such as photography, video, digital media, installation, sound and performance.

You’ll spend much of your time working and researching independently - but you’ll also learn about recent theories, contexts and practices in lectures, seminars and one-to-one tutorials.

We’ll give you the chance to test out your ideas in a professional environment, and to pick up important transferable skills for your career through group and individual presentations and critiques, exhibiting, curation and critical writing.

Here at Cambridge School of Art, you’ll be supported by lecturers who are themselves experienced artists. So as well as having access to artists who are working across many disciplines at the forefront of contemporary art practice, you’ll receive invaluable advice and direction for your future career.

Teaching times: Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 10am-5pm (full-time); Wednesdays 10am-5pm in Year 1 and Tuesdays 10am-5pm in Year 2 (part-time).

Careers

As well as preparing you for work as a practising artist, you’ll pick up skills and knowledge that will equip you for other roles. Our past students now enjoy careers in further and higher education, museum and gallery management, public arts projects, artist in residence schemes and fellowships opportunities, both in the UK and abroad.

Or you might decide to continue on to a research degree, like our PhD Fine Art.

Our links with local art organisations, such as Aid & Abet, Changing Spaces, Wysing Arts Centre and Cambridge Artworks, will give you the chance to take part in professional exhibitions, portfolio reviews and live projects.

You’ll also have access to events such as Creative Front Futures, which will give you a taste of the different creative industries, and be able to take part in Fine Art Professional Practice and networking initiatives for both students and alumni.

Our Fine Art Research Unit (FARU) runs fortnightly lectures that will give you a chance to hear contemporary artists and staff talk about their work, and engage in debates about art practice. Recent speakers have included Phillip Allen, Juan Bolivar, Rebecca Fortnum, Danny Rolph, Hayley Newman, Günter Herbst, David Kefford, Cally Spooner, Tim Ellis, Andrew Grassie, Lilah Fowler, Jemima Brown, Caroline Wright and Matthew Derbyshire.

Core modules

Process and Practice as Research
Acts and Discourses
Fine Art: Critical Practice
Master's Dissertation Art and Design
Master's Project: Art and Design

Assessment

On most of our core modules, you’ll demonstrate your progress through visual research outcomes supported by a written evaluative statement, except for the Master’s Dissertation where you’ll submit a 6,000-word contextual essay.

Specialist facilities

You’ll have the chance to experiment with many different art forms, making use of our MA studios, printmaking and 3D/sculpture workshops, photography dark rooms, and computer suites for video production and digital imaging. You’ll also have access to three brand new Mac suites with Adobe Creative Suite software, plus high-quality 27-inch monitors.

If you're a full-time student, you'll have an individual studio space to work in. If you're part-time, you'll need your own external studio facility, but may be able to negotiate some temporary on-site space for specific projects. Whether you're full-time or part-time, you'll be based in our MA studios and we'll encourage you to make full use of them both during and outside of formal teaching times. You can also arrange to use the studios on weekday evenings and at weekends during term-time.

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Led by some of the country's leading teachers and practitioners in the field, this course is designed for aspiring playwrights and dramaturgs as well as those who want to gain an intensive, hands-on training in playwriting. Read more
Led by some of the country's leading teachers and practitioners in the field, this course is designed for aspiring playwrights and dramaturgs as well as those who want to gain an intensive, hands-on training in playwriting.

Studying at the UK's largest drama department, you will enhance your skills in writing for performance by developing your own plays in a variety of different forms and styles, from stage to radio, the traditional single-authored play to writing for devised theatre and live art. Students will be taught by experienced, professionally-produced and published playwrights. Recent visitors to the college have included Simon Stephens, April de Angelis, Roy Williams, Dennis Kelly, Martin Crimp, David Eldridge, Linda McLean, David Greig, Howard Barker, Michael Frayn and Duncan Macmillan.

All students complete an independently-researched dissertation, which offers a further opportunity to develop your own area of specialist interest.

The class is normally taught in the College’s London base in Bedford Square.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/dramaandtheatre/coursefinder/maplaywriting.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The 2008 Research Assessment Exercise ranked the majority of the Department's research activities as world-leading (4*) or internationally excellent (3*).

- Royal Holloway has the largest Drama Department in the UK with 25 academic members of staff working at the cutting edges of the discipline.

- We foster an excellent research environment and support a vibrant community of postgraduate and doctoral students.

- The topics taught reflect the research excellence of the course faculty and our distinctive commitment to nurturing critically-informed practice.

- You will benefit from a range of unique performance spaces which include a traditional Japanese Noh theatre, a fully equipped black box studio and the substantial Victorian Boilerhouse.

Department research and industry highlights

- The department has strong links with a range of theatre companies, organisations and practitioners and regularly invites visiting speakers and practitioners to work with students.

- There are a number of active research groups in the department that organise a range of activities each year addressing specific subject areas and research questions.

- Members of the academic staff are leading researchers in the field of theatre and performance practice.

Course content and structure

You will study three core course units and complete a dissertation.

Core course units:
- Playwriting (25%)
This unit is taught over the two teaching terms and assessed through a portfolio of theatrical and performance texts, accompanied by written analysis of this work.

- Making Performance Texts (25%)
You will explore alternative means of generating performance text – for devising, live art, physical theatre, for example. Support will be offered through intensive practical workshops by visiting practitioners.

- Theatre Contexts, Histories, Practices (25%)
This unit examines the relationship between theatre theory and practice and is assessed through practice and written work.

- Dissertation (25%)
Students on the MA Playwriting programme write a full-length play with an accompanying substantial essay (6-7000 words). This work is supported by a non-weighted methodologies course.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- enhanced and applied their skills as reflective playwrights
- worked in a range of different theatrical/dramaturgical contexts
- developed their understanding of contemporary playwriting and its contexts
- explored the scope of theatre studies and its critical and research methodologies
- developed their ability to undertake independent research and analysis.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including essays and performance analyses, practical projects as well as a final dissertation. Practical projects are sometimes carried out in a group and may include an element of assessment for an individual’s contribution to group working and direction. You will undertake a summer term practical project.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different drama and theatre-related areas, including careers in professional theatre, training and education. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies and many of our students go on to advanced research.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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The course offers students the opportunity to study theatre and performance studies in a dynamic research environment in the heart of London. Read more
The course offers students the opportunity to study theatre and performance studies in a dynamic research environment in the heart of London. From avant-garde drama to political action, queer performance, live art, dance, cultural tourism, and the spectacles of the West End, you will be introduced to a range of theatre and performance theories and practices.

Ideal for students who have recently completed an undergraduate degree in Theatre, English or related fields, or spent time engaging in performance practice or work in related industries.

Key benefits

- Unrivalled location at the heart of London allows students regular access to a wide range of theatre and performance events, including performances, seminars, and research centres.

- Dynamic intellectual community offered by King’s College London and surrounding institutions, supplemented by regular invited artist and academic speakers or artist residents.

- Core modules providing a strong foundation in theatre and performance studies, plus the opportunity to create an individualised course of study through selected options.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/theatre-and-performance-studies-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The programme offers students the opportunity to study theatre and performance studies in a dynamic research environment in the heart of London. From avant-garde drama to political action, queer performance, live art, dance, cultural tourism, and the spectacles of the West End, students will be introduced to a range of theatre and performance theories and practices in an expanded field.

Students will take a core module in Theatre and Performance Theory, which will provide them with systematic understanding and critical awareness of current problems and new insights in the field, and the ability to critically evaluate current research and advanced scholarship in the discipline. Students will also take a core module in Theatre and Performance Research Methods in the second semester, which will provide them with the research skills and techniques needed to undertake advanced research and scholarship in the field, and enable them to evaluate and critique various methodological approaches to practice-based and scholarly research.

- Course purpose -

Ideal for prospective students who have recently completed an undergraduate degree in Theatre, English or related fields, or spent time engaging in performance practice or work in related industries. The programme invites considered reflection on performance and performativity, emphasising close reading, research, and interdisciplinary approaches to theatre and the arts.

- Course format and assessment -

Lectures, seminars, and optional workshops; essays; dissertation; lab-based research projects (as relevant); independent study; tutorials.

Career Prospects:

Graduates may go on to work in arts practice and related industries, including museum, curatorial, and archival work; production; dramaturgy; journalism; performance; and theatre and performance-related arts management and administration. Graduates may also pursue further research in the field at doctoral level.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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The programme addresses what has become a significant need in the field by offering an innovative interdisciplinary approach to Creative Arts and Mental Health. Read more
The programme addresses what has become a significant need in the field by offering an innovative interdisciplinary approach to Creative Arts and Mental Health. The programme is taught by mental health professionals and specialists in live art, performance art, theatre and performance history. This MSc seeks to attract professionals in education, artists, and mental health practitioners who would like to learn in more breadth and depth how art and performance can be used to understand experiences of mental health and illness, and how arts offers critique and challenge to conventional practices that may be evidence based but still risk disempowerment. Art enables the stories of individuals and groups to be better embraced. Students will be offered core modules in mental health and in performance and then select optional practice-based modules in arts-based research and arts-programme evaluation and in live art and performance.

The course is delivered by experts in the centre for psychiatry and the drama department at QMUL, both leading research departments that rank amongst the top in the country.

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Are you an emergent theatre and performance maker wishing to advance your career as a practitioner, instructor or critic? Hone your performance skills and enhance your knowledge of performance training processes. Read more
Are you an emergent theatre and performance maker wishing to advance your career as a practitioner, instructor or critic? Hone your performance skills and enhance your knowledge of performance training processes. You’ll develop the confidence and ability to understand and analyse the nature of performance within a thriving artistic and research community. We’ll help you realise your potential through a deep level of practical investigation, experimentation and discovery.

Key features

-Take advantage of our stunning, new, multi-million pound, purpose-built performing arts facility, The House.
-Choose to study full time over one year, or take the flexible two-year part-time pathway to fit in with your career plans or other commitments.
-Work in a vibrant interdisciplinary arts and research community where you’ll mix with staff and students from across the arts faculty creating opportunities for collaborative performance and practice-based research. This includes colleagues from areas such as theatre and performance, dance, music and creative writing.
-Benefit from mentorship and teaching by highly skilled practitioners and scholars.
-Make use of the close links we have fostered with leading theatre companies and professional artists while you’re with us, and gain extra experience that will open up your career prospects.
-Engage with Plymouth’s vibrant theatre and performance scene with Peninsula Arts, Theatre Royal Plymouth and Barbican Theatre Plymouth, alongside events and workshops arranged by the department itself. In the past visitors have included included Action Hero, -Low Profile, John Nettles, Wildworks, Lone Twin, Earthfall and Robert Lyons.

Course details

You’ll take a series of modules taught through lectures, workshops and seminars. You’ll explore the larger implications of training in/for performance and specialise in a specific training of your choice (such as acting, live art or performance-making training). You’ll be offered support and mentorship from experienced staff and visiting practitioners. Staff expertise and research is in performance training, live art, improvisation, integrated performance practice, digital performance, contemporary cross-cultural performance, site-specific performance, somatic movement practice, and articulating practice as research. You’ll acquire a more sophisticated ability to reflect critically on performance practice, allowing you to realise your potential as a practical scholar. You’ll also work, with the guidance of your supervisor, to produce an artistic and/or academic thesis on a subject of your choice, underpinned by relevant research, analysis and critical reflection.

Core modules
-MAPR700 Researching Performance
-MAPR702 Final Major Project
-MAPT704 Training Processes: Doing
-MAPT705 Training Processes:Making

Optional modules
-MAPT703 Philosophies of Training
-MACH703 Choreography Lab 2: Choreographic Process and Development

Every postgraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the programme aims, the programme structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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This course is due to be revalidated, please continue to check the website for changes to the programme. The MA in Composition and Sonic Art offers a comprehensive introduction to practice-based research methodologies providing an excellent basis for doctoral research and ongoing independent practice. Read more
This course is due to be revalidated, please continue to check the website for changes to the programme.

The MA in Composition and Sonic Art offers a comprehensive introduction to practice-based research methodologies providing an excellent basis for doctoral research and ongoing independent practice.

The course has been designed to allow sound artists and musicians/composers to develop their interests in a vibrant, interdisciplinary context. It encourages students to develop experimental approaches to their work and examines the conceptual and creative role of the sound artist and musician/composer in 21st century art practice.

Key elements include a focus of the role of site, context and location, together with an examination of the relationship between work and audience.

It is one of four taught postgraduate courses for artists, composers and interdisciplinary practitioners currently offered by the School of Arts at Oxford Brookes University. The other three courses are:
- MA in Contemporary Arts
- MA in Contemporary Arts and Music
- MA in Social Sculpture.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/composition-and-sonic-art/

Why choose this course?

- The School of Arts offers a unified hub for the arts in the Richard Hamilton Building, with state-of-the-art technical facilities and 24-hour studio access.

- A special feature of all four interdisciplinary arts MA courses is the MA Forum, in which students and staff meet to discuss creative practice in a supportive and stimulating environment.

- Innovative cross-disciplinary and socially-engaged creative practices, including internationally renowned programmes in sonic art and social sculpture.

- A stimulating environment where creative practitioners and writers about the arts and culture work closely together to form specialist research units and interdisciplinary research clusters in areas including the Sonic Art. Popular Music, Opera and Social Sculpture.

- Research and teaching programmes linked to some of Oxford’s leading cultural organisations such as Modern Art Oxford, Oxford Contemporary Music, and events such as the annual OXDOX International Documentary Film Festival.

- You have the opportunity to spend a semester at one of the following institutions: the Bauhaus University in Weimar; Piet Zwart Institute, Rotterdam; or the Vilnius Art Academy.

- The School of Arts has a thriving culture of practice-based PhD research students, linked to our specialist research units. Seventy per cent of these research students began on our MA courses.

- Opportunities for international study, with students recently visiting the United States, Europe and Australia.

Specialist facilities

The MA Composition and Sonic Art is situated in the Richard Hamilton Building, which includes a large lecture theatre, a smaller lecture room, studios and installation rooms, seven practice rooms including a band room (with PA and drum kit), an ensemble practice room and a drum room, two music studios, a music technology room and a research room for postgraduate students. Students also have access to pianos and practice areas elsewhere in the University.

Access to the Richard Hamilton Building is available 24 hours a day for all music students.

The department also has access to the drama studio where performances and installations can take place. This provides a live performance venue with versatile sound, lighting and staging possibilities, including surround sound, projections and raised staging and seating.

Music Technology and IT
The Music Technology room houses 12 PC workstations running Adobe Audition 3.0; Sibelius 6; Cubase Essential 4; Pure Data; Hyperprism; GRM Tools and Composers Desktop Project, alongside general internet, email and office software. Other computer networked facilities are also available.

The music studios are based in the basement of the Richard Hamilton Building. The facilities consist of two large single user electroacoustic studios, two sound proof booths; access to Adobe Audition; Pro-Tools; Cubase Studio and Logic; workstations running Pure Data; Max/MSP; Hyperprism; GRM Tools; CDP; a range of sound-recording equipment; along with the possibility of using the two studios together as separated recording and control rooms. One studio has a pair of Genelec 1037C Shielded Active Monitoring Speakers and the other studio has a pair of Genelec S30C Active Monitoring Speakers.

Sonic Art Research Unit Room
This is a space for postgraduate students and research staff engaged in Composition; Sonic Art; or Sound Art practices to use. There are two Apple Macs running Logic alongside a range of powered speakers, mixing desks; electronic components for the creation of bespoke devices; microphones for field and instrumental recording; and a range of digital recording devices.

Field trips

You are given the opportunity to spend a semester at the Bauhaus University in Weimar.

Attendance pattern

Full-time students meet twice weekly in the first semester - mondays and Tuesdays, and in the second semester, on Tuesdays only.

In the summer Full-time students work to develop their Major Project, which concludes in early October the following year.

Part-time students meet once a week every Tuesday in their first year, and in their seocnd year, once a week on Mondays in Semester 1 and Tuesdays in Semster 2. In Year 2 they work through the summe ron their Major Project which concludes in October of their second year.

Students doing full-time need to be on-site or nearby, at least half the week, and put in about 40 hours per week.

Part-time students are expected to be in at least one day a week, and work in their own time for at least 20 hours per week, on or off site, as appropriate.

Careers

Combining the academic rigour of a traditional programme with practical and vocational components, sonic arts and composition students at Oxford Brookes are well placed for a variety of careers in the creative sector. Many master's students who have developed their practice at postgraduate level will continue as practising sound artists and new music composers, whilst others take up careers related to their knowledge, expertise or interests. This includes within teaching further or higher education; the media and new technologies, and cultural administration.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

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Inventing Modern Art enables you to understand how painting, design and architecture took new forms and meanings in an age of radical social, scientific and technological change. Read more
Inventing Modern Art enables you to understand how painting, design and architecture took new forms and meanings in an age of radical social, scientific and technological change. Working with leading experts, you will learn to interpret these from theoretical as well as object-based approaches.

Why this programme

◾World-leading resources, from Charles Rennie Mackintosh’s School of Art to the Burrell Collection and The Hunterian, home to the world’s largest public Whistler display.
◾State-of-the-art collections access at the new Kelvin Hall Study Centre, and tuition by specialists including the Mackintosh and European Modernism Academic Curator.

Programme structure

The programme offers a wide-ranging mix of taught and research components, and is taught by a team including the Academic Curator in Mackintosh studies and European Modernism, and experts in the Enlightenment, Whistler, Impressionism, the Vienna Secession, and dress history.

The 20-credit core course on 'Research Methods in Practice' is taken by all students in Semester 1, and provides an introduction to the key techniques and principles of advanced art-historical study and research. This provides a foundation for the programme's other components, which consist of:
◾A compulsory dissertation (60 credits; 15-20,000 words, including footnotes and bibliography). This is submitted in August and written under the guidance of a specialist tutor. It provides opportunity for self-directed research on a topic chosen by the student in consultation with the programme convener and the tutor.
◾Five individual option courses, each worth 20 credits. These enable you to study particular themes or artistic movements in depth, and, if desired, also to obtain work experience. They include opportunities for first-hand engagement with relevant work in local collections and the new Kelvin Hall Collections Study Centre, and are selected from the following list.

Some courses are taught in Semester 1 and some in Semester 2 (not all are available each year):
◾Whistler, Impressionism, and European Avant-Gardes
◾The Artistic House
◾The Birth of Modern Fashion? Textiles and Dress, 1680-1815
◾Victorian Visions: Dress and Textiles c. 1837-1901
◾Cultures of Collecting
◾Provenance
◾Work Placement
◾Independent Study
◾Semester Abroad (Ecole du Louvre, Paris)
◾Research Forum

One or more of your option courses may be chosen from those available in other College of Arts subjects, to create a distinctive interdisciplinary emphasis within your degree. The programme convener will give guidance on choices relevant to your personal goals and interests.

Career prospects

The programme provides a strong foundation for work in the museum, heritage, and education sectors, as well as in media, publishing, and arts administration. Its distinctive object-based study sessions and field trips introduce you to key professionals, whilst the placement option provides 'live' work experience - an essential first step in much arts employment. Our Art History Masters' graduates have secured curatorial posts at institutions including the Palace of Westminster, V&A Museum, Ironbridge Museum, and Thomas Jefferson's Monticello, as well as specialist positions with film and TV companies and auction houses. For those interested in an academic career, the dissertation component provides essential preparation for doctoral research.

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The aim of the course is to develop your critical and contextual practice, contemporary and innovative methodologies, cross-disciplinary and collaborative practices, and reflective studio-based practice. Read more
The aim of the course is to develop your critical and contextual practice, contemporary and innovative methodologies, cross-disciplinary and collaborative practices, and reflective studio-based practice.

During your time with us, you will be encouraged to undertake independent contextual and theoretical research that will improve your capacity for independent enquiry, creativity and professional practice.

Key benefits:

• Develop your knowledge and skills relating to current debates and practices
• Enjoy access to your own studio space and workshop support
• Tap into long-established associations with key creative and professional networks.

Visit the website: http://www.salford.ac.uk/pgt-courses/art-and-design-contemporary-fine-art

Suitable for

This course is for committed fine art or creative practitioners who wish to develop their personal practice to a higher, professional level. It actively encourages the pursuit of individual agendas for study and for personal choice of media/disciplines selected from the range of practices within the field of contemporary fine art.

Programme details

This course embraces a range and diversity of practices and aims to:

• Develop creative, critical, analytical and intellectual competencies informed by contemporary professional practice
• Develop an advanced understanding of research methods in general and those of importance to creative practice and industry in particular
• Enhance your knowledge and understanding of professional and collaborative frameworks
• Provide the opportunity to develop industry experience and understanding through contact by placement, project and/or contact with professional practitioners.

Format

This course uses a range of teaching and learning settings including lectures, seminars/workshops, tutorials, situated learning (e.g. ‘live’ projects) and independent learning. The combination of these aims is to develop an environment that allows students to progressively take ownership and direction of their learning so that they may develop as independent, life-long learners. The process of Masters level study, relating to an individual and independent arts practice, is one of dense critical self-reflection; this is achieved by including self-directed projects where students have the opportunity to negotiate their learning and assessment requirements.

Indicative to the course are:

• formal lectures
• seminar presentations
• workshops
• critical analysis and independent learning.

Award specific learning activities include exercises; team and peer-based learning, studio practice and critical seminar-events, site visits, visiting professionals, work placements, online activities and critical debates. Students will have the opportunity to engage in a range of course-work activities in order to foster active learning through contribution to participatory exercises and through formal and informal presentations of their work.

Semester 1

• Research Methods and Practice
• Specialist Practice

Semester 2

• Creative Contexts
• Practice in Context

Semester 3

• Negotiated Thesis/Major Project

Assessment

Assessment methods used on the course include:

• Practical, oral and written assignments (80%)
• Group presentations (20%)

You will be assessed throughout the course on:

• Body of work and contextual research: e.g studio/portfolio/exhibition/publication/etc.
• Reflective journals: log or sketch-book/statement/seminar or other presentation

Career potential

Our graduates have exhibited successfully in a range of venues and biennales. Many graduates establish themselves within the local creative economy and develop a studio presence in the region and beyond.

We encourage students to pursue an international profile and presence as soon as possible in support of their professional reputation. It is envisaged that opportunities via MediaCity will facilitate internationalization of practice on individual terms.

Many of our students succeed through related professions in: education, community development, healthcare environments or enterprise. Some graduates prefer to apply their creative practice to commissioning, consultancy or other professional outcomes.

The majority of our graduates continue with their creative careers. Graduates are particularly visible in the region – in group studios, exhibitions or events. Many graduates support their practice via teaching or demonstrator roles in further or higher education establishments. A number of graduates find work with museums or galleries. Our graduates are particularly proactive in initiating art-based projects – establishing new venues and curating group exhibitions, for example. A number are successful each year in securing artist residencies at home and abroad. It is envisaged that opportunities via MediaCity will further facilitate internationalization of practice on individual terms.

The School co-ordinates a range of enterprise projects and initiatives that can benefit graduating students, in order to assist their career opportunities or routes into self-employment.

How to apply: http://www.salford.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying

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Channel your creativity and join a multi-skilled team to develop the next generation of video games. On our arts-based MA, you’ll join the vibrant games and technology community based here in Cambridge that includes Guerrilla, ARM, Frontier Developments, Jagex and Ninja Theory. Read more
Channel your creativity and join a multi-skilled team to develop the next generation of video games. On our arts-based MA, you’ll join the vibrant games and technology community based here in Cambridge that includes Guerrilla, ARM, Frontier Developments, Jagex and Ninja Theory.

Your course will have a new home in Compass House, which will extend our campus along East Road. You’ll have the latest technology at your fingertips and be able to collaborate with other students on innovative projects to hone your skills.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/computer-games-development-art

If you have a degree in an art and design or computer games-related subject, our course will allow you to specialise in games art at Master's level.

Based in the inspiring environment of our new Compass House Games Centre, you’ll learn all about best practice in the games industry. We’ll encourage you to work in design production teams, tackling a series of creative and technical challenges with programmers and industry professionals. You'll develop your design skills and learn how to create and publish successful games across a range of platforms.

Cambridge accounts for nearly 20% of the UK computer games industry, so it's a great place to study as we enjoy excellent links with the major games developers in the area. What's more, our Computer Games Centre offers studio space to local indie developers, who'll share their knowledge and experience with you.

We're partners with the Global Science & Technology Forum, allowing our students access to cutting-edge research materials.

While you're studying, we'll encourage you to take on work placements and collaborate on live projects with the games industry. You’ll also have the chance to enter games events, such as Brains Eden, which Anglia Ruskin hosts every year.

This course runs in parallel with our MSc Computer Games Development (Computing), reflecting the multidisciplinary nature of games creation.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/computer-games-development-art

Careers

Our MA gives you the chance to specialise in the design and technical implementation of computer games, whether you already have a games-related degree, or you're a recent graduate of a non-games-related degree who's looking to move into this area. Our course is also suitable if you work in another creative industry and are looking to move into games design and creation.

The skills you'll learn on this course are relevant to other forms of games - including board games and educational games - allowing you to consider a number of career options.

Interactive computer games is a relatively new medium; as the industry grows, you’ll find more and more opportunities to use the computing and creative skills you'll hone while studying here.

Modules & assessment

Core modules:
Process and Practice as Research
Games Development 1
Games Development 2
Digital Arts - Experimental Practice
Master's Project: Art and Design

Assessment

You’ll show your progress through a combination of written and practical work, carried out individually and as part of a team.

What you'll study

Cambridge School of Art has been inspiring creativity since 1858 when it was opened by John Ruskin.

Engaging with current debates surrounding contemporary practice and with the state-of-the-art facilities, Cambridge School of Art houses light, bright studios, industry-standard film and photographic facilities, and 150-year-old printing presses alongside dedicated Apple Mac suites. Our digital art gallery, the Ruskin Gallery, exhibits both traditional shows and multimedia presentations, from national and international touring exhibitions and our own students.

We are the only university in Cambridge offering art and design courses at higher education level. A tight-knit community of artists, academics and over 900 students, we collaborate across our University, the creative industries, and other sectors. Cambridge is a centre for employment in the creative industries and there are rich opportunities for collaboration with the city’s entertainment, technological, scientific, arts and heritage industries.

Our graduates have a history of winning national and international awards and an excellent employment record. They include Pink Floyd's Syd Barrett and Dave Gilmour, Spitting Image creators Peter Fluck and Roger Law, and illustrator Ronald Searle, the creator of St Trinian's.

We’re part of the Faculty of Arts, Law and Social Sciences, a hub of creative and cultural innovation whose groundbreaking research has real social impact.

Facilities

Based at the new Compass House Computer Games Centre, a three-minute walk from our main Cambridge campus, you’ll have 24-hour access to a hub space with group work naturally forming a part of your studies.

The centre includes a start-up lab for small games companies, supported by Games Eden, the Cambridge Computer Games industry network. This will give you excellent opportunities to work in an entrepreneurial games environment.

All students on our Computer Games courses – undergraduate and postgraduate – have access to industry-standard PCs running Maya, 3DS Max, ZBrush, Mudbox, Motion Builder, After Effects, Unity 3D, and UDK. You’ll be able to use motion capture equipment, 3D monitors, VR equipment, graphics tablets, a render farm, HD cameras and digital SLRs (for HDRI capture).

Links with industry

Cambridge is home to nearly 20% of the UK’s computer games industry, including Sony’s Guerrilla Studios, ARM, Jagex, Ninja Theory, Frontier, Geomerics and a host of smaller indie developers. Our Computer Games Art department is a member of TIGA, the Business & University Games Syndicate, and a partner of the Global Science & Technology Forum, giving you access to cutting-edge research materials.

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Since the Department of History of Art's foundation in 1970, we have established ourselves as one of the world’s leading centres for advanced research in the field. Read more
Since the Department of History of Art's foundation in 1970, we have established ourselves as one of the world’s leading centres for advanced research in the field. We are proud of our team of staff and students whose impressive performance is critical to sustaining and enhancing the national and international reputation created by our distinguished alumni.

Cambridge itself is, from an art historical point of view, a stunning city in which to live and work. We make full use of Cambridge’s unique holdings of art and architecture, including the Fitzwilliam Museum (on our doorstep), Kettle’s Yard and the University Library as well as the College libraries. The Hamilton Kerr Institute at Whittlesford, a department of the Fitzwilliam Museum, is dedicated to the conservation of easel paintings and contributes to our teaching and research.

The MPhil in the History of Art and Architecture is a nine-month course providing advanced study and training in research in specialised areas of the subject. It is intended as a self-contained programme of art-historical study, but also serves as a preparation for students intending to proceed to doctoral research. Please note that this is a research degree with taught methodological elements, not a conversion course for students whose first degree lies in another subject.

The educational aims of the programme are:

- to provide teaching and learning to post-graduate students in the history of art and architecture in a range of fields linked to the research interests of the staff;
- to provide high-calibre students with training in relevant research skills and to offer excellent specialist supervision of their individual research in these fields;
- to provide a stimulating environment in which students can reach their full intellectual potential;
- to help students develop a wide range of intellectual abilities and skills which will enable them to make a significant contribution in their chosen careers and walks of life, including academic teaching and research.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/ahhamphaa

Course detail

On completion of the MPhil, students should have:

- made the transition in learning style and pace from undergraduate to postgraduate level;
- acquired the necessary research skills in the use of bibliographical, archival and museum resources as relevant to their field of study;
- gained practice in the use of the languages and archival skills relevant to their chosen research area;
- gained confidence in the choice and use of different methodological approaches and theoretical perspectives;
- refined their critical skills in the examination, recording and analysis of works of art and/or architecture, especially at first-hand (through travel and fieldwork if appropriate);
- gained experience in oral and written presentation, and in a sustained piece of research in the form of a dissertation of not more than 15,000 words;
- acquired the proficiency needed to present in writing a coherent and sustained piece of academic research.

Format

Teaching is delivered through a series of seminars held in the Faculty during the Michaelmas (Autumn) and Lent (Spring) Terms, focusing on salient critical and theoretical issues in the discipline, and organised into two parallel strands in each term. The seminars include presentations by MPhil students and other research students. Students may either take one option in each term, or follow the same course throughout. A taught course in visual culture offered at MPhil level by another university department (eg Classics, English, History, Modern and Medieval Languages) may be undertaken in addition to one of the two taught courses, with the approval of your supervisor and the Degree Committee of the Faculty of Architecture and History of Art. This needs to be discussed and arranged at the beginning of the Michaelmas Term.

Throughout the course, students are encouraged to undertake independent reading and study, in order to consolidate what is under discussion in the seminars. In addition, they attend the Department’s weekly public Graduate Research Seminar organised by the graduate students, the Department's fortnightly Medieval Seminars and other lectures and seminars in the Department and elsewhere in the University.

The syllabus is as follows:

- Attendance at two selected seminar courses in specialised areas of research, one in the Michaelmas (Autumn) Term and one in the Lent (Spring) Term;
- Attendance at the department's weekly graduate seminars;
- Attendance at classes in skills training and career development;
- Frequent individual consultation with the candidate's supervisor, who will guide the candidate's choice of topics and preparation of individual written work for essays, presentations and dissertation.

Each of the seminar courses runs over two terms (Michaelmas and Lent), with a different emphasis in each term. The seminars include presentations by MPhil students and other research students. Students may either take one option in each term, or follow the same course throughout. A taught course in visual culture offered at MPhil level by another university department (eg Classics, English, History, Modern and Medieval Languages) may be undertaken in addition to one of the two taught courses, with the approval of your supervisor and the Degree Committee of the Faculty of Architecture and History of Art. This needs to be discussed and arranged at the start of Michaelmas Term.

Assessment

- The dissertation of not more than 15,000 words represents 60% of the overall mark and is submitted at the end of May.
- Two essays of not more than 6000 words (one of which may include a literature review). The essays represent 40% of the total mark. One will be submitted at the end of the Michaelmas (Autumn) and one at the end of the Lent (Spring) terms respectively.

Continuing

To continue to read for the PhD following the course, MPhil in History of Art & Architecture students must achieve an overall average score of at least 70%. Continuation is also subject to the approval of the proposed research proposal, and, the availability of an appropriate supervisor.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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-The MA Games Art and Design degree allows you to develop your Games Art and Design skills and knowledge to a professional level. Read more
-The MA Games Art and Design degree allows you to develop your Games Art and Design skills and knowledge to a professional level
-You will produce a commercial-standard personal portfolio that reflects the forefront of current practices in approach, style and vision
-Explore the theoretical and contextual understanding of games art, its audiences and significances in our contemporary media culture
-Develop professional-level enquiry, research, creative invention, project planning and management practices
-On this masters degree you will learn in a multi-disciplinary environment through discussion and the exploration of ideas

Why choose this course?

This MA Games Art and Design degree meets the needs of the games industry. The games industry has developed dramatically from the days of the solo practitioner to become a global market where large teams of artists work in unison to create content for the next generation of interactive game technologies. The current games art and design practitioner is likely to become a specialist in one area, such as character modelling, environment creation, lighting, animating etc. This award fuses technical knowledge of real-time rendering with the aesthetic decisions and traditional skills you will need as a games artist.

On this postgraduate Games Art and Design degree, your study will include ways of thinking about the cultural resonance of your work and about the audiences it is made for, about the nature of creativity, and the role of the Cultural Industries in a modern knowledge economy. Through your study you will develop a range of project management skills, and an ability to identify and manage your own learning. You will consider the role of enterprise opportunities in commercial, professional and social environments. Enquiry, research and clear communication underpin work throughout the programme. As well as specialist modules in your chosen discipline area the programme includes modules that are shared with other postgraduate awards in the School of Creative Arts.

The structure of MA Games Art and Design promotes cross-discipline discussion and maintains the enthusiasm and focus of discipline specialists. It enables you to develop the key transferable skills of postgraduate study grounded in activities that have currency, relevance and application for your future career and for further academic study.

The MA Games Art and Design course, part of the postgraduate Media programme, offers you a coherent learning in one of several awards. It enables you to develop creative practical skills in a discipline of your choosing. That work may extend your existing skills, knowledge and understanding, or it may mean a change of direction, new learning, and new experiences. Induction, seminars and social events for students and staff mean that you will be part of a friendly and supportive postgraduate community, which includes film makers, musicians and professionals working in new media. Senior research staff and internationally renowned professionals work with postgraduate students, helping you to develop original and challenging work.

Careers

Particular emphasis is given to providing you with the skills necessary to further your career as an Games Artist. The course is designed to help you understand and work within the contemporary media environment.

You will also acquire enquiry and information handling skills, enterprise skills in the development and presentation of ideas, in communicating in the spoken and written word, and addressing particular audiences.

Teaching methods

On this programme teaching and learning emphasises enquiry led project work, developing the kind of independence and autonomy that is appropriate for postgraduate education. Lectures, seminars and other discussions bring students together in multi-disciplinary groups where ideas are shared, challenged, developed. Workshops and other activities develop specific discipline centered skills and understandings while tutorials develop individual study trajectories and responses to assignment tasks and briefs.

Much of the time students are engaged in self-managed independent study, undertaking enquiries and research, developing skills, inventing and developing ideas, realizing project outcomes, exploring the cultural resonance of their work.

All students on the PG Media programme engage in an interdisciplinary project as a part of their MA study, giving them an opportunity to work with students from other disciplines in an experimental and creative way.

Work Placement

There are work related learning opportunities on this course, all students complete a live external brief as part of their coursework.

Structure

Core Modules
-Creative Economies
-Major Study: Games Art and Design
-Media Discourses
-Practice 1: Media
-Practice 2: Media
-Research and Enquiry

Optional
-Creative Economies (Online)
-Research and Enquiry (Online)

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All applicants will be required to present a portfolio of their work and will be interviewed by teaching staff. The course welcomes international applicants and requires an English level of IELTS 6.5 or equivalent. Read more
All applicants will be required to present a portfolio of their work and will be interviewed by teaching staff. The course welcomes international applicants and requires an English level of IELTS 6.5 or equivalent.

One of two strands of enquiry in arts practice at masters level (the other beting Arts Practice, Fine Art) the MA Arts Practice (Arts, Health and Wellbeing) course offers students the opportunity to explore their own art practice or to take an outward facing approach, in partnership with others. Students of the course develop the skills to evaluate, critique and implement methodologies, gaining the ability to articulate sound arguments relevant to their practice.

Graduates exploring the role of the Arts in realising health and wellbeing focus on the value of the arts in community engagement and also its impact on the environment. They make a significant contribution to the advancement of Arts in Health within Wales and further afield.

The broad and interdisciplinary nature ensures that our course reflects the diversity of activity and interest in this dynamic field.

The role of the arts in health and well-being is widely recognised and valued. The MA Arts Practice (Arts, Health and Wellbeing) course will be of interest to artists, arts or health managers, community workers and teachers, plus those with an interest in the relationship between arts and health. It aims to support and develop innovative practice and research in this vibrant and expanding sector, so you will be encouraged to engage in creative dialogue,collaboration and interdisciplinary working

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/940-ma-arts-practice-art-health-and-wellbeing

What you will study

The MA Art Practice course runs over two calendar years if you choose part-time study, or one calendar year for full-time study:

Part One
- Critical Studies in the Arts (20 credits)
Learn about systems of enquiry, how to understand and engage with objects and issues that affect your particular domain

- Arts Practice 1 (40 credits)
Develop your skills in your chosen discipline, challenging genre and context to develop an original body of work in either a studio context or placement.

Please note: For students studying part-time the above modules will be undertaken between October – June during your first year.

Part Two
- Arts Praxis (40 credits)
Refine and build upon your line of enquiry, develop new skills, producing a body of work within a studio context or placement which demonstrates complexity of understanding.

- Professional Practice in the Arts (20 credits)
Explore entrepreneurial, marketing and management aspects of contemporary practice within a framework of social, political, economic and cultural responsibility

- Major Arts Project (60 credits)
Complete a detailed project demonstrating praxis; an area of research and practice relevant to your concerns, utilising research methods appropriate for an arts scholar and an appropriate means of presentation.

Please note: For students studying part-time the above modules will be undertaken between October – September during your second year.

Learning and teaching methods

The MA Art Practice course is delivered using specialist facilities in our post-graduate studios which are available seven days a week. The MA Art Practice course makes use of lectures, guest speakers, workshops, demonstrations and tutorials, field trips and visits (additional costs will apply for field trips and visits). Contact time will include weekly workshops or seminars, and regular group and individual tutorials. You will also be expected to develop your area of practice independently.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

The course acknowledges the value of experience and partnerships to enable employability. A key element of the course involves establishing partnerships, internships, residencies and placements with arts organisations and galleries, NHS Trusts, social services, charitable trusts, schools, colleges, care homes and commercial companies to develop these. The course also develops your professional skills and positions your practice within critical and contextual frameworks.

You will have the opportunity to develop your practice and gain experience in the field through practical placements, mentoring and live projects matched to your needs whilst benefiting from specialist facilities and expertise to extend your skill sets.

Graduates can progress to careers in academia, arts administration, artists in residence, arts education, arts and disability, community arts, commissioned works, gallery administration and curatorship, health sector management, public art, studio practice, social services, and youth work.

Assessment methods

You will usually have to complete coursework as you progress, and normally sit exams at the end of each academic year.

Facilities

Practical facilities available to students include an MA base room, computer lab with software for digital imaging and film editing, printmaking studio, ceramics, casting, wood and metal workshops, photographic darkroom and studio.

Learning resources include the campus library, access to online journals and research.

Teaching

Our MA Art Practice staff are actively engaged in research, they embody a high level of knowledge, expertise and professional experience across a range of arts practices. Students on this course will benefit from interdisciplinary teaching delivered by a teaching team with extensive experience in exhibiting; project management; project realisation and practice within the public realm, NHS and community contexts.

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