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Masters Degrees (Liturgy)

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Sarum College’s MA in Christian Liturgy is a unique programme designed to provide a comprehensive study of the major aspects of Christian worship, drawing upon historical, theological and contemporary pastoral themes. Read more

Sarum College’s MA in Christian Liturgy is a unique programme designed to provide a comprehensive study of the major aspects of Christian worship, drawing upon historical, theological and contemporary pastoral themes.

Students will have the opportunity to study modules that explore a range of themes related to the development and interpretation of different aspects of Christian worship.

The study of Christian liturgy seeks to understand how Christians have worshipped in the past and the factors influencing the evolution of Christian worship; equip students to interpret the rapidly changing landscape of present patterns of worship within an informed liturgical and theological perspective; encourage a liturgical imagination that is alert to the significance of worship for the Church.

The MA in Christian Liturgy is validated by the University of Winchester.

Study Structure

The mix of classroom and homebased study allows students to pursue a qualification alongside personal and professional responsibilities.

Learning is collaborative in small groups on four-day intensive residential courses offered throughout the academic year. In this way, students benefit from close contact with tutors, lecturers and classmates.

MA students usually complete six modules over two years and a dissertation in the third.

Classes and additional assessed work are credit-rated for students planning to go on to a research degree. 

Core Module

Approaches to Liturgical Study

An introduction to the sources and methods used by scholars in the evaluation and interpretation of liturgical forms.

Optional Modules

These examine a particular aspect of Christian liturgy in greater depth. Each module is offered every two or three years to allow students to shape a programme of study to suit their own interests and concerns.

  • The Eucharist
  • Christian Initiation
  • Music in Christian Worship
  • Liturgy and Time: Calendar and Daily Prayer
  • Worship, Art and Architecture
  • Liturgy and Culture
  • Guided Reading in Christian Liturgy
  • Liturgy and Spirituality
  • Liturgy and Mission
  • Practical Liturgical Research Project (an independent study option)


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Run in partnership with the College of the Resurrection and the Yorkshire Ministry Course. We designed this course in creative dialogue with pastoral practice. Read more
Run in partnership with the College of the Resurrection and the Yorkshire Ministry Course.

We designed this course in creative dialogue with pastoral practice. There are specific modules that meet the training needs of newly ordained clergy.

You’ll go on a placement in the community as part of the course. This might be in a parish, a school or a chaplaincy. And you’ll learn the habits of critical theological reflection.

You can choose modules from across the discipline or focus on one particular subject area.

Careers

The course is aimed at anyone involved in Christian ministry, lay or ordained, who wants to study theological subjects in more depth.

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Course content. You will study a varied and exciting series of modules aimed to develop your theological skills and understanding and help you apply this new knowledge to your specific context and concerns. Read more

Course content

You will study a varied and exciting series of modules aimed to develop your theological skills and understanding and help you apply this new knowledge to your specific context and concerns.

The MA is studied part-time by following a two year taught module programme followed by a one year dissertation module. The taught modules are delivered at residential schools in August, January and May.

At the beginning of the course you will explore critically the methodological presumptions which underpin practical and public theology. This provides a grounding for your theological engagement with your context. Further core modules are a practical theology project, spirituality, and ritual and liturgy. You may then undertake advanced study in important public theology topics such as biblical studies, ethics, pluralism and diversity, and missiology.

Year One

August Residential: Practical and Public Theology (core)

January Residential: Pluralism and Diversity or The Bible and Public Theology

May Residential: Liturgy and Ritual in Contemporary Culture (core)

Year Two

August Residential: Practical Theology Project (core)

January Residential: Christian Ethics in Contemporary Society or Christian Mission in Western Sociey

May Residential: Spirituality (core)

Year Three

All year: Dissertation 

The modules are assessed through a variety of tasks including essays, book reviews, case studies, research project reports, and presentations. The final dissertation is 15,000 words.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is delivered in blocks lasting 3 days. You may either visit the University daily or if you live further away accommodation will need to be arranged. We can help find suitable accommodation, including on campus. A separate fee is charged for the accommodation.



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You will study a varied and exciting series of modules aimed to develop your theological skills and understanding and help you apply this new knowledge to your specific context and concerns. Read more

You will study a varied and exciting series of modules aimed to develop your theological skills and understanding and help you apply this new knowledge to your specific context and concerns.

The MA is studied part-time by following a two year taught module programme followed by a one year dissertation module. The taught modules are delivered at residential schools in August, January and May.

At the beginning of the course you will explore critically the methodological presumptions which underpin practical and public theology. This provides a grounding for your theological engagement with your context. Further core modules are a practical theology project, spirituality, and ritual and liturgy. You may then undertake advanced study in important public theology topics such as biblical studies, ethics, pluralism and diversity, and missiology.

Year One

August Residential: Practical and Public Theology (core)

January Residential: Pluralism and Diversity or The Bible and Public Theology

May Residential: Liturgy and Ritual in Contemporary Culture (core)

Year Two

August Residential: Practical Theology Project (core)

January Residential: Christian Ethics in Contemporary Society or Christian Mission in Western Sociey

May Residential: Spirituality (core)

Year Three

All year: Dissertation 

The modules are assessed through a variety of tasks including essays, book reviews, case studies, research project reports, and presentations. The final dissertation is 15,000 words.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is delivered in blocks lasting 3 days. You may either visit the University daily or if you live further away accommodation will need to be arranged. We can help find suitable accommodation, including on campus. A separate fee is charged for the accommodation.



Read less
Course content. You will study a varied and exciting series of modules aimed to develop your theological skills and understanding and help you apply this new knowledge to your specific context and concerns. Read more

Course content

You will study a varied and exciting series of modules aimed to develop your theological skills and understanding and help you apply this new knowledge to your specific context and concerns.

The MA is studied part-time by following a two year taught module programme followed by a one year dissertation module. The taught modules are delivered at residential schools in August, January and May.

At the beginning of the course you will explore critically the methodological presumptions which underpin practical and public theology. This provides a grounding for your theological engagement with your context. Further core modules are a practical theology project, spirituality, and ritual and liturgy. You may then undertake advanced study in important public theology topics such as biblical studies, ethics, pluralism and diversity, and missiology.

Year One

  • August Residential: Practical and Public Theology (core)
  • January Residential: Pluralism and Diversity or The Bible and Public Theology
  • May Residential: Liturgy and Ritual in Contemporary Culture (core)

Year Two

  • August Residential: Practical Theology Project (core)
  • January Residential: Christian Ethics in Contemporary Society or Christian Mission in Western Sociey
  • May Residential: Spirituality (core)

Year Three

All year: Dissertation 

The modules are assessed through a variety of tasks including essays, book reviews, case studies, research project reports, and presentations. The final dissertation is 15,000 words.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is delivered in blocks lasting 3 days. You may either visit the University daily or if you live further away accommodation will need to be arranged. We can help find suitable accommodation, including on campus. A separate fee is charged for the accommodation.



Read less
The MA in Theology and Religion serves both the specific needs of students focussed on progressing towards doctoral research and those of students looking to continue relatively broad-based studies in Theology and Religion to Level four, perhaps in support of a career in teaching. Read more

The MA in Theology and Religion serves both the specific needs of students focussed on progressing towards doctoral research and those of students looking to continue relatively broad-based studies in Theology and Religion to Level four, perhaps in support of a career in teaching.

Course Structure

  • Choice of one of the three core modules
  • Three option modules
  • Dissertation.

Core Modules

  • One of the following: The Bible and Hermeneutics, Classic Texts in Christian Theology, Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion
  • Dissertation.

Optional Modules

Optional modules in previous years have included:

2-3 choices from:

  • Advanced Hebrew Texts
  • Advanced Aramaic
  • Middle Egyptian 
  • The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and the New Testament
  • The Bible and Hermeneutics
  • Paul and his Interpreters
  • Gospels and Canon
  • Patristic Exegesis
  • Patristic Ecclesiology
  • Christian Northumbria 600-750
  • Classic Texts in Christian Theology
  • The Anglican Theological Vision
  • Liturgy and Sacramentality
  • Conceiving Change in Contemporary Catholicism
  • Twentieth-Century Catholic Theology
  • Christian Gender
  • Principles of Theological Ethics
  • Theology, Ethics and Medicine
  • Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion
  • Ritual, Symbolism and Belief in the Anthropology of Religion
  • Literature and Religion
  • Catholic Social Thought
  • Ecclesiology and Ethnography
  • Doctrine of Creation.

Plus up to 1 choice from:

  • Selected modules from the MA in Theology and Ministry programme
  • Level 3 undergraduate module, or any Level 1 – 2 language module offered by the Department of Theology and Religion, taken in conjunction with the Extended Study in Theology & Religion module
  • 30 credits from another Board of Studies (including appropriate credit-bearing language modules offered by the University’s Centre for Foreign Language Study).

Course Learning and Teaching

Most MA teaching is delivered through small group seminars and tutorials. These exemplify and encourage the various skills and practices required for independent scholarly engagement with texts and issues. Teaching in the Department of Theology & Religion is ‘research led’ at both BA and MA levels, but particularly at MA level. Research led teaching is informed by staff research, but more importantly it aims to develop students as independent researchers themselves, able to pursue and explore their own research interests and questions. This is why the independently researched MA dissertation is the culmination of the MA programme. Such engagement with texts and issues is not only an excellent preparation for doctoral research, it also develops those skills of critical analysis, synthesis and presentation sought and required by employers.

Many MA classes will contain a ‘lecture’ element, conveying information and exemplifying an approach to the subject-matter that will enable students to develop a clear understanding of the subject and improve their own ability to analyse and evaluate information and arguments. Seminars enhance knowledge and understanding through preparation and interaction with other students and staff, promoting awareness of and respect for different viewpoints and approaches, and developing skills of articulacy, advocacy and interrogation. Through small group discussions and tutorials, feedback is provided on student work, with the opportunity to discuss specific issues in detail, enhancing student knowledge and writing skills.

The Dissertation module includes training in generic research skills, from the use of the Library to issues in referencing and bibliography. The subject specific core module introduces students to questions of interpretation and argument in the disciplines encompassed by theology and religion, and helps them to develop their own interests and questions that will issue in the MA dissertation. The latter is a piece of independent research, but it is fostered and guided through individual tutorials with a supervisor, with whom students meet throughout the academic year.

Career Opportunities

A significant number of our graduates find employment in academic institutions (universities and seminaries) around the world.

Others go into teaching, church ministry, the caring professions, and many other professional fields.



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This course focuses on the context and interpretation of biblical and pseudepigraphal texts, along with the study of biblical languages. Read more

This course focuses on the context and interpretation of biblical and pseudepigraphal texts, along with the study of biblical languages. Durham has a long tradition of outstanding biblical scholarship, providing a wide range of distinctive approaches to biblical studies, including historical, critical and theological.

Course Structure

  • The Bible and Hermeneutics core module
  • Three option modules
  • Dissertation.

Core Modules

  • The Bible and Hermeneutics
  • Dissertation.

Optional Modules

Optional Modules in previous years have included:

2-3 choices from:

  • Advanced Hebrew Texts
  • Advanced Aramaic
  • Middle Egyptian
  • The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and the New Testament
  • Gospels and Canon

Plus up to 1 choice from:

  • Paul and his Interpreters
  • Patristic Exegesis
  • Patristic Ecclesiology
  • Christian Northumbria 600-750
  • The Anglican Theological Vision
  • Classic Texts in Christian Theology
  • Liturgy and Sacramentality
  • Conceiving Change in Contemporary Catholicism
  • Twentieth-Century Catholic Theology
  • Christian Gender
  • Principles of Theological Ethics
  • Theology, Ethics and Medicine
  • Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion
  • Ritual, Symbolism and Belief in the Anthropology of Religion
  • Literature and Religion
  • Catholic Social Thought
  • Ecclesiology and Ethnography
  • Doctrine of Creation
  • Selected modules from the MA in Theology and Ministry programme
  • Level 3 undergraduate module, or any Level 1 – 2 language module offered by the Department of Theology and Religion, taken in conjunction with the Extended Study in Theology & Religion module
  • 30 credits from another Board of Studies (including appropriate credit-bearing language modules offered by the University’s Centre for Foreign Language Study)

Course Learning and Teaching

Most MA teaching is delivered through small group seminars and tutorials. These exemplify and encourage the various skills and practices required for independent scholarly engagement with texts and issues. Teaching in the Department of Theology & Religion is ‘research led’ at both BA and MA levels, but particularly at MA level. Research led teaching is informed by staff research, but more importantly it aims to develop students as independent researchers themselves, able to pursue and explore their own research interests and questions. This is why the independently researched MA dissertation is the culmination of the MA programme. Such engagement with texts and issues is not only an excellent preparation for doctoral research, it also develops those skills of critical analysis, synthesis and presentation sought and required by employers.

Many MA classes will contain a ‘lecture’ element, conveying information and exemplifying an approach to the subject-matter that will enable students to develop a clear understanding of the subject and improve their own ability to analyse and evaluate information and arguments. Seminars enhance knowledge and understanding through preparation and interaction with other students and staff, promoting awareness of and respect for different viewpoints and approaches, and developing skills of articulacy, advocacy and interrogation. Through small group discussions and tutorials, feedback is provided on student work, with the opportunity to discuss specific issues in detail, enhancing student knowledge and writing skills.

The Dissertation module includes training in generic research skills, from the use of the Library to issues in referencing and bibliography. The subject specific core module introduces students to questions of interpretation and argument in the disciplines encompassed by theology and religion, and helps them to develop their own interests and questions that will issue in the MA dissertation. The latter is a piece of independent research, but it is fostered and guided through individual tutorials with a supervisor, with whom students meet throughout the academic year.

Career Opportunities

A significant number of our graduates find employment in academic institutions (universities and seminaries) around the world. Others go into teaching, church ministry, the caring professions, and many other professional fields.



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This course involves the study of historical and systematic theology from a range of Christian perspectives. Durham has long-established strengths in both Greek and Latin patristics, the medieval Church and Reformation, contemporary Catholic and Anglican theology, theological ethics, and philosophical theology. Read more

This course involves the study of historical and systematic theology from a range of Christian perspectives. Durham has long-established strengths in both Greek and Latin patristics, the medieval Church and Reformation, contemporary Catholic and Anglican theology, theological ethics, and philosophical theology.

Course Structure

  • Classic Texts in Christian Theology core module
  • Three option modules
  • Dissertation.

Core Modules

  • Classic Texts in Christian Theology
  • Dissertation.

Optional Modules

Optional modules in previous years have included:

2-3 choices from:

  • Paul and his Interpreters
  • Gospels and Canon
  • The Bible and Hermeneutics
  • Patristic Exegesis
  • Patristic Ecclesiology
  • Christian Northumbria 600-750
  • The Anglican Theological Vision
  • Liturgy and Sacramentality
  • Conceiving Change in Contemporary Catholicism
  • Twentieth-Century Catholic Theology
  • Christian Gender
  • Principles of Theological Ethics
  • Theology, Ethics and Medicine
  • Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion
  • Ritual, Symbolism and Belief in the Anthropology of Religion
  • Literature and Religion
  • Catholic Social Thought
  • Ecclesiology and Ethnography
  • Doctrine of Creation

Plus up to 1 choice from:

  • Advanced Hebrew Texts
  • Advanced Aramaic
  • Middle Egyptian
  • Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and the New Testament
  • Selected modules from the MA in Theology and Ministry programme
  • Level 3 undergraduate module, or any Level 1 – 2 language module offered by the Department of Theology and Religion, taken in conjunction with the Extended Study in Theology & Religion module
  • 30 credits from another Board of Studies (including appropriate credit-bearing language modules offered by the University’s Centre for Foreign Language Study)

Course Learning and Teaching

Most MA teaching is delivered through small group seminars and tutorials. These exemplify and encourage the various skills and practices required for independent scholarly engagement with texts and issues. Teaching in the Department of Theology & Religion is ‘research led’ at both BA and MA levels, but particularly at MA level. Research led teaching is informed by staff research, but more importantly it aims to develop students as independent researchers themselves, able to pursue and explore their own research interests and questions. This is why the independently researched MA dissertation is the culmination of the MA programme. Such engagement with texts and issues is not only an excellent preparation for doctoral research, it also develops those skills of critical analysis, synthesis and presentation sought and required by employers.

Many MA classes will contain a ‘lecture’ element, conveying information and exemplifying an approach to the subject-matter that will enable students to develop a clear understanding of the subject and improve their own ability to analyse and evaluate information and arguments. Seminars enhance knowledge and understanding through preparation and interaction with other students and staff, promoting awareness of and respect for different viewpoints and approaches, and developing skills of articulacy, advocacy and interrogation. Through small group discussions and tutorials, feedback is provided on student work, with the opportunity to discuss specific issues in detail, enhancing student knowledge and writing skills.

The Dissertation module includes training in generic research skills, from the use of the Library to issues in referencing and bibliography. The subject specific core module introduces students to questions of interpretation and argument in the disciplines encompassed by theology and religion, and helps them to develop their own interests and questions that will issue in the MA dissertation. The latter is a piece of independent research, but it is fostered and guided through individual tutorials with a supervisor, with whom students meet throughout the academic year.

Career Opportunities

A significant number of our graduates find employment in academic institutions (universities and seminaries) around the world. Others go into teaching, church ministry, the caring professions, and many other professional fields.



Read less
This course looks at religion from anthropological and sociological perspectives. Read more

This course looks at religion from anthropological and sociological perspectives. Durham has particular strengths in the study of Mormonism; death, dying and disposal; religion and emotion; religion/faith and globalisation; religion and politics; contemporary evangelicalism and post-evangelicalism; and religion and generational change. It also boasts the Centre for Death and Life Studies and the Project for Spirituality, Theology and Health.

Course Structure

  • Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion core module
  • Three option modules
  • Dissertation.

Core Modules

  • Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion 
  • Dissertation.

Optional Modules

Optional modules in previous years have included:

2-3 choices from:

  • Ritual, Symbolism and Belief in the Anthropology of Religion
  • Theology, Ethics and Medicine
  • Literature and Religion
  • Christian Northumbria 600-750
  • Ecclesiology and Ethnography

Plus up to 1 choice from:

  • Advanced Hebrew Texts
  • Advanced Aramaic
  • Middle Egyptian
  • The Bible and Hermeneutics
  • The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and the New Testament
  • Paul and his Interpreters
  • Gospels and Canon
  • Patristic Exegesis
  • Patristic Ecclesiology
  • The Anglican Theological Vision
  • Liturgy and Sacramentality
  • Classic Texts in Christian Theology
  • Conceiving Change in Contemporary Catholicism
  • Christian Gender
  • Principles of Theological Ethics
  • Catholic Social Thought
  • Doctrine of Creation
  • Selected modules from the MA in Theology and Ministry programme
  • Level 3 undergraduate module, or any Level 1 – 2 language module offered by the Department of Theology and Religion, taken in conjunction with the Extended Study in Theology & Religion module
  • 30 credits from another Board of Studies (including appropriate credit-bearing language modules offered by the University’s Centre for Foreign Language Study)

Course Learning and Teaching

Most MA teaching is delivered through small group seminars and tutorials. These exemplify and encourage the various skills and practices required for independent scholarly engagement with texts and issues. Teaching in the Department of Theology & Religion is ‘research led’ at both BA and MA levels, but particularly at MA level. Research led teaching is informed by staff research, but more importantly it aims to develop students as independent researchers themselves, able to pursue and explore their own research interests and questions. This is why the independently researched MA dissertation is the culmination of the MA programme. Such engagement with texts and issues is not only an excellent preparation for doctoral research, it also develops those skills of critical analysis, synthesis and presentation sought and required by employers.

Many MA classes will contain a ‘lecture’ element, conveying information and exemplifying an approach to the subject-matter that will enable students to develop a clear understanding of the subject and improve their own ability to analyse and evaluate information and arguments. Seminars enhance knowledge and understanding through preparation and interaction with other students and staff, promoting awareness of and respect for different viewpoints and approaches, and developing skills of articulacy, advocacy and interrogation. Through small group discussions and tutorials, feedback is provided on student work, with the opportunity to discuss specific issues in detail, enhancing student knowledge and writing skills.

The Dissertation module includes training in generic research skills, from the use of the Library to issues in referencing and bibliography. The subject specific core module introduces students to questions of interpretation and argument in the disciplines encompassed by theology and religion, and helps them to develop their own interests and questions that will issue in the MA dissertation. The latter is a piece of independent research, but it is fostered and guided through individual tutorials with a supervisor, with whom students meet throughout the academic year.

Career Opportunities

A significant number of our graduates find employment in academic institutions (universities and seminaries) around the world.

Others go into teaching, church ministry, the caring professions, and many other professional fields.



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This course offers a distinctive learning experience based on the integration of the fields of theology, biblical studies and Christian practice. Read more
This course offers a distinctive learning experience based on the integration of the fields of theology, biblical studies and Christian practice. Students will engage critically with the intellectual challenges of ministry through the study of key themes in biblical, theological and ministerial studies. The programme is thus framed around a clear interaction between both theory and practice and across a variety of areas of ministerial formation. The M.Theol. aims to maintain a rigorous academic core whilst also broadening the scope of content and assessment to include professional application. Candidates are assessed by a combination of course work, ministry portfolio and dissertation.

This programme is offered only in the part-time mode, with two options:

Mode A which runs for three years and Mode B which runs for 6 years.

Course Content:
The course covers areas including:
The Bible and its Interpretation
• Texts and Communities in Context – Old Testament/Hebrew Bible
• Texts and Communities in Context –New Testament
• Communities of Interpretation - To the Enlightenment Period
• Communities of Interpretation - In the Modern Period and in the Church Today
Theological Reflection and Christian Identity
• Christian Thinking About God
• Jesus the Christ
• Cosmology, Anthropology and the Church
• Theology and Ethics
Christian Practice in Church and Society
• Mission, Culture and Social Context
• Pastoral Studies
• Liturgy, Worship and Spirituality
• Anglican Studies in an Irish Context
• Church Leadership Practice and Practicalities

Students take a total of one of three elective modules.

• Music and Worship
• Faith, Nurture and Christian Education
• Ministry for Reconciliation

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We are interested in hearing from students with research proposals covering all aspects of medieval and early modern history, life and culture. Read more
We are interested in hearing from students with research proposals covering all aspects of medieval and early modern history, life and culture.

Academic staff interests include: early modern material culture; late medieval art history; medieval and early modern religious history; Anglo-Saxon archaeology and liturgy; early modern politics; medieval and early modern drama; and textual editing.

At present, research topics include: the Reformation; visual and manuscript culture; community; the plays of John Lyly; medieval ecclesiastical architecture; female sexuality and transexuality; priory management; deviant and vernacular language; and kingship. You will be part of a vibrant and varied community of researchers from different disciplines.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/152/medieval-and-early-modern-studies

The Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMS)

We are an interdisciplinary centre for the study of Medieval and Early Modern periods. Our 28 teaching staff are drawn from English, History, Architecture, Classical & Archaeological Studies, History & Philosophy of Art, and the Canterbury Archaeological Trust.

MEMS offers a successful, interdisciplinary MA programme, which attracts students from across the world. A thriving community of enterprising, supportive graduate students study for research degrees and benefit from the Centre’s involvement in the prestigious EU-funded Erasmus Mundus doctoral programme, Text and Event in Early Modern Europe (TEEME). We have close relationships with Canterbury Cathedral and the Archaeological Trust, which allow our students access to a wide range of unique historical, literary and material evidence.

Study support

- Postgraduate resources

Canterbury Cathedral Archives and Library have unparalleled holdings of manuscripts and early printed books. Kent’s Templeman Library holds a good stock of facsimiles, scholarly editions, monographs and journals, and we are within easy reach of the British Library, The National Archives, and other London research libraries. There are good online computing facilities across campus and, in addition, our students have special access to postgraduate computer terminals and the postgraduate student room provided by the School of History.

The Centre runs a weekly research seminar, and special termly, public lectures to which we welcome distinguished speakers. These events are at the heart of the Centre’s activities. We also run a full programme of conferences and colloquia.

- Dynamic publishing culture

Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Historical Research; English Historical Review; Renaissance Studies; Medium Aevum; Transactions of the Royal Historical Society; and Studies in the Age of Chaucer.

- Researcher Development Programme

Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Research areas

The research interests of our staff cover areas as broad as: religion, ideas, material culture, theatre and performance culture, gender, economy, food and drink, legal history, war, visual culture, politics, architecture, history of books and manuscripts, environment and travel, art history, and literature.

Careers

The transferable skills gained from this postgraduate programme are enhanced by the University of Kent’s employability initiative and careers advice service. Many of our recent graduates have gone on to careers in heritage, museum or archivist work. Some go on to pursue research in the area, many continuing with PhDs at Kent or other higher education institutions.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This course focuses on the Anglican theological tradition within the more general context of Christian theology. Read more

This course focuses on the Anglican theological tradition within the more general context of Christian theology. Durham offers unparalleled resources for the theological study of Anglicanism, a strong basis for which is provided by the Department's close historical links with Durham Cathedral, the seat of numerous theologian-bishops.

Course Structure

  • Classic Texts in Christian Theology core module
  • Three option modules
  • Dissertation.

Core Modules

  • Classic Texts in Christian Theology 
  • Dissertation.

Optional Modules

Optional Modules in previous years have included:

2-3 choices from:

  • The Anglican Theological Vision
  • Liturgy and Sacramentality
  • Ritual, Symbolism and Belief in the Anthropology of Religion
  • Ecclesiology and Ethnography
  • Selected modules from the MA in Theology and Ministry programme

Plus up to 1 choice from:

  • Paul and his Interpreters
  • Gospels and Canon
  • The Bible and Hermeneutics
  • Patristic Exegesis
  • Patristic Ecclesiology
  • Christian Northumbria 600-750
  • Conceiving Change in Contemporary Catholicism
  • Twentieth-Century Catholic Theology
  • Christian Gender
  • Principles of Theological Ethics
  • Theology, Ethics and Medicine
  • Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion
  • Literature and Religion
  • Advanced Hebrew Texts
  • Advanced Aramaic
  • Middle Egyptian
  • The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and the New Testament
  • Catholic Social Thought
  • Doctrine of Creation
  • Selected modules from the MA in Theology and Ministry programme
  • Level 3 undergraduate module, or any Level 1 – 2 language module offered by the Department of Theology and Religion, taken in conjunction with the Extended Study in Theology & Religion module
  • 30 credits from another Board of Studies (including appropriate credit-bearing language modules offered by the University’s Centre for Foreign Language Study)

Course Learning and Teaching

Most MA teaching is delivered through small group seminars and tutorials. These exemplify and encourage the various skills and practices required for independent scholarly engagement with texts and issues. Teaching in the Department of Theology & Religion is ‘research led’ at both BA and MA levels, but particularly at MA level. Research led teaching is informed by staff research, but more importantly it aims to develop students as independent researchers themselves, able to pursue and explore their own research interests and questions. This is why the independently researched MA dissertation is the culmination of the MA programme. Such engagement with texts and issues is not only an excellent preparation for doctoral research, it also develops those skills of critical analysis, synthesis and presentation sought and required by employers.

Many MA classes will contain a ‘lecture’ element, conveying information and exemplifying an approach to the subject-matter that will enable students to develop a clear understanding of the subject and improve their own ability to analyse and evaluate information and arguments. Seminars enhance knowledge and understanding through preparation and interaction with other students and staff, promoting awareness of and respect for different viewpoints and approaches, and developing skills of articulacy, advocacy and interrogation. Through small group discussions and tutorials, feedback is provided on student work, with the opportunity to discuss specific issues in detail, enhancing student knowledge and writing skills.

The Dissertation module includes training in generic research skills, from the use of the Library to issues in referencing and bibliography. The subject specific core module introduces students to questions of interpretation and argument in the disciplines encompassed by theology and religion, and helps them to develop their own interests and questions that will issue in the MA dissertation. The latter is a piece of independent research, but it is fostered and guided through individual tutorials with a supervisor, with whom students meet throughout the academic year.

Career Opportunities

A significant number of our graduates find employment in academic institutions (universities and seminaries) around the world. Others go into teaching, church ministry, the caring professions, and many other professional fields.



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This course focuses on the Catholic theological tradition, within the more general context of Christian theology. Durham has a strong interest in and engagement with contemporary Catholicism, with a . Read more

This course focuses on the Catholic theological tradition, within the more general context of Christian theology. Durham has a strong interest in and engagement with contemporary Catholicism, with a Centre for Catholic Studies and the Bede Chair in Catholic Theology.

Course Structure

  • Classic Texts in Christian Theology core module
  • Three option modules
  • Dissertation.

Core Modules

  • Classic Texts in Christian Theology 
  • Dissertation.

Optional Modules

Optional Modules in previous years have included:

2-3 choices from:

  • Twentieth-Century Catholic Theology
  • Conceiving Change in Contemporary Catholicism
  • Christian Gender
  • Principles of Theological Ethics
  • Patristic Ecclesiology
  • Patristic Exegesis
  • Catholic Social Thought

Plus up to 1 choice from:

  • The Anglican Theological Vision
  • Liturgy and Sacramentality
  • Ritual, Symbolism and Belief in the Anthropology of Religion
  • Paul and his Interpreters
  • Gospels and Canon
  • The Bible and Hermeneutics
  • Christian Northumbria 600-750
  • Theology, Ethics and Medicine
  • Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion
  • Literature and Religion
  • Advanced Hebrew Texts
  • Advanced Aramaic
  • Middle Egyptian
  • The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and the New Testament
  • Ecclesiology and Ethnography
  • Doctrine of Creation
  • Selected modules from the MA in Theology and Ministry programme
  • Level 3 undergraduate module, or any Level 1 – 2 language module offered by the Department of Theology and Religion, taken in conjunction with the Extended Study in Theology & Religion module
  • 30 credits from another Board of Studies (including appropriate credit-bearing language modules offered by the University’s Centre for Foreign Language Study)

Course Learning and Teaching

Most MA teaching is delivered through small group seminars and tutorials. These exemplify and encourage the various skills and practices required for independent scholarly engagement with texts and issues. Teaching in the Department of Theology & 

Most MA teaching is delivered through small group seminars and tutorials. These exemplify and encourage the various skills and practices required for independent scholarly engagement with texts and issues. Teaching in the Department of Theology & Religion is ‘research led’ at both BA and MA levels, but particularly at MA level. Research led teaching is informed by staff research, but more importantly it aims to develop students as independent researchers themselves, able to pursue and explore their own research interests and questions. This is why the independently researched MA dissertation is the culmination of the MA programme. Such engagement with texts and issues is not only an excellent preparation for doctoral research, it also develops those skills of critical analysis, synthesis and presentation sought and required by employers.

Many MA classes will contain a ‘lecture’ element, conveying information and exemplifying an approach to the subject-matter that will enable students to develop a clear understanding of the subject and improve their own ability to analyse and evaluate information and arguments. Seminars enhance knowledge and understanding through preparation and interaction with other students and staff, promoting awareness of and respect for different viewpoints and approaches, and developing skills of articulacy, advocacy and interrogation. Through small group discussions and tutorials, feedback is provided on student work, with the opportunity to discuss specific issues in detail, enhancing student knowledge and writing skills.

The Dissertation module includes training in generic research skills, from the use of the Library to issues in referencing and bibliography. The subject specific core module introduces students to questions of interpretation and argument in the disciplines encompassed by theology and religion, and helps them to develop their own interests and questions that will issue in the MA dissertation. The latter is a piece of independent research, but it is fostered and guided through individual tutorials with a supervisor, with whom students meet throughout the academic year.

Career Opportunities

A significant number of our graduates find employment in academic institutions (universities and seminaries) around the world. Others go into teaching, church ministry, the caring professions, and many other professional fields.



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The Pentecostal/Charismatic and Evangelical movements are among the largest and fastest-growing traditions within world Christianity. Read more

The Pentecostal/Charismatic and Evangelical movements are among the largest and fastest-growing traditions within world Christianity.

Birmingham has a long-standing tradition of studying these movements, and is a world leader in this field of research. Our specialisms include Evangelical and Pentecostal/Charismatic history, missiology, theology, biblical interpretation, sociology, worship, and liturgy.

This distance learning programme at Birmingham explores the faith, practices, worship and teaching of Pentecostal/Charismatic and Evangelical communities from a critical academic perspective, which emphasises their global and contextual nature. It offers a range of study options – full-time or part-time and at MA, Diploma or Certificate level. The programme provides an excellent preparation for further research in the field and admission to doctoral studies, but is also well suited to personal and professional development purposes. You can pursue a range of specialisms and the dissertation provides an ideal opportunity for you to explore your own specific interests.

Course details

This course provides an excellent preparation for further research in the field but as a standalone course which will be of interest to:

People from within these Christian traditions; those who are fascinated by religious phenomena, growth and development; professionals in social policy, education, politics and economics; and the faith groups who engage regularly with individuals and communities from Evangelical and Pentecostal/Charismatic backgrounds.

MA and Diploma students will study six taught modules, while Certificate students will study three taught modules. All students will take two core modules:

  • History of Evangelicalism and Pentecostalism
  • Research Methods in Pentecostal and Charismatic Studies

The remaining modules are optional, and will be chosen from a range of options available by distance learning.

Assessment

Modules are assessed by written assignment. MA students will complete the programme with a 15,000-word dissertation.

Learning and teaching

Although much of the course is delivered through our ‘virtual learning environment,’ support is always available. You will have a personal tutor and dissertation supervisor to guide you and answer any questions, and you have access to a wide range of online resources too.

You also have the opportunity to meet other students and academic staff through online chats and discussion forums.

Programme structure

We offer a flexible range of study options for this programme – full-time or part-time, and at MA, Diploma or Certificate level.

Each module is taught over an eight-week period, following which you will be required to submit an assessment. You can expect to have around three weeks from the end of teaching to the submission deadline, except modules taught in the summer, which have much longer periods.

Teaching takes place throughout the academic year, which runs from September to July. Dissertation supervision sessions (for MA students) will take place between February and August – in Year 1 for full-time students and Year 2 for part-time students – with dissertations to be completed by mid-September. The number of modules you take at any one time, or in any given year, depends on your mode of study:

  • Full-time MA/Diploma students: Two modules at a time, totalling six over approximately eight months. For MA students this is followed by a dissertation, written between June and September.
  • Part-time MA/Diploma students: Year 1 – One module at a time, totalling four over the entire year. Year 2 – Two modules, one at a time, taught over approximately five months. For MA students this is followed by a dissertation, written between March and September.
  • Full-time Certificate students: Two modules at a time, followed by one further module, taught over approximately five months.
  • Part-time Certificate students: Three modules, one at a time, taught over approximately eight months.

Please note - the durations stated above are standard programme lengths, but part-time MA students may also choose to study over three years.

Employability

Your degree will provide excellent preparation for employment and this will be further enhanced by a range of employability support services offered by the University.

The University's Careers Network provides advice and information specifically for postgraduates that will help you to develop an effective career and skills development strategy, and to make the most of your time with us at the University. The College of Arts and Law also has a dedicated careers and employability team to deliver local support.

In addition to a range of campus-based events and workshops, Careers Network provides extensive online resources, and comprehensive listings of hundreds of graduate jobs and work experience opportunities.

You will also be able to access our full range of careers support for up to two years after graduation.

Postgraduate employability: Theology and Religion

Birmingham’s Theology graduates develop a broad range of transferable skills including: familiarity with research methods; the ability to manage large quantities of information from diverse sources; the ability to organise information in a logical and coherent manner; the expertise to write clearly and concisely and to tight deadlines; critical and analytical ability; the capacity for argument, debate and speculation; and the ability to base conclusions on statistical research.

Many of our graduates go into careers in churches of various denominations. Other students use their transferable skills in a range of employment sectors, including publishing, education and social work. Employers that our graduates have gone on to work for include: Church of England; Methodist Church; NHS; and University of Birmingham.



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The MA in Christian Leadership in Education is a two year, part-time programme, providing a professional qualification for those involved in the second-level educational sector. Read more
The MA in Christian Leadership in Education is a two year, part-time programme, providing a professional qualification for those involved in the second-level educational sector. It is designed to support school principals, prospective principals, members of boards of management, members of school trusts or those involved in the educational enterprise in any way, who wish to provide themselves with the necessary theological, leadership and management skills to lead faith based schools. The programme offers an integrated approach to the various subject areas, which include the following: New Testament, Christology; Developing Emotional and Relational Competence; Group Dynamics; Psychology of Leadership; Leading Curriculum and Learning; Education Legislation and Governance; A Christian Vision of Humanity for Contemporary Culture; Sacraments and Liturgy; Foundational Topics in Christian Spirituality and Ethos; Leading a Catholic School in Contemporary Ireland.

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