• University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses

Postgrad LIVE! Study Fair

Birmingham | Bristol | Sheffield | Liverpool | Edinburgh

University of Nottingham in China Featured Masters Courses
Cass Business School Featured Masters Courses
Durham University Featured Masters Courses
King’s College London Featured Masters Courses
ETH Zürich Featured Masters Courses
"lithic"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Lithic)

We have 4 Masters Degrees (Lithic)

  • "lithic" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 4 of 4
Order by 
Both a UNESCO World Heritage Site and a biosphere reserve, the Mount Carmel area reveals a nearly 500,000 year-long sequence of human evolution exposed in caves, rock shelters and open-air sites along mountain valleys and the nearby coastal plain. Read more

Both a UNESCO World Heritage Site and a biosphere reserve, the Mount Carmel area reveals a nearly 500,000 year-long sequence of human evolution exposed in caves, rock shelters and open-air sites along mountain valleys and the nearby coastal plain. Unlike any other region in the world, Mount Carmel’s key sites, such as the Tabun and Skhul caves, preserve evidence of both modern human and Neanderthal populations, at sites less than 100 meters from each other. As such, situated atop the Carmel Mountain, Haifa University provides students with an ideal setting for the study of Prehistoric Archaeology and an invaluable opportunity to take part in field research all over Israel’s historic landscape.

Upon completion of the program, students will be awarded a Master of Arts in Archaeology from the Faculty of Humanities and the Department of Archaeology.

What you will study

The program focuses on the prehistory and paleoenvironment of the Mount Carmel region and each student can choose to specialize in one of many relevant topics, such as lithic, faunal, geological and palynological studies. Students will benefit from a rich variety of courses focusing on prehistoric studies, as well as from a range of additional key topics including environmental archaeology; archaeological theory and method; and archaeology of the Southern Levant. The one-year program is taught in English over three consecutive semesters from October until September.

Students wishing to pursue the thesis track will need to submit a research thesis within one year of completing their coursework and may require remaining at the university for an additional one or two semesters.

Careers

Graduates of the program can find employment with archaeological contractors, local government, university archaeology departments, national heritage agencies, national parks, museums and with independent archaeological consultants.

Field Work

Here at Haifa University’s Archaeology department, we believe that archaeology starts and ends in the field. As part of the program, students are exposed to applied sciences, research methods and hands-on experience with the sites and settings of Mount Carmel, the Galilee and the Negev; and an acquaintance with the challenges of prehistoric research. The interdisciplinary curriculum offers students exceptional opportunities for advanced training and individual research in a dynamic learning environment, with exclusive access to the natural laboratory provided by the diverse landscapes and numerous prehistoric sites around the university campus.

Researchers in the Department of Archaeology are currently conducting surveys and excavations in a wide variety of sites and offer students the opportunity to take an active role in these projects. For a full description of the course curriculum please visit us here

Current field work projects can be viewed here. 

Academic Prerequisites

Students who have not completed an undergraduate degree in archaeology or anthropology will be required to successfully complete the following introductory courses before the first semester of the program:

• Introduction to Anthropology/Archaeology

• Introduction to Quantitative Analysis/Basic Statistics

Under certain exceptional circumstances, the review committee may be willing to consider applicants who do not meet the minimal admissions requirements. Please see the program website for course descriptions and additional details.

Courses

Track A & B Core Courses

  • Human Ecology in the Levant: Seminar
  • Selected Topics in Prehistory: Seminar
  • Prehistoric Mount Carmel and the Galilee: Seminar
  • Mount Carmel Field Campus: Workshop
  • Negev Field Campus
  • Galilee Field Campus
  • Archaeology in the Southern Levant
  • Near Eastern Prehistory
  • Advances in Prehistoric Research
  • Introduction to Lithic Technology: Workshop
  • Advanced Lithic Technology: Workshop
  • Department Seminar

Track A Electives & Track B Core Courses*

  • Archaeobotany
  • Archaeozoology
  • Geoarchaeology
  • Physical Anthropology
  • Practical Osteology

*Three of these courses will be offered each year.

Faculty

Our experienced and field-active staff at Haifa University’s Archaeology department offer a warm and applied tutorship that covers many of the fields specializations. Read our Blog to get more insight on our faculty. 

Scholarships

This program is now eligible for Masa scholarship. Please click here to apply on Masa website directly or contact a MASA representative at . Information on more financial aid can be found here.



Read less
Material culture and artefact studies combines the archaeological recovery and specialist examination of an object with its presentation, management and understanding within a cultural context. Read more

Material culture and artefact studies combines the archaeological recovery and specialist examination of an object with its presentation, management and understanding within a cultural context.

Why this programme

  • This MSc in Material Culture & Artefact Studies will prepare you to participate at both a practical and theoretical level within the field of specialist artefactual analysis.
  • You will be able to undertake a work placement to gain valuable work experience in a museum, archaeological unit or other cultural institution.
  • You will benefit from the involvement of staff from Glasgow Museums, National Museums Scotland and other institutions within Scotland, and will have the opportunity to work with collections from local museums, including the University’s own Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery.

Programme structure

The taught component consists of core courses and optional courses, running over two semesters.

Assessment is normally focused on written performance, but oral presentation skills and other modes of assessment allow you to develop your writing skills in a number of formats. This is in addition to the practical emphasis on developing your ability to interpret and analyse artefacts.

For the MSc you can opt to do either a dissertation or an extended work placement (assessed by work placement eportfolio and either a research report or a student exhibition design).

Core courses

  • Material culture in context
  • The process of artefact studies.

Optional courses include modules such as:

  • Lithic analysis
  • Independent study
  • Critical themes in the display and reception of objects
  • Early medieval artefacts 
  • Viking and late Norse artefacts (AD 750-1350). 
  • Optional courses drawn from Archaeology or from other programmes across the University can be taken by agreement with the programme convener.

Career prospects

The two strands to the degree enable you to prepare for further doctoral research whilst also providing opportunities for valuable vocational experience in a commercial environment.

The wealth of experience and knowledge provided by the interdisciplinary nature and focus of the degree and the networks and relationships developed during their time here, has stood past graduates in good stead upon graduation. They have found full-time positions with Historic Scotland, Headland Archaeology Ltd, Guard Archaeology Ltd. While others are working with various heritage organisations and some are continuing with their postgraduate studies.

Several of our international graduates have found employment working at the Smithsonian, Washington D.C and at the Pink Palace Museum, Memphis Tennessee. Others continue to work in the Cultural Resource Management sector. Several students have gone on to further doctoral research at Glasgow University and beyond, on prehistoric stone tools, Shetland lace knitting, Bronze Age ceramics and medieval settlement.



Read less
This MA provides training in the documentation and interpretation of artefacts from archaeological sites and museum collections. Students benefit from a placement within a museum or an archaeological unit where experience will be gained in the practice of finds analysis. Read more

This MA provides training in the documentation and interpretation of artefacts from archaeological sites and museum collections. Students benefit from a placement within a museum or an archaeological unit where experience will be gained in the practice of finds analysis.

About this degree

Students are introduced to the skills of finds specialists. They develop the ability to identify, describe, document, catalogue and analyse artefacts and artefact assemblages. Subjects covered include the description of ceramic, lithic and metal objects. In practical sessions, we cover drawing, photography and work with databases. Many sessions make use of the institute's extensive collections. The programme will also raise awareness of different approaches to artefact analysis and introduce recent discussions on the subject.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core module (30 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), an optional work placement and a research project (90 credits).

Core modules

All students are required to take the following: 

  • Working with Artefacts and Assemblages
  • Technology within Society

Optional modules

Students choose to follow further optional modules up to the value of 60 credits from an outstanding range of Master's options available at the UCL Institute of Archaeology. For this degree, some of the most popular choices include: 

  • Antiquities and the Law
  • Archaeological Ceramic Analysis
  • Archaeological Glass and Glazes
  • Archaeometallurgy
  • British and European Prehistory: Neolithic to Iron Age
  • Experimental Archaeology
  • Funerary Archaeology
  • Geoarchaeology
  • Intangible Dimensions of Museum Objects from Egypt
  • Interpreting Pottery
  • Issues in Conservation: Understanding Objects
  • Key Topics in the Archaeology of the Americas
  • Laboratory and Instrumental Skills in Archaeological Science
  • Making and Meaning in Ancient Greek Art
  • Making and Meaning in Ancient Roman Art
  • Nature, Culture and the Languages of Art: theories and methodologies of art interpretation
  • Prehistoric Stone Artefact Analysis
  • Social and Material Contexts in Art: comparative approaches to art explanation

Dissertation/report

The 15,000–word dissertation can cover any artefact-based subject matter. It normally combines a professional standard finds report with an analysis and an academic overview.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through formal lectures, seminars and practical sessions. It can include a placement at a relevant museum or archaeological unit where students gain experience in the practical study and the recording of an artefact assemblage. Assessment of the core course is by weekly pieces of short work, a portfolio and the dissertation. The Technology within Society module is assessed by a project proposal and an essay.

Placement

Students have the option to undertake a 20-day voluntary placement at a relevant museum or archaeological unit. The placement itself is not formally assessed other than through its contribution to the student's dissertation work. 

Tier 4 students are permitted to undertake a work placement during their programme, however they must not exceed 20 hours per week (unless the placement is an intergral and assessed part of the programme). This applies whether that work placement takes place at UCL or at an external institution. If you choose to undertake a placement at an external institution, you will be required to report to the department on a weekly basis so that you can continue to comply with your visa. 

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Artefact Studies MA

Careers

Some recent graduates of the programme have gone on to PhD studies while others have pursued a very wide range of professional careers both within and beyond archaeology. The main career path is working as assistants, museum curators or working in the antiquities service recording and analysing finds.

Employability

The degree is tailored to give graduates a solid grounding in systematically recording and documenting artefacts as well as analysing artefact assemblage. They will also have a basic understanding of creating graphs and diagrams, and analysing and assembling finds-catalogues. Without concentrating on any specific epoch, we give students the tools for understanding and systematically analysing any artefact assemblages.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Whether you plan a career as a finds assistant, museum curator or plan a materials-based PhD, this programme provides you with the skills you need to successfully identify, describe and document artefacts and analyse assemblages. The emphasis  is very much on practical application, so there will be numerous handling sessions and praxis-related tasks.

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study. Its outstanding archaeological library is complemented by UCL's Main Library, University of London Senate House and other specialist libraries. UCL is located in central London, within walking distance of the British Museum and the British Library.

UCL's own museums and collections form a resource of international importance for academic research. Students will work on material from the institute's collection as part of their assessment. Past students on this programme have made effective use of the resources at the British Museum, the Museum of London and the Museum of London archives, the Petrie Museum, Victoria and Albert Museum and other British and international museums. The Wolfson Labs provide a unique facility for scientific analyses of materials and have been used by numerous artefact students for their dissertations after the required training.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Institute of Archaeology

73% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



Read less
The MA is for people with a personal passion for material culture, materials innovations, crafts, designs, heritage, and the cultural issues which they present. Read more

The MA is for people with a personal passion for material culture, materials innovations, crafts, designs, heritage, and the cultural issues which they present. Some are social scientists rethinking the engagement of anthropology, ethnography and material culture; others are designers or makers exploring cultural and social issues.

About this degree

Students will study anthropological and material culture theory, apply social science and ethnographic methodologies to the problems of design, explore the technical, aesthetic and symbolic properties of materials, and examine how these interact with production technologies and consumption choices. They will develop understanding of how working with materials, crafts, and design helps us to rethink, understand, and critique socio-cultural issues in ways beyond other disciplines, and in cutting-edge anthropological ways.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), a departmental seminar series and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules

  • Materials, Anthropology and Design

Optional modules

  • Anthropology of the Built Environment
  • Art in the Public Sphere
  • Mass Consumption and Design
  • Anthropology and Photography
  • Social Construction of Landscape
  • Ethnographic Film
  • Archaeobotanical Analysis in Practice
  • Archaeometallurgy 1: Mining and Extractive Technology
  • Archaeometallurgy 2: Metallic Artefacts
  • Archaeological Glass and Glazes
  • Interpreting Pottery
  • Lithic Analysis
  • Archaelogical Ceramics and Plaster
  • Issues in Conservation: Understanding Objects

Dissertation/report

All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, and tutorials. Several courses entail practical instruction, including visits to product design companies and trade fairs; archaeological field sites; Kew Botanical Archive and the British Museum. Assessment is through unseen examination, long essays, research methodology project and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Materials, Anthropology and Design MA

Careers

The unique combination of scientific and social science training offers students career pathways in a range of areas including:

  • design research
  • design consultancy and policy
  • heritage and museums
  • materials consultancy: advising industry on different materials, old and new, and their technical and aesthetic properties
  • product marketing
  • fashion marketing and buying
  • academia (PhDs, lecturing)

Employability

In addition to analytic and ethnographic skills honed by the core academic training, graduates develop a solid grounding in materials and design literacy, communication and interpersonal skills, new ways of thinking about culture and society and presentational and studio groupwork skills. 

Our graduates are equipped to collaboratively engage with different materials and design approaches for working alongside, and in conjunction with, designers, engineers, heritage professionals, environmentalists, materials scientists, and others with a pragmatic interest in materials and design.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL is a world leader in anthropological work, specialising in material culture, and also a pan-disciplinary leader in materials innovation and making. This MSc is the only specific design anthropology programme with a material culture emphasis, and the only one dedicated to seriously exploring materials and making in cultural terms.

The programme involves interdisciplinary engagements in: looking at materials expertise across London through visits to makespaces and materials libraries; a project for an external design client (in commerce, heritage, or the third sector); weekly high-profile academic speakers on material culture; and optional vocational seminars in the Spring Term. In some years we facilitate participation in conferences or workshops abroad.

UCL is located in central London, within walking distance to the British Museum and the British Library. UCL's own museums and collections form a resource of international importance for academic research.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Anthropology

68% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



Read less

  • 1
Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X