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Comparative Literature at Kent offers an excellent environment for the postgraduate study of literature beyond national and linguistic borders. Read more
Comparative Literature at Kent offers an excellent environment for the postgraduate study of literature beyond national and linguistic borders. The programme involves the study of literature from two or more national and linguistic traditions, allowing you to gain an intercultural and transnational understanding of diverse cultural and literary practices.

The MA programme explores three main areas: themes, genres, movements and major literary figures; the interactions and exchanges between national literary traditions; and the theory and practice of comparative literature. These complementary strands encourage comparative analysis in a variety of contexts, ranging from the study of national literatures to the exploration of different genres, periods, media and literary theory.

The programme is offered by the Department of Comparative Literature and benefits from staff expertise in a range of areas, including European modernism, postmodernism, postcolonial literature, literature and medicine, literature and sexuality, literature and psychoanalysis and literature and the visual arts. Our programme also draws on additional expertise in the School of European Culture and Languages, particularly from colleagues in the departments of French, German, Hispanic Studies and Italian.

You begin by studying a choice of four modules across the Autumn and Spring terms, before writing a 12,000-word dissertation over the summer, supervised by an expert in the department. The programme can also be studied in Canterbury and Paris, where you relocate to Kent’s Paris centre for the spring term.

The MA in Comparative Literature is an ideal programme for those wanting to engage in and pursue detailed literary and cultural analysis that crosses national boundaries.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/complit/postgraduate/taught-comparative-literature.html

Course structure

The programme comprises three main interweaving strands:

- themes and major figures in European literature

- interactions between European national literatures, as reflected in important genres such as autobiography and the fantastic

- comparative literature in theory and practice, with an emphasis on the history of the discipline and ways of reading literature comparatively.

These complementary strands encourage comparative analysis in a variety of contexts: national literatures, genres, media and theory.

Assessment

Assessment is by one 5,000-word essay for each module, and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with the knowledge and skills to prepare you for the academic study of comparative literature at MPhil/PhD level

- attract outstanding students, irrespective of race, background, gender, or physical disability from within the UK

- further the University’s International Strategy by attracting graduate students from abroad as well as from the UK

- enable you to begin to specialise in your areas of interest

- enable you to hone your ability to read literature and literary theory critically and comparatively

- provide you, consistent with point one above, with a transition from undergraduate study to independent research

- provide you with a training that will culminate, if followed through to PhD level, in the ability to submit articles to refereed journals in comparative literature.

Research areas

Areas of particular research strength in Comparative Literature at Kent include the European avant-garde, modernism and postmodernism, postcolonial literature, literary theory, literature and medicine, literature and the visual arts, literature and sexuality, and literature and philosophy. The list below indicates the range of current research interests of members of staff within Comparative Literature and the other disciplines with whom we work closely. Many of these staff are members of the Centre for Modern European Literature. They can supervise postgraduate students for the MA or PhD degrees in any of their respective areas of expertise. If you are considering applying to undertake a research degree, we encourage you to contact us to discuss your plans at an early stage of your application.

- The European avant-garde
- Modernism and postmodernism
- Postcolonial literature
- Literary theory
- Literature and medicine
- Literature and philosophy
- Literature and sexuality
- Literature and the visual arts

- Centre for Modern European Literature
Many of the most significant European writers and literary movements of the modern period have traversed national, linguistic, and disciplinary borders. Co-directed by members of Comparative Literature, French, and German, the Centre for Modern European Literature aims to promote collaborative interdisciplinary research that can do justice to these kinds of border crossing. Ranging across English, French, German, Italian and Spanish literature, the Centre focuses in particular on the European avant-garde, European modernism and postmodernism, literary theory, the international reception of European writers, and the relations between modern European literature and the other arts, including painting, photography, film, music and architecture. The Centre’s activities include a lecture and seminar series and the regular organisation of conferences. It also works with the editors of the postgraduate journal Skepsi, and runs the MA in Modern European Literature.

Careers

Comparative literature graduates develop key skills, including critical thinking, analysis and problem solving. They go on to successful careers in areas such as the media, academia and many different cultural institutions including libraries, museums and galleries.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Our department offers a distinctively comparative approach to the study of literature; at Essex you don’t just study English literature, you study world literature in English. Read more
Our department offers a distinctively comparative approach to the study of literature; at Essex you don’t just study English literature, you study world literature in English. You explore literature across time, geography, and genre, combining scholarly research with innovative, practical ways of engaging with texts.

You grapple with the challenges of conducting research into Shakespeare and other early modern literature, acquiring specialist skills in archival research, palaeography, and the study of rare and antiquated books. You study materials on 18th century drama and literature, visiting the UK’s only surviving Regency Theatre to investigate how architecture affected the content of drama, and how drama reflected Georgian society. You have the opportunity to explore the history of genres such as the novel and lyric poetry, and study a truly extensive range of work; your reading takes you from African American literature, through Caribbean literatures, to the literature and performance of New York, Paris, Berlin, Vienna, Moscow and London.

Our department is ranked Top 20 in the UK (Guardian University Guide 2015), and three-quarters of our research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014).

This course is also available on a part-time basis.

Our expert staff

At Essex, we have an impressive literary legacy. Our history comprises staff (and students) who have been Nobel Prize winners, Booker Prize winners, and Pulitzer Prize winners.

Our Department is a vibrant conservatoire of scholars and practitioners who are committed to unlocking creative personal responses to literature. This distinctive environment is possible because we are a community of award-winning novelists, poets and playwrights, as well as leading literature specialists.

Our academic staff specialise in a range of areas including modernism, comparative and world literature, Shakespeare, the Renaissance, modernism, travel writing, nature writing, translated literature, cultural geography, Irish and Scottish writing, U.S. and Caribbean literatures, and the history of reading.

Specialist facilities

-Meet fellow readers at the student-run Literature Society or at our department’s Myth Reading Group
-Write for our student magazine Albert or host a Red Radio show
-View classic films at weekly film screenings in our dedicated 120-seat film theatre
-Learn from leading writers and literature specialists at weekly research seminars
-Our on-campus Lakeside Theatre has been established as a major venue for good drama, staging both productions by professional touring companies and a wealth of new work written, produced and directed by our own staff and students
-Improve your playwriting and performance skills at our Lakeside Theatre Workshops
-Our Research Laboratory allows you to collaborate with professionals, improvising and experimenting with new work which is being tried and tested

Your future

A good literature degree opens many doors.

We offer supervision for PhD, MPhil and MA by Dissertation in different literatures and various approaches to literature, covering most aspects of early modern and modern writing in English, plus a number of other languages.

Our University is one of only 11 AHRC-accredited Doctoral Training Centres in the UK. This means that we offer funded PhD studentships which also provide a range of research and training opportunities.

A number of our Department of Literature, Film, and Theatre Studies graduates have gone on to undertake successful careers as writers, and others are now established as scholars, university lecturers, teachers, publishers, publishers’ editors, journalists, arts administrators, theatre artistic directors, drama advisers, and translators.

We work with our Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Dissertation
-Research Methods in Literary and Cultural Analysis
-Georgian and Romantic Literature and Drama
-Early Modern to Eighteenth Century Literature
-The New Nature Writing (optional)
-Writing the Novel (optional)
-Memory Maps: Practices in Psychogeography (optional)
-Dramatic Structure (optional)
-Literature and Performance in the Modern City (optional)
-Adaptation
-Documentary and the Avant-garde: Film, Video, Digital
-Film and Video Production Workshop
-Advanced Film and Industry: Production and Industry
-US Nationalism and Regionalism (optional)
-African American Literature (optional)
-Sea of Lentils: Modernity, Literature, and Film in the Caribbean (optional)
-Writing Magic (optional)
-"There is a Continent Outside My Window" : United States and Caribbean Literatures in Dialogue (optional)
-Literature and the Environmental Imagination: 19th to 21st Century Poetry and Prose (optional)

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study English Literature at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study English Literature at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in English Literature offers an exciting array of modules from the traditional core of English studies in the context of contemporary approaches to the subject.

Key Features of MA in English Literature

The MA in English Literature allows you to range widely across English studies rather than confine yourself to a narrow field and draws on the individual research expertise of members of staff.

From the student’s point of view the MA in English Literature is openly structured. As a student enrolled in the English Literature programme, you define your own pathway through the Department’s MA provision. This means that as well as choosing modules from the MA in English, you can select modules in any combination from the other specialist MAs offered by the Department, such as the MA in Welsh Writing in English and the MA in Gender and Culture.

As a MA in English Literature student, you develop your dissertation project on a topic of your own choosing in consultation with a supervisor.

The full-time English Literature course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. The dissertation component draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year, or emerges from a topic of the student's proposing in English Literature. Part-time study is available for the MA in English Literature.

Students of the MA in English Literature will benefit from the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

Modules

Modules on the MA in English Literature typically include:

• Practising Ideas: Advnaced Research Skills
• ‘The Unsex’d Females’: Women Writers and the French Revolution
• Women Writing India
• The Romantic Sublime
• Gender and Culture: An Introduction
• The Modernist Novel: James Joyce
• Angela Carter
• Dylan Thomas and the Idea of Welsh Writing in English
• Locating Wales: Comparative Perspectives
• ‘American Wales’: Writing the Transatlantic
• Welsh Identities: Literature and Nationhood
• Saints and Sinners in Christian Late Antiquity
• Fin’Amor and Marriage in the Medieval English Secular Lyric
• Gender and Humour in Medieval and Early Modern Europe
• Lost in Europe: History, Biography, Ideology through the Short twentieth Century (1914-89)
• Neo-Victorian Mutinies: Gender & Racial Trauma in Neo-Victorian Fiction (& Film)
• Writing Poetry
• Writing the Self

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for English Literature graduates. Our Graduates enter careers in education, professional and creative writing, publishing, global marketing and advertising, media, international and national recruitment, heritage and tourism, and relief/humanitarian organisations. Some Graduates go on to pursue further postgraduate study leading to a PhD and a career in Academia.

Research Interests

The Department of English Language and Literature is home to three research centres and groupings:

• the Centre for the Research in the English Literature and Language of Wales (CREW)
• the Centre for the Research into Gender in Culture and Society (GENCAS)
• the Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Research (MEMO)

All staff in the Department are research active and publish books and articles in their areas of expertise. Books published by staff in recent years include studies of medieval women’s writing, William Blake, Dylan Thomas, American fiction, Walt Whitman, narratives of the European border, Angela Carter, contemporary English language studies and many other areas. Regular research seminars
and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Student Quote

"The MA in English Literature at Swansea offers students a unique opportunity to expand their intellectual horizons in an environment that brings people together from across the globe. I've had the chance to study with people from Ireland, England, America, and Germany and the differing views and experiences that each of us bring to our classroom discussions have been an invaluable part of my education here. One of the other enormous benefits of studying in Swansea is its location. In few other places can a student read a poem by Dylan Thomas or William Wordsworth and then walk through the same streets and countryside that inspired that poet. At Swansea University a student can find a learning experience that breaks free of the confines of the classroom and that may lead them out into all the beauty and history of the city and its surrounding areas. To top it off the small class sizes create an intimate and informal atmosphere where passionate professors challenge you to make the most of your love of literature. In all I'd describe my time here at Swansea as an experience that has both deepened my love of literature while allowing me to come to view it from a more global perspective."


Robert Tretin, English Literature, MA

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The University of British Columbia offers a Master of Arts in Children’s Literature (MACL) program, jointly offered by the Departments of English and Language and Literacy Education, the Creative Writing Program, and the School of Library, Archival & Information Studies. Read more
The University of British Columbia offers a Master of Arts in Children’s Literature (MACL) program, jointly offered by the Departments of English and Language and Literacy Education, the Creative Writing Program, and the School of Library, Archival & Information Studies. The Program Chair and administrative support of the MACL program are housed at the School of Library, Archival & Information Studies.

MACL Overview

The MACL program provides specialized education for graduate students in the study of children’s and young adult literature and media using a multi-disciplinary approach. It provides each student with the opportunity to study the creative writing and publishing of this literature, to examine models of sharing its rich heritage with the young, and also to facilitate the literary, social, historic, and psychological analyses of children’s literature as literature. This multi-disciplinary approach exposes students to many schools of literary criticism, educational theory, and professional and creative practice. It acquaints students with the broad literary canon of children’s literature across a spectrum of languages and cultures, and with a variety of critical perspectives and professional application. Across various disciplines, departments, and faculties, a broad range of courses provide disciplined, academic study of children’s and young adult literature and media.

The MACL Program is the only one of its kind in the world offered from such a broad, multidisciplinary perspective and the only Master’s program in children’s literature in Canada. The program is unique in that the two faculties and the four academic units jointly provide faculty, courses, thesis supervision and committee support to give the graduate academic study of children’s literature a perspective on the full life cycle of the literature – the creation of the literature (through Creative Writing), its critical analysis (through English) and pedagogical approaches to the literature in interaction with children in schools, homes and libraries (Language and Literacy Education; School of Library, Archival & Information Studies).

Faculty in these departments are authors of both acclaimed children’s books and scholarly guides to the literature. They serve on national and international children’s book juries, lead national research studies, and have received awards for scholarship, service, and teaching.

The University Library's collections in historical and contemporary children’s books and the critical study of children’s literature are considered among the strongest such collections in an academic library in Canada, including some 4,000 early and rare children’s books and some 50,000 modern children’s books. As well, the Library maintains a large collection of research materials on children’s literature, including histories, criticisms, bibliographies, catalogues, and biographies.

Students in the MACL Program have come from China, England, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Mexico, the United States, and from across Canada. The program provides specialized study of children’s books to those who are, or who intend to be, involved in teaching, school and public library services, writing, editing/publishing, theatre/film, storytelling, or affiliated fields.

The Master of Arts in Children’s Literature Program extends beyond its four departments and two faculties in a strong outreach to the community across and outside the University. Members of all departments involved in the program sit on the Steering Committee of the Vancouver Children’s Literature Roundtable which plans a series of annual events and conferences to bring award-winning authors, illustrators, editors and publishers such as Philip Pullman, Gregory Maguire, Shaun Tan, Katherine Paterson, and Lois Lowry to speak with students and Vancouver’s dynamic children’s literature community.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Arts
- Specialization: Children's Literature
- Subject: Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts
- School: School of Library, Archival and Information Studies

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This new taught-Masters degree offers a deep insight into the Arab world through its literatures. It is an advanced programme designed for students with a good first degree in Arabic or with a good university degree who also know Arabic. Read more
This new taught-Masters degree offers a deep insight into the Arab world through its literatures. It is an advanced programme designed for students with a good first degree in Arabic or with a good university degree who also know Arabic. The fundamental objective is to make Arabic culture and literature accessible to a wider body of postgraduate students and to provide them with training in the study of literature. Students develop an advanced understanding of Arabic literature and gain detailed knowledge of its past and present. The syllabus combines the literary approaches of comparative literature with in-depth study of Arabic literature. Students have the opportunity to become familiar with, among other things, literary theory, translation techniques, the sociology of literature, the social and political dimensions of modern Arabic literature, and different genres and themes of classical, medieval and modern Arabic literature.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/maarablit/

Structure

Students take modules to the value of three units from the lists of options below, and write a 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic.

Options List:
Theory and techniques of Comparative Literature - 15PCSC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year
Social and Political Dimensions of Modern Arabic Literature - 15PNMC347 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
Arabic Women's Writing: Theories and Practices - 15PNMC411 (1 Unit) - Full Year
Early and Medieval Arabic Linguistic Thought: Scholarship and Literature - 15PNMC410 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
A Modern Arabic Literary Genre: Themes and Techniques - 15PNMC046 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
Arabic Poetry and Criticism - 15PNMC048 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
Arabic Popular Literature: Themes, Genres & Theory - 15PNMC045 (1 Unit) - Full Year
Modern Palestinian Literature (PG) - 15PNMC379 (1 Unit) - Full Year
Classical Arabic Prose Literature and Adab - 15PNMC047 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
Reading Classical Arabic Historians: Themes and Trends in Islamic Historiography - 15PNMC378 (1 Unit) - Full Year
Arabic Critical Theory and Thought - 15PNMC403 (1 Unit) - Full Year
Culture, Society and Politics in Classical Arabic Literature - 15PNMC426 (1 Unit) - Full Year

MA Arabic Literature- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 34kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/maarablit/file80795.pdf

Teaching & Learning

All courses are taught in English, and essays and presentations are also done in English. All courses apart from "Theories and Techniques of Comparative Literature" involve reading some original Arabic texts.

Most courses are taught in seminar groups. These demand active participation by students, e.g. by giving presentations and by discussion with other students in the class, in order to develop research potential, original thinking and, by the tutor's direction, structured knowledge of the topic.

Classes are one two-hour session each week; in some cases an additional tutorial hour is added. In addition students are encouraged to attend lectures and seminars organised by the AHRB Centre for Asian and African Literature and the London Middle East Institute.

Destinations

A postgraduate degree in MA Arabic Literature from SOAS provides students with competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, history, cinema, politics, economics or law. Graduates of this programme will develop their ability to engage with and explore relationships between indigenous aesthetics of the region and contemporary literary theories. Some graduates leave SOAS to pursue careers directly related to their study area, while others have made use of the intellectual training for involvement in analysing and solving many of the problems that contemporary societies now face.

Postgraduate students gain linguistic and cultural expertise enabling them to continue in the field of research or to seek professional and management careers in the business, public and charity sectors. They leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources. Graduates can use their skills in Arabic and literary study in a variety of occupations, particularly those in which deep knowledge of Arabic intellectual culture and a trained mind are an advantage.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Research profile. Modern English Literature begins in the extraordinary developments of the 16th and early 17th centuries. Read more

Research profile

Modern English Literature begins in the extraordinary developments of the 16th and early 17th centuries. Under the influence of social, religious and political transformations, and through engagement with classical and continental European culture, new theories and practices of literature appeared that have influenced generations of writers since.

Studying the literature of this period allows us both to enter a world that is not our own, and to see the origins of modern western perspectives and predicaments. This programme offer you the opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of supervised independent research in this field.

We are the oldest department of English Literature in the world, and at the last Research Assessment Exercise were awarded the highest research rating possible, of 5*A. We have one of the largest graduate programmes in this area in the country and a rich research culture covering all aspects of literatures in English.

We offer supervision in all areas of Renaissance literature, and have particular strengths in Renaissance drama and performance, Renaissance poetry, the politics of literature in the Renaissance, religious writing in the Renaissance, Renaissance biographical and autobiographical writing, and the relevance to the study of Renaissance literature of modern and contemporary theory.

The research of staff has made valuable contributions to the areas of literature and philosophy, modernism/postmodernism, medieval and early modern literature, history of the book, romanticism, transatlantic studies and performance studies.

English Literature houses the Centre for the History of the Book and is one of the UK's leading forces in this area. It works closely with the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities and with the National Library of Scotland. The latter's recently acquired Murray Archive is crucial for studies in Romanticism, Book History, Bibliography and Archive Studies.

Extensive collections of Renaissance manuscripts and printed books are held in Edinburgh by the University’s own library, the National Library of Scotland, and the National Archives of Scotland. These collections offer excellent research resources and opportunities for graduate study, and are particularly rich in materials relating to Shakespeare and Renaissance drama.

Programme Structure

The course includes a 15,000 word dissertation, completed under the supervision of one or more of the course tutors. Students will undertake a seminar based programme of research methods training in core research skills and subject specific methodologies. They will also take two option courses covering areas of Renaissance literature and culture related to their chosen fields and will write two extended essays in relation to these course

Training and support

The academic staff you will be working with are all active researchers or authors, many of them prize winners and leading scholars in their fields. As well as benefiting from their expert supervision, you will undertake a seminar-based programme of training in core research skills and subject-specific methodologies. You will also have the opportunity to develop other transferable skills through the University’s Institute for Academic Development

We encourage you to share your research and learn from the work of others through a vibrant programme of Work-in-Progress seminars, reading groups, visiting speakers and conferences.

Our postgraduate journal, Forum, is a valuable conduit for research findings, and provides an opportunity for editorial experience.

Facilities

On hand are all the amenities you would expect, such as computing facilities, study areas and a common room and kitchen. Our location gives you easy access to the University’s general facilities, such as the Main Library and our collections, as well as to the National Museum, National Library and National Galleries of Scotland at the heart of the city.

In addition to the impressive range of resources available at the University’s Main Library (more than two million printed volumes and generous online resources) and the nearby National Library of Scotland, we host a number of collections of rare and valuable archival materials, all of which will be readily available to you as a postgraduate student.

Among the literary treasures are the libraries of William Drummond, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Hugh MacDiarmid, Adam Smith, Dugald Stewart and Norman MacCaig, plus the WH Auden collection, the Corson Collection of works by and about Sir Walter Scott and the Ramage collection of poetry pamphlets.

Our cultural collections are highly regarded and include a truly exceptional collection of early Shakespeare quartos and other early modern printed plays, and world-class manuscript and archival collections.



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This programme gives you the opportunity to pursue your own interests in English Literature at postgraduate level across a wide range of courses led by internationally renowned experts. Read more
This programme gives you the opportunity to pursue your own interests in English Literature at postgraduate level across a wide range of courses led by internationally renowned experts. A core research training course will introduce you to key skills in postgraduate study, while a flexible degree structure allows you to select from the rich variety of optional courses on offer from the School of Critical Studies and elsewhere in the College of Arts, or even beyond. You can also pursue one of the specialist pathways offered by English Literature, including Fantasy, Medieval and Early Modern, Modernities, and Victorian Literature. The programme ends with an opportunity to write a dissertation on an appropriate English Literature-related topic of your choice.

Why this programme

◾The structure of the degree allows you to follow either a bespoke English Literature MLitt programme, constructing your own pathway through a range of different courses, or one of several specialist pathways to suit your interests (see below).
◾You will have access to world class libraries and museums, as well as the extraordinary diversity of cultural, literary and artistic events that makes Glasgow such a vibrant place for postgraduate study.
◾The core research skills programme includes tailored workshops with the University’s archives and world-class Special Collections, as well as providing the academic and technical skills you will need to succeed at postgraduate level in the university and other professional environments.


[[Programme Structure}}

There are five different pathways through the MLitt in English Literature at Glasgow:
◾MLitt in English Literature
◾MLitt in English Literature: Fantasy
◾MLitt in English Literature: Medieval and Early Modern Literature and Culture
◾MLitt in English Literature: Modernities: Literature, Culture, Theory
◾MLitt in English Literature: Victorian Literature

Each pathway will give you a different mix of core and optional courses. All students take our 20 credit core English Literature Research Training Course. You then take five more 20 credit courses, some of which may be compulsory for your chosen pathway, and one 60 credit dissertation.

The structure for full-time students is as follows:

Semester 1: English Literature Research Training Course plus two 20 credit courses

Semester 2: Three 20 credit courses

Summer: Dissertation

The two semesters of coursework are followed by one term of supervised work towards a dissertation of up to 15,000 words which you will submit at the beginning of September. The topic normally arises out of the work of the previous two semesters, but the choice is very much open to the student’s own initiative. If you are on a named pathway, then your dissertation topic should fall within the scope of that pathway. If you are on the general pathway, you are welcome to choose a topic from anywhere in the field of English Literature. Your supervisor helps you to develop the proposal and plan the most appropriate reading and methodology.

It is also possible to write a dissertation made up of creative writing with a critical component. Normally this possibility is only available to students who have taken the Creative Writing Fiction Workshop (cross-discipline) as one of their options.

Part-time students

Part-time students take the English Literature Research Training Course and three 20 credit courses in their first year of study, and two 20 credit courses and the dissertation in their second year.

Career prospects

Our MLitt programmes provide excellent preparation for PhD studies and an academic career. They also develop key skills sought by many employers, including: the ability to find, select and manage large quantities of information; confident and persuasive oral and written communication; and problem solving through creative and critical thinking.

Past Glasgow MLitt graduates have gone on to pursue successful careers in writing, editing, publishing, teaching, the media, heritage and creative industries, and numerous other related professions.

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This unique, two-year degree provides an interdisciplinary study of the interaction between children, texts and media, along with the opportunity to study and live in at least three European countries. Read more
This unique, two-year degree provides an interdisciplinary study of the interaction between children, texts and media, along with the opportunity to study and live in at least three European countries. You will be able to engage with an array of cultural events related to children’s literature and media, and participate in a placement with a practitioner organisation.

● This is a unique programme that draws on the recognised strengths of the consortium partners to offer a joint degree that engages in children’s literature, media and culture.

● Glasgow is the leading partner in the consortium of universities that have developed this programme. The other universities are Aarhus University, Tilburg University and the Autonomous University of Barcelona.

● The programme includes the study of a wide variety of genres and considers new developments in the production of texts and media for children, including multimodal forms and digital technologies.

● You will receive a theoretical grounding in children’s literature and media as well as the opportunity to complete bespoke placements.

● You will be supported by a friendly, internationally acclaimed team of scholars who work in both the arts and humanities and the social sciences.

● You will have access to world class libraries, teaching and research facilities, as well as museums and other cultural organisations.

● The programme builds upon the foundations of the MEd in Children’s Literature & Literacies at the University of Glasgow which has been running for 6 years.

Programme Structure

The programme is structured around a series of mobility periods across two years where you study at the programme universities for one semester. The periods of mobility are designed to enable you to engage with a variety of perspectives on the three core themes of the programme and promote valuable knowledge and practical skills based outcomes that will feed into future career opportunities.

During year 1 you will undertake a series of core courses which reflect the main themes of the programme and methods of enquiry delivered in Glasgow and Aarhus. In year 2 you will choose a specialist pathway in either Barcelona or Tilburg and will complete a work-based learning placement. The final mobility period can be spent with either partner, depending on your chosen topic of dissertation. The programme also includes an optional summer school at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver at the end of year 1.

Semester 1: September - December (Glasgow): Historical and critical perspectives
Semester 2: January - May (Aarhus): Children’s Literature in a mediatised world
Summer (optional): June-August (Vancouver)
Semester 3: September – January: Pathway 1 (Barcelona) – Promotion of reading OR Pathway 2 (Tilburg) - Transcultural trajectories
Semester 4: February - July (Glasgow, Aarhus, Tilburg or Barcelona): independent study; dissertation
Core courses

Year 1
Children’s literature and childhood
Children’s literature, texts and media
Children’s literature: critical enquiry
Children’s literature: from the printing press to virtual reality
Crossing boundaries: children’s literature and other media (online)
Digital literature (online)
Life writing and fan fiction
Literature and picturebooks for the early years (0-8).
Year 2
Canon formation
Children’s literature for a diverse world
Children’s literature in translation
Developing reading programmes for different contexts
Literature and media in wider social contexts
Placements with publishers/libraries
Promoting reading through cultural activities
Research on literary education
Reviewing children’s and young adult books.
Optional courses (summer school)

Historical and archival children’s literature
Illustrated literature and other materials for children
Writing, publishing and the book trade for children.

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An MA in English is increasingly regarded as a valuable extension from undergraduate study in that it goes beyond a “baseline” BA qualification by. Read more
An MA in English is increasingly regarded as a valuable extension from undergraduate study in that it goes beyond a “baseline” BA qualification by:

--offering students an anticipated edge in the professional job market;

--enhancing applications for teacher training where advanced specialist knowledge can be an asset;

--providing necessary postgraduate experience for students who intend to continue their study of literature at MPhil/PhD level;

--providing a year of literary study for those who wish to take a career break.

Intended to meet the needs of students who have a passion for English literature and wish to extend their undergraduate study by engaging in further fast-track study leading to a Master’s qualification, our MA is designed as a one-year full-time programme. (In some years a part-time route may be available-please check our website for details).

The MA timetable has been designed to enable concentration of seminars within two days (Monday and Tuesday) to offer flexibility with students’ other commitments.

Our MA offers opportunities to those who wish to pursue an eclectic generalist programme of modules and to those who seek specialisation in particular areas of literary study. Students, therefore, enrol on one of three pathways.

MA IN ENGLISH LITERATURE
The MA in English Literature pathway enables students to select from a range of modules and work in a variety of areas either not covered in their undergraduate choices, or which they desire more deeply to examine. Contributing tutors are acknowledged experts in their specialisms.

MA IN ENGLISH: CHILDREN'S LITERATURE
The MA in English: Children's Literature focuses on key areas within children’s literature and draws on the department’s long-established reputation in this field. Our 1981 introduction of an undergraduate module in Children’s Literature made us one of the earliest English departments, nationally or internationally, to offer modules in this rapidly expanding and popular field of study.

MA IN ENGLISH: LITERATURES VICTORIAN AND MODERN
The MA in English: Literatures Victorian and Modern attends to specific genres, types, and sub-periods of literature within the consistently popular Victorian and Modern periods. It differs from period-based MAs in other institutions by offering modules in specific literary types rather than generalist or panoramic treatments of period.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
All MA students complete “Issues, Scholarship and Method in Literary Research” 1 and 2, four option modules, and produce a 15,000-word dissertation. Taught modules run for one term each. The dissertation is completed during Term 3 and the summer.

MANDATORY ELEMENTS:

MLS4ISM1: Issues, Scholarship and Method in Literary Research 1

MLS4ISM2: Issues, Scholarship and Method in Literary Research 2

MLS4DIS: Dissertation

OPTION MODULES:

MLS4CMCL: Classics of Modern Children’s Literature *#

MLS4NCCL: Nineteenth-century Children’s Literature *#

MLS4VCF: Victorian Crime Fiction #

MLS4LFS: Literature of the Fin de Siècle #

MLS4LWTC: Literature and War in the Twentieth Century #

MLS4LYAF: Young Adult Fiction *#

PATHWAY REQUIREMENTS
Students taking the MA in English Literature pathway can choose any four options and may write their dissertation on an approved topic in any area of English literature.

Students taking the MA in English: Children's Literature pathway must take at least two of the modules marked * over the course of the year and complete their dissertation on an approved topic in children’s literature.

Students taking the MA in English: Literatures Victorian and Modern pathway must take at least two of the modules marked # over the course of the year and complete their dissertation on an approved topic in Victorian and/or Modern literatures.

Please see our website for further details. The Programme Convenor welcomes enquiries about any aspect of the programme.

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Research profile. From the poetry of Dunbar and Henryson to the fiction of James Kelman and A.L. Kennedy, Scottish literature presents an extraordinarily rich and varied subject of study, whether considered as a tradition in its own right or in terms of its interaction with English, European or world literatures. Read more

Research profile

From the poetry of Dunbar and Henryson to the fiction of James Kelman and A.L. Kennedy, Scottish literature presents an extraordinarily rich and varied subject of study, whether considered as a tradition in its own right or in terms of its interaction with English, European or world literatures.

Whether you’re interested in poetry, fiction or drama, the literary dimensions of the Scottish Enlightenment, the relationship between modernism and nationalism, Walter Scott or Irvine Welsh, Muriel Spark or Robert Louis Stevenson, this programme offers you the opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of supervised independent research in your chosen area.

We are the oldest department of English Literature in the world, and at the last Research Assessment Exercise were awarded the highest research rating possible, of 5*A. We have one of the largest graduate programmes in this area in the country and a rich research culture covering all aspects of literatures in English.

We offer supervision in all areas of Scottish literature, and have particular strengths in medieval Scottish writing, in comparative approaches to Scottish literature, in Scotland’s transatlantic connections, in the relationship between literature and philosophy in Scotland, in 18th and 19th century writing and culture, and in modern and contemporary Scottish literature.

The research of staff has made valuable contributions to the areas of literature and philosophy, modernism/postmodernism, medieval and early modern literature, history of the book, romanticism, transatlantic studies and performance studies.

English Literature houses the Centre for the History of the Book and is one of the UK's leading forces in this area. It works closely with the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities and with the National Library of Scotland. The latter's recently acquired Murray Archive is crucial for studies in Romanticism, Book History, Bibliography and Archive Studies.

Programme Structure

The course includes a 15,000 word dissertation, completed under the supervision of one or more of the course tutors. Students will undertake a seminar based programme of research methods training in core research skills and subject specific methodologies. They will also take two option courses covering areas of Scottish literature related to their chosen fields and will write two extended essays in relation to these courses.

Training and support

The academic staff you will be working with are all active researchers or authors, many of them prize winners and leading scholars in their fields. As well as benefiting from their expert supervision, you will undertake a seminar-based programme of training in core research skills and subject-specific methodologies. You will also have the opportunity to develop other transferable skills through the University’s Institute for Academic Development

We encourage you to share your research and learn from the work of others through a vibrant programme of Work-in-Progress seminars, reading groups, visiting speakers and conferences.

Our postgraduate journal, Forum, is a valuable conduit for research findings, and provides an opportunity for editorial experience.

Facilities

On hand are all the amenities you would expect, such as computing facilities, study areas and a common room and kitchen. Our location gives you easy access to the University’s general facilities, such as the Main Library and our collections, as well as to the National Museum, National Library and National Galleries of Scotland at the heart of the city.

In addition to the impressive range of resources available at the University’s Main Library (more than two million printed volumes and generous online resources) and the nearby National Library of Scotland, we host a number of collections of rare and valuable archival materials, all of which will be readily available to you as a postgraduate student.

Among the literary treasures are the libraries of William Drummond, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Hugh MacDiarmid, Adam Smith, Dugald Stewart and Norman MacCaig, plus the WH Auden collection, the Corson Collection of works by and about Sir Walter Scott and the Ramage collection of poetry pamphlets.

Our cultural collections are highly regarded and include a truly exceptional collection of early Shakespeare quartos and other early modern printed plays, and world-class manuscript and archival collections.



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The Higher Certificate in French Literature has been developed by the Department of French, Maynooth University to address the needs of those working as teachers of French, graduates of French exploring other career options as well adults with a very good competence in French language who are interested in learning more about the literature and culture of the French-speaking countries. Read more

Overview

The Higher Certificate in French Literature has been developed by the Department of French, Maynooth University to address the needs of those working as teachers of French, graduates of French exploring other career options as well adults with a very good competence in French language who are interested in learning more about the literature and culture of the French-speaking countries.

The Higher Certificate in French Literature aims to:
- provide students with an opportunity to specialise in the area of French literature through the study of a broad range of French-language literary texts through history;

- equip students who have little experience of dealing with literary texts with the necessary academic, analytical, creative, aesthetic, reflective and presentation skills to enable them to engage with literature in a productive way;

- enhance students’ knowledge and understanding of important concepts in French-speaking literatures, cultures and societies.

See the website https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/french/our-courses/higher-certificate-french-literature

Minimum English language requirements:
- IELTS: 6.5 minimum overall score
- TOEFL (Paper based test): 585
- TOEFL (Internet based test): 95
- PTE (Pearson): 62

National University of Ireland Maynooth’s TOEFL code is 8850

Course Structure

The Higher Certificate in French Literature is a part-time programme that will be delivered in an open learning format incorporating distance learning and intensive workshops. It comprises a set of four 5-credit modules on which students will be examined by continuous assessment.
- 9 x 4-hour workshops: 36 hours
- Planned home-based learning activities: 88 hours
- Independent student activities: 144
- Total:268 hours

There will be a 4-hour introductory workshop at the start of the course. Each 5-credit module will also involve two 4-hour module workshops as well as ongoing scheduled activities and independent study. The nine workshops, normally organised on Saturdays, will provide an opportunity for participants to familiarise themselves with a variety of approaches to the literary text, to present and discuss their ideas about the texts they have read at home and to critically reflect on the way in which literature both reflects and feeds into issues of relevance to the societies in which the authors are writing.

There are two options for completing the Higher Certificate in French Literature:
- a 1-year part-time option, where students complete two 5-credit modules each semester and
- a 2-year part-time option, where students complete one 5-credit module each semester.

Before registration for the 1-year part-time programme, students should agree a study plan with the Programme Director.

Modules:
Semester 1:
- FR211D LITERATURE & SOCIETY 1 (Distance)
- FR221D LITERATURE & SOCIETY 2 (Distance)

Semester 2:
- FR311D LITERATURE & SOCIETY 3 (Distance)
- FR321D LITERATURE & SOCIETY 4 (Distance)

- Assessment Procedure
Participants will be expected to attend all course workshops, to prepare for those workshops by reading prescribed material, and to participate fully in the group process and learning. All four modules involved in the Higher Certificate in French Literature will be assessed by continuous assessment, which may involve a combination of methods such as essays, presentations at module workshops, or critical analysis of short excerpts from text. Participants will be advised on how to prepare for these and will receive feedback on their progress throughout the course.

Career Options

The Certificate in French Literature enables graduates working as Post-Primary language teachers to engage with a substantial body of literature through the medium of the foreign language. The course would furthermore constitute an ideal starting point for further study in literary and cultural studies, including the NUI Maynooth’s MA French and the MA in Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures: Narratives of Conflict.

Find out how to apply here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/french/our-courses/higher-certificate-french-literature#tabs-apply

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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The Higher Certificate in German Literature has been developed by the Department of German, Maynooth University to address the needs of those working as teachers of German, graduates of German exploring other career options as well adults with a very good competence in German language who are interested in learning more about the literature and culture of the German-speaking countries. Read more

Overview

The Higher Certificate in German Literature has been developed by the Department of German, Maynooth University to address the needs of those working as teachers of German, graduates of German exploring other career options as well adults with a very good competence in German language who are interested in learning more about the literature and culture of the German-speaking countries.
The Higher Certificate in German Literature aims to
- provide students with an opportunity to specialise in the area of German literature through the study of a broad range of German-language literary texts from the Enlightenment to the present day;

- equip students who have little experience of dealing with literary texts with the necessary academic, analytical, creative, aesthetic, reflective and presentation skills to enable them to engage with literature in a productive way;

- enhance students’ knowledge and understanding of important concepts of European languages, literatures, cultures and societies, in particular with regard to Germany, Austria and Switzerland.

See the website https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/german/our-courses/higher-certificate-german-literature

Minimum English language requirements:
- IELTS: 6.5 minimum overall score
- TOEFL (Paper based test): 585
- TOEFL (Internet based test): 95
- PTE (Pearson): 62

National University of Ireland Maynooth’s TOEFL code is 8850

Course Structure

The Higher Certificate in German Literature is a part-time programme that will be delivered in an open learning format incorporating distance learning and intensive workshops. It comprises a set of four 5-credit modules on which students will be examined by continuous assessment.

9 x 4-hour workshops: 36 hours

Planned home-based learning activities: 88 hours

Independent student activities: 144

Total: 268 hours

There will be a 4-hour introductory workshop at the start of the course. Each 5-credit module will also involve two 4-hour module workshops as well as ongoing scheduled activities and independent study. The nine workshops, normally organised on Saturdays, will provide an opportunity for participants to familiarise themselves with a variety of approaches to the course texts, to present and discuss their ideas about the texts they have read at home and to critically reflect on the way in which literature both reflects and feeds into issues of relevance to the societies in which the authors are writing.

There are two options for completing the Higher Certificate in German Literature:
- a 1-year part-time option, where students complete two 5-credit modules each semester and
- a 2-year part-time option, where students complete one 5-credit module each semester.

Before registration for the 1-year part-time programme, students should agree a study plan with the Programme Director.

Modules:
Semester 1
- GN211D LITERATURE & SOCIETY 1 (Distance)
- GN311D LITERATURE & SOCIETY 3 (Distance)

Semester 2
- GN221D LITERATURE & SOCIETY 2 (Distance)
- GN321D LITERATURE & SOCIETY 4 (Distance)

Assessment Procedure:
Participants will be expected to attend all course workshops, to prepare for those workshops by reading prescribed material, and to participate fully in the group process and learning. All four modules involved in the Higher Certificate in German Literature will be assessed by continuous assessment, which may involve a combination of methods such as essays, presentations at module workshops, reaction papers and/or critical analysis of short excerpts from text. Participants will be advised on how to prepare for these and will receive feedback on their progress throughout the course.

Career Options

The Certificate in German Literature enables graduates working as Post-Primary language teachers to engage with a substantial body of literature through the medium of the foreign language. The course would furthermore constitute an ideal starting point for further study in literary and cultural studies, including the NUI Maynooth MA in German or the MA in Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures: Narratives of Conflict.

Find out how to apply here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/german/our-courses/higher-certificate-german-literature#tabs-apply

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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Research profile. This programme introduces you to a range of colonial and postcolonial discourse from countries and regions such as Africa, the Americas, Asia, Canada and Oceania. Read more

Research profile

This programme introduces you to a range of colonial and postcolonial discourse from countries and regions such as Africa, the Americas, Asia, Canada and Oceania. You will explore a range of issues contingent upon colonisation, independence, and the formation of postcolonial diasporic communities.

You will be encouraged to develop a knowledge and understanding of the roles played by various forms of writing in the shaping and representation of postcolonial subjectivity and context, and to contextualise postcolonial writing in terms of its chronological and geographical specificities, deepening your knowledge and understanding of selected themes and topics in a way that will enable you to select and execute an independent piece of research.

We are the oldest department of English Literature in the world, and at the last Research Assessment Exercise were awarded the highest research rating possible, of 5*A. We have one of the largest graduate programmes in this area in the country and a rich research culture covering all aspects of literatures in English.

We offer supervision in all areas of postcolonial literature, and have particular strengths in African American and Chicana writing, black British writing, Canadian literature, Indian subcontinental and diasporic writing, New Zealand literature, and Pacific literature.

The research of staff has made valuable contributions to the areas of literature and philosophy, modernism/postmodernism, medieval and early modern literature, history of the book, romanticism, transatlantic studies and performance studies.

English Literature houses the Centre for the History of the Book and is one of the UK's leading forces in this area. It works closely with the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities and with the National Library of Scotland. The latter's recently acquired Murray Archive is crucial for studies in Romanticism, Book History, Bibliography and Archive Studies.

Programme Structure

The course includes a 15,000-word dissertation, completed under the supervision of one or more of the course tutors. Students will undertake a seminar based programme of research methods training in core research skills and subject specific methodologies. They will also take two option courses covering areas of postcolonial literature and culture related to their chosen fields, each consisting of a weekly two-hour seminar, and will write two extended essays in relation to these courses.

Training and support

The academic staff you will be working with are all active researchers or authors, many of them prize winners and leading scholars in their fields. As well as benefiting from their expert supervision, you will undertake a seminar-based programme of training in core research skills and subject-specific methodologies. You will also have the opportunity to develop other transferable skills through the University’s Institute for Academic Development

We encourage you to share your research and learn from the work of others through a vibrant programme of Work-in-Progress seminars, reading groups, visiting speakers and conferences.

Our postgraduate journal, Forum, is a valuable conduit for research findings, and provides an opportunity for editorial experience.

Facilities

On hand are all the amenities you would expect, such as computing facilities, study areas and a common room and kitchen. Our location gives you easy access to the University’s general facilities, such as the Main Library and our collections, as well as to the National Museum, National Library and National Galleries of Scotland at the heart of the city.

In addition to the impressive range of resources available at the University’s Main Library (more than two million printed volumes and generous online resources) and the nearby National Library of Scotland, we host a number of collections of rare and valuable archival materials, all of which will be readily available to you as a postgraduate student.

Among the literary treasures are the libraries of William Drummond, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Hugh MacDiarmid, Adam Smith, Dugald Stewart and Norman MacCaig, plus the WH Auden collection, the Corson Collection of works by and about Sir Walter Scott and the Ramage collection of poetry pamphlets.

Our cultural collections are highly regarded and include a truly exceptional collection of early Shakespeare quartos and other early modern printed plays, and world-class manuscript and archival collections.



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Should translated literature be entirely faithful to the original text, or should the translation be creative in its attempt not to lose the poetry of the work? How can translation account for double entendre or other wordplay? Is it possible to translate experimental literature which ignores conventional grammar rules?. Read more
Should translated literature be entirely faithful to the original text, or should the translation be creative in its attempt not to lose the poetry of the work? How can translation account for double entendre or other wordplay? Is it possible to translate experimental literature which ignores conventional grammar rules?

Building on the internationally recognised expertise of both our Departments of Language and Linguistics, and our Department of Literature, Film and Theatre Studies, our MA Translation and Literature course will allow you to further specialise in literature and general translation. In the second term you will also learn techniques of professional literary translation. You develop your own personal translation skills, allowing you to translate a literary work accurately and creatively from one language to another for your dissertation.

Our course is offered with the combination of English and one of Arabic, French, German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish. You can be a native or near-native speaker of any of these languages, as you learn to translate to and from both languages. You work with native speakers in developing your ability to move accurately and quickly between your chosen language and English.

Explore our hands-on, practical modules, including:
-Principles of Translation
-US and Caribbean literatures in dialogue
-Translation Portfolios
-Technologies of Translation

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’, placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK (REF 2014)

Our Department of Language and Linguistics is ranked among the top 150 departments on the planet and our Department of Literature, Film, and Theatre Studies is ranked among the top 200 departments on the planet, according to the QS World [University] Rankings [2016].

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

Our expert staff

Our lecturers are skilled interpreters and translators, experienced in training students with the necessary skills for professional practice. We maintain excellent student-staff ratios with capped language-specific seminars.

Our lecturers come from around the world including France, Belgium, Germany, Italy, Brazil, Spain, Cuba, China, and the UK. They will share their expertise with you in the areas of professional translation.

Within our Department of Literature, Film and Theatre Studies, Professor Karin Littau specialises in book and film history, reception, adaptation and translation studies, and is especially interested in the effects of print, cinematograph, and computers on practices of reading, writing and translation. Dr Clare Finburgh has translated several plays from French into English, and worked as dramaturg for productions of British plays in France, and French works in the UK.

Specialist facilities

-24-hour self-access to our translation lab dedicated to translation students
-Use specialist software such as SDL Trados Studio 2015
-Meet fellow readers at the student-run Literature Society or at the department’s Myth Reading Group
-Access the University’s Media Centre, equipped with state-of-the-art studios, cameras, audio and lighting equipment, and an industry-standard editing suite
-Weekly multilingual workshops led by internationally renowned experts from the industry
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost

Your future

If you love literature and languages and would like to acquire professional translation skills, then our MA Translation and Literature is for you. Takers of our courses in translation can use the skills gained to further their future career in this area.

You develop a range of key employability skills including researching, writing for specific purposes, and translation. Our course typically leads to a career in translation, but could also lead to a career in education, publishing and administration.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Our graduates are successful in a wide variety of career paths. They leave Essex with a unique set of skills and experience that are in demand by employers.

Example structure

-Principles of Translation and Interpreting
-Technologies of Translation
-Dissertation
-Translation Portfolio I (French) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio II (French) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio I (German) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio II (German) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio I (Portuguese) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio II (Portuguese) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio I (Spanish) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio II (Spanish) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio I (Italian) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio II (Italian) (optional)
-Writing the Novel (optional)
-Memory Maps: Practices in Psychogeography (optional)
-The Tale: Tellings and Re-Tellings (optional)
-Dramatic Structure (optional)
-Literature and Performance in the Modern City
-Early Modern to Eighteenth Century Literature
-Georgian and Romantic Literature and Drama
-Adaptation (optional)
-Documentary and the Avant-garde: Film, Video, Digital (optional)
-Film and Video Production Workshop (optional)
-Advanced Film and Industry: Production and Industry
-US Nationalism and Regionalism (optional)
-African American Literature
-Sea of Lentils: Modernity, Literature, and Film in the Caribbean
-Writing Magic (optional)
-"There is a Continent Outside My Window" : United States and Caribbean Literatures in Dialogue (optional)
-Literature and the Environmental Imagination: 19th to 21st Century Poetry and Prose

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Our MA in French and Comparative Literature involves the postgraduate study of literature beyond national and linguistic borders with a particular focus on French culture. Read more
Our MA in French and Comparative Literature involves the postgraduate study of literature beyond national and linguistic borders with a particular focus on French culture.

Comparative Literature at Kent involves the study of literature from two or more European cultures, to gain an intercultural and transnational understanding of cultural practice. The MA in French and Comparative Literature introduces you to a wide range of theoretical perspectives, enriching your appreciation of the cultures, texts and critical practices examined in the programme’s various modules. You benefit from expert teaching from members of the Department of Modern Languages (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/modern-languages/index.html) and the Department of Comparative Literature (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/complit/index.html) and thus participate in an interdisciplinary dialogue.

Kent provides an ideal location in which to study French culture; our Canterbury campus is close to mainland Europe, with Paris only a couple of hours away by Eurostar.

In the Autumn and Spring terms, you take a choice of four modules, before undertaking a 12,000 word dissertation over the summer with supervision from an expert within the department. There is also a version of this programme which allows you to spend the spring term in Paris.

This programme is ideal for modern languages graduates who wish to consolidate their knowledge in a wider context; English graduates wishing to diversify their interests; and graduates in other humanities subjects (history, philosophy, theology) who would like to apply their knowledge to literary and visual material.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/modern-languages/postgraduate/taught-french-and-comparative-literature.html

Assessment

Assessment is by one 5,000-word essay for each module and the dissertation.

Programme aims

The programme aims to:

- provide the opportunity for you to obtain a postgraduate qualification (MA) in one year, and to allow, if required, a smooth transition to doctoral studies

- allow you to study modules in both modern French studies and comparative literature

- develop your knowledge and understanding of relevant aspects of contemporary Paris and the cultural history of the city as reflected in modern French, European, English and American literatures and other artistic media

- enhance your comprehension and communication skills in both French and English

- develop your awareness of various critical and research methodologies and of the interplay between literature, art and cultural context

- provide teaching which is informed by current research and scholarship and which requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge

- provide a deepening of intercultural awareness and understanding

- provide opportunities for the further development of personal, communication and research skills and other key skills appropriate for graduate employment both in industry and in the public sector

- provide further development of critical, analytical, problem-solving and other transferable skills.

Research areas

Staff interests broadly fit within the parameters of French literature and thought from the 18th century to the present, with research clusters organised around the following areas: the European Enlightenment and Counter-Enlightenment; Ekphrasis; Franco-Sino relations; Life Writing; Medical Humanities; Philosophy and Critical Theory; French Surrealism; Cubism; the Avant-Garde; the interface between visual arts and text.

Recent publications have focused on authors, artists and thinkers including the following: Apollinaire; Artaud; Badiou; Barthes; Blanchot; Cocteau; Crébillon fils; Deleuze; Diderot; Djebar; Flaubert; Foucault; Houellebecq; Lacan; Maupassant; Mérimée; Nimier; Proust; Sade; Yourcenar; Zola.

Centre for Language and Linguistic Studies (CLLS)
Founded in 2007, the Centre for Language and Linguistic Studies (CLLS) promotes interdisciplinary collaboration in linguistic research and teaching. Membership embraces not just the members of English Language and Linguistics but also other SECL members with an interest in the study of language, as well as researchers in philosophy, computing, psychology and anthropology, reflecting the many and varied routes by which individuals come to a love of language and an interest in the various disciplines and subdisciplines of linguistics.

Centre for Modern European Literature
Many of the most significant European writers and literary movements of the modern period have traversed national, linguistic, and disciplinary borders. Co-directed by members of Comparative Literature, French, and German, the Centre for Modern European Literature aims to promote collaborative interdisciplinary research that can do justice to these kinds of border crossing.

Ranging across English, French, German, Italian and Spanish literature, the Centre focuses in particular on the European avant-garde, European modernism and postmodernism, literary theory, the international reception of European writers, and the relations between modern European literature and the other arts, including painting, photography, film, music and architecture. The Centre’s activities include a lecture and seminar series and the regular organisation of conferences. It also works with the editors of the postgraduate journal Skepsi, and runs the MA in Modern European Literature.

Careers

A postgraduate degree in French studies is an extremely versatile qualification that can open the door to exciting career opportunities in many professions. Our graduates have gone on to work in the IT industry, academic administration, cultural management and to further postgraduate training and academic careers at UK and overseas universities.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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