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Masters Degrees (Linguistic Anthropology)

We have 41 Masters Degrees (Linguistic Anthropology)

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The MA in Linguistic Anthropology is an advanced degree in Socio-cultural Anthropology with a particular emphasis on Linguistic Anthropology in which students… Read more

The MA in Linguistic Anthropology is an advanced degree in Socio-cultural Anthropology with a particular emphasis on Linguistic Anthropology in which students are given a sophisticated introduction to the theoretical underpinnings of the discipline of Anthropology, a block of modules that open up and explore the conceptual and methodological core of the discipline, and a series of specialized modules in Linguistic Anthropology. Students are also required to write a thesis in Linguistic Anthropology. The MA in Linguistic Anthropology is primarily a scholarly degree that aims to equip students for later doctoral research in this sub-field or for work in roles that demand academic social-scientific knowledge or the particular skills of trained ethnographic researchers.



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The MA in Linguistic Anthropology is an advanced degree in Socio-cultural Anthropology with a particular emphasis on Linguistic Anthropology in which students… Read more

The MA in Linguistic Anthropology is an advanced degree in Socio-cultural Anthropology with a particular emphasis on Linguistic Anthropology in which students are given a sophisticated introduction to the theoretical underpinnings of the discipline of Anthropology, a block of modules that open up and explore the conceptual and methodological core of the discipline, and a series of specialized modules in Linguistic Anthropology. Students are also required to write a thesis in Linguistic Anthropology. The MA in Linguistic Anthropology is primarily a scholarly degree that aims to equip students for later doctoral research in this sub-field or for work in roles that demand academic social-scientific knowledge or the particular skills of trained ethnographic researchers.



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Overview. The MA in Anthropology and Development is an advanced degree in socio-cultural anthropology with a particular emphasis on the Critical Anthropology of Development. Read more

Overview

The MA in Anthropology and Development is an advanced degree in socio-cultural anthropology with a particular emphasis on the Critical Anthropology of Development. During their studies students shall be provided with a sophisticated introduction to the theoretical underpinnings of socio-cultural anthropology, together with a block of modules that open up and explore the conceptual and methodological core of the discipline, and a series of specialised modules in the Critical Anthropology of Development. Students are also asked to write a thesis in the Anthropology of Development. This Masters programme is primarily a scholarly degree that aims to equip students for later doctoral research or for work in third sector roles that demand academic social-scientific knowledge or the particular skills of trained ethnographic researchers.

Course Structure

Students take a total of 90 credits over 1 year.

 

Compulsory Modules (70 credits)

AN651 Social Thought (10 credits)

AN653 Writing Cultures (10 credits)

AN649 Foundations of Anthropology & Development (5 credits)

AN652 Key Concepts in Anthropology (10 credits)

AN669 Topics in Anthropology & Development (5 credits)

AN634T Thesis (30 credits)

 

Optional Modules (subject to availability)

AN646 Foundations of Linguistic Anthropology (5 credits)

AN647 Foundations of Medical Anthropology (5 credits)

AN648 Foundations of Material Culture and Design (5 credits)

AN862 Ethnography Winter School (5 credits)

AN657 Ethnographic Ireland (5 credits)

AN630 Creole Culture (5 credits)

AN666 Topics in Linguistic Anthropology (5 credits)

AN667 Topics in Medical Anthropology (5 credits)

AN668 Topics in Material Culture & Design (5 credits)

PD606 Design Ethnography (7.5 credits)

GY621 Dublin Urban Laboratory (10 credits)

GY619 Public Engagement Research and Practice (10 credits)

GY627 Places, Landscapes, Mappings (10 credits)

Students complete an intensive course of four 6-week compulsory modules in anthropological theory (10 credits each) alongside four compulsory modules in Anthropology and Development (5 credits each), as well as two Saturday workshops. Students develop a proposal for a research project during the taught year in consultation with a member of the anthropology faculty, who will advise the student and mark the project. In the summer, students register for the 30-credit Thesis, which must be completed by early September.

Career Options

An anthropology degree provides an excellent preparation for a wide variety of fields in both public and private sectors, and is an especially good foundation for an international career. Anthropology has become increasingly important as a job skill in the context of globalisation, where a deeper understanding of cultural difference is crucial, both locally and internationally. Our graduates go on to employment in a wide variety of careers in community work, education, the health professions, product design, international aid and development projects, NGO work, business and administration, and more.



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Overview. Read more

Overview

The MA in Anthropology is an advanced degree in socio-cultural anthropology in which students are given a sophisticated introduction to the theoretical underpinnings of the discipline, a block of modules that open up and explore the conceptual and methodological core of the discipline, and a series of specialised modules that show the range of socio-cultural anthropology today. Students are also required to write a thesis. The MA in Anthropology is primarily a scholarly degree that aims to equip students for later doctoral research or for work in roles that demand academic social-scientific knowledge or the particular skills of trained ethnographic researchers.

Course Structure

In the autumn and spring semesters, students complete an intensive course of four 6-week compulsory modules in anthropological theory (10 credits each) alongside two professional development modules and two optional modules (5 credits each). The taught programme develops students’ core theoretical competence and combines this with the methodological tools necessary to successfully formulate an anthropological topic and carry out a research project. In the summer, students register for the 30-credit Thesis, which must be completed by early September.

Students take a total of 90 credits over 1 year.

 

Compulsory Modules (60 credits)

AN651 Social Thought (10 credits)

AN653 Writing Cultures (10 credits)

AN652 Key Concepts in Anthropology (10 credits)

AN634T Thesis (30 credits)

 

Optional Modules (subject to availability)

AN646 Foundations of Linguistic Anthropology (5 credits)

AN647 Foundations of Medical Anthropology (5 credits)

AN648 Foundations of Material Culture and Design (5 credits)

AN649 Foundations of Anthropology & Development (5 credits)

AN862 Ethnography Winter School (5 credits)

AN657 Ethnographic Ireland (5 credits)

AN630 Creole Culture (5 credits)

AN666 Topics in Linguistic Anthropology (5 credits)

AN667 Topics in Medical Anthropology (5 credits)

AN668 Topics in Material Culture & Design (5 credits)

AN669 Topics in Anthropology & Development (5 credits)

PD606 Design Ethnography (7.5 credits)

GY621 Dublin Urban Laboratory (10 credits)

GY619 Public Engagement Research and Practice (10 credits)

GY627 Places, Landscapes, Mappings (10 credits)

Career Options

An anthropology degree provides an excellent preparation for a wide variety of fields in both public and private sectors, and is an especially good foundation for an international career. Anthropology has become increasingly important as a job skill in the context of globalisation, where a deeper understanding of cultural difference is crucial, both locally and internationally. Our graduates go on to employment in a wide variety of careers in community work, education, the health professions, product design, international aid and development projects, NGO work, business and administration, and more.




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The study of anthropology draws freely on various fields of study in the humanities and in the social and natural sciences, and its diversity today is such that no single central mission earns a wide consensus. Read more
The study of anthropology draws freely on various fields of study in the humanities and in the social and natural sciences, and its diversity today is such that no single central mission earns a wide consensus.
To this end, the department of anthropology at Binghamton University offers students training in the four traditional subfields of archaeology, biological anthropology, linguistic anthropology, and social/cultural anthropology, while encouraging students to specialize along tracks that cross these sub-disciplinary boundaries.
Recent doctoral graduates are employed in positions at the New York State Department of Health, the National Geographic Society, Museum of International Folk Art, Purdue University, and the University of Tennessee.

Anthropology seeks to understand the nature and origins of human biological variability, cultural diversity and social formations through systematic exploration, scientific examination and the application of theory to human populations and their artifacts, including their social configurations, past and present.
Although anthropology has historically been most successful in the analysis of small sociocultural systems, its current challenge is to situate the direct objects of study in their global contexts in both space and time. The discipline draws freely on various fields of study in the humanities and in the social and natural sciences, and its diversity today is such that no single central mission earns a wide consensus.
While training in the traditional four subfields of archaeology, biological anthropology, linguistic anthropology and social/cultural anthropology are offered in the department at Binghamton, students are encouraged to specialize along tracks that cross these sub-disciplinary boundaries.
A central objective of graduate training in anthropology is the ability to develop an original research design and to communicate the research findings in a research paper, thesis or dissertation of publishable quality. All recipients of graduate degrees submit and defend formal, written demonstration of their ability to apply appropriate analysis to an original research project, except for the MS degree for which an oral demonstration of ability is required.

All applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university which you attended
- Three letters of recommendation
- Personal statement (2-3 pages) describing your reasons for pursuing graduate study, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee.
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)
- Official GRE scores

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

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The Postgraduate Certificate in Anthropology is a one-year part-time course designed for students who would like to make a transition to studying anthropology but have no previous background in the subject, or for students who for various reasons are not able to enroll in the full MA programme. Read more

The Postgraduate Certificate in Anthropology is a one-year part-time course designed for students who would like to make a transition to studying anthropology but have no previous background in the subject, or for students who for various reasons are not able to enroll in the full MA programme. This Certificate can be applied to the MA in Anthropology, upon acceptance to that programme.

Students take a total of 40 credits over 1 year.

 

Compulsory Modules (30 credits)

AN651 Social Thought (10 credits)

AN653 Writing Cultures (10 credits)

AN652 Key Concepts in Anthropology (10 credits)

 

Optional Modules (subject to availability)

AN646 Foundations of Linguistic Anthropology (5 credits)

AN647 Foundations of Medical Anthropology (5 credits)

AN648 Foundations of Material Culture and Design (5 credits)

AN649 Foundations of Anthropology & Development (5 credits)

AN657 Ethnographic Ireland (5 credits)

AN630 Creole Culture (5 credits)

PD606 Design Ethnography (7.5 credits)

GY621 Dublin Urban Laboratory (10 credits)

GY619 Public Engagement Research and Practice (10 credits)

GY627 Places, Landscapes, Mappings (10 credits)

 

This course can serve as a foundation for further work to complete an MA in Anthropology & Development.

The PG Cert in Anthropology provides an excellent enhancement to existing careers in both public and private sectors. Anthropology has become increasingly important as a job skill in the context of globalisation, where a deeper understanding of cultural difference is crucial, both locally and internationally.



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The Postgraduate Certificate in Anthropology & Development is a one-year part-time course designed for development and humanitarian aid professionals (and those who envisage such a career) who would like to add an anthropological perspective to their development expertise. Read more

The Postgraduate Certificate in Anthropology & Development is a one-year part-time course designed for development and humanitarian aid professionals (and those who envisage such a career) who would like to add an anthropological perspective to their development expertise. The course provides a holistic and critical approach to culture, the inevitable context of all relief and development activity. This Certificate can be applied to the MA in Anthropology & Development, upon acceptance to that programme.

The course consists of four consecutive 6-week modules, offered on Tuesday evenings, plus two Saturday Workshops distributed over the course of the academic year (20 ECTS combined). The Saturday Workshops feature guest scholars who bring critical perspectives to development-related issues. PG Cert students are also welcome at our weekly Anthropology Department Seminar.

This course can enhance the career of development professionals by equipping them with a critical perspective informed by anthropology’s holistic approach. It is also suitable for those interested in pursuing NGO work in the voluntary/charity sector.

Students take a total of 40 credits over 1 year.

 

Compulsory Modules (30 credits)

AN651 Social Thought (10 credits)

AN653 Writing Cultures (10 credits)

AN652 Key Concepts in Anthropology (10 credits)

 

Optional Modules (subject to availability)

AN646 Foundations of Linguistic Anthropology (5 credits)

AN647 Foundations of Medical Anthropology (5 credits)

AN648 Foundations of Material Culture and Design (5 credits)

AN649 Foundations of Anthropology & Development (5 credits)

AN657 Ethnographic Ireland (5 credits)

AN630 Creole Culture (5 credits)

PD606 Design Ethnography (7.5 credits)

GY621 Dublin Urban Laboratory (10 credits)

GY619 Public Engagement Research and Practice (10 credits)

GY627 Places, Landscapes, Mappings (10 credits)

 

This course can serve as a foundation for further work to complete an MA in Anthropology & Development.



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Our Social Anthropology group forms an international centre of excellence for postgraduate training, recognised as one of the premier research departments in the UK. Read more

Our Social Anthropology group forms an international centre of excellence for postgraduate training, recognised as one of the premier research departments in the UK.

Applied research includes policy-related work on asylum seekers, non-governmental organisations, sustainable development and participatory rights. Our regional expertise is not confined to Scotland and the UK but includes Europe, Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, Southeast Asia, East Asia, and North and South America.

Particular research strengths include:

  • law and justice
  • politics, governance and the state
  • nationalism and citizenship
  • war, violence and displacement
  • medicine and health
  • science and technology studies
  • history and theory of anthropology
  • development and environment
  • kinship and relatedness
  • death and the limits of the body
  • material culture, identity and memory
  • contemporary hunter-gatherers
  • linguistic anthropology
  • urban anthropology
  • anthropology of landscape

Training and support

The PhD programme combines work on your thesis project, usually based on long-term fieldwork, with systematic training in anthropological and social research skills. Research training is also available in the form of our MSc by Research.

The Graduate School provides a suite of ESRC-recognised research training courses for social science students across the University. We are developing an exciting package of flexible web-based training courses in line with the increased emphasis on ongoing training throughout the course of doctoral studies.

Scholarships and funding

Find out more about scholarships and funding opportunities:



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All M.A. students are expected to develop field research skills through participation in the department’s ongoing research programs. Read more

All M.A. students are expected to develop field research skills through participation in the department’s ongoing research programs. There is no formal language requirement for the M.A. degree. However, students will consult with their advisors regarding the development of pertinent linguistic or computer skills that may be necessary for their thesis research and analysis.

Curriculum

Thirty credit hours, including 6 credit hours of thesis, are required for the thesis option; no more than 12 of these hours may be taken at the 6000 level. Students pursuing this option are required to present a thesis proposal, approved by a faculty member, to the graduate advisor.

Thirty-six credit hours are required for the non-thesis option; no more than 15 of these hours may be taken at the 6000 level. Students who select this option must complete the specified 24 hours of coursework plus an additional 12 credit hours of courses selected in consultation with the graduate advisor.

Core Courses (6 hours)

Methods Courses (6 hours)

Topical and Regional Courses (12 hours)

Selected from available 6000- and 7000-level courses. At least 6 hours must be taken at the 7000-level.

Tutorials/Independent Research

Specialized training and information not provided in regularly scheduled courses. With consent of advisor, tutorials may be taken in lieu of topical and regional courses.

Thesis (6 hours)

The thesis is expected to involve field research.

Non-Thesis (12 Hours)

If completing non-thesis track, student takes 12 additional credits from graduate level Anthropology courses and/or supporting graduate programs, rather than 6 hours of thesis.



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The English Language MA gives you the opportunity to investigate language in its social and cultural contexts. Read more

The English Language MA gives you the opportunity to investigate language in its social and cultural contexts.

You will examine theoretical and analytical frameworks that explore issues of language variation, language contact, language and identity; analyse the role of language in social relationships and practices; and look at how linguistic theory can be applied to the analysis of literature and culture.

The programme equips you with high-level research skills that you can apply in your dissertation, which allows you to address an issue of particular interest with the knowledge you have gathered throughout the course.

Course structure

The programme is designed for both full-time and part-time students, with a flexible framework that can fit in with your professional and personal commitments. Modules are taught across the two semesters, usually in nine sessions per semester.

In addition, you are expected to work independently and engage with reading and research in your subject area. You will be offered support through tutorial supervision and the university's online virtual learning environment.

Areas of study

The English Language MA covers semantics, pragmatics (minimalism and contextualism), the philosophy of language, grammar, language variation and attitudes, language and identity (class, age, gender, ethnicity, social networks), language in interaction (politeness, speech accommodation, cross-cultural communication), feminist theory and linguistic theory, and ethnocentrism/racial prejudices in colonial discourse.

You approach these topics by: examining theoretical and analytical frameworks that explore issues of language variation; analysing the role of language in social relationships and practices; and examining how linguistic theory can be applied to the analysis of literature and culture.

Modules

  • Grammar and the English Language
  • Semantics: Word Meaning
  • Pragmatics, Meaning and Truth
  • Topics in Sociolinguistics
  • Research Methods
  • Dissertation

One from:

  • Discourses of Culture
  • Semantics/Pragmatics Interface: Approaches to the Study of Meaning
  • Cultural and Critical Theory module

Careers and employability

The English Language MA prepares you for careers in linguistics, linguistic anthropology, forensic linguistics, speech therapy, sign language, journalism, writing, English language teaching, politics and sociology.



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The Linguistics MA advances your knowledge of critical theory in theoretical linguistics and the philosophy of language, specifically with regard to the syntax/semantics interface, the semantics/pragmatics interface and grammar. Read more

The Linguistics MA advances your knowledge of critical theory in theoretical linguistics and the philosophy of language, specifically with regard to the syntax/semantics interface, the semantics/pragmatics interface and grammar.

The MRes is designed for students who already have some background in linguistics and intend to progress to PhD study. It is designed as an enhanced route of entry to a PhD programme, giving you an opportunity to develop research skills early in order to be fully prepared for your doctorate.

Course structure

The programme is designed for both full-time and part-time students, with a flexible framework that can fit in with your professional and personal commitments. Modules are taught across the two semesters, usually in nine sessions per semester.

In addition, you are expected to work independently and engage with reading and research in your subject area. You will be offered support through tutorial supervision and the university's online virtual learning environment.

Areas of study

The Linguistics MA covers semantics, pragmatics (minimalism and contextualism), the philosophy of language, grammar, language variation and attitudes, language and identity (class, age, gender, ethnicity, social networks), language in interaction (politeness, speech accommodation, cross-cultural communication), feminist theory and linguistic theory, and ethnocentrism/racial prejudices in colonial discourse.

You approach these topics by: analysing and evaluating different approaches to studying the structure of the English language; engaging with theoretical frameworks which attempt to account for meaning in language; and examining the relationship between the philosophy of language and linguistics on one hand, and the influence of philosophical theories on the analysis of language on the other.

Modules

  • Grammar and the English Language
  • Semantics: Word Meaning
  • Pragmatics, Meaning and Truth
  • Topics in Sociolinguistics
  • Research Methods
  • Dissertation

One from:

  • Discourses of Culture
  • Semantics/Pragmatics Interface: Approaches to the Study of Meaning
  • Cultural and Critical Theory module

Careers and employability

The Linguistics MA prepares you for careers in linguistics, linguistic anthropology, forensic linguistics, speech therapy, sign language, journalism, writing, English language teaching, politics and sociology.



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The Philosophy of Language MA is designed for students with a particular interest in philosophy and ways in which its principles and teachings can be applied to the study of language. Read more

The Philosophy of Language MA is designed for students with a particular interest in philosophy and ways in which its principles and teachings can be applied to the study of language.

The study of language has given rise to a number of distinctive philosophical problems that became central to Western philosophy in the nineteenth century and that have dominated research and discussion in the twentieth century.

Our philosophy modules give you a thorough grounding in philosophical insights, as you engage in critical reflection on the relationship between sociopolitical context and philosophical debate. You explore the history of philosophy from the Enlightenment to the twentieth century, examining the variety of critical and analytical traditions that have emerged from those foundations.

Philosophy of language modules examine the influence of philosophical theories on the analysis of language, focusing on the critical analysis of the relationship between the philosophy of language and linguistics.

Course structure

The programme is designed for both full-time and part-time students, with a flexible framework that can fit in with your professional and personal commitments. Modules are taught across the two semesters, usually in nine sessions per semester.

In addition, you are expected to work independently and engage with reading and research in your subject area. You will be offered support through tutorial supervision and the university's online virtual learning environment.

Areas of study

The Philosophy of Language MA covers semantics, pragmatics (minimalism and contextualism), the philosophy of language, grammar, language variation and attitudes, language and identity (class, age, gender, ethnicity, social networks), language in interaction (politeness, speech accommodation, cross-cultural communication), feminist theory and linguistic theory, and ethnocentrism/racial prejudices in colonial discourse.

You approach these topics by: analysing and evaluating aspects of philosophy that have had significant influence on the general understanding of what language is and how its use interacts with, and exploits, context; engaging with philosophical frameworks starting with Frege, through to Russell and Wittgenstein, which attempt to account for meaning in language; and evaluating philosophical foundations of critical theory that have contributed to debates on the understanding of history, politics and the nature of meaning.

Modules

  • Grammar and the English Language
  • Semantics: Word Meaning
  • Pragmatics, Meaning and Truth
  • Topics in Sociolinguistics
  • Research Methods
  • Dissertation

One from:

  • Discourses of Culture
  • Semantics/Pragmatics Interface: Approaches to the Study of Meaning
  • Cultural and Critical Theory module

Careers and employability

The Philosophy of Language MA prepares you for careers in linguistics, linguistic anthropology, forensic linguistics, speech therapy, sign language, journalism, writing, English language teaching, politics and sociology.



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Students who wish to conduct doctoral-level research in Nepal, or in preparation for professional employment in e.g. a government agency or international NGO. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

Students who wish to conduct doctoral-level research in Nepal, or in preparation for professional employment in e.g. a government agency or international NGO.

This is the only Masters-level programme offered anywhere in the world that provides students who intend to proceed to conduct anthropological research (broadly defined) in Nepal with the necessary skills (disciplinary, linguistic, methodological).

What will this programme give the student an opportunity to achieve?

- The ability to read, write, speak and understand Nepali to a level suitable for field research in Nepal
- A grounding in the scholarly literature on Nepali history, society and culture
- Expertise in anthropological theory and practice that will provide a basis for research in a Nepali context

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-research-methods-nepali/

Structure

- Year 1
Students take a 1.0 unit Nepali language course (either Nepali Language 1 or Nepali Language 2); 1.0 unit Culture and Conflict in the Himalaya; 1.0 unit Theoretical Approaches in Social Anthropology (or other anthropology options, chosen in consultation with programme convenor, for students with equivalent anthropology training); 0.5 unit Media Production Skills; and 0.5 units of anthropology options.

- Summer break between years 1 and 2
Two weeks of intensive Nepali language tuition at SOAS after the June exams, followed by two months in Kathmandu, attached to the Nepā School of Social Sciences and Humanities and the Bishwo Bhasa Campus of Tribhuvan University. At the end of the summer students will be required to submit a 5000-word preliminary fieldwork report and research proposal, accompanied by a 500-word abstract written in Nepali.

- Year 2
Students take the following courses: 1.5 unit Nepali for researchers; 1.0 unit Anthropological Research Methods (0.5 units Ethnographic Research Methods in term 1 and 0.5 units in Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research in term 2). They also attend the compulsory weekly MPhil Research Training Seminar in anthropology and write a 15,000 word MA Dissertation.

Language courses will be assessed though a mixture of written papers and oral examinations.

Non-language courses will be assessed on the basis of coursework essays and written papers.

Programme Specification (msword; 668kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-research-methods-nepali/file68458.rtf

Teaching & Learning

What methods will be used to achieve the learning outcomes?

Knowledge:
1. How to assess data and evidence critically from manuscripts and digital sources, solve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations, locate materials, use research sources (particularly research library catalogues) and other relevant traditional sources.

2. The Research Methods course focuses on teaching the various research methods associated with anthropological fieldwork including: participant observation, historical research, qualitative interviewing, quantitative data collection, Rapid Participatory Assessment, how to design questionnaires and, especially, on how to formulate a research question and design a project and consider the ethical issues involved. The Statistics courseworks on how to compile statistics, and how to critically assess statistics.

3. The Research Training course, which is assessed by the Masters dissertation, works on students’ writing skills with an emphasis on thinking of the history of the discipline, writing to schedule, writing to requested word count, how to formulate a research question based on the material gathered, as well as how to do a presentation, how to comment on presentations and how to apply for funding. Term three looks at the strategies for working on the Masters’ dissertation and how to be upgraded at the start of the MPhil year.

4. A good grounding in the sociocultural and political history of and contemporary sociocultural and political issues in Nepal, and familiarity with the scholarly literature on these topics.

5. Proficiency in spoken and written Nepali sufficient for the purposes of anthropological field research: ability to conduct conversations and interviews, and read and synthesise information from Nepali written sources.

Intellectual (thinking) skills

1. Students should become precise and cautious in their assessment of evidence, and to understand through practice what documents can and cannot tell us.

2. Students should question interpretations, however authoritative, and reassess evidence for themselves. They should be able to design a research project, set a timetable, understand the principles of fieldwork, and consider questions of ethics.

3. Students should learn to read each others’ work for both its strengths and weaknesses, develop their skills as public speakers, learn how to compose short abstracts of their project (for funding), be able to think critically and yet be open to being critiqued themselves.

Subject-based practical skills

The programme aims to help students with the following practical skills:

1. Communicate effectively in writing, in both English and (at a less advanced level) Nepali
2. Retrieve, sift and select information from a variety of sources in both English and Nepali.
3. Present seminar papers.
4. Listen to and discuss ideas introduced during seminars.
5. Practice research techniques in a variety of specialized research libraries and institutes.
6. Be prepared to do fieldwork for an anthropology PhD.

Transferable skills

The programme will encourage students to:

1. Write good essays and dissertations.
2. Structure and communicate ideas effectively both orally and in writing.
3. Understand unconventional ideas.
4. Present (non–assessed) material orally.
5. Function as a student and researcher in a radically different environment.
6. Be able to apply for funding to do a PhD.
7. Be prepared to enter an Anthropology PhD programme and to be upgraded from MPhil to PhD in the shortest possible time.

Destinations

Students who study MA Anthropological Research Methods and Nepali develop a wide range of transferable skills such as research, analysis, oral and written communication skills.

The communication skills of anthropologists transfer well to areas such as information and technology, the media and tourism. Other recent SOAS career choices have included commerce and banking, government service, the police and prison service, social services and health service administration. Opportunities for graduates with trained awareness of the socio-cultural norms of minority communities also arise in education, local government, libraries and museums.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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All M.A. students are expected to develop field research skills through participation in the department’s ongoing research programs. Read more

All M.A. students are expected to develop field research skills through participation in the department’s ongoing research programs. There is no formal language requirement for the M.A. degree. However, students will consult with their advisors regarding the development of pertinent linguistic or computer skills that may be necessary for their thesis research and analysis.

Curriculum

Thirty credit hours, including 6 credit hours of thesis, are required for the thesis option; no more than 12 of these hours may be taken at the 6000 level. Students pursuing this option are required to present a thesis proposal, approved by a faculty member, to the graduate advisor.

Thirty-six credit hours are required for the non-thesis option; no more than 15 of these hours may be taken at the 6000 level. Students who select this option must complete the specified 24 hours of coursework plus an additional 12 credit hours of courses selected in consultation with the graduate advisor.

Core Courses (6 hours)

Methods Courses (9 hours)

Topical and Regional Courses (9 hours)

Selected from available 6000- and 7000-level courses.

Tutorials/Independent Research

Specialized training and information not provided in regularly scheduled courses. With consent of advisor, tutorials may be taken in lieu of topical and regional courses.

Thesis (6 hours)

The thesis is expected to involve field and/or laboratory research.

Non Thesis (12 Hours)

If completing non-thesis track, student takes 12 additional credits from graduate level Anthropology courses and/or supporting graduate programs, rather than 6 hours of thesis.



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Kent's MA in Applied Linguistics with TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) provides teachers with advanced knowledge of linguistics and language pedagogy, informed by research and scholarship, to enhance, develop and inform an understanding of language learning and classroom practice. Read more

Kent's MA in Applied Linguistics with TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) provides teachers with advanced knowledge of linguistics and language pedagogy, informed by research and scholarship, to enhance, develop and inform an understanding of language learning and classroom practice.

The programme is offered by the Department of English Language & Linguistics, and benefits from staff expertise in areas of linguistics that inform classroom practice (such as syntax, morphology, semantics, pragmatics and phonetics), raising awareness of these fields and applying them to TESOL. Students gain an understanding of the theory, methodology and interdisciplinary nature of TESOL, as well as a firm foundation in linguistics.           

Practical teaching opportunities are a feature of the programme, including teaching to peer groups and international students. There is also the opportunity to observe language classes.

Students begin by studying eight modules across the Autumn and Spring terms, before writing a 12,000-word dissertation or teaching portfolio over the summer, supervised by an expert in the department.

The programme is an ideal for teachers aiming to improve their understanding and abilities in communicating across the barriers of language and those who wish to build an international dialogue.

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/ell/postgraduate/taught-applied-linguistics-for-tesol.html

About the Department of English Language and Linguistics

English Language and Linguistics (ELL), founded in 2010, is the newest department of the School of European Culture and Languages (SECL). ELL is a dynamic and growing department with a vibrant research culture. We specialise in experimental and theoretical linguistics. In particular, our interests focus on quantitative and experimental research in speech and language processing, variation and acquisition, but also cover formal areas such as syntax, as well as literary stylistics. In addition to English and its varieties, our staff work in French, German, Greek, Romani, Korean, Spanish and Russian.

Staff and postgraduates are members of the Centre for Language and Linguistic Studies (CLLS), a research centre that seeks to promote interdisciplinary linguistic research. We also have links with research networks outside Kent, and are involved with national and international academic associations including the Linguistics Association of Great Britain, the British Association of Academic Phoneticians, the Linguistic Society of America, the Association for French Language Studies and the Poetics and Linguistics Association.

Course structure

The programme starts with two core linguistics modules (Sounds and Structure), the choice between two modules (Meaning or Research Skills) and a module on language awareness for teachers (Language Awareness and Analysis for TESOL) so that you have a firm grasp of the linguistic bases of language teaching.

In the spring term the focus is on how languages are learned (Second Language Acquisition), how you can improve classroom technique (Methods and Practice of TESOL), plan for your students' needs (Course and Syllabus Design for TESOL) and the option between two modules (Materials Evaluation and Development for TESOL or one of the linguistics modules offered that term). 

Students can choose to do either a Research Dissertation or a Teaching Portfolio in the summer term. The dissertation will be an opportunity to plan and develop a piece of empirical research which can be of direct relevance to your current or planned teaching situation. The teaching portfolio functions both as the culmination of the year's work on the program and as preparation for students' professional development as language teachers.

Assessment

Modules are typically assessed by a 3-4,000-word essay, but assessment patterns can include practical/experimental work, report and proposal writing, critiques, problem solving and seminar presentations. You also complete a 12-15,000-word research dissertation on a topic agreed with your supervisor.

Programme aims

- Provide TESOL practitioners with advanced knowledge of linguistics related to language pedagogy, informed by research and scholarship, which will enhance, develop and inform their understanding of language learning and classroom practice.

- To produce graduates who will contribute locally, nationally and internationally to the TESOL community.

- To prepare students to be more effective in the TESOL classroom.

- To provide students with teaching and training which is informed by research, scholarship, practice and experience.

Research areas

Alongside our research centre below, we also have links with research networks outside Kent, and are involved with national and international academic associations including the Linguistics Association of Great Britain, the British Association of Academic Phoneticians, the Linguistic Society of America, the Association for French Language Studies and the Poetics and Linguistics Association.

- Linguistics Lab

The newly established Linguistics Lab is currently housed in Rutherford College and has facilities for research in acoustics, sociophonetics and speech and language processing. English Language and Linguistics (ELL) members also have access to the School of European Culture and Language (SECL) recording studio and multimedia labs which can be used both for research and teaching.

- Centre for Language and Linguistics

English Language and Linguistics is the main contributor to the Centre for Language and Linguistics. Founded in 2007, the Centre promotes interdisciplinary collaboration in linguistic research and teaching. Membership embraces not just the members of English Language and Linguistics but also other SECL members with an interest in the study of language, as well as researchers in philosophy, computing, psychology and anthropology, reflecting the many and varied routes by which individuals come to a love of language and an interest in the various disciplines and subdisciplines of linguistics.

Careers

Postgraduate work in English Language and Linguistics prepares you for a range of careers where an in-depth understanding of how language functions is essential. These include speech and language theory, audiology, teaching, publishing, advertising, journalism, public relations, company training, broadcasting, forensic and computational work, and the civil or diplomatic services.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/



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