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This programme is designed to meet the needs of committed students who are interested in exploring and exploiting their own possibilities as writers, and in critically examining their own writing. Read more
This programme is designed to meet the needs of committed students who are interested in exploring and exploiting their own possibilities as writers, and in critically examining their own writing. It is unique in combining creative and life writing in a stimulating and enriching programme- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-creative-life-writing/

We examine relevant literary and cultural theory as well as the politics and practicalities of language and writing from the point of view of the writer.

Practitioner-led, the programme offers you the opportunity to work with a range of published writers who visit the College to give readings and lead workshops.

Visiting writers have included William Fiennes, Jackie Kay and Aminatta Forna.

Poetry Masterclasses have been led by Sharon Olds, Les Murray, Derek Walcott and C K Williams

We also expect to draw fully upon London’s rich tradition as a converging point for culturally diverse literary practices.

Our graduates have gone on to have successful careers as writers and have won awards including the Guardian First Book Award, the Eric Gregory Award, the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Award, and the Dylan Thomas Prize. Two of our graduates (Ross Raisin and Evie Wyld) were recognised in Granta's Best of Young British Novelists 2013 list.

Explore the work of students currently enrolled on the programme in the Goldfish online journal.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Maria Macdonald.

There are three main components of the Masters:

Creative and life writing workshops
Contemporary Contexts for Creative and Life Writing
One-to-one tutorials
There will be two core modules: a two-term workshop in creative and life writing, and a one-term Contemporary Contexts for Creative and Life Writing seminar module.

Workshop in Creative and Life Writing

All students attend this two and-a-half-hour compulsory workshop – part-time students attend in their first year. In the first term you will be encouraged to experiment with a variety of genres in creative and life writing, and then in the second term to develop your individual interests in poetry, fiction, autobiography and biography, or perhaps a fusion of those genres.

Each term you submit a piece of your own writing together with a critical account of how you have structured and developed it. Presentations of your work to other students with an account of your aims and approaches form an additional important element.

Some workshops will be taken by visiting writers, introducing you to a range of practices, concerns and techniques. The workshop also enables you to debate issues raised in the Contemporary Contexts module in relation to your own practice.

Contemporary Contexts for Creative and Life Writing

This is a two-hour seminar module, made up of informal talks by visiting speakers, followed by a seminar. These talks might be by practising writers, biographers, critics or philosophers (from both outside and inside Goldsmiths).

Our notable visitors have included Ali Smith, A L Kennedy, Daljit Nagra and Jon McGregor. Wide-ranging topics have included: the role of the writer and politics; writing the self; the relationship between contemporary fiction and biography; the relationship between fictional and non-fictional autobiography; writers and their readers; the publishing world; contemporary ideas about language; gender and writing.

In both the Contemporary Contexts module and the workshops you will be asked to consider works by significant contemporary writers in relation to your own writing practice. Assessment is by a critical essay on a writer or literary issue. Full-time students take the Contemporary Contexts module in their first term and part-time students in their second year.

Tutorials will be offered at regular intervals during the year (12 in all).

Options

You also choose an option module lasting one term. Full-time students take the module in the second term, while part-time students take it in the second year (second term). You can choose from a specialist workshop in fiction, poetry or life writing, or an option from the list of MA options offered by ECL including topics such as European Avant-Garde, Postmodernist Fiction or Re-writing Sexualities.

Assessment

Assessment is by the submission of four pieces of writing of 5,000 words each – either an essay, or, for workshops, a piece or pieces of creative or life-writing – plus a critical account of how you have structured and developed your work. You will also be assessed on a portfolio (maximum of 20,000 words) containing a piece or pieces of creative or life-writing together with a critical account of how you have structured and developed your work. In all cases, the number of words applies to prose.

Careers

Graduates of this programme include Tom Lee, Lucy Caldwell, Ross Raisin, Amy Sackville, Rohan Kriwaczek, Evie Wyld, Sara Grant, Naomi Foyle, Bronia Kita, Lijia Zhang, Ashley Dartnell and Suzanne Joinson and the poets Emily Berry, Andy Spragg, Kate Potts, Jack Underwood, Abigail Parry, Anthony Joseph, Katrina Naomi and Matthew Gregory.

Among them they've won or been shortlisted for awards including The Sunday Times/EFG Private Bank Short Story Award 2012, the Rooney Prize for Literature 2011, the 2008 and 2011 Dylan Thomas Prize, several Eric Gregory Awards, The Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Award 2009, the John Llewellyn Rhys Prize 2009 and 2010, the Guardian First Book Award, the New Writing Ventures Prize, and several Betty Trask Awards.

Other graduates have gone on to work in publishing (for example, as senior commissioning editors), journalism, public relations, teaching, advertising, the civil service, business, industry, and the media.

Skills

The MA will enable you to develop transferable skills, including: enhanced communication and discussion skills in written and oral contexts; the ability to analyse and evaluate different textual materials; the ability to organise information, and to assimilate and evaluate competing arguments.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This programme caters for teachers and educators who are keen to develop as both writers and educational practitioners, and is delivered in collaboration with London-based cultural institutions- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-writer-teacher/. Read more
This programme caters for teachers and educators who are keen to develop as both writers and educational practitioners, and is delivered in collaboration with London-based cultural institutions- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-writer-teacher/

There is a growing interest in linking cultural sector practices to those of education, to the benefit of both. This programme creates a valuable partnership across the Educational Studies and the creative writing team in the English and Comparative Literature at Goldsmiths, in collaboration with London-based cultural institutions.

The course caters for teachers and educators who are keen to develop as both writers and educational practitioners. It develops insights into creative writing practices that provide a critical perspective on relations and discourses of teaching and learning in contemporary education.

The programme enables students to establish and strengthen their identity as writers and educators in informal and formal learning contexts (eg Writing Workshop and project based dissertation).

You'll develop strong writing skills to a potentially publishable level and will be able to engage in sustained practical and theoretical research into writing practices. Practices of creative writing and practices of teaching and learning are brought into a productive relationship.

As part of the programme you'll rethink notions of writing pedagogy in a range of contexts, including local community sites.

You may be given the opportunity to contribute to:

-performance poetry workshops and events conducted by Apples and Snakes
-poetry performances and sessions run by the Poetry Society
-drama projects created by The Complete Work
-writing projects developed by the English and Media Centre
-writing workshops in a range of forms led by the Ministry of Stories
-creative research projects run by the British Library
-Storytelling workshops run by Discover Children's Story Centre

Spoken Word Education programme

The Spoken Word Education Training Programme is led by Jacob Sam-La Rose (Artistic Director) and Bohdan Piasecki (Education Director). All Spoken Word Educators need to first apply to the MA Writer/Teacher programme and, if they are accepted, they will then be interviewed for the Spoken Word Education Training programme.

MA Writer/Teacher student shortlisted for the Costa Short Story Award 2015:
'Gerado Dreams of Chillies', written by Niall Bourke as part of his MA studies at Goldsmiths is one of six shortlisted for the £3,500 prize.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Vicky Macleroy (Educational Studies)

Modules & Structure

You'll have the opportunity to develop your own creative writing practices and explore a range of educational approaches towards creative writing.

You'll work with practising and published creative writing lecturers and education lecturers in collaboration with professionals working in local cultural institutions.

You'll participate in creative and life writing workshops and research creative writing pedagogies in classrooms and educational settings.

You have to complete 180 credits points, made up from:

-one compulsory core module in the Department of English and Comparative Literature:
–Workshop in Creative and Life Writing (30 credits)

-two compulsory core modules in the Department of Educational Studies in association with the British Library, Poetry Society, English and Media Centre, Apples and Snakes, Ministry of Stories, The Complete Works:
–Contemporary Writer Identity and Education (30 credits)
–Research into Writing Practices (30 credits)

-an option module in the Department of Educational Studies (30 credits)

-the Dissertation in the Department of Educational Studies and the Department of English and Comparative Literature (60 credits)

Practitioners who already have existing M-level credits may transfer these on to the MA.

Assessment

Assessment for the Workshop in Creative and Life Writing module is by the submission of a piece or pieces of creative or life-writing of 5,000 words plus a critical account of how you have structured and developed your work.

Assessment for the Educational Studies modules is by the submission of assignments.

You'll also be assessed on a project-based dissertation.

Skills

The programme will enable you to develop creative writing skills to a potentially publishable level, participate in local cultural events as writers, and develop advanced theoretical and critical skills in creative writing pedagogy.

Careers

The programme provides and enhances continuing professional development in creative writing for educators and teachers, opening up opportunities to work with local cultural institutions and schools, and enriching current professional practice.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This course is subject to validation. The Creative Writing MAs at Canterbury Christ Church offer stimulating courses with a commercial edge, taught by experienced tutors who are successful writers themselves. Read more
This course is subject to validation.

The Creative Writing MAs at Canterbury Christ Church offer stimulating courses with a commercial edge, taught by experienced tutors who are successful writers themselves. We believe that all writers need a core toolkit of skills, but we also understand that our students often want to specialise in an area of writing about which they’re passionate; that’s why we offer pathways in Fantasy, Science Fiction and Horror, Commercial Fiction, Writing for Children and Creative Non-Fiction. Our courses are designed with busy lives in mind, and are taught through a combination of intensive weekends, high-quality distance learning and one-to-one tutorials, either in person or via Skype. We also offer a strong focus on developing professional practice in writers, looking at skills such as self-presentation, pitching and understanding the publishing industry.

Our Pathways

Commercial Fiction:
Students selecting this pathway will explore literary and more commercial forms of creative writing, fiction, poetry and non-fiction. This degree will appeal to students who wish to generally enrich their writing skills, or whose practice falls broadly into these areas.

Fantasy, Science-Fiction and Horror:
This pathway is aimed at students who wish to specialise in speculative fiction genres. You will develop a detailed understanding of the history and diversity of these literary forms, and work on techniques such as world-building, metaphor and narrative structure.

Creative Non-Fiction:
This pathway allows students to explore the creative aspects of non-fiction writing, including memoir, features journalism and travel/nature writing. Students will explore the creative tension between fact and fiction, and will develop practical skills in pitching and selling their work.

Writing for Children:
An ideal choice for those who want to develop a career in writing novels, picture books or children’s non-fiction, this pathway will develop the specific writing skills needed for writing for under-12s, and give students a practical understanding of issues such as the specific publishing environment for this practice, working with illustrators and interfacing with school curricula.

Steeped in literary history, Canterbury is an excellent setting for the next chapter of your Creative Writing story. Canterbury Christ Church University is a young, dynamic university, and the degree is run by a team of writers who have live experience of the publishing market. We pride ourselves in taking innovative approaches to the way our students learn, offering flexible options that help you to fit an MA into your life. We also have strong links to publishers, agents and literary festivals, and work hard to create opportunities for our students to develop their writing practice and career.

The MA Creative Writing includes core modules in The Craft of Writing, Professional Practice and Research Skills, which develop a toolkit for great writing across all genres. In all other modules, you will specialise in your chosen pathway of either Commercial Fiction, Creative Non-Fiction, Writing for Children or Fantasy, Sci-Fi and Horror. You will study in guided reading groups to develop a critical understanding (and warm appreciation) of your specialised area of writing, and will work intensively to develop your practice in termly residential weekends. Finally, every student submits a 15,000 word piece of extended writing, working closely with a prominent writer from their chosen area of specialism.

Who Is The Course For?

The programme is aimed at adults who are passionate about writing, and want to hone their craft while developing an understanding of the publishing market and how to access it. Unlike traditional MAs, we ensure that our teaching falls outside of office hours, which allows students to learn at times that suit them. It may appeal to recent graduates who wish to specialise further in their chosen writing practice, or to adult learners who have been writing independently for a while, and are now ready to take the next steps towards a writing career. We are proud to work with many mature students, and aim to continue to do so in the future.

Students completing this MA could go on to a Creative Writing PhD, or could undertake a teaching qualification to take their practice into a school, FE or HE setting.

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The Master of Studies (MSt) in Creative Writing is designed for those who wish to develop high-level skills in creative writing both in fiction and non-fiction literatures. Read more
The Master of Studies (MSt) in Creative Writing is designed for those who wish to develop high-level skills in creative writing both in fiction and non-fiction literatures. The MSt is taught over two years in short, intensive study blocks. It has been designed to be accessible to those in full- or part-time employment and to international students.

You will be guided in the production of creative work in a range of genres and styles, and also in critical reflection on your own work and that of other writers. The course tutors and guest speakers are all established literary professionals.

See the website http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/mst-creative-writing

Who is the course designed for?

The MSt aims to facilitate students' creative practice, whether for their own personal creative development as writers or because their professional work impinges on these areas.

Examples could include teachers of English at secondary level for whom the teaching of creative writing is increasingly necessary for GCSE and A-level English Language and English Literature. It is also designed to be of professional value to those working in areas such as journalism, broadcasting, publishing and editing.

Aims of the programme

By the end of the course students should have:

- Developed their own writing and self-editing skills in a range of fiction and non-fiction genres
- Developed a solid and substantial understanding of the history (in terms of innovative developments) of fiction and non-fiction writing and of critical, analytical and narrative theory

Format

The MSt is structured around four modules, each of which includes a residential block at Madingley Hall that students must attend. In the first year, each of the four residential blocks is preceded by guided preparatory reading and other activities, and followed by two writing assignments: one critical and one creative.

A Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) offers learning support to students while they are on the programme, including learning resources, peer-to-peer and student-to-tutor discussion between modules to build a virtual community of practice.

Lectures, seminars and classes: 4 x 4-day residential sessions in Year 1; a 2-day residential session in Year 2.

Supervisions and tutorials: each student has their own tutor to whom they will have several one-to-one sessions during the first year. During the second year students have 5 x 1-hour sessions with their supervisor.

Year 1

The first year is characterised by variety. Students will engage and experiment with a wide variety of genres, building on existing strengths and exploring unfamiliar territories.

Module 1: Writing for readers: the art of poetry and the craft of criticism (17-20 October 2016)
This module will combine close critical reading of selected example of poetry and autobiographical prose with the writing of both by students.

Module 2: Writing for readers: imagined worlds - fiction, long and short (12-15 December 2016)
This module focuses on prose fiction, examining the relationship between memory, imagination and research and exploring the essential concerns of the fiction-writer, including plot and narrative, voice and character and the importance of place.

Module 3: Writing for performance: monologue and polyphonic scripts (13-16 February 2017)
This module explores various forms of writing for an audience, encompassing writing for radio, theatre, television, cinema and other forms of scripted public address and performance.

Module 4: Writing life: creative non-fiction (15-18 May 2017)
This module explores the concept of creative non-fiction and examines examples drawn from a range of sub-genres. These are likely to include biography, memoir, travel-writing and writing about the environment. Sessions on study and research skills will prepare students for Year 2. Visiting speakers for this module will include those from the world of publishing.

Year 2

The second year is characterised by focus on a specialist genre. Students will work independently to explore further and develop their own literary and critical skills, resulting in an extended piece or portfolio of writing. They will work under the supervision of an expert in their chosen field with whom they will have regular contact.

Students will have five supervisions in the second year. The first will take place in October 2017, ideally at Madingley Hall, but Skype can also be used. The dates of this and the next three supervisions will be arranged between you and your supervisor (these can also be face-to-face or via Skype). The fifth and final supervision will usually take place at Madingley Hall at the time of the only residency in the second year, the Presentation and Discussion of Portfolios, on 16-17 April 2018.

Assessment

- Year 1 -

Following the first residency students will produce 750 words of poetry and a critical commentary of 3,000 words. Following the other three residencies students will produce 4,000 words of creative prose and a critical commentary of 3,000 words.

- Year 2 -

Students will produce a portfolio consisting of 15,000 words of creative prose (or 5,000 words of poetry) and a 3,000-word critical commentary.

- Feedback -

Students are given formal written feedback on their assignments and informal feedback throughout the course, including during tutorials and supervisions. Tutors produce a report for each student at the end of Year 1 and supervisors produce termly reports for each student during Year 2.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding

Sources of government funding and financial support - including Professional and Career Development Loans: https://www.gov.uk/browse/education/student-finance

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“One of the greatest pleasures of my working life continues to be the Manchester Writing School at Manchester Metropolitan University – a department with a real sense of family, achievement and celebration, and an ethos of nurturing and innovation.”. Read more
“One of the greatest pleasures of my working life continues to be the Manchester Writing School at Manchester Metropolitan University – a department with a real sense of family, achievement and celebration, and an ethos of nurturing and innovation.”
Carol Ann Duffy – Poet Laureate and Creative Director of the Manchester Writing School

At the heart of the Manchester Writing School are our Masters programmes in Creative Writing, available to study on campus in Manchester, and also from anywhere in the world via online distance learning.

On our Master of Fine Arts (MFA) programme, you will explore and practice techniques and styles of modern and contemporary writing and apply these through the development of your own full-length book. MFA students undertake all of the elements of our MA Creative Writing programme (a taught element blending writing workshops with reading units, an elective, and a dissertation), then take an additional unit about the publishing industry and submit a full-length manuscript: a completed novel, poetry collection, book for children or young adults, or book about place. The MFA is available to complete over two years full-time or three years part-time/online.

You will be introduced to professionals from the publishing industries – agents, editors, publishers and publicists – and the School has strong links with many major arts, educational and cultural organisations. Our MFA model is unparalleled in coaching students through the development and completion of a full-length book under the sustained guidance of distinguished, practising writers and seeing those students achieve success in publishing.

You will specialise in one of the following routes:
-Novel Writing (including Short Fiction)
-Poetry Writing
-Writing for Children & Young Adults
-Place Writing

Applications are also welcome from those already holding an MA in Creative Writing (180 credits) – from Manchester Metropolitan or other universities – who would like to top-up to an MFA by taking an additional 120 credits (including the Manuscript unit).

Placement options

The Manchester Writing School is one the UK’s leading schools of creative writing. It is also home to ground-breaking outreach activities, international writing competitions, series of city-wide literary events, innovative publishing projects, and the Manchester Children’s Book Festival. These activities provide our students with many opportunities to get involved and develop their experience in a number of exciting directions.

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Transnational Writing sits within the subject area of Creative Writing at Bath Spa University and within Bath Spa’s newly formed centre for Transnational Creativity. Read more
Transnational Writing sits within the subject area of Creative Writing at Bath Spa University and within Bath Spa’s newly formed centre for Transnational Creativity. We’re a pioneer and leading provider in the teaching of creative writing. We’ve just been recognised by the top consumer body in the UK as ‘the leading course in Creative Writing in the country’ (Which 2016).

This exciting new field of creative inquiry develops the artist’s capacity to respond creatively to the world. The course brings together creative writing, spoken word and creative research. You’ll design your own research plan and produce a portfolio of creative writing or a spoken word performance. We’ll encourage you to conduct extensive fieldwork at home or abroad and you’ll be able to tap into our vibrant network of international partner organisations.

We’ll encourage you to conduct extensive fieldwork at home or abroad and you’ll be able to tap into our vibrant network of international partner organisations.

[[COURSE STRUCTURE]
The course introduces the concept of transnational research and creativity, exploring its application as a mode of cultural production. It considers engagement with other art forms, approaches to creative writing, fieldwork and a diverse contemporary context of international creative expression as the basis of research.

Activities such as writing exercises, field trips, visiting tutors from our international partners and workshops will form the core of the first half of the programme. In the second part of the programme you’ll undertake an extended period of self-directed creative research, giving you the freedom to develop expertise in your own craft and to attempt the production of a substantial piece of creative work to a publishable standard.

MODULES

In Module 1 you will use your own experience of people, places and environment as a source and inspiration for creative writing. This module sets the foundations for independent study and is designed to give you a real sense of what writing from experience in the field is about.

In Module 2 you will gain an overview of the key ideas and processes associated with transnational writing and research. You’ll prepare further for independent study and work on establishing a research plan for your six-month creative project.

In Module 3 you will carry out a creative project, working closely with your supervisor. You can submit your project in a variety of formats. This includes a novel, a collection of stories, a short film, poetry, a spoken word performance or an action based portfolio.

For more information on modules please go to our website: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-transnational-writing/

TEACHING METHODS

The course is low residency, with residential periods at Corsham Court campus.

The learning process will involve a variety of forms of interaction, study and experience including master classes, workshops and creative labs. During workshops, tutors and students present core material with the expectation of lively interaction and designated group discussions.

The low-residential aspect of this MRes equally allows you the time and freedom to research your own points of transition, to write from place, between places and people, while fitting the requirements of the course around your life.

ASSESSMENT

You will be required to submit 16,000 - 20,000 word portfolio (or the equivalent) of creative work of a transnational nature, a well as course-specific written and/or spoken-word assignments for chosen modules.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

The Master of Research in Transnational writing will prepare you for a PhD or career in the creative sector.

For more information please go to our website: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-transnational-writing/

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Oxford University's Master of Studies in Creative Writing is a two-year, part-time master's degree course offering a unique combination of high contact hours, genre specialization, and critical and creative breadth. Read more
Oxford University's Master of Studies in Creative Writing is a two-year, part-time master's degree course offering a unique combination of high contact hours, genre specialization, and critical and creative breadth.

The emphasis of this postgraduate creative writing course is cross-cultural and cross-genre, pointing up the needs and challenges of the contemporary writer who produces his or her creative work in the context of a global writerly and critical community. The master's degree in creative writing offers a clustered learning format of five Residences, two Guided Retreats and one Placement over two years. The research Placement, a distinguishing feature of the course, offers between one and two weeks' hands-on experience of writing in the real world. Students may undertake their placement in a literary agency, a publishing house, the offices of a literary periodical, a theatre company, a screen production company, or other relevant organization. Placement organisations have included Macmillan, Initialise Films, Random House, the BBC, the Literary Review, AM Heath, Pegasus Theatre, the Poetry Society, and Carcanet.

The virtual open event for this programme is available to watch at http://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/cwopenday. The open event features acting Course Director Jane Draycott and course administrator Rebecca Rue, who discuss the programme, its requirements and the student experience. Participants' questions were texted in and answered during the event. A FAQ of all the questions and their answers is available at the top of this section.

The MSt has a blog, a resource for Oxford events, calls for submission, competitions, news, interviews and more, which is available at http://blogs.conted.ox.ac.uk/mstcw/.

"The Oxford MSt enables you to fast-track your career in writing."
- Fortuna Burke

"… the freedom to explore and experiment… has been fundamental to my development as a writer."
- Clare Tetley

"The range and variety of the group … offers truly exciting opportunities for the kind of exchanges that really accelerate your development as a writer."
- Michael Schuller

"What does the course offer? Self-discipline, professionalism and confidence."
- Abigail Green-Dove

"My life has been so enriched and expanded. My writing evolves daily through the tools that you gave me. Not to mention the wonderful friendships formed throughout our two years together."
- Lindsay Moore

"The Masters in Oxford, while encouraging creativity, raised the bar on the quality of the finished work and gave me the discipline to be a professional."
- Bette Adriaanse

"I doubt there’s a more suitable MSt in the United Kingdom for work which challenges boundaries and takes risks."
- Jennifer Thorp

Students and alumni have won a wide range of prizes. These successes include winning the Gregory O’Donoghue Prize, the Writers’ Village International Short Fiction Award 2014, the Parallel Universe Poetry Competition, the Martin Starkie Prize, the International Jane Martin Poetry Prize, the Heritage Arts Radio play competition, the Cascade Pictures Writer’s Couch pitching competition, first prize in the Poetry Book Society Student Poetry Competition, the Miracle Poetry Competition, Best Photography Book Award from POYi (Pictures of the Year international), and the Yeovil Literary Prize for Poetry. Two alumni have won the Oxford University’s DL Chapman Memorial Prize, another was a finalist in the 2013 Writers at Work Fellowship Competition, and another won the London Fringe Festival’s Short Fiction Award. Alumni have been awarded a Toshiba Studentship, a Hawthornden Fellowship, and funded residencies at the Banff Centre, Canada, and at the Expansionists Project, Whitstable.

Students and alumni have had their work shortlisted across the genres for, among others, the Asham Award, the Bridport Prize, the Bridport Prize for Flash Fiction, the Fish Flash Fiction prize, the Yeoville Literary Prize, the Oxonian poetry prize, the Fish Short Story Prize 2013, the Big Issue in the North’s New Writing Award, the Oxonian review, and the Aesthetica Creative Writing Competition. A 2010 graduate was short-listed for the Crime Writers’ Association Debut Dagger award 2011. Two alumni were longlisted for the Dylan Thomas Prize, and one was shortlisted. An alumnus’ debut novel also made the longlist for the Not the Booker Prize.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-creative-writing

Destinations

Many of our graduate students have signed with agents, and each year a number go on to undertake doctoral study in creative writing or English Literature. Our graduates have obtained positions in publishing, media and the creative arts industries, as well as teaching positions in tertiary education.

The MSt has enjoyed a very strong application field since its inception, attracting record interest in recent years from a global constituency of writers. The course`s emphasis on critical analysis as well as on writerly and creative excellence attracts students of commensurately strong academic potential as well as of significant creative promise. This combination of academic rigour and creativity is a central distinctive feature of the course. The resulting emphasis on exploration and the development of an individual writerly voice serve to attract particularly talented students from around the world as well as a strongly diverse group of UK students of varied backgrounds and ethnicity.

Continuing education and life-long learning in Oxford have been formally linked to the collegiate system of the University since 1990, when Kellogg College, the University’s 36th college, was established. Please consult http://www.kellogg.ox.ac.uk/.

Who should apply?

We are looking for writers with a proven record of commitment to their craft. You should be a keen reader, and bring an open-minded, questioning approach to both reading and writing. You will not necessarily have yet achieved publication, but you will have written regularly and read widely over a sustained period. You will be keen to dedicate time and energy and staying-power to harnessing your talent, enlarging your skills, and aiming your writerly production at consistently professional standards. It is likely you will have a first degree, or equivalent, although in some cases other evidence of suitability may be acceptable.

For applicants with a degree from the USA, the minimum GPA we normally seek is 3.6 out of 4.0. We do not seek a Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or GMAT score. Although a GRE or GMAT score is not a formal requirement, if one is available it should be supplied.

The high number of contact hours are concentrated into Residences and Retreats. Students should be at a stage in their writing where, with appropriate guidance, they can undertake agreed assignments, projects and essays between meetings. There is a dedicated Course Website for provision of up-to-date information; contact and exchange between students; and contact between students and tutors. The course, however, is not a ‘distance-learning’ course, and tutors, while being happy to help with questions or problems, do not offer regular weekly ‘office hours’.

The M.St is unlikely to be suitable for those who are just starting out on their writerly and critical development.

If you have any doubts about whether the M.St is right for your stage of development, please consult the website for information on our Undergraduate Diploma in Creative Writing https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/dipcw

What does the course cover?

The first year concentrates equally on prose (fiction and narrative non-fiction), poetry and drama. There is a significant critical reading and analysis component, which is linked to the writerly considerations explored in each of the three genres. Students are expected to engage fully with all three genres, in a spirit of exploration and with the aim of discovering what impact and relevance unaccustomed genres have for the development of their individual writerly voice. This necessarily involves undertaking assignments and exercises in areas that are new to students, and do not relate directly to any work they may have in progress. Students may be able to continue with their own longer term pieces-in-progress but the concentration of year 1 teaching is on producing new work, and the exercises and assignments, which should take priority, reflect this emphasis.

The second year offers specialisation in a single genre, again accompanied by a significant critical element focused around issues of interest to the individual student and related to the genre of choice.

Your specialisation choices are as follows:

- The novel
- Short fiction
- Radio drama
- TV drama
- Screenwriting
- Stage drama
- Poetry
- Narrative non-fiction

In year 2, the specialisation in the genre of students’ choice provides an opportunity for significant concentration on either new work, or, subject to consultation with supervisor, on existing work-in-progress.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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“One of the greatest pleasures of my working life continues to be the Manchester Writing School at Manchester Metropolitan University – a department with a real sense of family, achievement and celebration, and an ethos of nurturing and innovation.”. Read more
“One of the greatest pleasures of my working life continues to be the Manchester Writing School at Manchester Metropolitan University – a department with a real sense of family, achievement and celebration, and an ethos of nurturing and innovation.”
Carol Ann Duffy – Poet Laureate and Creative Director of the Manchester Writing School

At the heart of the Manchester Writing School are our Masters programmes in Creative Writing, available to study on campus in Manchester, and also from anywhere in the world via online distance learning.
On our Master of Arts (MA) Creative Writing programme, you will explore and practice techniques and styles of modern and contemporary writing and apply these through the development of your own creative work. MA students undertake a taught element blending writing workshops with reading units and an elective, and then complete their studies through submission of an extended piece of writing from a proposed full-length book. The MA is available to complete in one year full-time, or two years part-time/online.
You will specialise in one of the following routes:

◾Novel Writing (including Short Fiction)
◾Poetry Writing
◾Writing for Children & Young Adults
◾Place Writing

For more information about the Manchester Writing School, including profiles of staff and published students, and news items about events and projects, visit: mmu.ac.uk/writingschool.

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This programme enables you to engage in both creative and critical writing while focusing on the larger critical question of identity. Read more

This programme enables you to engage in both creative and critical writing while focusing on the larger critical question of identity. You'll be able to develop a theoretically informed understanding of the relationship between writing and the self while exploring a range of literary genres as a critical reader and as a practitioner. You will study a wide variety of genres, such as memoir and autobiography, lyric poetry, prose fiction, and drama.

You’ll develop your knowledge of research methods in critical and creative studies and choose from a range of options to explore genres that suit your own interests.

With the support of active researchers, publishers and writers you'll have access to wide-ranging research resources in our library as well as workshop opportunities to develop expertise in a range of different kinds of writing skills which will be valuable not just in the creative sphere, but in a variety of careers. You’ll learn in a stimulating environment with access to excellent resources for your research. The world-class Brotherton Library has extensive holdings to support both critical and creative writing. Our Special Collections are full of archive and manuscript material, including the extensive archives of contemporary poets, including Tony Harrison, Geoffrey Hill, and Simon Armitage. The University Library offers full training to help you make the most of them, equipping you with valuable skills in the process. The School of English also hosts readings and workshops by contemporary writers, including the [email protected] series of readings run by the Poetry Centre; and there are creative writers on its staff, including the Douglas Caster Poetry Fellow.

This degree is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

Two core modules in your first semester will develop your understanding of research methods in the study of English, build your research skills and provide an introduction to critical and creative writing practices. In the following semester, you’ll choose at least one of the optional modules related to critical and/or creative writing, with the option to choose one final module from the full range of English modules or from outside the School of English.

Throughout the programme, you’ll have the opportunity to explore the complex relationships between writing and identity through critical and theoretical reflection while also working as a writer within your chosen genres. You'll also have the opportunity of specializing in either critical or creative work in your research project, though you may continue to combine the two sides of the programme if you wish. If you choose to focus on the creative side, this will entail a critical reflection on your own work to accompany the portfolio.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll take fewer modules in each year and study over a longer period.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Studying English: Research Methods 30 credits
  • Research Project 60 credits
  • Writing Identities: Criticism, Creativity, Practice 30 credits

Optional modules

  • So Where do you come from? Selves, Families, Stories 30 credits
  • Poetry of Catastrophe: Reading Paul Celan 30 credits
  • Feeling Time 30 credits
  • The Magic of Mimesis 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Writing Identities: Critical and Creative Practices MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Writing Identities: Critical and Creative Practices MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You’ll generally have two-hour weekly seminars in each module where you discuss the themes and issues arising from your reading, and you’ll be able to enhance your learning by attending the wide range of research seminars and talks by visiting speakers that we arrange throughout the year. You’ll also have a series of foundational workshops in the first semester to develop your creative writing skills. Further workshops will feature depending on your option module choices in semester 2 and you will benefit from supervisions throughout semester 2 with an allocated dissertation supervisor.

Independent study is a vital part of the degree as it allows you to build your skills and explore your own ideas.

Assessment

Most of our modules are assessed by a single essay of around 4,000 words, which you submit at the end of the semester in which you studied the module. You may also be expected to submit unassessed essays to gain feedback on your work, or give presentations in your seminars. The research project/dissertation is 12,000-15,000 words in length.

Career opportunities

This programme will equip you with advanced transferable skills which are valuable in a wide range of careers.

You’ll be a confident researcher who can work independently as well as within a team. You’ll be a strong communicator, both verbally and in writing, and be able to think critically and analytically. In addition, you’ll have a strong level of cultural and critical awareness, and you’ll be able to look at a situation from different points of view.

All of these qualities are attractive to employers across sectors, and you’ll be well equipped to pursue a career in a wide range of fields depending on your interests. These could include teaching, journalism, publishing, advertising, broadcasting and law. Many of our graduates also progress to PhD-level study and you’ll be in a good position to develop a career in academia.

Careers support

Leeds for Life is our unique approach to helping you make the most of University by supporting your academic and personal development. Find out more at the Leeds for Life website.

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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This cutting-edge programme is unique to Buckingham. A course with wide appeal, it is aimed at anyone who has an interest in biography or in researching and writing biography for themselves. Read more

Course outline

This cutting-edge programme is unique to Buckingham. A course with wide appeal, it is aimed at anyone who has an interest in biography or in researching and writing biography for themselves. The varied mix of backgrounds and interests that students bring to the course, the experience and commitment of the programme director and the friendly small-group setting allow a lively, enjoyable and intellectually rigorous exchange of ideas. Graduates have gone on to publish their own books, and to win prizes. Some have embarked on further research for the MPhil or the DPhil in Biography.

When it was founded in 1996, the Biography MA was the first of its kind. Since then Life Writing has become part of the postgraduate menu, but the Buckingham course has kept its distinctive edge. Unlike most Life Writing degrees, it is not linked to Creative Writing, and there is a strong emphasis on research and historical biography. The programme is consistently rated ‘excellent’ by external examiners and inspectors.

Find out more about our School of Humanities on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities.

Location

Teaching takes place at the University’s London premises:
51 Gower Street
Bloomsbury
London
WC1E 6HJ

Timetable

The course offers entry points in September and January and runs for a calendar year if taken full-time. Teaching takes place on one day a week over three terms running from September to December, January to March and April to June; the term from July to September is devoted to independent research. The programme may be followed part-time over 2 years. In the first year part-time students follow the taught courses and the second year is normally devoted to the dissertation. A detailed programme is shown here. Suitably qualified students with a major research topic in mind may be accepted for the higher degrees of MPhil (two years full-time/four years part-time) or DPhil (three years full-time/six years part-time).

Course structure

Students have a choice between following the taught MA, or opting for the MA by Research. The taught MA gives an opportunity to produce written term papers on a variety of topics as well as a dissertation of up to 20,000 words. Students accepted for the MA by Research are required to produce written work which includes an extended dissertation of up to 40,000 words. All students produce coursework for the Research Methods module: an annotated bibliography and a short biography, with supporting material, produced according to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography format.

Research support

One of the distinctive features of the programme is the value attached to the supervision which is provided for students working on dissertations. One-on-one supervisions are held every two or three weeks during term. While the dissertation must be the candidate’s independent work, it is the supervisor who offers advice on refining the topic (if necessary), on primary sources, on secondary reading, on research techniques and on writing the dissertation. Regular group discussions between research students at all degree levels (MA, MPhil and DPhil) allow the exchange of research experiences and mutual support.

Programme director

Professor Jane Ridley founded the Buckingham Biography MA in 1996. She is an Oxford-trained historian and biographer, and her publications include The Young Disraeli (1995); The Architect and his Wife: A Life of Edwin Lutyens (2002), which won the Duff Cooper Prize; and Bertie: A Life of Edward VII (2012), for which she was awarded a research fellowship by the Leverhulme Trust. She has contributed widely to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, and she is a regular reviewer for publications such as the Spectator, the Literary Review and the Times Literary Supplement.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/ma/biography.

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The Keele MA in Creative Writing offers a distinctive and exciting opportunity to develop your creative and professional skills as a writer. Read more

Overview

The Keele MA in Creative Writing offers a distinctive and exciting opportunity to develop your creative and professional skills as a writer.

Working with published writers from within and outside the University, the Keele Writing MA offers participants an opportunity to improve their writing and to bring it up to publishable standard while learning more about the critical and intellectual context in which their work is situated.

Students on the Keele Writing MA also participate directly in the development and maintenance of the events, publications, workshops and short courses which constitute Keele’s vibrant writing culture – typically through opting to gain experience in one of the areas in which writers often establish a secondary income – reviewing, editing and teaching.

You can study full-time or part-time for this MA. It is also possible to take short courses in Creative Writing, delivered as part of our MA programme, as well as Certificate and Diploma-level courses in the subject.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/creativewriting/

Course Aims

- To provide opportunities for the practice and study of creative writing at an advanced, publishable level

- To provide a supportive and constructively critical environment in which students can work with published writers and their peers to improve their writing

- To provide students with the necessary skills to write at an advanced, publishable level

Course Content

The course is delivered as three stand-alone taught modules. In addition students complete a Portfolio of original work. Students will have the opportunity to take any single module as a short course or to combine two modules and be awarded a Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) or to complete four modules and receive a Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits).

The contents of each module are summarised below.

The Writer as Critic, The Critic as Writer (30 Credits) is the core compulsory module, and looks at questions of influence, the critical process of reading other writers’ work and the cultural context in which a writer lives and works. Students will study contemporary examples of script, poetry and fiction.

Writing Fiction (30 Credits) is a workshop-based module option on writing short fiction and novels, with structured reading and peer/tutor feedback on your own writing.

Writing Poetry (30 Credits) is a workshop-based module option on writing poetry, with structured reading, discussion and peer/tutor feedback on your own writing.

Life Writing (30 Credits) is a workshop-based module option on forms of writing such as auto/biography and memoir.

The Writer in the Community (30 Credits) is a project-based module which offers students the opportunity to create and deliver a professional project of a type commonly undertaken by writers. Possible projects include: designing and delivering creative writing workshops; mentoring less experienced writers; steering a literary editing project; setting up and putting on a literary event; or creating a web-based literary resource.

The Portfolio (90 Credits) is the compulsory Dissertation-level module, taught through a series of individual supervisions. Students develop a portfolio of original writing to a professional standard through the production of either a complete piece of written work or a substantial part of a complete piece of written work, e.g: a collection of poetry; a collection of short stories; a short novel; or a substantial part of a longer novel.

Teaching & Assessment

The core 30-credit module (The Writer As Critic, The Critic As Writer) is assessed by written assignments and a presentation. The optional 30-credit modules (Writing Prose, Writing Poetry, Life Writing, The Writer in the Community) are assessed by a portfolio of work and a critical commentary that reflects on the contents of the portfolio. The 90-Credit dissertation-level Portfolio is assessed by a substantial portfolio of original writing and a commentary.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Master's degree programmes in Creative Writing have been offered here since 1997 and have attracted students from a range of backgrounds and experiences – from recent graduates to mature students with a wealth of life experience. Read more
Master's degree programmes in Creative Writing have been offered here since 1997 and have attracted students from a range of backgrounds and experiences – from recent graduates to mature students with a wealth of life experience. This programme is designed for committed writers who wish to complete significant pieces of work and generally broaden their experience as writers.

Course Overview

The MA in Creative and Scriptwriting provides the opportunity to specialise in creative writing for film, TV or theatre. The overall aim of the programme is to equip students with the ability to hone their screen, dramatic or other writing skills, with a particular understanding of commercial contexts and to develop areas of creativity at an advanced level. In all cases the emphasis is on developing the individual student's creative expression. There is no attempt to impose a house style.

The programme provides the opportunity to work with internationally recognised dramatists and screen writers as well as with writers with expertise in other genres of creative writing. The dissertation element of the programme will enable you to develop a full script, reflecting both creative and commercial imperatives, building upon exercises in dramatic writing developed through the screenwriting and workshop modules.

The MA has responded to the explosion of online publishing by supporting students in publication and promotion. The course is delivered by a mixture of professional writers and academics who prepare you for the realities of a hugely competitive market. You will learn how to prepare manuscripts, to approach publishers, and, increasingly important, to market yourself.

The School and the University support a number of reading and social events in which students are encouraged to participate. We also support the student-led design, production, publication and promotion of the well-received online journal The Lampeter Review. As a result of this activity several former students now work in publishing and we are proud of our excellent track record of student publishing success.

Modules

-Approaches to Creative Writing
-Writing Workshop: Research and Writing
-Writing Workshop: Writing and Context
-Writers World
-Screenwriting
-Creative Project (Dissertation)

Key Features

-The programmes are delivered on the University’s campus in Lampeter. They are taught through seminars, small workshops and individual tutorials and supervision that enable detailed and personalised feedback.
-Access to a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) enables additional learning, especially work-shopping, to take place outside the sessions and supports the development of a mutually supportive cohort of committed writers. Graduates from the programmes have gone on to become successful and prize-winning authors.
-The MA programmes also offer students the opportunity to write and discuss their work through the medium of Welsh should they wish to do so.
-The programme is based upon an established pool of expertise in related concerns, and covers a range of projects undertaken over a number of years.
-Staff are active publishers and practitioners in their own right

Assessment

There are no examinations. All modules are assessed by original creative assignments supported by reflective and developmental material: logs, journals, treatments, reviews proposals. The Creative Project provides the opportunity for students to develop a substantial piece of work to publishable standard.

Career Opportunities

-Professional Writers
-Editors
-Publishers
-Marketing
-Expert tuition from professional writers, poets, novelists, dramatists, script-writers
-An opportunity to learn about publishing through the design and production of the digital journal, The Lampeter Review
-An opportunity to read your work at such events as the Hay Festival
-Programme delivered on our beautiful and inspiring campus in Lampeter

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Master's degree programmes in Creative Writing have been offered here since 1997 and have attracted students from a range of backgrounds and experiences – from recent graduates to mature students with a wealth of life experience. Read more
Master's degree programmes in Creative Writing have been offered here since 1997 and have attracted students from a range of backgrounds and experiences – from recent graduates to mature students with a wealth of life experience. This programme is designed for committed writers who wish to complete significant pieces of work and generally broaden their experience as writers.

Course Overview

The MA in Creative Writing is designed for committed writers who wish to expand their range and complete significant pieces of publishable work.

The overall aim of the programme is to equip students with the ability to hone their writing skills and to develop areas of creativity at an advanced level, while the practical benefits offered by the module will enable students to pursue careers as professional writers, editors and publishers A focus on the ability to communicate clearly through precise language prepares students for a range of careers, from writing-based advertising or journalism, to related professions such as publicity or arts administration.

Throughout the programme you will have the opportunity to develop your writing across a range of fields, expanding your repertoire by trying unfamiliar modes and genres.

The MA has responded to the explosion of online publishing by supporting students in publication and promotion. The course is delivered by a mixture of professional writers and academics who prepare you for the realities of a hugely competitive market. You will learn how to prepare manuscripts, to approach publishers, and, increasingly important, to market yourself.

The School and the University support a number of reading and social events in which students are encouraged to participate. We also support the student-led design, production, publication and promotion of the well-received online journal The Lampeter Review. As a result of this activity several former students now work in publishing and we are proud of our excellent track record of student publishing success.

Modules

-Approaches to Creative Writing
-Writing Workshop: Research and Writing
-Writing Workshop: Writing and Context
-Writers' World
-Screenwriting
-Creative Project (Dissertation)

Key Features

-The programmes are delivered on the University’s campus in Lampeter. They are taught through seminars, small workshops and individual tutorials and supervision that enable detailed and personalised feedback.
-Access to a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) enables additional learning, especially workshopping, to take place outside the sessions and supports the development of a mutually supportive cohort of committed writers. Graduates from the programmes have gone on to become successful and prize-winning authors.
-The MA programmes also offer students the opportunity to write and discuss their work through the medium of Welsh should they wish to do so.
-The programme is based upon an established pool of expertise in related concerns, and covers a range of projects undertaken over a number of years.
-Staff are active publishers and practitioners in their own right.

Assessment

There are no examinations. All modules are assessed by original creative assignments supported by reflective and developmental material: logs, journals, treatments, reviews proposals. The Creative Project provides the opportunity for students to develop a substantial piece of work to publishable standard.

Career Opportunities

-Professional Writers
-Editors
-Publishers
-Marketing
-Expert tuition from professional writers, poets, novelists, dramatists, script-writers
-An opportunity to learn about publishing through the design and production of the digital journal, The Lampeter Review
-An opportunity to read your work at such events as the Hay Festival
-Programme delivered on our beautiful and inspiring campus in Lampeter

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Have you ever dreamed about becoming a writer in any capacity? If the answer is yes you have a great opportunity to consolidate and expand your creative writing style at University of Aberdeen. Read more

Your programme of study

Have you ever dreamed about becoming a writer in any capacity? If the answer is yes you have a great opportunity to consolidate and expand your creative writing style at University of Aberdeen. You are guided by professional writers. The world of writing is changing rapidly to allow you to self publish electronically online where you may be picked up by an agent, you can write freelance for any number of magazines, newspapers online and offline or you may decide to write and publish on the internet to improve your own marketing within your chosen area of creativity. You need to get your work visible and there are now many ways to do this.

The MLitt in Creative Writing is a taught postgraduate programme designed to offer you the opportunity to develop your creativity and literary skills in a highly supportive, constructive learning environment. You prepare for the processes and challenges involved in publishing creative written work, whether poetry or prose. There are plenty of courses to find your inspiration in which included narrative, prose, the role of literature, Irish and Scottish Women's fiction, study of language, Walter Scott, Visual Culture and more.

Courses listed for the programme

First Semester
Creative Writing: Poetry
Creative Writing: Fiction

Optional
Approaching Literature
Critical Approaches to Literature
Special Study in Language and Literature
Novel Ideas: Reading Prose Fiction
Introduction to Visual Culture

Second Semester
Creative Writing: Prose Fiction
Creative Writing: Narrative, Medicine, Psychology

Optional
Locations and Dislocations: the Role of the Place in Literature
Contemporary Irish and Scottish Women's Fiction
Irish and Scottish Science Fiction
Special Study in Language and Literature
Scott in Context: Walter Scott and His World
Critical Analysis of Visual Culture

Third Semester
Creative Writing Portfolio (dissertation)

Qualification MLitt

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page
https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/degree-programmes/39/creative-writing/

Why study at Aberdeen?

• At Aberdeen you get to explore you writing potential at any age with no prior experience necessary
• You can study to Diploma or MLitt level or go on to PhD level
• There are a wide variety of careers from which you can earn a living whilst pursuing your dream book which include: publishing,
journalism, advertising, broadcasting and agency plus teaching.

Where you study

• University of Aberdeen
• Full Time or Part Time
• September or January
• 12 Months or 24 Months

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees:
https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/tuition-fees-and-living-costs-287.php

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page
https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/finance-funding-1599.php
https://www.abdn.ac.uk/funding/

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:
• Your Accommodation
• Campus Facilities
• Aberdeen City
• Student Support
• Clubs and Societies

Find out more about living in Aberdeen:
https://abdn.ac.uk/study/student-life

Living costs
https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/finance.php

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The only Creative Writing MA in the UK which is dedicated solely to the novel and ensures you finish yours. We take students of any age and from anywhere in the world. Read more
The only Creative Writing MA in the UK which is dedicated solely to the novel and ensures you finish yours.

Who is it for?

We take students of any age and from anywhere in the world. All you need is a desire to write exciting words and spend two years working on a novel.

All our group teaching is conducted in the evening – so if you have a job or a family, you can still take this course. We actively seek to attract people who, with other life commitments, are still committed above all to writing great fiction.

David Young, Crime Thriller MA - "The chance to have a novel-length manuscript read and challenged by leading published crime writers is what attracted me to the MA course. The focus is on writing your own novel and giving you the tools to do that, rather than getting bogged down in literary criticism. I'd thoroughly recommend it."

Objectives

At the end of the Novels MA course, you will be very different; you will have written a novel.

This course is designed to provide a supportive and thought-provoking, yet challenging, environment for novelists to develop their skills, experiment with approaches to writing, learn about the industry and, most importantly, complete a polished novel ready to send to publishers and agents.

This MA allows you to focus on one of two areas: Literary Novels or Crime Thriller Novels. As a focused, high-intensity course, we only have a maximum cohort of 14 students each year for each genre, therefore you must apply and be awarded a place for Literary Novels or Crime Novels at the outset.

At the core of the Novels course is the experience of established writers. Everyone who teaches on this MA course is a working, published novelist. Their experience underpins all the teaching.

Teaching and learning

Workshops, seminars and lectures are 6pm to 9pm every Tuesday and Wednesday of the first two terms. Thereafter tutorials are fixed at mutually convenient times – we are happy to work around other life commitments.

Everyone who teaches on this course is a published and working novelist – we strongly believe that only published writers understand everything it takes to write a novel. The core of the teaching comes in one-to-one tutorials which are used to discuss a minimum of 10,000 words of your novel in progress. Thus, across the two-year programme we read and discuss more than 200,000 words of creative writing by each student.

In the first two terms, we aim to provide you with your toolbox for when you start the novel. This covers every way in which you might approach constructing and writing and polishing your novel: we look at the word, the sentence, the paragraph, the chapter and the entire plotting and structuring of a full-length novel. During these terms, we encourage you to experiment with your writing, to find skills and aptitudes you didn’t know you possessed. We also examine published novels, taking them apart like clockmakers, to see how the constituent parts make them tick. That said, there is no literary criticism on this course – we are not theorists, we are a craft-based course, teaching you the techniques and devices (and pitfalls) required when writing your first novel.

In addition to the tutors and lecturers, there are Q and A sessions with visiting guest authors in each term.

Modules

For this course you are required to write 2,000 words a week for 100 weeks. 2,000 in order to generate 1,000 polished, edited words. During the first two terms, the exercises require 1,000 words each week. For the remaining 80 weeks of the course, you need to write a novel and the average length is 80,000 words. This is a serious course for serious writers who want to work hard and write better.

In addition, during the first two terms there are two other modules requiring an analysis and an outline.

Term 1
-Fundamentals of fiction
-Storytelling (Part 1)
-Reading as a Writer

Term 2
-Experiments in style
-Storytelling (Part 2)

Term 3-6
-Complete your novel

Career prospects

The focus is for you to finish a novel and use City’s unparalleled industry links to help start our literary career as a published novelist.

At the end of this course, you will have the manuscript of your novel and we will do everything we can to assist you to find an agent to represent you who will then work to find a publisher for it.

Our recently published alumni include:
-Rod Reynolds
-Hannah Kohler
-Jem Lester
-David Young

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