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Masters Degrees (Library Science)

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With our Library Science MA/MSc you can develop the skills and understanding to initiate, work with and develop modern collection based information services. Read more
With our Library Science MA/MSc you can develop the skills and understanding to initiate, work with and develop modern collection based information services.

Who is it for?

This programme is for students with a first degree or equivalent in any discipline, who have an interest in information communication, and who would like to start or develop a career in information management in libraries, galleries, archives or museums. It is also suitable for professionals wishing to update their knowledge and skills within the discipline.

Library Science is a broad discipline, and it appeals to students prepared to challenge inequalities in information access and use, who enjoy communicating and sharing information, and who like working with information technologies.

Objectives

Humanity has now entered the age of the zettabyte (1000 exabytes), with enough information being generated daily to fill US libraries several times over [Floridi L, 2014. The 4th Revolution. Oxford. p 38]. The demand for knowledge organisation, access, and understanding has never been greater.

City’s MA/MSc Library Science examines contemporary questions of information communication from a framework of information history and philosophy. Our focus is divided equally between theory and its application to practice. The course spans the fundamental concepts of documentation, collection management, information organisation, access, information literacy, use of new and emergent technologies, methods of investigation and analysis, socio-political implications and policy formulation.

The course equips you with a deep understanding of collection-orientated institutions and services, and their relevance and impact within society. There is a strong focus on ethics, professional communication and networking. You will benefit from a high level of engagement with practitioners, and we are pleased to welcome many leaders in the profession as speakers on our modules.

Academic facilities

City has recently undergone a significant level of refurbishment, so that course participants can enjoy state of the art classrooms and facilities.

We work in close connection with our colleagues at City Library, who offer excellent support and advice to our students, in addition to contributing to our courses. Follow @cityunilibrary and @cityunilibresearchers on Twitter. You will have access to our state-of-the-art mentoring service.

Placements

Internships are not a part of this course, but students who wish to are usually able to obtain work experience (paid or voluntary), or to work with external organisations in completing assignments or carrying out a dissertation project. Details of opportunities are posted on our Moodle forum.

Teaching and learning

The teaching and learning methods we use mean that your specialist knowledge and autonomy develop as you progress through the course.

Taught modules are normally delivered through a series of 30 hours of lectures.

Lectures are normally used to:
-Present and exemplify the concepts underpinning a particular subject.
-Highlight the most significant aspects of the syllabus.
-Indicate additional topics and resources for private study.

In addition to lectures and tutorial support, you also have access to a personal tutor. This is an academic member of staff from whom you can gain learning support throughout your degree. In addition, City’s online learning environment Moodle contains resources for each of the modules including lecture notes, further reading, web-based media resources and an interactive discussion forum.

We expect you to study independently and complete coursework for each module. This should amount to approximately 120 hours per module if you are studying full time. Each module is assessed through coursework, where you will need to answer a variety of assignments to show that you are able to apply your theoretical learning to practical situations.

Communication and networking via social media is an integral part of our Library Science masters course, and in preparation for professional practice, you are expected to engage with blogs, Twitter and other relevant communication media as part of your studies. Face-to-face participation in student and new professional forums including research seminars, workshops and conferences is actively promoted. You are encouraged to present your work (assignments, dissertation) to the wider LIS community for discussion and development.

The course culminates with an individual project. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently. The individual project (dissertation) allows you to demonstrate your ability to think and work independently, to be aware of and to comprehend current issues within the discipline and practice, to initiate ways of investigating and solving current problems or questions, and to deliver results and solutions on time.

The individual project is a substantial task. It is your opportunity to develop a research-related topic under the supervision of an academic member of staff. This is the moment when you can apply what you have learnt to solve a real-world problem or to develop further, contemporary conceptual theory in library science.

Modules

The MA/MSc in Library Science is offered as a one year full-time course, or two year part-time course. On successful completion of the course, you can choose between the award of MA or of MSc. This is usually based on the arts or science content of the work undertaken for the degree, and/or your career aspirations. The course structure and modules are the same for either award. The difference occurs in the focus of the assignments and the dissertation.

You can expect to study for approximately 40 hours per week full-time, and 20 hours per week part-time. The actual time required will vary according to the individual, and with existing experience and prior study.

The course comprises seven core modules and one elective module. These taught modules run during the first and second terms, whilst the third, summer term is reserved for the dissertation. Each of the modules counts for 15 credits, and requires approximately 150 hours work, of which 30 hours are face-to-face instruction (this may be lectures, seminars, group work, discussion or practical work), and 120 hours are self-directed study.

On successful completion of eight taught modules, students can progress to the dissertation. The dissertation is worth 60 credits, and takes around 400 hours. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently.

The goal of library and information science is to enable access to, use of, and consequent understanding of information. To do this, the discipline is concerned with the processes of the information communication chain: the creation, dissemination, management, organisation, preservation, analysis and use of information, instantiated as documents.

Core modules
-Library and Information Science Foundation (15 credits)
-Digital Information Technologies and Architecture (15 credits)
-Information Organisation (15 credits)
-Digital Libraries (15 credits)
-Information Management and Policy (15 credits)
-Research Methods and Communication (15 credits)
-Libraries and Publishing in the Information Society (15 credits)

Elective modules - you can choose one module from the following.
-Information Resources and Documentation (15 credits)
-Information law and policy (15 credits)
-Independent study (15 credits)
-Web applications development (15 credits)

Career prospects

Library Science MSc/MA graduates have an excellent record of finding suitable jobs and going on to successful careers, most commonly in public, academic and school libraries, consultancies, special libraries and information services and publishing. The Library Science postgraduate course is also an excellent preparation for further study and research.

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Are you looking for a distance learning course that gives you the flexibility to combine your existing job, or other commitments, with a Masters-level qualification in the field of library management? This course combines core modules in information science with specialised modules in Information and Digital Literacy as well as Library Management, Leadership and Outreach. Read more
Are you looking for a distance learning course that gives you the flexibility to combine your existing job, or other commitments, with a Masters-level qualification in the field of library management? This course combines core modules in information science with specialised modules in Information and Digital Literacy as well as Library Management, Leadership and Outreach.

This course is designed equally for those who are already information professionals in libraries and those who are looking to break into the sector for the first time. To suit those who have existing work commitments, the course is taught via a flexible distance learning mode and it has a slightly extended duration of 16 months. If you would prefer to study full-time on campus, please see MSc Information Science.

All of Northumbria’s information science postgraduate courses are accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals. This accreditation makes our courses stand out and enhances their credibility and currency among employers, and is also crucial for progressing to Chartership status once qualified.

Accreditation

Accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) to assure students that programmes provide an excellent preparation for professional practice.

Learn From The Best

Our teaching staff include cutting-edge researchers whose specialisms overlap with the content of this course, helping ensure that teaching is right up-to-date. Specialisms include big data, data mining, decision-making, digital literacy, information behaviour, information retrieval systems, recommender systems, and the link between information science and cognitive psychology.

Our eminent academics have written books that regularly appear on reading lists for information science courses at universities all over the world. They also work as external examiners and reviewers of courses at other UK and non-UK universities.

Our course is delivered through the Northumbria iSchool, which is one of only six iSchools in the UK. A hallmark of an iSchool is an understanding that expertise in all forms of information is required for progress in science, business, education and culture. This expertise must cover the uses and users of information, the nature of information itself, as well as information technologies and their applications.

Information Science at Northumbria was established over 70 years ago and has developed in close collaboration with the profession. That dynamic working relationship has allowed us to not only reflect professional requirements, but also to be instrumental in understanding and shaping those requirements.

Teaching And Assessment

Our teaching is linked to what you want to learn and also to what you need to learn in order to achieve greater success in information science. Our long established relationship with employers ensures that you receive the most relevant and up-to-date knowledge to bring innovation, relevance, ethical sensitivity and currency to all you do. There is an emphasis on learning by doing; coursework will include projects, portfolios of work, reports and presentations as well as essays. All this helps you to make sense of the subject, getting a clear understanding of important concepts and theories.

While some assessments contribute to your final grade, there are other assessments that are provided purely to guide your progress and reinforce your learning. You can expect both your tutors and your peers to provide useful comments and feedback throughout the course.

Module Overview
Year One
KC7020 - Information Organisation and Access (Core, 20 Credits)
KC7022 - Information Systems and Technologies (Core, 20 Credits)
KC7023 - Research Methods and Professional Practice (Core, 20 Credits)
KC7025 - The library professional: management, leadership and outreach (Core, 20 Credits)

Year Two
KC7024 - User Behaviour and Interaction Design (Core, 20 Credits)
KC7026 - Masters Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)
KC7027 - Information and digital literacy (Core, 20 Credits)

Learning Environment

Northumbria uses a range of technologies to enhance your learning, with tools including web-based self-guided exercises, online tests with feedback, videos and tutorials. These tools support and extend the material that is delivered during lectures, and are available anywhere anytime. Group work and peer interaction feature prominently in our learning and teaching, this reflects the practices you’re likely to encounter within the working environment.

You will have 24/7 term-time access to Northumbria’s library, which has over half a million print books as well as half a million electronic books available online. Our library was ranked #2 in the Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey for 2015 and, since 2010, it has been accredited by the UK Government for Customer Service Excellence.

The University has advanced search software and database tools, including NORA Power Search that allows you to use a single search box to get fast results from across a wide and reliable range of academic resources. The use of such software and tools is an important aspect of our information science courses.

Research-Rich Learning

In fast-moving fields like information science it’s particularly important for teaching to take account of the latest research. Northumbria is helping to push out the frontier of knowledge in a range of areas including:
-Digital consumers, behaviours and literacy
-Digital socio-technical design
-Digital libraries, archives and records

As a student, you will be heavily engaged in analysing recent insights from the field of information science. You will undertake a major individual study that will require you to evaluate relevant literature as well as to develop your ideas within the context of existing research. Your study will be tailored to your particular interests but the underlying theme will be the relationships between information, people and technology. Many of our students publish their own research and present at professional and academic conferences, before or soon after graduating.

Give Your Career An Edge

This course is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals as well as the Archives and Records Association. This reflects the relevance of the curriculum, which is informed by contact with the employers and close professional links. The accreditation vital if you want to move on to Chartership status once qualified.

The topics and activities in the course have a strong emphasis on employability. For example you will develop practical skills in leadership and strategy within the context of library management. You will also learn how to evaluate and use a range of appropriate technologies for solving problems and delivering seamless services in libraries. Your knowledge and practical skills will help you take a lead on research-informed approaches that will give your employers a valuable advantage.

Your Future

Libraries are being transformed due to the spreading of digital literacy and the changing needs and expectations of users. More than ever before, the delivery of high-quality services relies on library and information professionals who have a strong grasp of the principles and practices of modern library management.

On graduation, you will be well placed to play a role in this new world of libraries. Employers are looking for information professionals who can develop fresh insights through mastery of their subject and critical scholarship. With your Masters qualification, you will be equipped to make a difference, advance your practice and make well-balanced judgements. You could work for a wide range of employers in the public, private and third sector, or you could progress in a career that you have already started. Your Masters qualification can also form the basis for further postgraduate studies at a higher level.

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Are you looking for a Masters-level qualification that will open doors to jobs and promotions in the field of information science? This course combines core modules in information science with options that range across the sub-disciplines of data analytics, library management and records management. Read more
Are you looking for a Masters-level qualification that will open doors to jobs and promotions in the field of information science? This course combines core modules in information science with options that range across the sub-disciplines of data analytics, library management and records management.

The core modules cover topics such as human information behaviour, interactive information retrieval, user-centred design and persuasive technologies. You will solve problems from a number of perspectives: as a developer of rigorous technical solutions, as a manager who wants to achieve a profitable and sustainable advantage, and as an ethical and socially aware information professional who understands the role of information within the wider social context.

For your optional modules, you have the flexibility to pick and choose from different sub-disciplines of information science. If you are sure that you want to focus on just one sub-discipline, we offer a suite of more focused courses: MSc Information Science (Data Analytics), MSc Information Science (Library Management), and MSc Information Science (Records Management).

This course can also be completed through distance learning - for more information, please view this web-page: https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/information-science-msc-dl-dtdinz6/

Accreditation

All of Northumbria’s information science postgraduate courses are accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals, with our Records Management pathway also accredited by the Archives and Records Association. These accreditations make our courses stand out and enhance their credibility and currency among employers, and are also crucial for progressing to Chartership status once qualified.

CILIP assessors particularly commended the way in which the programme had been developed to take account of the changing requirements of employers and feedback from students. The resulting course was particularly strong in the digital elements of information work, and in developing students’ transferable skills.

Learn From The Best

Our teaching staff include cutting-edge researchers whose specialisms overlap with the content of this course, helping ensure that teaching is right up-to-date. Specialisms include big data, data mining, decision-making, digital literacy, information behaviour, information retrieval systems, recommender systems, and the link between information science and cognitive psychology.

Our eminent academics have written books that regularly appear on reading lists for information science courses at universities all over the world. They also work as external examiners and reviewers of courses at other UK and non-UK universities.

Our course is delivered through the Northumbria iSchool, which is one of only six iSchools in the UK. A hallmark of an iSchool is an understanding that expertise in all forms of information is required for progress in science, business, education and culture. This expertise must cover the uses and users of information, the nature of information itself, as well as information technologies and their applications.

Our course is delivered through the Northumbria iSchool, which is one of only six iSchools in the UK. A hallmark of an iSchool is an understanding that expertise in all forms of information is required for progress in science, business, education and culture. This expertise must cover the uses and users of information, the nature of information itself, as well as information technologies and their applications.

Teaching And Assessment

Our teaching is linked to what you want to learn and also to what you need to learn in order to achieve greater success in information science. Our long established relationship with employers ensures that you receive the most relevant and up-to-date knowledge to bring innovation, relevance, ethical sensitivity and currency to all you do. There is an emphasis on learning by doing; coursework will include projects, portfolios of work, reports and presentations as well as essays. All this helps you to make sense of the subject, getting a clear understanding of important concepts and theories.

While some assessments contribute to your final grade, there are other assessments that are provided purely to guide your progress and reinforce your learning. You can expect both your tutors and your peers to provide useful comments and feedback throughout the course.

Module Overview
KC7013 - Database Modelling (Optional, 20 Credits)
KC7020 - Information Organisation and Access (Core, 20 Credits)
KC7021 - Statistics and Business Intelligence (Optional, 20 Credits)
KC7022 - Information Systems and Technologies (Core, 20 Credits)
KC7023 - Research Methods and Professional Practice (Core, 20 Credits)
KC7024 - User Behaviour and Interaction Design (Core, 20 Credits)
KC7025 - The library professional: management, leadership and outreach (Optional, 20 Credits)
KC7026 - Masters Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)
KC7027 - Information and digital literacy (Optional, 20 Credits)
KC7038 - Recordkeeping Practice: Processes, systems and tools (Optional, 20 Credits)
KC7039 - Recordkeeping Principles: Theory and Concepts (Optional, 20 Credits)

Learning Environment

Northumbria uses a range of technologies to enhance your learning, with tools including web-based self-guided exercises, online tests with feedback, videos and tutorials. These tools support and extend the material that is delivered during lectures, and are available anywhere anytime. Group work and peer interaction feature prominently in our learning and teaching, this reflects the practices you’re likely to encounter within the working environment.

You will have 24/7 term-time access to Northumbria’s library, which has over half a million print books as well as half a million electronic books available online. Our library was ranked #2 in the Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey for 2015 and, since 2010, it has been accredited by the UK Government for Customer Service Excellence.

The University has advanced search software and database tools, including NORA Power Search that allows you to use a single search box to get fast results from across a wide and reliable range of academic resources. The use of such software and tools is an important aspect of our information science courses.

Research-Rich Learning

In fast-moving fields like information science it’s particularly important for teaching to take account of the latest research. Northumbria is helping to push out the frontier of knowledge in a range of areas including:
-Digital consumers, behaviours and literacy
-Digital socio-technical design
-Digital libraries, archives and records

As a student, you will be heavily engaged in analysing recent insights from the field of information science. You will undertake a major individual study that will require you to evaluate relevant literature as well as to develop your ideas within the context of existing research. Your study will be tailored to your particular interests but the underlying theme will be the relationships between information, people and technology. Many of our students publish their own research and present at professional and academic conferences, before or soon after graduating.

Give Your Career An Edge

This course is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals. This reflects the relevance of the curriculum, which is informed by contact with employers and close professional links. The following features of the programme were particularly commended by CILIP assessors:
-The way in which the programme had been developed to take account of the changing requirements of employers and feedback from students. The resulting course was particularly strong in the digital elements of information work, and in developing students’ transferable skills;
-The strong relationships with local employers and the active contribution which the department makes to the regional professional network;
-The areas of good practice reflected in the programme, such as the high level of support provided to distance learners, including dedicated library provision, and the use of innovative approaches to assessment.

The topics and activities in the course have a strong emphasis on employability. For example you will develop skills in how to analyse, monitor and evaluate user behaviour. You will also learn how to evaluate and use a range of appropriate technologies for solving problems and supporting decision-making in organisations. Your knowledge and practical skills will help you take a lead on research-informed approaches that give organisations and professionals a valuable advantage.

Your Future

Information science has an exciting future as massive increases in processing power transform the accessibility and utility of data. With an MSc Information Science, you can play a full and rewarding role in that future.

Employers are looking for information professionals who can develop new insights through mastery of their subject and critical scholarship. With your Masters qualification, you will be equipped to make a difference, advance your practice and make well-balanced judgements. You could work for a wide range of employers in the public, private and third sector, who need information scientists or you could consider freelance roles as a consultant. Your Masters qualification can also form the basis for further postgraduate studies at a higher level.

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This programme gives you the opportunity to study the main contexts of contemporary science and technology; gain a broad base in science policy, communication, sociology and engagement; enjoy flexibility in specialisation; and work in an interdisciplinary environment with research experts. Read more
This programme gives you the opportunity to study the main contexts of contemporary science and technology; gain a broad base in science policy, communication, sociology and engagement; enjoy flexibility in specialisation; and work in an interdisciplinary environment with research experts.

Degree information

The programme provides broad-based training in three disciplines: science policy and governance; science communication, engagement, and evaluation; and sociology of modern science and technology. This programme encourages specialised investigation. It also encourages interdisciplinary integration. Our degree works in dialogue with our sister MSc programme in History and Philosophy of Science, which adds historical and analytical depth to our offer.

MSc students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (15 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), three ancillary modules (45 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits) Postgraduate Diploma students undertake modules to the value of 120 credits: one core (15 credits), four optional (60 credits), and three ancillary (45 credits), studied over one year. Postgraduate Certificate students undertake modules to the value of 60 credits. The programme consists of one core module (15 credits), and three optional modules (45 credits), studied over one year.

Core module
-Introduction to Science and Technology Studies

Optional modules - students must take three modules from a prescribed list of options including:
-Practical Science Communication and Engagement
-Curating the History of Science
-Responsible Science and Emerging Technologies
-Science in the 20th Century and Beyond
-Science Policy Beyond Borders
-Science, Media, and Culture
-Science, Security, and Social Research
-Sociology and the Sociology of Science
-Special Topics Seminar in STS
-Ancillary Modules

Students must take two ancillary modules which may be options from our own degrees, for example, Material Culture and Science in the 18th Century OR, Knowledge, Evidence, and Explanation in Science, OR, they might be selected from any other programme at UCL.

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, tutorials and research supervision. Student performance is assessed through coursework such as long and short essays, advocacy work, and project work.

Careers

Our programme provides essential training and study for students wishing to pursue PhD level study in several fields, and also provides appropriate training and qualifications sought by individuals pursuing careers in areas such as education, museum and archival curatorship, or administration and policy-making in science, engineering and health care.

Employability
The programme offers a range of transferable skills and networking opportunities. No matter whether your career plan looks towards the public or private sector, we can help you build a portfolio of skills and contacts that will give your CV the edge. Highlights of the programme include:

the chance to develop practical media skills, including audio production
learning to write for different audiences
developing your skills in both practical and theoretical science communication, including working in a major London museum
to meet and network with policy makers.

Why study this degree at UCL?

There is no UK academic department quite like UCL Science & Technology Studies. The department combines award-winning teaching with award-winning public engagement.

We are research active over an enormous range of topics. Our teaching builds on research not only in our subject specialties but also in the fundamentals of teaching and learning.

Our programme makes unique use of London’s attractions and resources. We have close links with the Science Museum, the National Maritime Museum, the Natural History Museum, the Wellcome Library, and UCL Museums & Collections. We also use the city as a classroom, with custom-made walking tours, site visits, and special excursions.

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This programme offers breadth across a wide range of historical and philosophical themes. It also encourages intensive investigation and specialisation. Read more
This programme offers breadth across a wide range of historical and philosophical themes. It also encourages intensive investigation and specialisation: a survey of nearly 3,000 years of scientific ideas and communities, and an exploration of the inner workings of science's methods and theories.

Degree information

The programme provides broad-based training in the history of science, the philosophy of science, and an “integrated history and philosophy of science”. The historical coverage is broad, from antiquity to the present, while the philosophical coverage spans causality and the philosophy of medicine as well as the metaphysics of chemistry and computer science.

MSc students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (15 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), three ancillary modules (45 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits). The Postgraduate Diploma programme consists of one core module (15 credits), four optional modules (60 credits) and three ancillary modules (45 credits), available in full time mode. The Postgraduate Certificate programme consists of one core module (15 credits) and three optional modules (45 credits), available in full time mode.

Core modules
-Introduction to Science and Technology Studies

Optional modules - students choose four options from the following:
-Science in the 19th Century
-Material Culture and Science in the 18th Century
-Early Modern Science
-Medieval Science and Medicine in Global Perspective
-Science in Antiquity
-Causality, Mechanism, and Classification in Science
-Knowledge, Evidence, and Explanation in Science
-Science, Art, and Philosophy
-Special Topics Seminar in History and Philosophy of Science

One optional module from our sister MSc programme, Science, Technology, and Society, may be substituted here provided it contributes to a coherent programme of study.

Ancillary Modules - students choose three ancillary modules which may be options from our degrees, e.g. Science in the 20th Century and Beyond, and Curating the History of Science, or they might be selected from any other programme at UCL.

Dissertation/research project
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, tutorials and research supervision. Student performance is assessed through coursework such as long and short essays, advocacy work and project work.

Careers

Our programme provides essential training for students wishing to pursue PhD level study in related fields. It also provides appropriate training for those pursuing careers in education, museum and archival curatorship, or governance and policy-making.

Employability
During the course of this programme, students will develop a wide range of transferable skills, including writing, research, critical thinking, and working in collaboration with others. Most graduates of this programme go on to follow careers that engage with the substance of the degree, including in the museums sector, or in academia. For these students, this programme provides an excellent opportunity to develop the specialist skills and personal connections necessary to succeed. These include basic curatorial skills, developing personal contacts in London museums, and developing personal and intellectual connections with key thinkers in the field.

Why study this degree at UCL?

There is no UK academic department quite like UCL Science & Technology Studies. The department combines award-winning teaching with award-winning public engagement.

We are research-active over an enormous range of topics. Our teaching builds on research not only in our subject specialties but also in the fundamentals of teaching and learning.

Our programme makes unique use of London’s attractions and resources. We have close links with the Science Museum, the National Maritime Museum, the Natural History Museum, the Wellcome Library, and UCL Museums & Collections. We also use the city as a classroom, with custom-made walking tours, site visits, and special excursions.

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The School of Life Science has developed an extremely active and successful undergraduate, Biomedical Science programme. We have embraced specialists working in local NHS Trusts to develop outstanding, collaborative relationships covering key diagnostic and clinical specialties. Read more

Overview

The School of Life Science has developed an extremely active and successful undergraduate, Biomedical Science programme. We have embraced specialists working in local NHS Trusts to develop outstanding, collaborative relationships covering key diagnostic and clinical specialties. Not only do students benefit from the inclusion of such specialist practitioners onto our teaching programmes, but could also be offered highly competitive research opportunities working within the hospital itself.

This MSc programme builds on this wealth of experience and best practice to enable well-qualified students to develop their scientific training and employability skills within a Biomedical context. The need for innovation and a multidisciplinary approach to Biomedical Science has never been more important. The teaching strategies embedded within this programme embrace these principles in its pursuit of Clinical Biochemistry, Medical Immunology and Haematology.

IBMS Accreditation

This programme is accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS) as the professional body of Biomedical Scientists within the United Kingdom. The IBMS aims to promote and develop the role of Biomedical Science within healthcare to deliver he best possible service for patient care and safety.

Accreditation is a process of peer review and recognition by the profession of the achievement of quality standards for delivering Masters level programmes.

Individuals awarded a Masters degree accredited by the Institute are eligible for the title of Chartered Scientist and the designation CSci if they meet the other eligibility criteria of corporate membership and active engagement in Continued Professional Development. A Masters level qualification is also one of the entry criteria for the Institute’s Higher Specialist Examination and award of the Higher Specialist Diploma, a pre-requisite for the membership grade of Fellowship and designation FIBMS.

The aim of IBMS accreditation is to ensure that, through a spirit of partnership between the Institute and the University, a good quality degree is achieved that prepares the student for employment in circumstances requiring sound judgement, critical thinking, personal responsibility and initiative in complex and unpredictable professional environments.

The Institute lists 10 advantages of IBMS accreditation:
1. Advances professional practice to benefit healthcare services and professions related to biomedical science.

2. Develops specific knowledge and competence that underpins biomedical science.

3. Provides expertise to support development of appropriate education and training.

4. Ensures curriculum content is both current and anticipatory of future change.

5. Facilitates peer recognition of education and best practice and the dissemination of information through education and employer networks.

6. Ensures qualification is fit for purpose.

7. Recognises the achievement of a benchmark standard of education.

8. The degree award provides access to professional body membership as a Chartered Scientist and for entry to the Higher Specialist Diploma examination.

9. Strengthens links between the professional body, education providers employers and students.

10. Provides eligibility for the Higher Education Institution (HEI) to become a member of HUCBMS (Heads of University Centres of Biomedical Science)

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/biomedicalbloodscience/

Course Aims

The main aim of the programme is to provide multidisciplinary, Masters Level postgraduate training in Biomedical Blood Science. This will involve building on existing, undergraduate knowledge in basic science and applying it to clinical, diagnostic and research applications relevant to Clinical Biochemistry, Medical Immunology and Haematology.

Intended learning outcomes of the programme reflect what successful students should know, understand or to be able to do by the end of the programme. Programme specific learning outcomes are provided in the Programme Specification available by request, but to summarise the overarching course, aims are as follows:

- To develop students’ knowledge and understanding of different theoretical perspectives, methodological approaches, research interests and practical applications within Blood Science

- To explore and explicitly critique the clinical, diagnostic and research implications within the fields of Clinical Biochemistry,

- Medical Immunology and Haematology, and to place this in the context of a clinical laboratory, fully considering the potential implications for patients, health workers and research alike

- To develop a critical awareness of Biomedical ethics and to fully integrate these issues into project management including grant application and business planning

- To support student autonomy and innovation by providing opportunities for students to demonstrate originality in developing or applying their own ideas

- To direct students to integrate a complex knowledge base in the scrutiny and accomplishment of professional problem-solving scenarios and project development

- To enable student acquirement of advanced laboratory practical competencies and high level analytical skills

- To promote and sustain communities of practice that allow students to share best practice, encourage a multidisciplinary approach to problem-solving and to develop extensive communication skills, particularly their ability to convey complex, underpinning knowledge alongside their personal conclusions and rationale to specialist and nonspecialist listeners

- To provide students with a wide range of learning activities and a diverse assessment strategy in order to fully develop their employability and academic skills, ensuring both professional and academic attainment

Course Content

This one year programme is structured so that all taught sessions are delivered in just two days of the working week. Full-time students are expected to engage in independent study for the remaining 3 days per week. Consolidating taught sessions in this way allows greater flexibility for part-time students who will be expected to attend one day a week for two academic years, reducing potential impact in terms of workforce planning for employers and direct contact for students with needs outside of their academic responsibilities.

Semester 1 will focus on two main areas, the first being Biomedical ethics, grant application and laboratory competencies. The second area focuses on the clinical and diagnostic implications of Blood Science for patients and health workers, with the major emphasis being on Clinical Biochemistry.

Semester 2 will also focus on two main themes; firstly, business planning methodological approaches, analytical reasoning and research. Secondly, the clinical and diagnostic implications of Blood Science for patients and health workers, with the major emphasis being on Haematology and Immunology.

Compulsory Modules (each 15 credits) consist of:
- Biomedical Ethics & Grant Proposal
- Project Management & Business Planning
- Advanced Laboratory Techniques*
- Research Methodologies *
- Case Studies in Blood Science I
- Case Studies in Blood Science II
- Clinical Pathology I
- Clinical Pathology II

*Students who have attained the IBMS Specialist Diploma and are successfully enrolling with accredited prior certified learning are exempt from these two modules.

Dissertation – Biomedical Blood Science Research Project (60 credits)

This research project and final dissertation of 20,000 words is an excellent opportunity for students to undertake laboratory based research in their chosen topic and should provide an opportunity for them to demonstrate their understanding of the field via applications in Biomedical Science. Biomedical Science practitioners are expected to complete the laboratory and data collection aspects of this module in conjunction with their employers.

Requirements for an Award:
In order to obtain the Masters degree, students are required to satisfactorily accrue 180 M Level credits. Students who exit having accrued 60 or 120 M Level credits excluding the ‘Dissertation – Biomedical Blood Science Research Project’ are eligible to be awarded the Postgraduate Certificate (PgC) and Postgraduate Diploma (PgD) respectively

Teaching and Learning Methods

This programme places just as much emphasis on developing the way in which students approach, integrate and apply new knowledge and problem-solving as it is with the acquisition of higher level information. As such, particular emphasis is placed on developing critical thinking, innovation, reflective writing, autonomous learning and communication skills to prepare candidates for a lifetime of continued professional development.

The teaching and learning methods employed throughout this programme reflect these principles. For example, there is greater emphasis on looking at the subject from a patient-orientated, case study driven perspective through problem-based learning (PBL) that encourages students to think laterally, joining up different pieces of information and developing a more holistic level of understanding.

Assessment

The rich and varied assessment strategy adopted by this programme ensure student development of employability
and academic skills, providing an opportunity to demonstrate both professional and academic attainment. Assessment design is
largely driven by a number of key principles which include: promotion of independent learning, student autonomy, responsibility for personal learning and development of innovation and originality within one’s chosen area of interest. Note that not all modules culminate in a final examination.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Data science is an emerging new area of science. With City’s MSc in Data Science you can develop the skills and knowledge to analyse data in many forms and communicate insights. Read more
Data science is an emerging new area of science. With City’s MSc in Data Science you can develop the skills and knowledge to analyse data in many forms and communicate insights.

Who is it for?

This programme is for students who have a numerate first degree or can demonstrate numerate skills. Students are often at the early stages of their careers in diverse professions including economics, statistics and computer science.

Students will have a curiosity about data, and will want to learn new techniques to boost their career and be part of exciting current industry developments. The MSc in Data Science includes some complex programming tasks because of the applied nature of the course, so many students have a mathematics or statistics background and enjoy working with algorithms.

Objectives

The demand for data scientists in the UK has grown more than ten-fold in the past five years *. The amount of data in the world is growing exponentially. From analysing tyre performance to detecting problem gamblers, wherever data exists, there are opportunities to apply it.

City’s MSc Data Science programme covers the intersection of computer science and statistics, machine learning and practical applications. We explore areas such as visualisation because we believe that data science is about generating insight into data as well as its communication in practice.

The programme focuses on machine learning as the most exciting technology for data and we have learned from our own graduates that this is of high value when it comes to employment within the field. At City, we have excellent expertise in machine learning and the facilities students need to learn the technical aspects of data analysis. We also have a world-leading centre for data visualisation, where students get exposed to the latest developments on presenting and communicating their results – a highly sought after skill.

Placements

There is the opportunity to do an internship as part of the programme. The final project, which is normally three months for a full-time student, can be extended to six months if you want to study within a specific organisation. When it comes to the big data and data science area, we have established relationships with organisations including the BBC, Microsoft and The British Library so you can be confident that with City, your access to professional experience is unparalleled. One recent student undertook an internship with Google and has since secured a job within the company.

Academic facilities

The School's computer science laboratories are equipped with the latest up-to-date hardware and software. From Oracle’s leading commercial object-relational database server to PCs with state-of-the-art NVidia GPUs for computer graphics, you will have access to an array of tools to support your learning.

The MSc Data Science programme offers two (three by mid 2016) dedicated computer servers for the Big Data module, which you can also use for your final project to analyse large data sets. We give you the opportunity to undertake training in MATLAB, the most popular numerical and technical programming environment, while you study.

Scholarships

A scholarship for the full fees of the MSc will be offered to an outstanding applicant. The scholarship is available to UK/EU and overseas students, studying full-time. To be considered for the scholarship, please include with your full application a one-page essay with your answer to the question:

'What are the challenges that Data Science faces and how would you address those challenges?'

The submission deadline for anyone wishing to be considered for the scholarship is: 1 MAY 2017

Teaching and learning

The teaching and learning methods we use mean that students’ specialist knowledge and autonomy increase as they progress through each module. Active researchers guide your progress in the areas of machine learning, data visualization, and high-performance computing, which culminates with an individual project. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently and, where appropriate, in collaboration with industrial partners.

Taught modules are delivered through a series of 20 hours of lectures and 10 hours of tutorials/laboratory sessions. Lectures are normally used to:
-Present and exemplify the concepts underpinning a particular subject.
-Highlight the most significant aspects of the syllabus.
-Indicate additional topics and resources for private study.

Tutorials help you develop the skills to apply the concepts we have covered in the lectures. We normally achieve this through practical problem solving contexts.

Laboratory sessions give you the opportunity to apply concepts and techniques using state-of-the-art software, environments and development tools.

In addition to lectures, laboratory sessions and tutorial support, you also have access to a personal tutor. This is an academic member of staff from whom you can gain learning support throughout your degree. In addition, City’s online learning environment Moodle contains resources for each of the modules from lecture notes and lab materials, to coursework feedback, model answers, and an interactive discussion forum.

We expect you to study independently and complete coursework for each module. This should amount to approximately 120 hours per module if you are studying full time. Each module is assessed through a combination of written examination and coursework, where you will need to answer theoretical and practical questions to demonstrate that you can analyse and apply data science methods and techniques.

The individual project is a substantial task. It is your opportunity to develop a research-related topic under the supervision of an academic member of staff. This is the moment when you can apply what you have learnt to solve a real-world problem using large datasets from industry, academia or government and use your knowledge of collecting and processing real data, designing and implementing big data methods and applying and evaluating data analysis, visualisation and prediction techniques. At the end of the project you submit a substantial MSc project report, which becomes the mode of assessment for this part of the programme.

Course content

Data science is the area of study concerned with the extraction of insight from large collections of data.

The course covers the study, integration and application of advanced methods and techniques from:
-Data analysis and machine learning
-Data visualisation and visual analytics
-High-performance, parallel and distributed computing
-Knowledge representation and reasoning
-Neural computation
-Signal processing
-Data management and information retrieval.

It gives you the opportunity to specialise so, once you graduate, you can apply data science to any sector from health to retail. By engaging with researchers and industrial partners during the programme, you can develop your knowledge and skills within a real-world context in each of the above areas.

Core modules
-Principles of data science (15 credits)
-Machine learning (15 credits)
-Big Data (15 credits)
-Neural computing (15 credits)
-Visual analytics (15 credits)
-Research methods and professional issues (15 credits)

Elective modules
-Advanced programming: concurrency (15 credits)
-Readings in computer science (15 credits)
-Advanced databases (15 credits)
-Information retrieval (15 credits)
-Data visualisation (15 credits)
-Digital signal processing and audio programming (15 credits)
-Cloud computing (15 credits)
-Computer vision (15 credits)
-Software agents (15 credits)

Individual project - (60 credits)

Career prospects

From health to retail, and from the IT industry to government, the Data Science MSc will prepare you for a successful career as a data scientist. You will graduate with specialist skills in data acquisition, information extraction, aggregation and representation, data analysis, knowledge extraction and explanation, which are in high demand.

City's unique internships, our emphasis on machine learning and visual analytics, together with our links with the industry and Tech City, should help you gain employment as a specialist in data analysis and visualization. Graduates starting a new business can benefit from City's London City Incubator and City's links with Tech City, providing support for start-up businesses.

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Long Island University offers the Master of Science in Library and Information Science – accredited by the American Library Association– at the Palmer School at LIU Post in Brookville, New York and at New York University’s Bobst Library in Manhattan. Read more
Long Island University offers the Master of Science in Library and Information Science – accredited by the American Library Association– at the Palmer School at LIU Post in Brookville, New York and at New York University’s Bobst Library in Manhattan. In addition, the Palmer School partners with NYU to provide a unique Dual Degree program for scholar-librarians, leading to a Master's degree from NYU Steinhardt or NYU College of Arts and Science and a Master of Science in Library and Information Science from LIU. Students can also take master's level courses at LIU Brentwood in Brentwood, N.Y. or Long Island.

Areas of Study

-Academic & Special Librarianship
-Digital Libraries
-Health Sciences
-Rare Books & Special Collections
-School Library Media Specialist
-Technical Service
-Youth Librarianship (Children's & Young Adult Services)

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This programme is unique in teaching the collective history of science, medicine, environment and technology. It is also unique as it offers modules that combine imperial, ethical, and military history with general areas of history of science and medicine. Read more
This programme is unique in teaching the collective history of science, medicine, environment and technology. It is also unique as it offers modules that combine imperial, ethical, and military history with general areas of history of science and medicine.

You learn from experts working in these diverse fields, being taught how different societies, cultures, and races have conceptualised disease, reacted to changes in environment and created different technological artefacts and scientific knowledge. You are introduced to the major and recent historiographical and methodological approaches, become familiar with the main archives in the UK and encouraged to approach the history of medicine, science, environment and technology from past as well as contemporary concerns.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/83/history-of-science-medicine-environment-and-technology

About the School of History

The School of History at the University of Kent offers a great environment in which to research and study. Situated in a beautiful cathedral city with its own dynamic history, the University is within easy reach of the main London archives and is convenient for travelling to mainland Europe.

The School of History is a lively, research-led department where postgraduate students are given the opportunity to work alongside academics recognised as experts in their respective fields. The School was placed eighth nationally for research intensity in the most recent Research Excellence Framework, and consistently scores highly in the National Student Survey.

There is a good community spirit within the School, which includes regular postgraduate social meetings, weekly seminars and a comprehensive training programme with the full involvement of the School’s academic staff. Thanks to the wide range of teaching and research interests in the School, we can offer equally wide scope for research supervision covering British, European, African and American history.

At present, there are particularly strong groupings of research students in medieval and early modern cultural and social history, early modern religious history, the history and cultural studies of science and medicine, the medicine, the history of propaganda, military history, war and the media, and the history of Kent.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

HI878 - Methods and Interpretations of Historical Research (30 credits)
HI866 - Science and Medicine in Context (30 credits)
HI817 - Deformed, Deranged and Deviant (30 credits)
HI827 - Home Front Britain, 1914-18 (30 credits)
HI857 - Geiger Counter at Ground Zero: Explorations of Nuclear America (30 credits)
HI881 - Museums, Material Culture and the History of Science (30 credits)
HI883 - Work Placement (30 credits)

Assessment

All courses are assessed by coursework, and the dissertation counts for half the final grade (comprising one third assessed preparation, two thirds actual dissertation).

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- place the study of texts, images and documentaries in their historical contexts, at the centre of student learning and analysis

- ensure that students of the history of science, medicine, environment and technology acquire a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the historical modes of theory and analysis

- enable you to understand and use concepts, approaches and methods of the history of science, medicine, environment and technology in different academic contexts and develop an understanding of the differing and contested aspects between, and within, the relevant disciplines

- develop your capacities to think critically about past events and experiences

- encourage you to relate the academic study of the history of science, medicine, environment and technology to questions of public debate and concern

- promote a curriculum supported by scholarship, staff development and a research culture that promotes breadth and depth of intellectual enquiry and debate

- assist you to develop cognitive and transferable skills relevant to your vocational and personal development.

Study support

Postgraduate resources
The resources for historical research at Kent are led by the University’s Templeman Library: a designated European Documentation Centre which holds specialised collections on slavery and antislavery, and on medical science. The Library has a substantial collection of secondary materials to back-up an excellent collection of primary sources including the British Cartoon Archive, newspapers, a large audio-visual library, and a complete set of British Second World War Ministry of Information propaganda pamphlets.

The School has a dedicated Centre for the Study of Propaganda and War, which has a distinctive archive of written, audio and visual propaganda materials, particularly in film, video and DVD. Locally, you have access to: the Canterbury Cathedral Library and Archive (a major collection for the study of medieval and early modern religious and social history); the Centre for Kentish Studies at Maidstone; and the National Maritime Collection at Greenwich. Kent is also within easy reach of the country’s premier research collections in London and the national libraries in Paris and Brussels.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Journal of Contemporary History; English Historical Review; British Journal for the History of Science; Technology and Culture; and War and Society.

Global Skills Award
All students registered for a taught Master's programme are eligible to apply for a place on our Global Skills Award Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/gsa.html). The programme is designed to broaden your understanding of global issues and current affairs as well as to develop personal skills which will enhance your employability

Research areas

Medieval and early modern history
Covering c400–c1500, incorporating such themes as Anglo-Saxon England, early-modern France, palaeography, British and European politics and society, religion and papacy.

Modern history
Covering c1500–present, incorporating such themes as modern British, European and American history, British military history, and 20th-century conflict and propaganda.

History of science, technology and medicine
Incorporating such themes as colonial science and medicine, Nazi medicine, eugenics, science and technology in 19th-century Britain.

Careers

As the job market becomes increasingly competitive, postgraduate qualifications are becoming more attractive to employers seeking individuals who have finely tuned skills and abilities, which our programmes encourage you to hone. As a result of the valuable transferable skills developed during your course of study, career prospects for history graduates are wide ranging. Our graduates go on to a variety of careers, from research within the government to teaching, politics to records management and journalism, to working within museums and galleries – to name but a few.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This is a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) course, also known as Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert). As a qualified science teacher you may be required to teach National Curriculum general science to Key Stage 4, as well as your particular specialism to 'A' level and beyond. Read more

About the Course

This is a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) course, also known as Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert).

As a qualified science teacher you may be required to teach National Curriculum general science to Key Stage 4, as well as your particular specialism to 'A' level and beyond. To this end, the course aims to facilitate your transformation into a well-educated, well-trained, confident and motivated science educator.

Along with English and mathematics, science is one of the three compulsory subjects of the National Curriculum and since all pupils have to study a broad, balanced curriculum in science there is a demand for well-qualified and skilled science teachers. Most pupils entering secondary school are excited at the prospect of work, for the first time in a fully equipped laboratory, and secondary school science teachers have to build upon and sustain this interest for the subject.

To meet this challenge we need capable, skilled and enthusiastic teachers who are able to motivate young people and lead them to discover the wonders of science.

Aims

The Brunel Science Postgraduate Certificate (PGCE) is a M-level course with 60 credits that can contribute to further Master's level study in Education, subject to approval.

The course will equip you with the knowledge, understanding and skills necessary to teach science and the ability to:

-Demonstrate an understanding of the vital role of the teacher and the school in ensuring excellence in the educational experiences of young people
-Undertake professional practice which enables you to evidence the Teachers’ Standards which facilitate the award of Qualified Teacher Status
-Understand the relationships between Education and science within current national and government frameworks, and critically reflect on the impact of these in the work of schools and the educational experiences of young people
-Recognise the contribution that science as part of the whole school curriculum makes to the development of the individual learner and groups of learners
-Think critically about what it means to be scientifically educated and how this informs curriculum planning and design within the subject area
-Apply a thorough knowledge and understanding of science (Physics) National Curriculum to the planning of curriculum experiences for pupils in school
-Demonstrate competence and confidence in your ability to teach across the contexts for pupil learning in the mathematics National Curriculum range and content, applying principles of continuity and progression
-Use subject knowledge and relevant course specifications to plan and deliver the 14-16 curriculum including examination and vocational courses
-Demonstrate an understanding of the subject knowledge and specification requirements for the 16-19 curriculum
-Utilise a range of teaching strategies to meet the identified learning needs of a wide range of pupils
-Utilise a range of resources, including information and communication technology, to enhance pupil learning in physics
-Understand the importance of safe practice and safeguarding and apply these in working with young people both within and beyond lessons
-Use a wide range of class management strategies to maximise pupil learning
-Understand the principles of inclusion and apply these to ensure equality of opportunity for all pupils in the subject area
-Understand national frameworks for assessment within the subject area and use these to support the recording and analysis of data, and the subsequent use of this to plan the next phase of learning
-Raise the status of the subject area by demonstrating high standards of professionalism at all times
-Understand the crucial role of professional learning for the teacher, the pupils and schools.

Funding

Please follow this link https://www.getintoteaching.education.gov.uk/

Course Content

The course runs from early September through to late June. As you commence the training, your individual subject knowledge is assessed so that targeted improvements can be made throughout the year in areas that may be lacking. As the course continues, your time is spent alternating between University and school, with increasing time being spent in school as your experience develops. By the end of the course, if school placements and written M level assignments have been completed successfully you are awarded the title PGCE with recommendation for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS).

You will spend two thirds of your time teaching in Partnership schools. These are schools where we have established links and where a number of the science teachers working in them are past Brunel students. As your school experience begins, you will be attached to a mentor whose role involves guidance and management of your professional development. You will learn from observing and working alongside experienced teachers, particularly in the process of teaching your own classes (under supervision). The course has three blocks of school experience in two different schools, providing the opportunity to work in contrasting settings, whilst working towards the Teachers’ Standards (TA, 2012).

How is the University portion of the course organised?
Campus Sessions

Campus-based work relates theory to school practice, facilitating your maturity into an effective and reflective science teacher.

Sessions involve student teachers working together in small groups, developing the thinking and attributes needed to teach effectively in the classroom or laboratory.

Although campus sessions cover a wide range of foci, there is a particular emphasis on practical work, literacy and communication, science for all and digital technologies in line with the interests of the research-active science tutors. They experienced schoolteachers and have published widely in national and international journals.

Facilities

As a Brunel PGCE student teacher you will have access to a range of teaching rooms including a new, well-equipped laboratory, a well-resourced library which includes textbook schemes, teaching packs, videos and visual aids – as well as books, journals and e-journals appropriate to work at Master's level. You will also benefit from extensive computer facilities where you can familiarise yourself with the hardware and software available in schools.

Learning Atmosphere

University tutors are available to offer advice and support throughout the course. Campus sessions have a friendly, informal atmosphere as classes gel, and you will find yourself forging lasting professional and personal relationships with other student teachers on the course.

Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) requirement

This course involves regular access to children and/or vulnerable adults. Where this is the case, students will be required to complete a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) application, previously known as a Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) check. The application will cost £51.86 (this amount may be subject to change) and the University will send further instructions as part of the admissions process. For further guidance please email .

Read more about the structure of postgraduate degrees at Brunel and what you will learn on the course:
http://www.brunel.ac.uk/courses/pg/postgraduate-taught-course-information/taught-programme-structure
http://www.brunel.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0020/423902/PGCert-Secondary-Education-with-QTS.pdf

For more information on the Special Features of the course and Teaching and Assesment, please follow this link http://www.brunel.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/pgce-secondary-education-science-with-physics

Read less
This is a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) course, also known as Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert). As a qualified science teacher you may be required to teach National Curriculum general science to Key Stage 4, as well as your particular specialism to ‘A’ level and beyond. Read more

About the Course

This is a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) course, also known as Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert).

As a qualified science teacher you may be required to teach National Curriculum general science to Key Stage 4, as well as your particular specialism to ‘A’ level and beyond. To this end, the course aims to facilitate your transformation into a well-educated, well-trained, confident and motivated science educator.

Along with English and mathematics, science is one of the three core subjects of the National Curriculum and since all pupils have to study a broad, balanced curriculum in science there is a demand for well-qualified and skilled science teachers. Most pupils entering secondary school are excited at the prospect of work, for the first time in a fully equipped laboratory, and secondary school science teachers have to build upon and sustain this interest for the subject.

To meet this challenge we need capable, skilled and enthusiastic teachers who are able to motivate young people and lead them to discover the wonders of science.

Aims

The Brunel Science Postgraduate Certificate (PGCE) is an M level course with 60 credits that can contribute to further Master's level study in Education, subject to approval. The course will equip you with the knowledge, understanding and skills necessary to teach science such that you are able to:

-Demonstrate an understanding of the vital role of the teacher and the school in ensuring excellence in the educational experiences of young people;
-Undertake professional practice which enables you to evidence the Teachers’ Standards which facilitate the award of Qualified Teacher Status;
-Understand the relationships between Education and science within current national and government frameworks, and critically reflect on the impact of these in the work of schools and the educational experiences of young people;
-Recognise the contribution that science as part of the whole school curriculum makes to the development of the individual learner and groups of learners;
-Think critically about what it means to be scientifically educated and how this informs curriculum planning and design within the subject area;
-Apply a thorough knowledge and understanding of the science (Biology) National Curriculum to the planning of curriculum experiences for pupils in school;
-Demonstrate competence and confidence in your ability to teach across the contexts for pupil learning in the mathematics National Curriculum range and content, applying principles of continuity and progression;
-Use subject knowledge and relevant course specifications to plan and deliver the 14-16 curriculum including examination and vocational courses;
-Demonstrate an understanding of the subject knowledge and specification requirements for the 16-19 curriculum;
-Utilise a range of teaching strategies to meet the identified learning needs of a wide range of pupils;
-Utilise a range of resources, including information and communication technology, to enhance pupil learning in biology;
-Understand the importance of safe practice and safeguarding and apply these in working with young people both within and beyond lessons;
-Use a wide range of class management strategies to maximise pupil learning;Understand the principles of inclusion and apply these to ensure equality of opportunity for all pupils in the subject area;
-Understand national frameworks for assessment within the subject area and use these to support the recording and analysis of data, and the subsequent use of this to plan the next phase of learning;
-Raise the status of the subject area by demonstrating high standards of professionalism at all times;
-Understand the crucial role of professional learning for the teacher, the pupils and schools.

Funding

Please follow this link https://www.getintoteaching.education.gov.uk/bursaries-and-funding

Course Content

The course runs from early September through to late June. As you commence the training, your individual subject knowledge is assessed so that targeted improvements can be made throughout the year in areas that may be lacking. As the course continues, your time is spent alternating between University and school, with increasing time being spent in school as your experience develops. By the end of the course, if school placements and written M level assignments have been completed successfully you are awarded the title PGCE with recommendation for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS).

You will spend two thirds of your time teaching in Partnership schools. These are schools where we have established links and where a number of the science teachers working in them are past Brunel students. As your school experience begins, you will be attached to a mentor whose role involves guidance and management of your professional development. You will learn from observing and working alongside experienced teachers, particularly in the process of teaching your own classes (under supervision). The course has three blocks of school experience in two different schools, providing the opportunity to work in contrasting settings, whilst working towards the Teachers’ Standards (TA, 2012).

How is the University portion of the course organised?
Campus-based work relates theory to school practice, facilitating your maturity into an effective and reflective science teacher. Sessions involve student teachers working together in small groups, developing the thinking and attributes needed to teach effectively in the classroom or laboratory. Although campus sessions cover a wide range of foci, there is a particular emphasis on practical work, literacy and communication, science for all and digital technologies in line with the interests of the research-active science tutors who are experienced schoolteachers and have published widely in national and international journals.

As a Brunel PGCE student teacher you will have access to a range of teaching rooms including a new, well-equipped laboratory, a well resourced library which includes textbook schemes, teaching packs, videos and visual aids – as well as books, journals and e-journals appropriate to work at Masters level – plus extensive computer facilities where you can familiarise yourself with the hardware and software available in schools.

University tutors are available to offer advice and support throughout the course. Campus sessions have a friendly, informal atmosphere as classes gel, and you will find yourself forging lasting professional and personal relationships with other student teachers on the course.

Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) requirement

This course involves regular access to children and/or vulnerable adults. Where this is the case, students will be required to complete a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) application, previously known as a Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) check. The application will cost £51.86 (this amount may be subject to change) and the University will send further instructions as part of the admissions process. For further guidance please email

Read more about the structure of postgraduate degrees at Brunel:http://www.brunel.ac.uk/courses/pg/postgraduate-taught-course-information/taught-programme-structure

Read less
This is a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) course, also known as Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert). As a qualified science teacher you may be required to teach National Curriculum general science to Key Stage 4, as well as your particular specialism to ‘A’ level and beyond. Read more

About the Course

This is a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) course, also known as Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert).

As a qualified science teacher you may be required to teach National Curriculum general science to Key Stage 4, as well as your particular specialism to ‘A’ level and beyond. To this end, the course aims to facilitate your transformation into a well-educated, well-trained, confident and motivated science educator.

Along with English and mathematics, science is one of the three core subjects of the National Curriculum and since all pupils have to study a broad, balanced curriculum in science there is a demand for well-qualified and skilled science teachers. Most pupils entering secondary school are excited at the prospect of work, for the first time in a fully equipped laboratory, and secondary school science teachers have to build upon and sustain this interest for the subject.

To meet this challenge we need capable, skilled and enthusiastic teachers who are able to motivate young people and lead them to discover the wonders of science.

Aims

The Brunel Science Postgraduate Certificate (PGCE) is an M level course with 60 credits that can contribute to further Master's level study in Education, subject to approval. The course will equip you with the knowledge, understanding and skills necessary to teach science such that you are able to:

-Demonstrate an understanding of the vital role of the teacher and the school in ensuring excellence in the educational experiences of young people;
-Undertake professional practice which enables you to evidence the Teachers’ Standards which facilitate the award of Qualified Teacher Status;
-Understand the relationships between Education and science within current national and government frameworks, and critically reflect on the impact of these in the work of schools and the educational experiences of young people;
-Recognise the contribution that science as part of the whole school curriculum makes to the development of the individual learner and groups of learners;
-Think critically about what it means to be scientifically educated and how this informs curriculum planning and design within the subject area;
-Apply a thorough knowledge and understanding of the science (Chemistry) National Curriculum to the planning of curriculum experiences for pupils in school;
-Demonstrate competence and confidence in your ability to teach across the contexts for pupil learning in the mathematics National Curriculum range and content, applying principles of continuity and progression;
-Use subject knowledge and relevant course specifications to plan and deliver the 14-16 curriculum including examination and vocational courses;
-Demonstrate an understanding of the subject knowledge and specification requirements for the 16-19 curriculum;
-Utilise a range of teaching strategies to meet the identified learning needs of a wide range of pupils;
-Utilise a range of resources, including information and communication technology, to enhance pupil learning in chemistry;
-Understand the importance of safe practice and safeguarding and apply these in working with young people both within and beyond lessons;
-Use a wide range of class management strategies to maximise pupil learning;
-Understand the principles of inclusion and apply these to ensure equality of opportunity for all pupils in the subject area;
-Understand national frameworks for assessment within the subject area and use these to support the recording and analysis of data, and the subsequent use of this to plan the next phase of learning;
-Raise the status of the subject area by demonstrating high standards of professionalism at all times;
-Understand the crucial role of professional learning for the teacher, the pupils and schools.

Funding

Please follow this link https://www.getintoteaching.education.gov.uk/

Course Content

The course runs from early September through to late June. As you commence the training, your individual subject knowledge is assessed so that targeted improvements can be made throughout the year in areas that may be lacking. As the course continues, your time is spent alternating between University and school, with increasing time being spent in school as your experience develops. By the end of the course, if school placements and written M level assignments have been completed successfully you are awarded the title PGCE with recommendation for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS).

You will spend two thirds of your time teaching in Partnership schools. These are schools where we have established links and where a number of the science teachers working in them are past Brunel students. As your school experience begins, you will be attached to a mentor whose role involves guidance and management of your professional development. You will learn from observing and working alongside experienced teachers, particularly in the process of teaching your own classes (under supervision). The course has three blocks of school experience in two different schools, providing the opportunity to work in contrasting settings, whilst working towards the Teachers’ Standards (TA, 2012).

How is the University portion of the course organised?
Campus-based work relates theory to school practice, facilitating your maturity into an effective and reflective science teacher. Sessions involve student teachers working together in small groups, developing the thinking and attributes needed to teach effectively in the classroom or laboratory. Although campus sessions cover a wide range of foci, there is a particular emphasis on practical work, literacy and communication, science for all and digital technologies in line with the interests of the research-active science tutors who are experienced schoolteachers and have published widely in national and international journals.

As a Brunel PGCE student teacher you will have access to a range of teaching rooms including a new, well-equipped laboratory, a well resourced library which includes textbook schemes, teaching packs, videos and visual aids – as well as books, journals and e-journals appropriate to work at Masters level – plus extensive computer facilities where you can familiarise yourself with the hardware and software available in schools.

University tutors are available to offer advice and support throughout the course. Campus sessions have a friendly, informal atmosphere as classes gel, and you will find yourself forging lasting professional and personal relationships with other student teachers on the course.

Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) requirement

This course involves regular access to children and/or vulnerable adults. Where this is the case, students will be required to complete a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) application, previously known as a Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) check. The application will cost £51.86 (this amount may be subject to change) and the University will send further instructions as part of the admissions process. For further guidance please email .

Read more about the structure of postgraduate degrees at Brunel: http://www.brunel.ac.uk/courses/pg/postgraduate-taught-course-information/taught-programme-structure

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This Masters course will open the door to a fascinating and fast-moving sector of analytical science that will build on your previous undergraduate studies, in chemistry, biology or other appropriate science courses. Read more
This Masters course will open the door to a fascinating and fast-moving sector of analytical science that will build on your previous undergraduate studies, in chemistry, biology or other appropriate science courses. You will gain knowledge and scientific skills that are directly applicable to the field of forensic science, with prospects of employment in forensic science laboratories as well as in other analytical science laboratories.

The course involves a unique combination of forensic chemistry and forensic biology, covering subjects such as trace evidence, toxicology and DNA analysis. Once you have covered the underlying principles of both areas, you can then specialise in your chosen field for your MSc research project.

The course is accredited by the Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences, which enhances its credibility and currency among potential employers.

This course can also be taken part time - for more information, please view this web-page: https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/forensic-science-dtpfrs6/

Learn From The Best

Our teaching team are active researchers who routinely incorporate their expertise and enthusiasm into their teaching. Many of the staff have worked in forensic science laboratories and have been involved in high profile cases such as the Stephen Lawrence, Joanna Yeates, Suffolk strangler and Jigsaw murder cases. Their areas of research include toxicology, the analysis of fibres and their transfer and persistence and the analysis of ancient DNA.

Academic staff include former forensic biologists, forensic toxicologists, and forensic fibre experts. They continue to maintain close links with the industry including the police and practising forensic scientists. Many of them are well-established within professional forensic science societies and organisations, which directly inform policy and practices within the field.

Teaching And Assessment

Our teaching will give you a solid grounding in all the technical areas that are key to forensic science, while simultaneously developing the higher level of independent thinking and advanced interpretation that is expected at Masters level. To support your learning journey, many of the staff have an ‘open door’ policy which makes it easy to ask questions; it’s also possible to book appointments with them so that you can work through queries about lab work, concepts and theories, and any other aspects of the subject.

We use different types of assessments: some will contribute to your final grade while others will be used to provide you with guidance on your progress and reinforce your learning. You can expect both your tutors and your peers to provide useful comments and feedback throughout the course.

Module Overview
AP0700 - Graduate Science Research Methods (Core, 20 Credits)
AP0703 - Subject Exploration (Core, 20 Credits)
AP0708 - Applied Sciences Research Project (Core, 60 Credits)
AP0723 - Practices & Procedures in Forensic Science (Core, 20 Credits)
AP0724 - Forensic Toxicology & Drugs of Abuse (Core, 20 Credits)
AP0725 - Criminalistics (Core, 20 Credits)
AP0726 - Forensic Genetics (Core, 20 Credits)

Learning Environment

You will have access to a dedicated crime scene house to enable you to examine simulated crime scenes. Students can also access Return to Scene (R2S) software which provides a 360 degree interactive scan of a crime scene allowing you to perform further analysis in detail after you have left the scene. Northumbria University has also invested heavily in an impressive suite of analytical equipment allowing you to gain first-hand experience of the techniques used in operational laboratories.

We use a range of technologies to enhance your learning, with tools including web-based self-guided exercises, online tests with feedback, and electronic discussion boards. These tools support and extend the material that is delivered during lectures.

You will have 24/7 term-time access to Northumbria’s library, which was ranked #2 in the Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey for 2015 and has been accredited by the UK Government for Customer Service Excellence since 2010.

Research-Rich Learning

We host the Northumbria University Centre for Forensic Science and our research directly impacts on what and how you learn. Northumbria is helping to push the frontiers of knowledge in areas such as:
-Forensic fibre comparisons using statistical and chemometric approaches
-DNA profiling in contexts such as injuries to children and poaching of wildlife
-Human genetic and phenotypic variation
-Analytical toxicology

As part of the course, you will undertake a Masters project that will require you to evaluate relevant literature as well as to develop your ideas within the context of existing research. The project will involve information retrieval, critical appraisal, presentation of aims and strategy, development of advanced analytical and problem-solving skills, the discussion and interpretation of results, and the composition of a written dissertation. Each project will be aligned to an active area of research that is specific to an academic member of staff.

Give Your Career An Edge

This course is accredited by the Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences. This reflects the relevance and rigour of the curriculum, and provides assurance of workplace-ready knowledge and application.

The focus on practical laboratory work, combined with the mix of group work, independent learning and professional practice, will help ensure that you develop skills that are transferable to a range of careers and disciplines.

Throughout your time at Northumbria we will prompt you to reflect on your self-development through the Higher Education Achievement Report process. We will also encourage you to take advantage of the services of our Careers and Employment Service such as CV advice and interview preparation.

Your Future

Forensic science has gained a high profile through TV dramas and, in the years ahead the sector is likely to be further transformed by technological advances in a number of fields. With an MSc Forensic Science you will be well-placed to take up a fascinating and rewarding role in forensic science laboratories.

What’s more, by developing the attributes of a Masters student, including the ability to solve complex problems, think critically, and work effectively with others and on your own, you will enhance your employability in all sectors of the analytical science industry. You will also be well equipped to pursue further studies at PhD level.

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Sunderland has offered teacher training since 1908. This course is for people who need to improve their science subject understanding before starting a one-year Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) course. Read more
Sunderland has offered teacher training since 1908.

Course overview

This course is for people who need to improve their science subject understanding before starting a one-year Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE) course.

The structure of the course will vary according to whether you want to teach chemistry, physics or another science. You should have at least an A Level in the science subject that you intend to teach, and, you should have already received a conditional offer for initial teacher training (ITT). You will complete this preparatory course ready for starting ITT in September.

When you successfully complete your ITT, your career prospects will be very good. There is a national shortage of science teachers, particularly in physics and chemistry. So there are excellent job opportunities both in the North East and throughout the country.

Sunderland has a heritage of teacher training which dates back to 1908. What’s more, we’re one of only a small number of teacher-training institutions in the UK offering a broad range of science.

There is no tuition fee for this course, and you will be paid a bursary while you are studying.

Course content

This course enhances your skills and knowledge in science education, preparing you for teacher training.

You will complete a series of units which will equip you with essential subject knowledge, ahead of a one-year initial teacher training (ITT) course. This course runs for up to 36 weeks and will complete in time to ensure that you are ready to start your ITT in September.

Teaching and assessment

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods that include lectures, independent work, distance learning, directed tasks, written assignments and presentations. We encourage you to undertake voluntary work experience in a school.

Facilities & location

The University of Sunderland has excellent facilities that help you realise your full potential.

Course location
The course is a blend of on campus and distance learning. When on Campus you will be based in Forster Building on City Campus, just a few minutes from the main Murray Library and close to Sunderland city centre. It’s a very vibrant and supportive environment with excellent resources for teaching and learning.

University Library Services
We’ve got thousands of books and e-books on education topics, with many more titles available through the inter-library loan service. We also subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals. Resources include the EBSCO Professional Development Collection, which is a specialised collection of over 500 education journals.

Learning Environment
Sunderland has a rich heritage in scientific studies. We are fully plugged into relevant industry bodies, with strong links and an exchange of ideas and people. Our vibrant learning environment helps ensure a steady stream of scientists who are well-trained and ready to contribute in a variety of fields.

Employment & careers

There is currently a shortage of science teachers, and so there are excellent career opportunities both in the North East and nationwide, once you have Qualified Teacher Status (QTS).

This course enhances your subject knowledge, making it easier to complete a PGCE and achieve QTS. The starting salary of an NQT is over £22,000, with extra if you work in London. Teachers see their salaries rise by an average of 30 per cent after their first four years in the job.

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The Pre-Masters in Biomedical Science (Graduate Diploma in Biomedical Science) provides a discipline-specific pathway (a pre-masters year) into the taught Biomedical Blood Science masters level programme. Read more

Overview

The Pre-Masters in Biomedical Science (Graduate Diploma in Biomedical Science) provides a discipline-specific pathway (a pre-masters year) into the taught Biomedical Blood Science masters level programme. It is a one-year full-time programme designed for both home and international students, with a background in life sciences, who wish to study at postgraduate level for the MSc in Biomedical Blood Science. The programme is open to science graduates who do not meet the academic criteria for a direct entry into the MSc. The MSc in Biomedical Blood Science is accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS). The IBMS is the professional body of Biomedical Scientists within the United Kingdom. The IBMS aims to promote and develop the role of Biomedical Science within healthcare to deliver the best possible service for patient care and safety.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/biomedicalsciencegraduatediploma/

Course Aims

The overall aim is to provide the students with the academic background necessary for the masters programme and to enable them to develop and practise the subject specific academic skills required for the intensive pace of study at masters level. The course also aims to allow international students to benefit from English language support that will help them to develop their academic English language skills.

Intended learning outcomes of the programme reflect what successful students should know, understand or to be able to do by the end of the programme. Programme specific learning outcomes are provided in the Programme Specification available by request; but, to summarise, the overarching course aims are as follows:

- To provide students with core knowledge, understanding and skills relevant to Biomedical Science

- To produce skilled and motivated graduates who are suitably prepared for the MSc in Biomedical Science and for further study.

- To cultivate interest in the biosciences, particularly at the cellular and molecular level, within a caring and intellectually stimulating environment.

- To get an accurate insight into the role of Biomedical Scientists in the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of disease.

- To develop an understanding of the analytical, clinical and diagnostic aspects of Cellular Pathology, Clinical Biochemistry, Medical Microbiology, Blood Transfusion, Clinical Immunology and Haematology pathology laboratories.

- To promote the development of a range of key skills, for use in all areas where numeracy and an objective, scientific approach to problem-solving are valued.

- To provide students with a wide range of learning activities and a diverse assessment strategy in order to fully develop their employability and academic skills, ensuring both professional and academic attainment.

- To promote the development of critical thinking, autonomous learning, independent research and communication skills to help prepare the students for the MSc in Biomedical Blood Science and for a lifetime of continued professional development.

Course Content

All the modules in this one year programme are compulsory. The programme consists of a total of 90 credits made up of one 30 credit module and four 15 credit modules. An additional English module (English for Academic Purposes) will be offered for non-native English speakers if required. This module will not form part of the overall award, but successful completion is required for progression to the Masters programme.

Modules:
- Biomedical Science and Pathology (30 credits):
The module provides the student with the knowledge and understanding of the pathobiology of human disease associated with Cellular Pathology, Clinical Immunology, Haematology, Clinical Biochemistry, Medical Microbiology and Clinical Virology. It also examines the analytical and clinical functions of three more of the major departments of a modern hospital pathology laboratory, including Haematology, Clinical Pathology, Clinical Immunology, Blood Transfusion, Clinical Biochemistry and Medical Microbiology. In addition, the module will give an accurate insight into the role of Biomedical Scientists and how they assist clinicians in the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of disease.

- Biochemistry Research Project (non-experimental) (15 credits):
This module aims to introduce students to some of the key non-experimental research skills that are routinely used by biochemists and biomedical scientists, such as in depth literature searching, analysis of experimental data and the use of a computer as tool for both research (bioinformatics) and dissemination of information (web page construction). The student will research the literature on a specific topic, using library and web based resources and will produce a written review. In addition, the student will either process and interpret some raw experimental data provided to them.

- Advances in Medicine (15 credits):
This module will describe and promote the understanding of advances in medicine that have impacted on diagnosis, treatment, prevention of a range of diseases. It will highlight fast emerging areas of research which are striving to improve diagnosis including nanotechnology and new biochemical tests in the fields of heart disease, cancer and fertility investigations which will potentially improve patient care.

- Clinical Pathology (15 credits):
The majority of staff that contribute to the module are employees of the University Hospital of North Staffordshire (UHNS). Students will benefit from lectures and expertise in Clinical Diagnostic Pathology, Pharmacology, Biochemistry, Genetics and Inflammatory Diseases. Students will gain an insight into how patients are managed, from their very first presentation at the UHNS, from the perspective of diagnosis and treatment. The course will cover both standardised testing options and the development of new diagnostic procedures with a particular emphasis on genetic and epigenetic aspects of disease. Students will also gain an appreciation of the cost benefit of particular routes for diagnosis and treatment and the importance of identifying false positive and false negative results. Finally, the students will have the opportunity to perform their own extensive literature review of a disease-related topic that is not covered by the lectures on the course.

- Case Studies in Biomedical Science (15 credits):
This module aims to give you an understanding of the UK health trends and the factors that affect these trends. Through clinical case studies and small group tutorials, you will explore why the UK has some of the highest incidences of certain diseases and conditions in Europe and consider what factors contribute to making them some of the most common and/or rising health problems faced by this country. This will include understanding the relevant socioeconomic factors as well as understanding the bioscience of the disease process and its diagnosis and management. You will also focus on what is being done by Government and the NHS to tackle these major health problems.

- English for Academic Purposes (EAP ):
For non-native English speakers if required

Teaching & Assessment

In addition to the lecture courses and tutorials, problem based learning (PBL) using clinical scenarios is used for at least one module. Students will also be given the opportunity to undertake an independent non-experimental research project, supervised and supported by a member of staff. Web-based learning using the University’s virtual learning environment (KLE) is also used to give students easy access to a wide range of resources and research tools, and as a platform for online discussions and quizzes. Students will be given many opportunities to become familiar with word processing, spreadsheets and graphics software as well as computer-based routes to access scientific literature.

All modules are assessed within the semester in which they are taught. Most contain elements of both ‘in-course’ assessment (in the form of laboratory reports, essays, posters) and formal examination, although some are examined by ‘in-course’ assessment alone.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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