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Aberystwyth University’s MA/Diploma in Information and Library Studies will equip you with the highly desirable skills employers need to manage their most valuable assets in our global ‘information economy’. Read more
Aberystwyth University’s MA/Diploma in Information and Library Studies will equip you with the highly desirable skills employers need to manage their most valuable assets in our global ‘information economy’. You will be able to identify, organise, retrieve and make accessible information across paper, electronic and multimedia formats. This MA or Diploma will equip you to fulfil the essential role that companies and professional bodies need to compete effectively in a fast-moving national and international business environment.

The MA and Diploma are accredited by both CILIP and the Institute of Information Scientists making it one of the best courses for professional practice.

The Department of Information Studies at Aberystwyth has an impressive track record. In the department’s forty years of teaching, we have produced some of the UK's, and indeed the world's, leading librarians and information professionals. Our alumni include two national librarians (Scotland and former Wales), the first black national librarian in South Africa, and the Director of the Bureau for Library and Information Services at the United Nations.

This course features an extensive list of optional modules which allow you to direct your studies into areas which particularly fascinate you.

You can tailor your learning towards a wide range of career paths, such as children and schools work (with the Focus on the Child: Children's Literature and Schools Libraries and Learning Resources modules) and business services (including the modules on Business Information Services, and Management Information Systems).

This highly practical course is built around a variety of reports, essays, presentations, and case studies which will enable you to relate theoretical knowledge to the workplace. These challenges will also encourage you to improve your ICT, personal management and interpersonal skills, making you into a well-rounded, competent and highly employable individual.

Accreditation

The Master's degree is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) and the Institute of Information Scientists. Graduates will have a qualification which is recognised for admission to the Register of Chartered Librarians (subject to the Institute's chartership regulations).

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/information-and-library-studies-masters/

Suitable for

This degree will suit you:

- If you wish to obtain a Master’s degree or Diploma from one of the UK’s leading departments;
- If you wish to gain the knowledge and skills for professional work within Information and Library fields;
- If you wish to work in various types of information and library services or gain transferable skills for the pursuit of related careers such as media management and book publishing;
- If you wish to continue your studies to a more advanced level through undertaking further postgraduate level research.

Course detail

Aberystwyth University’s MA/Diploma in Information and Library Studies was one of the very first qualifications in this important area and is still one of the market’s most well regarded. It will introduce you to the challenges and best practice methods that determine the flow of information within and between organisations and their users. You will study how issues such as censorship, multiculturalism and intellectual freedom affect this movement. You will also study how technology impacts the delivery of information and library services in a range of important societal contexts, such as health, education and business arenas. By studying the principles and practical applications of these and many other subject areas, you will acquire skills that are highly desirable to all employers who rely on the flow of information including private companies, government bodies and public organisations.

The course is a full-time programme, taught over one year, and is divided into two parts over three semesters. In part one, you will study a number of crucial core modules whilst directing your own study by choosing specialist modules, together worth a total of 120 credits. In part two, you will apply your learning in the individual dissertation worth an additional 60 credits. If you do not wish to complete the individual dissertation then you can obtain the Diploma.

In the dissertation project, you will explore an approved topic in a dissertation totalling 15,000 words. You will engage with the central concepts, methods and techniques of the main streams of information and library research, and in doing so aim to contribute to the national understanding of data handling and information flow. Subject to the satisfactory completion of the dissertation, the MA in Information and Library Studies is awarded. The descriptions relating to this dissertation and all the study modules can be found on the Modules tab.

In addition to the teaching input from this leading department, you will be exposed to guest speakers and visits to services local to the University. You will participate in a four-day study tour to London in which you will have the opportunity to observe a wide variety of libraries and information organisations in both public and private sectors, and to meet the professional staff involved.

Upon graduation from the MA/Diploma in Information and Library Studies, you will have demonstrated the academic excellence, personal rigor and interpersonal adaptability required by recruiting corporate bodies, government agencies and research institutes alike. As someone with a wealth of up-to-date theoretical knowledge and practical experience, you will be on the cutting edge of the subject. In a competitive jobs market, your particular skills set, proven through highly relevant business, education and health applications, will make you highly desirable to employers from a range of industries.

The university has a proud tradition of research excellence, as demonstrated in the most recent Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It placed the university in the top 50 institutions for research power and intensity. It submitted 77% of eligible staff and 95% of the university's research was of an internationally recognised standard.

Format

Contact time is approximately 10 hours a week in the first two semesters. During semester three you will arrange your level of contact time with your assigned supervisor.

Assessment

The taught part of the course (Part 1) is delivered and assessed through lectures, student seminars, practical exercises, case studies, course work and formal examinations. Successful completion allows the award of a Diploma. The subsequent successful submission of your research dissertation (Part 2) leads to the award of an MA.

Employability

More of our Postgraduate Students (74.1%) entered employment at a graduate level than the national average (72.1%), earning more on average than postgraduates in other subject fields. * 2010/11

Every aspect of the Aberystwyth University’s Master’s in Information and Library Studies programme is designed to enhance your employability. Successful completion of this degree is in itself certain to do so by building your CV; but more significant is the hugely enhanced array of knowledge, abilities and skills with which you will graduate.

As a graduate, you will possess a wealth of subject-specific expertise, such as a thorough understanding of how ethical, legal, and social factors affect the flow of information; information literacy and the effect of 'information deprivation'; and the ongoing challenges of organising, storing, and retrieving information. You will also be confident in the use of system and their tools which you will use to order, store and retrieve information. These skills, which are fundamental to the subject, are applicable across a diverse array of workplaces. Likewise, the study skills, research methods and interpersonal awareness that you will learn within the context of study can be applied in any place of work where people and systems meet. In such situations, you will be at a tremendous advantage over your competitors.

As information is increasingly recognised as a core resource for organisations of all kinds, the range of posts to which our graduates progress widens all the time. In addition to the traditional library and information service sector, our graduates also go on to work as Information Officers, Information Managers, Information Systems Officers, Information Analysts and Computer Systems Officers. The most prestigious of our alumni include two national librarians (Scotland and former Wales), the newly appointed first black national librarian in South Africa, and the Director of the Bureau for Library and Information Services at the United Nations. In addition, companies which acknowledge the value of information also benefit from our graduates’ information skills when applied to the areas of management, sales, production or marketing. Your personal adaptability, coupled with the critical information and library skills, will make you a strong candidate for any post where excellence in organisations and systems management is prized.

Study in a Practical Context

The content of this MA/Diploma is weighted in favour of mastering the practical applications of Information and Library Studies. The University of Aberystwyth boasts library resources which are amongst the best in Europe. The Department’s specialist Thomas Parry Library is one of the leading libraries for Information Studies. As a student, you will have access to this exceptional resource where you can apply your learning in activities which will convert the purely academic theory into the proven know-how of experience.

In addition to this, you will also have access to the University's Hugh Owen Library which houses more than 700,000 volumes and subscribes to more than 3,500 current periodicals. Also, the National Library for Wales next to the campus is one of the UK's five copyright libraries housing more than 6,000,000 volumes. In addition to the University's computing facilities, you will also have access to the Department's own extensive computer workstation rooms, all housed in a purpose built Department on the attractive Llanbadarn campus.

Skills in Management of Systems and Stakeholders

The MA/Diploma is designed to give you a broad knowledge of a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of research interests, particularly in your Master’s dissertation. A significant proportion of postgraduate jobs demand management abilities; this course aims to support your progression into professional employment beyond by including such training.

You will become well versed in contemporary management theory and practice of relevance to the management of the relationship between information and organisations. You will learn to analyse and control how information is transmitted to users, including access to information and measurement of use. The monitoring an analysis of data is crucial to the success of business organisations and initiatives. Mastering it will enable you to manage within a changing and turbulent environment and provide you with an understanding of the inter-relationship of the organization with its customers and stakeholders.

As business relies on meeting needs, this training will be a significant advantage to you when you enter the jobs market.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

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Aberystwyth University’s MA/Diploma in Information and Library Studies by distance learning will equip you with the highly desirable skills employers need to manage their most valuable assets in our global ‘information economy’. Read more
Aberystwyth University’s MA/Diploma in Information and Library Studies by distance learning will equip you with the highly desirable skills employers need to manage their most valuable assets in our global ‘information economy’. You will be able to identify, organise, retrieve and make accessible information across paper, electronic and multimedia formats. This MA or Diploma will equip you to fulfil the essential role that companies and professional bodies need to compete effectively in a fast-moving national and international business environment.

The MA and Diploma are accredited by both CILIP and the Institute of Information Scientists making it one of the best courses for professional practice.

The Department of Information Studies at Aberystwyth has an impressive track record. In the department’s forty years of teaching, we have produced some of the UK's, and indeed the world's, leading librarians and information professionals. Our alumni include two national librarians (Scotland and former Wales), the first black national librarian in South Africa, and the Director of the Bureau for Library and Information Services at the United Nations.

This course features an extensive list of optional modules which allow you to direct your studies into areas which particularly fascinate you. As a Distance Learner in employment, you should find that your work experience enhances your studies, while your studies enable you to reflect on your work experience in new ways. Your studies can also help you to promote the best current practice in your workplace.

Although this postgraduate programme is primarily designed to meet the needs of those who wish to work in various types of information and library services, you can exploit the transferable skills mastered during the programme to pursue careers in related professions (e.g. media management and book publishing), or continue your studies to a more advanced level through undertaking further postgraduate level research.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/information-and-library-studies-distance-learning-masters/

Suitable for

This degree will suit you:

- If you wish to obtain a Master’s degree or Diploma from one of the UK’s leading departments;
- If you wish to gain the knowledge and skills for professional work within Information and Library fields;
- If you wish to work in various types of information and library services or gain transferable skills for the pursuit of related careers such as media management and book publishing;
- If you wish to continue your studies to a more advanced level through undertaking further postgraduate level research.

Course detail

The course accepts two intakes every year, one in April and another in September. Applications are welcomed throughout the year.

The skills of information and library professionals are in demand as employers recognise the necessity for staff to identify, organise, retrieve and make accessible information as it exists in paper, electronic and multimedia formats.

On this course you will be introduced to the key information handling skills as well as the opportunity to develop your ICT, management and interpersonal skills. You will be equipped with the knowledge and skills for professional work. In addition, as the programme is studied at a distance, you should be able to feedback your newly acquired knowledge into your workplace as you progress.

The university has a proud tradition of research excellence, as demonstrated in the most recent Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It placed the university in the top 50 institutions for research power and intensity. It submitted 77% of eligible staff and 95% of the university's research was of an internationally recognised standard.

Format

Contact time can be arranged remotely with your tutor. Attendance at at least two study schools is required and these provide the main contact.

Assessment

The programme is assessed on the basis of coursework in Part One and the dissertation in Part Two. Successful completion of Part One allows the award of a Diploma. The subsequent successful submission of your research dissertation (Part Two) leads to the award of an MA.

Employability

More of our Postgraduate Students (74.1%) entered employment at a graduate level than the national average (72.1%), earning more on average than postgraduates in other subject fields. *2010/11

Every aspect of the Aberystwyth University’s Master’s in Information and Library Studies programme is designed to enhance your employability. Successful completion of this degree is in itself certain to do so by building your CV; but more significant is the hugely enhanced array of knowledge, abilities and skills with which you will graduate.

As a graduate, you will possess a wealth of subject-specific expertise, such as a thorough understanding of how ethical, legal, and social factors affect the flow of information; information literacy and the effect of 'information deprivation'; and the ongoing challenges of organising, storing, and retrieving information. You will also be confident in the use of system and their tools which you will use to order, store and retrieve information. These skills, which are fundamental to the subject, are applicable across a diverse array of workplaces. Likewise, the study skills, research methods and interpersonal awareness that you will learn within the context of study can be applied in any place of work where people and systems meet. In such situations, you will be at a tremendous advantage over your competitors.

As information is increasingly recognised as a core resource for organisations of all kinds, the range of posts to which our graduates progress widens all the time. In addition to the traditional library and information service sector, our graduates also go on to work as Information Officers, Information Managers, Information Systems Officers, Information Analysts and Computer Systems Officers. The most prestigious of our alumni include two national librarians (Scotland and former Wales), the first black national librarian in South Africa, and the Director of the Bureau for Library and Information Services at the United Nations. In addition, companies which acknowledge the value of information also benefit from our graduates’ information skills when applied to the areas of management, sales, production or marketing. Your personal adaptability, coupled with the critical information and library skills, will make you a strong candidate for any post where excellence in organisations and systems management is prized.

- Study in a Practical Context:
The content of this MA/Diploma is weighted in favour of mastering the practical applications of Information and Library Studies. The University of Aberystwyth boasts library resources which are amongst the best in Europe. The Department’s specialist Thomas Parry Library is one of the leading libraries for Information Studies. As a student, you will have access to this exceptional resource where you can apply your learning in activities which will convert the purely academic theory into the proven know-how of experience.

In addition to this, you will also have access to the University's Hugh Owen Library which houses more than 700,000 volumes and subscribes to more than 3,500 current periodicals. Also, the National Library for Wales next to the campus is one of the UK's five copyright libraries housing more than 6,000,000 volumes. In addition to the University's computing facilities, you will also have access to the Department's own extensive computer workstation rooms, all housed in a purpose built Department on the attractive Llanbadarn campus.

- Skills in Management of Systems and Stakeholders:
The MA/Diploma is designed to give you a broad knowledge of a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of research interests, particularly in your Master’s dissertation. A significant proportion of postgraduate jobs demand management abilities; this course aims to support your progression into professional employment beyond by including such training.

You will become well versed in contemporary management theory and practice of relevance to the management of the relationship between information and organisations. You will learn to analyse and control how information is transmitted to users, including access to information and measurement of use. The monitoring an analysis of data is crucial to the success of business organisations and initiatives. Mastering it will enable you to manage within a changing and turbulent environment and provide you with an understanding of the inter-relationship of the organization with its customers and stakeholders.

As business relies on meeting needs, this training will be a significant advantage to you when you enter the jobs market.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

Read less
With our Library Science MA/MSc you can develop the skills and understanding to initiate, work with and develop modern collection based information services. Read more
With our Library Science MA/MSc you can develop the skills and understanding to initiate, work with and develop modern collection based information services.

Who is it for?

This programme is for students with a first degree or equivalent in any discipline, who have an interest in information communication, and who would like to start or develop a career in information management in libraries, galleries, archives or museums. It is also suitable for professionals wishing to update their knowledge and skills within the discipline.

Library Science is a broad discipline, and it appeals to students prepared to challenge inequalities in information access and use, who enjoy communicating and sharing information, and who like working with information technologies.

Objectives

Humanity has now entered the age of the zettabyte (1000 exabytes), with enough information being generated daily to fill US libraries several times over [Floridi L, 2014. The 4th Revolution. Oxford. p 38]. The demand for knowledge organisation, access, and understanding has never been greater.

City’s MA/MSc Library Science examines contemporary questions of information communication from a framework of information history and philosophy. Our focus is divided equally between theory and its application to practice. The course spans the fundamental concepts of documentation, collection management, information organisation, access, information literacy, use of new and emergent technologies, methods of investigation and analysis, socio-political implications and policy formulation.

The course equips you with a deep understanding of collection-orientated institutions and services, and their relevance and impact within society. There is a strong focus on ethics, professional communication and networking. You will benefit from a high level of engagement with practitioners, and we are pleased to welcome many leaders in the profession as speakers on our modules.

Academic facilities

City has recently undergone a significant level of refurbishment, so that course participants can enjoy state of the art classrooms and facilities.

We work in close connection with our colleagues at City Library, who offer excellent support and advice to our students, in addition to contributing to our courses. Follow @cityunilibrary and @cityunilibresearchers on Twitter. You will have access to our state-of-the-art mentoring service.

Placements

Internships are not a part of this course, but students who wish to are usually able to obtain work experience (paid or voluntary), or to work with external organisations in completing assignments or carrying out a dissertation project. Details of opportunities are posted on our Moodle forum.

Teaching and learning

The teaching and learning methods we use mean that your specialist knowledge and autonomy develop as you progress through the course.

Taught modules are normally delivered through a series of 30 hours of lectures.

Lectures are normally used to:
-Present and exemplify the concepts underpinning a particular subject.
-Highlight the most significant aspects of the syllabus.
-Indicate additional topics and resources for private study.

In addition to lectures and tutorial support, you also have access to a personal tutor. This is an academic member of staff from whom you can gain learning support throughout your degree. In addition, City’s online learning environment Moodle contains resources for each of the modules including lecture notes, further reading, web-based media resources and an interactive discussion forum.

We expect you to study independently and complete coursework for each module. This should amount to approximately 120 hours per module if you are studying full time. Each module is assessed through coursework, where you will need to answer a variety of assignments to show that you are able to apply your theoretical learning to practical situations.

Communication and networking via social media is an integral part of our Library Science masters course, and in preparation for professional practice, you are expected to engage with blogs, Twitter and other relevant communication media as part of your studies. Face-to-face participation in student and new professional forums including research seminars, workshops and conferences is actively promoted. You are encouraged to present your work (assignments, dissertation) to the wider LIS community for discussion and development.

The course culminates with an individual project. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently. The individual project (dissertation) allows you to demonstrate your ability to think and work independently, to be aware of and to comprehend current issues within the discipline and practice, to initiate ways of investigating and solving current problems or questions, and to deliver results and solutions on time.

The individual project is a substantial task. It is your opportunity to develop a research-related topic under the supervision of an academic member of staff. This is the moment when you can apply what you have learnt to solve a real-world problem or to develop further, contemporary conceptual theory in library science.

Modules

The MA/MSc in Library Science is offered as a one year full-time course, or two year part-time course. On successful completion of the course, you can choose between the award of MA or of MSc. This is usually based on the arts or science content of the work undertaken for the degree, and/or your career aspirations. The course structure and modules are the same for either award. The difference occurs in the focus of the assignments and the dissertation.

You can expect to study for approximately 40 hours per week full-time, and 20 hours per week part-time. The actual time required will vary according to the individual, and with existing experience and prior study.

The course comprises seven core modules and one elective module. These taught modules run during the first and second terms, whilst the third, summer term is reserved for the dissertation. Each of the modules counts for 15 credits, and requires approximately 150 hours work, of which 30 hours are face-to-face instruction (this may be lectures, seminars, group work, discussion or practical work), and 120 hours are self-directed study.

On successful completion of eight taught modules, students can progress to the dissertation. The dissertation is worth 60 credits, and takes around 400 hours. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently.

The goal of library and information science is to enable access to, use of, and consequent understanding of information. To do this, the discipline is concerned with the processes of the information communication chain: the creation, dissemination, management, organisation, preservation, analysis and use of information, instantiated as documents.

Core modules
-Library and Information Science Foundation (15 credits)
-Digital Information Technologies and Architecture (15 credits)
-Information Organisation (15 credits)
-Digital Libraries (15 credits)
-Information Management and Policy (15 credits)
-Research Methods and Communication (15 credits)
-Libraries and Publishing in the Information Society (15 credits)

Elective modules - you can choose one module from the following.
-Information Resources and Documentation (15 credits)
-Information law and policy (15 credits)
-Independent study (15 credits)
-Web applications development (15 credits)

Career prospects

Library Science MSc/MA graduates have an excellent record of finding suitable jobs and going on to successful careers, most commonly in public, academic and school libraries, consultancies, special libraries and information services and publishing. The Library Science postgraduate course is also an excellent preparation for further study and research.

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The Library and Information Studies MA provides the ideal foundation for career progression in library or information work. Read more
The Library and Information Studies MA provides the ideal foundation for career progression in library or information work. The one-year programme is accredited by the professional association Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP), and offers students a wide range of up-to-date learning opportunities while helping to develop strong networks designed to enhance their employability.

Degree information

The programme prepares students for professional practice in the field of library and information studies. It equips them with the practical skills required for the identification, location, management and organisation of information and information stores, and fosters an understanding of the processes by which information is produced, disseminated, controlled and recorded.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma, six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), full-time nine months or flexible study 2-5 years, is offered.

Core modules
-Cataloguing and Classification 1
-Collection Management and Preservation
-Information Sources and Retrieval
-Introduction to Management
-Principles of Computing and Information Technology
-Professional Awareness

Optional modules - students choose two of the following:
-Advanced Preservation
-Cataloguing and Classification 2
-Digital Resources in the Humanities
-Electronic Publishing
-Historical Bibliography
-Individual Approved Study
-Information Governance
-Knowledge Representation and Semantic Technologies
-Manuscript Studies
-Publishing Today
-Records Management
-Web Publishing
-Information Literacy
-Academic and Journals Publishing

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, computer laboratory and classroom practicals, with a strong emphasis on active learning and the acquisition of practical skills. Assessment is through a mixture of essays, reports, examination and practical assignments such as website design and the creation of indexing tools.

Placement
The work placement is only open to full-time students and forms part of the G030 Professional Awareness module. The work placement gives students experience of how the techniques they have learned may be applied in practice. Placements last for two weeks, and are undertaken at the beginning of the third term. We arrange placements individually for each student and do our best to match the placement with their interests and experience.

Careers

The programme aims to be broad-based: we are not trying to produce graduates who can work in only one kind of library or information service. The skills we try to impart are, therefore intended to apply in a wide range of different jobs.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Information Officer, Trowers and Hamlins
-News Reference Specialist, British Library
-Cataloguer, Eton College
-Librarian, BSix
-Knowledge and Information Specialist, CRU Group

Employability
As a vocational Master's, this programme prepares students for employment in the sector, and, in most cases, for promotion from their pre-library school role as a library assistant to a qualified librarian role, such as senior library assistant, assistant librarian, librarian and library manager. Students occasionally choose careers in information provision, such as taxonomists and web designers. There are specialist employment agencies that place students in both short-term and permanent positions, so if students do not find their ideal post straight away, they usually find suitable employment while continuing to seek their ideal post.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This well-established programme is accredited by CILIP (to 2019). It attracts an outstanding team of researchers, teachers, students, practitioners and information industry leaders. It combines an appreciation of the traditional library with the latest developments in internet and digital technologies to develop an understanding of the ever-evolving information environment.

Networking opportunities include a two-week work placement, regular journal club and speaker events, guest lectures by professionals and career seminars sponsored by industry professionals.

Students benefit from UCL's proximity to major libraries and repositories, including the British Library and the Senate House LIbrary of the University of London.

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Qatar has a bold vision to become a knowledge society. It is also committed to developing a world-class Qatar National Library (QNL) which will ‘bridge with knowledge Qatar’s heritage and future’. Read more
Qatar has a bold vision to become a knowledge society. It is also committed to developing a world-class Qatar National Library (QNL) which will ‘bridge with knowledge Qatar’s heritage and future’. This ground-breaking MA aims to nurture a world-class cadre of library professionals and train the future leaders of the sector.

Degree information

The programme provides students with an awareness of current issues and trends in library and information work. It fosters understanding of the processes by which information is produced, disseminated, controlled and recorded, and equips students with practical skills for the identification, location, management and organisation of information.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits). The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months) is also offered. Students complete all modules except the dissertation.

Core modules
-Knowledge Organsiation and Access
-Collection Management
-Information Sources and Retrieval
-Introduction to Management
-Principles of Computing and Information Technology
-Professional Awareness
-Dissertation

Optional modules
-The Book in the World
-Digital Resources in the Humanities
-Information Literacy
-Interdisciplinary Methods for the Study of Cultural Heritage
-Introduction to Archives and Preservation
-Islamic Manuscripts
-Library Systems and Data Management
-Services to Children and Young People

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, private reading, seminars, practical classes, small group work, group project work, computer laboratory sessions, essay writing, and independent research. Except for short courses, all programmes are delivered in afternoon sessions. Students can access and use the virtual learning environment (Moodle) at UCL, which provides the opportunity to benefit from the expertise of UCL staff both in London and Qatar. Intensive short courses will also be delivered by visiting staff from UCL Information Studies (London). Assessment takes a variety of forms including: essays, portfolios, prepared practical work, individual and group project work, report writing, policy writing, presentations, peer assessment and the dissertation. There is also a written examination, attached to the professional awareness module, and accounting for 50% of the marks.

Careers

Graduates will be able to work in a wide network of settings including school libraries, libraries based in government ministries, and many more libraries in institutions such as museums and societies, and countless business libraries and archives.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The MA in Library and Information Studies at UCL Qatar has become the first degree programme of its kind in the region to be formally accredited by CILIP: the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals. The MA in Library and Information Studies is identical to the programme offered at UCL’s Department of Information Studies in London – the UK’s premier facility for the teaching of library and information studies.

Students have the opportunity to network with leading library professionals from Qatar and the region and will undertake a placement in a local or international library.

Qatar is investing heavily in libraries, infrastructure and capacity building. This is an exceptionally exciting period for students and professionals who are looking to develop their career in the region.

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Now accepting applications for 2017/18. An international reputation for book conservation skills. Working on live projects, you will apply professional book conservation treatments and critical analysis of treatments. Read more
Now accepting applications for 2017/18

An international reputation for book conservation skills.

Working on live projects, you will apply professional book conservation treatments and critical analysis of treatments. Study of historical book structures will entail research in order to make an accurate model of a chosen historical book structure. In Conservation theory and practice you will explore exhibition issues, metal components of books, paper conservation, disaster response and materials science.

::You can expect::

- To develop excellent practical skills through object-based treatments
- To work on live projects, taking part in decision-making and applying professional conservation treatments
- To perform historical research and interpretation of the objects you work on
- To work with materials from library and archive collections

::Learning environment::

- High tutor: student ratio
- Interdisciplinary environment
- Workshop access 7am-10pm, 7 days a week
- Teaches students to understand and apply Icon's Professional Standards in Conservation
- Visits to collections

Programme Aims

The aims of the programme are to provide:

Practical:

1. A context for the analysis, assessment and treatment of historical Library Materials

2. The opportunity to further develop existing specialist craft and conservation skills

3. A research environment for the development and public dissemination of innovative
approaches to the conservation of Books and Library Materials

Theoretical:

1. The opportunity to contribute to the development of historical, cultural and technical
understanding of books through primary research and investigation

2. The opportunity to evaluate methodologies, develop critiques and propose new hypotheses

3. A context for individual inquiry and informed debate across conservation specialisms

Professional:

1. A context for the development of a range of verbal, written and visual skills appropriate for the
communication and documentation of conservation projects and research

2. A context for the development of, and critical reflection upon, personal and professional codes
of practice

3. Opportunities to plan and implement a range of projects that are increasingly technically
complex, and which present challenges of a compound nature

Careers

From the Postgraduate Diploma students often progress to MA Conservation Studies - https://www.westdean.org.uk/study/school-of-conservation

Work as a conservation professional in a museum, library or archive, with public and private collections. Pursue a career path into collections care and management or as an independent book conservator. Graduates have gone on to work on books at The Bodleian Library in Oxford, Admiralty Library, Portsmouth, Wimborne Minster Library, Chichester Cathedral Library Collection and the Dutch National Archive.

Facilities

You will work in a purpose-built space for book conservation with two workshops as well as a finishing room and science lab. Students each have their own benches with storage and can access the studio from 7am to 10pm, allowing them to take full advantage of their time at West Dean. You will also have access to facilities shared with other departments, including the analytical laboratory, photography space, IT suite, and specialist library.

The on-site Art and Conservation Library puts thousands of specialist books and journals within your reach and you can access specialist databases in the IT suite.

Find out more about facilities here - https://www.westdean.org.uk/study/school-of-conservation/facilities

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This course is a way to build on your professional skills and educational leadership. Are you a teacher or educationalist who would like to develop your professional practice? The aim of this course is to support your career development while also enabling you to develop advanced research and study skills. Read more
This course is a way to build on your professional skills and educational leadership.

Course overview

Are you a teacher or educationalist who would like to develop your professional practice? The aim of this course is to support your career development while also enabling you to develop advanced research and study skills.

This full-time course develops your professional practice as a teacher or educationalist. You will learn advanced research and study skills while acquiring Masters-level knowledge that is shaped by your personal interests and career aspirations.

We also offer a part-time Education MA and a distance learning Education MA, which may suit you if you need more flexible studying options.

There are four titles for the MA available, depending upon the modules chosen for study. The titles available are:
-MA Education (Generic)
-MA Education (Advanced Professional Practice - Secondary)
-MA Education (Advanced Professional Practice - Primary)
-MA Education (Special Educational Needs, Disability and Inclusion)

The content of the course can be tailored to your particular interests, with a range of modules available from our MA suite. Options may include ‘Advanced Pedagogical Practice’, ‘Assessment Theory into Pedagogical Practice’ and ‘Leading Organisational Effectiveness in Education’. You can also choose to undertake a negotiated individual study in education. For those who are returning to higher education, we provide plenty of support including classes to assist with academic writing.

MA Education (Special Educational Needs, Disability and Inclusion): This specialism is designed for professionals who are involved with Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND). The course equips you to develop SEND provision, allowing young people to reach their full potential in school and to make a successful transition into adulthood while continuing your broader professional development and also the opportunity to acquire Masters-level skills in research and analysis.

The research element of the course is excellent preparation if you decide to go on to a higher degree such as a PhD. The research element is supported by the University’s Centre for Pedagogy whose specialisms include teaching styles, motivation, human relationships in learning and comparative education.

Most people who join the course already have a PGCE or another teaching qualification. Your written outputs, together with the experiences and activities of the course, will provide a portfolio of evidence that can open up new opportunities and a fresh stage in your career.

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/courses/educationandsociety/postgraduate/education-generic-part-time/

Course content

This course offers considerable flexibility over the choice of modules from our MA suite. At Masters level, responsibility for learning lies as much with the student as with the lecturer. The course is structured as follows:
-You will choose three option modules from the MA suite (30 Credits each)
-You will complete the core module ‘Research Methods in Education’ (30 Credits)
-You will also undertake a Masters project/dissertation (60 Credits)

Modules in the MA suite may include the following:
-Development of Learning: A Case Study (30 Credits)
-Negotiated Individual Study in Education (30 Credits)
-Advanced Pedagogical Practice (30 Credits)
-Leading Organisational Effectiveness in Education and Training (30 Credits)
-Assessment Theory into Pedagogical Practice (30 Credits)
-Approaches to Teaching and Learning for Learners with Special or Additional Needs (30 Credits)
-Barriers to Learning (30 Credits)
-Inclusive Education (30 Credits)

Teaching and assessment

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include tutor input, seminars, workshops, support sessions, collaborative group work and discussion, tutorials, presentations, interactive practical sessions and directed private study.

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters course requires a higher level of independent working. Assessment methods include written assignments including the dissertation and oral and written presentations.

Facilities & location

The University of Sunderland has been a centre for training in education since 1908.

Course location
The course is based at our Sir Tom Cowie Campus at St Peter’s. The Campus is on the banks of the River Wear and is less than a mile from the seaside. It’s a vibrant learning environment with strong links to educational institutions and a constant exchange of ideas and people.

The campus also includes the Prospect Building – which mirrors our City Campus Gateway style in the main reception area. It also is home to the main campus library as well as several catering areas, which look out onto the river. Prospect Building underwent a recent 1.25m re-development to ensure it continues to meet the needs of the modern day student.

University Library Services
We have got thousands of books and e-books on education topics, with many more titles available through the inter-library loan service. We also subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date academic and industry articles.

Some of the most important sources for your course include:
-EBSCO Professional Development Collection, which is a specialised collection of over 500 education journals, including full-text education journals dating back to 1965
-British Education Index, which contains information on research, policy and practice in education and training in the UK
-Australian Education Index, which covers more than 130,000 documents relating to educational research, policy and practice
-Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC), which is a comprehensive, searchable bibliographic and full-text database of research and information. Over 650 journals are indexed
-JSTOR (short for ‘Journal Storage’), which provides access to important journals across the humanities, social sciences and sciences
-Lexis, which provides access to legal information as well as full-text newspaper articles

IT provision
When it comes to IT provision you can take your pick from hundreds of PCs as well as Apple Macs in the David Goldman Informatics Centre and St Peter’s library. There are also free WiFi zones throughout the campus. If you have any problems, just ask the friendly helpdesk team.

Employment & careers

On completing this course, your skills and understanding will be enhanced for roles in teaching, educational management and other educational settings.

Higher salaries are available for those who develop their professionalism and achieve the status of Excellent Teacher or Advanced Skills Teacher.

Teachers who take on additional responsibilities such as the co-ordination of provision for those with Special Education Needs can also expect to command a higher salary.

Past graduates from this course have gained employment in roles such as the following:
-Special needs and inclusion
-Senior management in education
-Special Educational Needs teacher

A Masters qualification also gives you broader career options including possible roles in lecturing, journalism, the media and arts administration. The research elements of a Masters course prepare you for further postgraduate studies at doctoral level.

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Ceramics aims to develop individual abilities within the subject, whether through practice or historical or theoretical study. Approaches range from sculpture and installation to studio ceramics and design for products. Read more
Ceramics aims to develop individual abilities within the subject, whether through practice or historical or theoretical study. Approaches range from sculpture and installation to studio ceramics and design for products. The course is distinctive in offering you the opportunity to specialise in ceramics as a medium allied to a breadth of possibilities, and establishing negotiated individual modes of practice.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

We offer Ceramics full or part time, lasting one year (3 trimesters) FT, 6 trimesters PT. Your first two trimesters is made up of taught sessions and assessed projects, the Master’s Project in the final trimester is by negotiated project only. Completion of the first 2 modules on the course lead to the award of the Postgraduate Certificate, completion of the first 4 modules leads to the award of the Postgraduate Diploma. Subsequent completion of the MA double module leads to the award of MA.

In the first trimester you will undertake a module in research methodologies in conjunction with students from other design disciplines. You will be establishing and initiating your studio based creative practice through individual and group tutorials and critiques. This teaching covers issues of technique together with aesthetic and design ideas and their interpretation and context within contemporary practice. This approach to studio work will be further developed in the second trimester, alongside an individual analysis of the relevant theoretical, cultural and social context for your work. The four modules taken in the first two trimesters lead to the postgraduate diploma (PGDip).

The final trimester, leading to the MA, comprises an individually negotiated and self-initiated body of work building on knowledge and skills already acquired. You will be supervised by tutorial through to completion. The project will be selected from options giving an emphasis either to individual expression or a more design-based approach.

DISTANCE LEARNING ROUTE

Students may opt to take some or all of the modules on this course by distance learning. Teaching and tutorial support will be delivered via a combination of computer-based learning and campus visits, with assessment matched to the particular interests and needs of individual students.

This route is open to all students on the course. You may pursue both practice based and/or historical approaches to the study of ceramics by this means. The route will be of particular interest to those geographically distant from Bath, or who would find attending campus regularly difficult. The technology used is simple and accessible. You will need access to a computer linked to the internet as materials are delivered through a standard web browser. We welcome enquiries from anyone interested in this option, and will be delighted to answer any questions you may have.

MODULES

Research Methodologies - This module is intended to provide students with a strong sense of methodological purpose when thinking in, through and about their practice. Research Methodologies will outline established models of academic enquiry - both practical and intellectual - proposing ways to gather, analyse and communicate a wide range of data and ideas.

Initiating Creative Practice - A practice module, where students produce work based upon a programme negotiated and agreed with staff, designed to set an agenda and working plan.

Developing Creative Practice - A practice module, where students make work based on visual research on a programme negotiated and agreed with staff to develop studio work, awareness and understanding of relevant concepts.

Analysis of Contemporary Context - A module where the practitioner engages in a contextual consideration of their work by referring to cultural, critical, theoretical and historical perspectives employing advanced research methods alongside development of a proposed programme for the final MA module.

Advanced Studio Practice - You are expected to submit a comprehensive body of creative ceramic work which meets the agreed objectives, accompanied by documentation of visual and other research. It should include a written evaluation of the ‘journey’ and outcomes of your project, and aspirations for future developments.

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

Theoretical elements will be delivered as a concurrent contextualisation of your practical work along with study of the relevant research methodologies. In this way your practical work is firmly based in the theoretical and critical awareness of its context and potential market.

Ceramics students have workspaces in well equipped workshops, including CAD facilities. There is an excellent glaze laboratory and a range of electric and gas-fired kilns, including outdoor firing facilities for salt and raku. There is also a dedicated space and kilns for large-scale work. All students have access to workshops in photography, sound and video, etching and litho, as well as the specialist Art and Design library.

TUTORS

• Jane Gibson Mdes RCA (design and ceramic production and curating)
• Keith Harrison MA RCA (time-based installation)
• Nick Lees MA Cardiff (tableware, ceramic sculpture, critical writing)
• Jo Dahn MA PhD UWA (history and theory)
• Graham McLaren PhD RCA

These staff will be supported by an extensive team of part-time staff, whose wide range of expertise is available on a regular basis. There are also 3-4 visiting artists each year.

• Marion Brandis MA (public art, commissioned projects)
• Steve Brown MA (ceramic print)
• Ian Byers BA (ceramic sculpture)
• Helen Harris BA (photography)
• Simon Hulbert MA (gallerist, potter)
• Penny Grist BA (printmaking)
• Aimee Lax MA (ceramics)
• Malcolm Ross-White (drawing)
• Zeita Scott MA (tableware, studio ceramics)
• Sasha Wardell MA (tableware and giftware)
• Professor Takeshi Yasuda (tableware, studio ceramics)

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Typical career destinations include exhibiting, ceramic design and museum work, arts administration, public art and research.

ASSESSMENT METHODS

The four taught modules in trimesters one and two are assessed through studio exhibition of work with a supporting statement, or the presentation of a document, accompanied in both cases by evidence of appropriate research. The final module for the MA is assessed through exhibition or exposition, according to the nature of the work, of all work for the module or a record of it, addressing the issues agreed in the initial proposal. There are no written examinations.

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Degree programme description. This MA offers you the opportunity to explore key aspects of film analysis, theory, history and practice. Read more
Degree programme description
This MA offers you the opportunity to explore key aspects of film analysis, theory, history and practice. If you have already studied film at undergraduate level, you will be able to deepen your knowledge here. If this is your first in-depth engagement with film, you will be introduced to some of the liveliest and most important chapters in the history of cinema. You will be able to pursue your own particular interests in a dissertation on a topic of your choice. The MA also includes an element of practical work and the study of production practices.

From the earliest days of British cinema, London was the location of most British studios and it remains the national focal point for studying film.
Our provision at Queen Mary is enhanced by our proximity to major cultural centres such as the British Film Institute, which includes the BFI Southbank, National Library and National Archive, the Institute of Contemporary Arts and the Ciné-Lumière at the French Institute. The MA attracts high numbers of well-qualified applicants from the UK and overseas each year. It is both a valuable qualification in its own right and particularly useful for applicants wishing to study subsequently for an MPhil or PhD in Film Studies.

Degree programme outline
The core module spans two semesters and provides an introduction to film analysis and theory, an overview of national and transnational cinemas (focusing on films from the USA, Britain, France, Germany, Spain, Italy, Russia and Latin America), and an outline of film history during the twentieth century. You will also be introduced to aspects of film production and practice, including the technology of photography and its use in the feature film, cinematography and the continuity system and its relationship to the development of directorial style.

You can also choose two single-semester optional modules from a range including:
• 9/11 and American Film
• Auteur Direction
• Comedies of Desire
• Films of Powell and Pressburger
• Film History: Hollywood and the Second World War
• Frame, Space, Time: Approaches to the Experiences of Film
• History, Fiction and Memory in French Cinema
• Hollywood’s Vietnam
• Introduction to Film Archives
• Married to the Mob?: Mafia representations in Hollywood and Italian Cinema
• Moving Landscapes: Film Geography and Contemporary European Cinema (subject to approval)
• Paris on the Screen
• Sighting Gender and Sexuality in Latin American Film.

You may be permitted to take one option offered as part of another MA programme in the School or within the Faculty of Arts, provided that the MA convenor agrees that this would be beneficial for your intellectual development and research plans. In the case of options outside the School, admission to such modules requires the further agreement of the module convenor. This arrangement is also extended to include an option offered as part of the MA in Global Cinema and the Transcultural at SOAS, the MA in Screen Studies at Goldsmiths, the MA in History of Film and Visual Media at Birkbeck, the MA in Film Studies at UCL, or the MA in Contemporary Cinema Cultures at KCL.

Assessment
You will submit three essays for the core module, one of 2,000 words and two of 3,000 words, and one 4,000-word essay for each of the two options. At the end of August you will submit a dissertation of 10,000 to 12,000 words.

Entry requirements
Applicants will normally be expected to have been awarded (by the time they are actually beginning the MA course) a first- or upper-second-class degree (or international equivalent) in a relevant field of study, for example in Literature, History, Film and Media, or Cultural Studies.

Career opportunities
Doing an MA is an essential prerequisite for an application to enrol for a PhD. If you are not interested in pursuing an academic degree, you will find that many varied opportunities may arise for which the MA in Film will be an appropriate training: media, teaching, PR, etc. There is no specific career for which the MA at Queen Mary is specifically designed to cater.

Further information
http://www.sllf.qmul.ac.uk/postgraduate/

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Our MA Education is designed for graduates and aimed specifically at educational professionals (e.g. teachers, lecturers and others working in educational settings in support/administrative roles). Read more
Our MA Education is designed for graduates and aimed specifically at educational professionals (e.g. teachers, lecturers and others working in educational settings in support/administrative roles). We offer a generic MA Education and also an MA Education with specialist routes:

MA Education (Catholic School Leadership),
MA Education (Leadership and Management),
MA Education (Learning and Teaching),
MA Education (Inclusion and SEN)
MA Education (Early Childhood Education and Care)
MA Education (Higher Education Practice),
MA Education (Research),
MA Education (Safeguarding).


Postgraduate certificates for the above routes are also available as interim or stand-alone awards, including a Post Graduate Special Education Needs Coordinators.

Course content

Newman offers you the opportunity to enhance your professional knowledge, understanding and skills by developing and implementing systematic professional enquiry and research. The course promotes critical engagement in a range of contemporary issues pertinent to specific interests and needs and you are encouraged to explore your own personal and professional interests and expertise.
If you wish to progress your studies even further then the course provides an appropriate academic platform for progression to PhD/EdD study.

Selection of module

s
This is a modular programme in which the emphasis is on selecting elective modules to best suit your professional needs and interests:
• An Introduction to Mentoring and Coaching
• Advanced Mentoring and Coaching
• Learning, Teaching and Assessment
• Learning via new Technologies
• Educational Leadership
• Change Management
• Reflective Practice
• SEN and Inclusion
• The role of the SENCo
• International Education
• Professional Enquiry Skills
• Independent Study
• Specialist Study
Please note elective modules will be offered based on viable numbers each year.
Compulsory modules:
• Research Methods
• Dissertation

The MA Education is typically taken over 2-3 years part-time (over 12-18 months full-time). To gain an MA Education you must complete 180 credits at Masters level. The programme also provides a basis for progression to doctoral study in education. To gain an MA Education, you must successfully complete 180 credits – 90 of these are from elective modules and 90 are from core/compulsory modules. The Postgraduate Certificate comprises 2 elective modules typically taken over 6-9 months part-time (over 4 months full-time).

Attendance

Modules are based at Newman, with sessions taking place from 5.30-7.30 on Monday-Thursday evenings. However, if there are significant numbers of staff in one institution wishing to undertake the programme we can deliver the programme on your site at times convenient to you.

Assessment

You will experience a range of assessment formats including portfolios, presentations and written assignments. The course will recognise your needs as a learner and develop independent study skills that are transferable to a range of learning situations and assessment tasks.

Special features

You will have access to all facilities at Newman including the library, which stocks a wide range of books, journals and e-books. Previous level 7 masters credits may be transferred (free-of-charge) through the accreditation of prior certificated learning (APCL). Also, you can gain credits for other sustained CPD programmes you have undertaken, such as National College Programmes, by writing up your reflections against the assessment criteria for a comparable module via the accreditation of prior experiential learning (APEL). You may also gain national professional recognition through the Teaching and Learning Academy for your Masters level work.

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​MA English Literature & Creative Writing is a rewarding taught degree, combining the study of English Literature with the theoretical and practical component of fiction writing. Read more

Course Overview

​MA English Literature & Creative Writing is a rewarding taught degree, combining the study of English Literature with the theoretical and practical component of fiction writing.

The MA is taught by published writers and researchers. The course is aimed to support you while you develop and hone your critical and creative writing skills, particularly in the field of fiction. You can take our MA for professional development purposes, in order to enhance your career and to increase your likelihood of publication. The MA will also help you specialise in the areas of creative practice as well as contemporary and historical literature in relation to place and space in order to pave the way for doctoral study.

We have expertise across a number of fields and our academic community is vibrant and dynamic with strong industry links.

The English Literature part of the degree analyses historic and contemporary textual representations of place, theorising cultural practices of location and space. The Creative Writing modules are specifically designed to develop you as a writer of fiction.

One of the great strengths of the programme is its flexibility. MA English Literature and Creative Writing can be studied either full or part time. Modules can be taken individually, allowing you to control the pace and depth of your postgraduate study. Programme delivery is enhanced by the university’s commitment to e-learning​.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/education/courses/Pages/English-and-Creative-Writing---MA.aspx

Course Content​​

All of our modules are core and are delivered over one year full time or two years part time.
Term 1
- Researching Humanities
Researching Humanities will introduce you to research methods at MA level. The module provides a thorough breakdown of research methods across the fields of Creative Writing and English Literature. This module is taught across all of our MA Creative Writing and English Literature pathways and it is also a great opportunity for you to get to know your peers.

- Short Story Writing
Short Story Writing provides a thorough introduction to the short story. This is done through two distinct, but integrated, approaches: a critical analysis of the development of the short story, with particular focus on twentieth century and contemporary writing; and through the creative practice itself. Each week you'll be encouraged to explore key techniques and approaches in your own writing through writing workshops.

- Literature and Landscapes
In Literature and Landscapes, you’ll examine artistic and literary representations of landscape, and engage with the complex social, cultural and aesthetic factors that contribute to the formation of identity. The module provides a comparative foundation from which you’ll consider representations of the urban encountered in Writing the City.

Term 2
- Novel Writing
Novel Writing extends and deepens your engagement with fiction writing. The module provides you with a thorough introduction to the novel as a distinct fictional genre focussing on the contemporary. As well as examining key works, you'll also be working on your own creative practice. A key part of the module focuses on the preparation of your work for publication.

- Writing the City
In Writing the City you'll explore representations of urban space through set texts and in your own creative writing. In this module you’ll examine texts that explore the urban in literary fiction, particularly throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

- Critical Practice
Critical Practice prepares you for your dissertation through which you'll be able to submit a substantial body of creative work along with a contextualising critical commentary.

- Dissertation
The Dissertation module is your opportunity to create a portfolio of writing, such as a collection of short stories or an excerpt of a novel that you are working on. The creative work will be accompanied by a critical reflection in which you contextualise your writing within a critical framework and with reference to other texts.

Learning & Teaching​

​Most modules are taught through group workshops and seminars. Some modules will also include individual tutorials and the dissertation module is delivered entirely through one-to-one tutorials with your supervisor.

In workshops and seminars full use is made of University technology and course materials will be delivered and stored through our Virtual Learning Environment. It will be possible for you to access the Virtual Learning Environment remotely and you will be encouraged to do so.

Most modules are 20 or 30 credits although we also have a 10-credit module and the dissertation is worth 60 credits.

In a 10-credit module you will receive 11 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 89 hours of independent study. In a 20-credit module you will receive 22 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 178 hours of independent study. In a 30-credit module you will receive 33 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 267 hours of independent study. The 60-credit dissertation is mainly conducted with independent study. You will receive 6 hours of tutorial supervision (this includes supervisors looking over your work) and you will be expected to conduct 594 hours of independent study.

Each student is appointed a personal tutor who will be available for academic advice, pastoral support and personal development planning. Tutors also have weekly office hours.

A critical but supportive environment is achieved through a combination of workshops, research seminars and e-learning. You will be introduced to the practicalities of preparing and submitting your work for possible publication.

Assessment

We have a variety of approaches to assessment across the programme depending upon the module. All creative practice modules (Short Story Writing, Novel Writing, Dissertation) are assessed through portfolios of creative work and accompanying critical essays in which you are required to reflect on your creative practice and to contextualise your work with reference to other texts. These modules also include class-based formative peer-assessment in the form of writing workshops. These do not count towards your final grade but the sessions do help you grow and reflect as a critical and creative writer.

In some modules (Writing the City) you can choose your method of assessment (creative portfolio and critical essay, or essay, or reflection, for example). In other modules (Literature and Landscapes) you will be asked to produce an essay.

In the introductory Researching the Humanities module you will be ask to produce a visual representation of a chosen research method, in the form of a poster. In other modules, such as Writing the City, you will be asked to post your work to a reflective blog.

Modules also make use of Virtual Learning Environments for assessments and you may be asked to view material online and then to respond to it.

You will receive tutor support in class and through our VLE in order to prepare you for each assessment point. We also have library facilities online and at campus.​

Employability & Careers​

Many of our students use the course to generate and hone their own writing for publication. Our creative practice modules are designed with eventual publication in mind. For example, in our Novel Writing module you will be taught how to write a synopsis for submission to an agent or publisher. Several of our students have had publication success (see below).

The MA is also a great choice for those wishing to enhance their employment and professional opportunities in editorial and publishing careers. The programme is suitable for those who would like to become teachers of English literature and creative writing as well as those who are already teachers. For example, teachers of English at ‘A’ Level and GCSE often find the course suitable for professional development purposes, providing them with skills to enhance their teaching of English literature creative writing within their current curricula or skilling them up to deliver the new Creative Writing ‘A’ Level.

Our MA is appropriate for those who would like careers in community-based education and practice. The course also prepares you for further study at PhD level at Cardiff Metropolitan University and beyond.

This degree will encourage you to develop the valuable transferable skills of autonomy, effective collaboration, self-direction, organisation, initiative and adaptability that are highly regarded in the workplace.

Recent student publishing successes:
Barbara A Stensland (MA Creative Writing) writes a blog about living with MS that has recently been published as a book, Stumbling in Flats (2015). It has been shortlisted for The International Rubery Book Award 2015.

Emre Karatoprak (MA Creative Writing) had his first novel published on Amazon, Türbülans (2013).

Alex Sambrook (MA Creative Writing) had a short story shortlisted in the prestigious Bridport Short Story Competition (2012).

​Stacey Taylor, (MA English & Creative Writing), won the It Started With a Kiss competition run by Authonomy in November 2011 with a 416 word flash fiction.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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The two-year language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with the Arab Middle East in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course would enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The two-year language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with the Arab Middle East in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course would enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

In the two-year pathway, students can take intensive Arabic language with either MA Islamic Societies and Cultures, MA Near and Middle Eastern Studies, or MA Palestine Studies, therefore making these programmes unique in Europe. The student will be provided with a near proficient ability in the Arabic language.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/ma-and-intensive-language-arabic/

May be combined with

- MA Islamic Societies and Cultures
- MA Near and Middle Eastern Studies
- MA Palestine Studies
- MA History
- MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia
- MA Religions of Asia and Africa
- MA Medical Anthropology
- MA Anthropological Research Methods
- MA Migration and Diaspora Studies

Once you have checked the structure for this programme via the structure tab, please click into the above discipline that you would like to study. You will then see the full list of optional courses available to you.

Structure

In the two-year language pathway, students take two units of Arabic and one discipline unit in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school in Jordan. Upon their return, they will take one unit of Arabic in their second year and two discipline units. They would also be expected to choose a Major in which to write the dissertation. In the intensive-language pathway, the same rules apply as for the usual MA.

For the part-time four year pathway, please refer to the programme specification (attached below) of your preferred discipline.

The intensive language courses will be assessed by a combination of exams and continuous assessment, involving in-class tests. The assessment in the summer school is handed over to the partner university but will be counted as one unit.

- Intermediate Arabic/English Translation Project (PG) - 15PNMC418 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
- Higher Intermediate Arabic/English/Arabic Translation Project (PG) - 15PNMC419 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
- Advanced Arabic/English/Arabic Translation Project (PG) - 15PNMC420 (1 Unit) - Full Year
- Intensive Advanced Summer Arabic (PG) - 15PNMC416 (1 Unit) - Full Year

Teaching & Learning

Learning outcomes will vary depending on the combination of courses chosen by individual students. Learning outcomes for each course can be found under the information provided on the relevant list of postgraduate courses on the departmental page of the SOAS website. In general, by the end of the course students will have learnt the following:

Knowledge:

- How to assess data and evidence critically from manuscripts and digital sources, solve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations, locate materials, use research-sources (particularly research-library catalogues) and other relevant traditional sources.
- Subject-specific skills are an amalgam of the skills described for each of the three options chosen by candidates from the cross-department/faculty choices available in the relevant course-descriptors.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:

- Students will learn to become precise and cautious in their assessment of evidence and should also come to understand through practice what documents can and cannot tell us.
- Students will learn to question interpretations, however authoritative, and reassess evidence for themselves.
- Communicate effectively in writing subject-based practical skills.
- Language-students will learn the chosen language at the appropriate level.
- Present seminar-papers.
- Listen and discuss ideas introduced during seminars.
- Practise research-techniques in a variety of specialised research-libraries and institutes.

Transferable skills:

- Writing good essays and dissertations.
- Structure and communicate ideas effectively, both orally and in writing.
- Study a variety of written and digital materials in libraries and research-institutes of a kind they will not have used as undergraduates.
- Present (non-assessed) material orally.
- To acquire/develop skills in Arabic language to Effective Operational Proficiency level.
- To demonstrate awareness of the conceptual and communicative underpinnings of Arabic and through this interlinguistic and intercultural understanding.
- Communicate in written and spoken medium in contemporary Arabic.
- Engage with people from different linguistic and cultural backgrounds, understand the role of different frames of reference.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The Aberystwyth MA in Literary Studies offers you a broad engagement with English literature with the opportunity to develop expertise in one of a number of specialist areas. Read more
The Aberystwyth MA in Literary Studies offers you a broad engagement with English literature with the opportunity to develop expertise in one of a number of specialist areas. By studying the latest developments in critical theory and research methodology you will cultivate the necessary skills to undertake your 15,000 word MA Dissertation – an extensive piece of critical research in your chosen area. You will also develop a host of transferable skills which you may deploy in a range of other academic or employment contexts.

As a student on the MA in Literary Studies at Aberystwyth, you will benefit from the University’s superb library and information technology resources and have access to the unrivaled collections of the National Library of Wales.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/literary-studies-masters/

Suitable for

This degree will suit you:

- If you are fascinated by particular developments in English Literature
- If you want to contribute to the academic understanding of periods in literary history
- If you wish to cultivate your own skills as a writer
- If you want to develop your research and analysis skills for future work in academia

Course detail

The MA in Literary Studies provides a number of modules in fascinating subject areas, including Romanticism's Radical Cultures, Ethnic American Literature, Postmodern Genres and many more. An important part of the course is the writing of a 15,000-word Dissertation in a field chosen by you in consultation with a specialist supervisor. We will take great care in assigning you a supervisor whose interests match your own as closely as possible.

A substantial part of the course is devoted to research preparation skills including exploiting library resources, using electronic journals and other IT skills, building a bibliography, researching and writing a proposal, structuring your Dissertation, developing and sustaining an argument, footnotes and referencing, and oral presentation skills. You will also be taught to interrogate the different kinds of 'textuality', or aspects of the literary text, which need to be taken into account in the study of literature at postgraduate level and beyond.

The department has a proud tradition of research excellence, as demonstrated in the most recent Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It found that 97% of research assessed was found to be of international standing or higher.

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of: research proposal, including a related bibliographic element; a case study; examined oral presentations; and 6,000-word assignments. Each student will complete a MA Dissertation of 15,000 words which deals with an area of chosen study in the third semester.

Application Details

In addition to completing the standard University application package (How to apply), candidates are asked by the Department to supply the following supplementary documents:

(1) A letter of application (1 side of A4) that explains why you want to enrol on the Literary Studies (or the particular Literary Studies pathway) MA. It should include a brief account of your academic study to date, touching on relevant literary/critical issues as appropriate – you might mention, for example, the authors to whose work you are particularly drawn, the topics and ideas that are of special significance to you, and the methodologies you have found particularly valuable in your encounter with literary works. The account will be important in helping us to arrive at a decision about your general suitability for the programme.

(2) A representative sample of critical work, written during the past three years, of no more than 3000 words. You are allowed to send work submitted as part of a previous degree.

Employability

Every MA course at Aberystwyth University is specifically designed to enhance your employability. In addition to developing your writing and research skills, this course will help you to master key skills that are required in almost every postgraduate workplace. You will be pushed to improve your approaches to planning, analysis and presentation so that you can tackle complex projects thoroughly and with professional independence. Your MA in Literary Studies will place you in the jobs marketplace as a professional writer with highly desirable skills suitable for a career in the arts, literature, journalism and many others.

- Key Skills and Competencies Study Skills:
You will learn how to identify and interrogate the most relevant materials and literature in your field. You will be taught to master a range of investigative methodologies and, importantly, you will learn to justify your preferred methodological approach to your subject. You will learn how to deploy your research and analysis in critical discussion to assert your expertise and build your academic argument. You will learn to quickly assemble, assimilate, interpret and present a broad range of information regarding your specialism, a set of skills keenly sought by many employers from the civil service and journalism to industry and commerce.

- Self-Motivation and discipline:
Studying at MA level requires high levels of discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. Though you will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of Departmental staff, you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your MA degree. This process will strengthen your skills in planning, executing and analysing work projects in ways that reflect standard practice in the world of employed work.

- Transferable Skills:
The MA is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of research interests and employment contexts. Upon graduation, you will have proven your abilities in structuring and communicating ideas efficiently, writing for and speaking to a range of audiences, evaluating and organizing information, working effectively with others and working within time frames and to specific deadlines.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

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The Music MA is a flexible programme designed to cater for those with a wide range of interests and specialisms. It is conceived as a 'next step' after the undergraduate degree, either as a stepping stone to research, as a qualification for teaching in the FE sector or simply to satisfy a thirst for development. Read more
The Music MA is a flexible programme designed to cater for those with a wide range of interests and specialisms. It is conceived as a 'next step' after the undergraduate degree, either as a stepping stone to research, as a qualification for teaching in the FE sector or simply to satisfy a thirst for development. There are 12 specialist pathways that you can choose from; each includes a range of core and optional taught modules and you will complete the course with a dissertation, recital or composition portfolio.

Pathways

Music MA: British Music Studies pathway
Music MA: Choral Conducting pathway
Music MA: Critical Musicology pathway
Music MA: Early Music pathway
Music MA: Electroacoustic composition/sonic art pathway
Music MA: Global Popular Musics pathway
Music MA: Instrumental/Vocal Composition pathway
Music MA: Mixed Composition pathway
Music MA: Open Pathway with Performance
Music MA: Open Pathway without Performance
Music MA: Performance pathway
Music MA: Performance Practice pathway)

About the School of Languages, Cultures, Art History and Music

The School of Languages, Cultures, Art History and Music brings together a number of internationally renowned departments to offer an extensive portfolio of innovative and interdisciplinary programmes in an exciting and creative environment, underpinned by a vibrant research culture.

We received outstanding results across the School in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) exercise, with at least 75% of our research judged to be ‘world leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ across all subject areas.

The Department of Art History, Curating and Visual Studies is located in the Barber Institute of Fine Arts, which houses the Barber Institute gallery and an exceptional Fine Art Library. The Department of Music is based in the Bramall Music Building, with state-of-the-art facilities including the 450-seat Elgar Concert Hall, a suite dedicated to the study and performance of early music, five electroacoustic studios and a large rehearsal room. We also have one of the best music libraries in the country, with special collections including materials on 20th-century English music, Baroque music and an extensive microfilm collection.

In addition to housing one of the UK’s largest groups of internationally renowned researchers in the national cultures of Europe, the Department of Modern Languages also hosts a Language and Media Resource Centre which specifically supports language learning through the latest interactive learning technology. We have a vibrant, international postgraduate community and offer excellent study and research opportunities in a supportive working environment.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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​The MA Creative Writing at Cardiff Metropolitan University is taught by published writers and researchers. The course is aimed to support you while you develop and hone your critical and creative writing skills, particularly in the field of fiction. Read more

Course Overview

​The MA Creative Writing at Cardiff Metropolitan University is taught by published writers and researchers. The course is aimed to support you while you develop and hone your critical and creative writing skills, particularly in the field of fiction. You can take our MA for professional development purposes, in order to enhance your career, and to increase your likelihood of publication. The MA will also help you specialise in the areas of creative practice and contemporary writing in order to pave the way for doctoral study.

We have expertise across a number of fields and our academic community is vibrant and dynamic with strong industry links. We have a focus on the contemporary that is underpinned with expertise in historical periods.

One of the great strengths of the programme is its flexibility. MA Creative Writing can be studied either full or part time. Modules can be taken individually, allowing you to control the pace and depth of your postgraduate study. Programme delivery is enhanced by the university's commitment to e-learning.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/education/courses/Pages/Creative-Writing---MA.aspx

​Course Content​​

All of our modules are co​re and are delivered over one year full time or two years part time.

Term 1
- Researching Humanities
Researching Humanities will introduce you to research methods at MA level. The module provides a thorough breakdown of research methods across the fields of Creative Writing and English Literature. This module is taught across all of our MA Creative Writing and English Literature pathways and it is also a great opportunity for you to get to know your peers.

- Short Story Writing
Short Story Writing provides a thorough introduction to the short story. This is done through two distinct, but integrated, approaches: a critical analysis of the development of the short story, with particular focus on twentieth century and contemporary writing; and through the creative practice itself. Each week you'll be encouraged to explore key techniques and approaches in your own writing through writing workshops.

- New & Experimental Writing
In New and Experimental Writing you will encounter a range of transgressive texts from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Starting with the avant-garde, the module proceeds chronologically to the contemporary. We interrogate what it means to transgress aesthetic norms at various points in time and take into consideration historical and cultural context to consider whether there might be a connection between the challenging of literary and social standards. You will be able to approach these texts via a number of methodologies, including theoretical and creative.

Term 2
- Novel Writing
Novel Writing extends and deepens your engagement with fiction writing. The module provides you with a thorough introduction to the novel as a distinct fictional genre focussing on the contemporary. As well as examining key works, you'll also be working on your own creative practice. A key part of the module focuses on the preparation of your work for publication.

- Writing the City
In Writing the City you'll explore representations of urban space through set texts and in your own creative writing. In this module you’ll examine texts that explore the urban in literary fiction, particularly throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

- Critical Practice
Critical Practice prepares you for your dissertation through which you'll be able to submit a substantial body of creative work along with a contextualising critical commentary.

- Dissertation
The Dissertation module is your opportunity to create a portfolio of writing, such as a collection of short stories or an excerpt of a novel that you are working on. The creative work will be accompanied by a critical reflection in which you contextualise your writing within a critical framework and with reference to other texts.

Learning & Teaching​

​Most modules are taught through group workshops and seminars. Some modules will also include individual tutorials and the dissertation module is delivered entirely through one-to-one tutorials with your supervisor.

In workshops and seminars full use is made of University technology and course materials will be delivered and stored through our Virtual Learning Environment. It will be possible for you to access the Virtual Learning Environment remotely and you will be encouraged to do so.

Most modules are 20 or 30 credits although we also have a 10 credit module and the dissertation is worth 60 credits. In a 10 credit module you will receive 11 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 89 hours of independent study. In a 20 credit module you will receive 22 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 178 hours of independent study. In a 30 credit module you will receive 33 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 267 hours of independent study. The 60 credit dissertation is mainly conducted with independent study. You will receive 6 hours of tutorial supervision (this includes supervisors looking over your work) and you will be expected to conduct 594 hours of independent study.

Each student is appointed a personal tutor who will be available for academic advice, pastoral support and personal development planning. Tutors also have weekly office hours.

A critical but supportive environment is achieved through a combination of workshops, research seminars and e-learning. You will be introduced to the practicalities of preparing and submitting your work for publication.

Assessment

We have a variety of approaches to assessment across the programme depending upon the module. All creative practice modules (Short Story Writing, Novel Writing, Dissertation) are assessed through portfolios of creative work and accompanying critical essays in which you are required to reflect on your creative practice and to contextualise your work with reference to other texts. These modules also include class-based formative peer-assessment in the form of writing workshops. These do not count towards your final grade but the sessions do help you grow and reflect as a critical and creative writer.

In some modules (New and Experimental Writing, Writing the City) you can choose your method of assessment (creative portfolio and critical essay, or essay, or reflection, for example).

In the introductory Researching the Humanities module you will be ask to produce a visual representation of a chosen research method, in the form of a poster. In other modules, such as Writing the City, you will be asked to post your work to a reflective blog.

Modules also make use of Virtual Learning Environments for assessments and you may be asked to view material online and then to respond to it.

You will receive tutor support in class and through our VLE in order to prepare you for each assessment point. We also have library facilities online and at campus.

Employability & Careers​

Many of our students use the course to generate and hone their own writing for publication. Our creative practice modules are designed with eventual publication in mind. For example, in our Novel Writing module you will be taught how to write a synopsis for submission to an agent or publisher. Several of our students have had publication success (see below).

The MA is also a great choice for those wishing to enhance their employment and professional opportunities in editorial and publishing careers. The programme is suitable for those who would like to become teachers of creative writing or who are already teachers. For example, teachers of English at ‘A’ Level and GCSE often find the course suitable for professional development purposes, providing them with skills to enhance their teaching of creative writing within their current curricula or skilling them up to deliver the new Creative Writing ‘A’ Level.

Our MA is appropriate for those who would like careers in community-based education and practice. The course also prepares you for further study at PhD level at Cardiff Metropolitan University and beyond.

This degree will encourage you to develop the valuable transferable skills of autonomy, effective collaboration, self-direction, organisation, initiative and adaptability that are highly regarded in the workplace.

Recent student publishing successes:
Barbara A Stensland (MA Creative Writing) writes a blog about living with MS that has recently been published as a book, Stumbling in Flats (2015). It has been shortlisted for The International Rubery Book Award 2015.

Emre Karatoprak (MA Creative Writing) had his first novel published on Amazon, Türbülans (2013).

Alex Sambrook (MA Creative Writing) had a short story shortlisted in the prestigious Bridport Short Story Competition (2012).

Stacey Taylor, (MA English & Creative Writing), won the It Started With a Kiss competition run by Authonomy in November 2011 with a 416 word flash fiction.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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