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Masters Degrees (Libraries)

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With our Library Science MA/MSc you can develop the skills and understanding to initiate, work with and develop modern collection based information services. Read more
With our Library Science MA/MSc you can develop the skills and understanding to initiate, work with and develop modern collection based information services.

Who is it for?

This programme is for students with a first degree or equivalent in any discipline, who have an interest in information communication, and who would like to start or develop a career in information management in libraries, galleries, archives or museums. It is also suitable for professionals wishing to update their knowledge and skills within the discipline.

Library Science is a broad discipline, and it appeals to students prepared to challenge inequalities in information access and use, who enjoy communicating and sharing information, and who like working with information technologies.

Objectives

Humanity has now entered the age of the zettabyte (1000 exabytes), with enough information being generated daily to fill US libraries several times over [Floridi L, 2014. The 4th Revolution. Oxford. p 38]. The demand for knowledge organisation, access, and understanding has never been greater.

City’s MA/MSc Library Science examines contemporary questions of information communication from a framework of information history and philosophy. Our focus is divided equally between theory and its application to practice. The course spans the fundamental concepts of documentation, collection management, information organisation, access, information literacy, use of new and emergent technologies, methods of investigation and analysis, socio-political implications and policy formulation.

The course equips you with a deep understanding of collection-orientated institutions and services, and their relevance and impact within society. There is a strong focus on ethics, professional communication and networking. You will benefit from a high level of engagement with practitioners, and we are pleased to welcome many leaders in the profession as speakers on our modules.

Academic facilities

City has recently undergone a significant level of refurbishment, so that course participants can enjoy state of the art classrooms and facilities.

We work in close connection with our colleagues at City Library, who offer excellent support and advice to our students, in addition to contributing to our courses. Follow @cityunilibrary and @cityunilibresearchers on Twitter. You will have access to our state-of-the-art mentoring service.

Placements

Internships are not a part of this course, but students who wish to are usually able to obtain work experience (paid or voluntary), or to work with external organisations in completing assignments or carrying out a dissertation project. Details of opportunities are posted on our Moodle forum.

Teaching and learning

The teaching and learning methods we use mean that your specialist knowledge and autonomy develop as you progress through the course.

Taught modules are normally delivered through a series of 30 hours of lectures.

Lectures are normally used to:
-Present and exemplify the concepts underpinning a particular subject.
-Highlight the most significant aspects of the syllabus.
-Indicate additional topics and resources for private study.

In addition to lectures and tutorial support, you also have access to a personal tutor. This is an academic member of staff from whom you can gain learning support throughout your degree. In addition, City’s online learning environment Moodle contains resources for each of the modules including lecture notes, further reading, web-based media resources and an interactive discussion forum.

We expect you to study independently and complete coursework for each module. This should amount to approximately 120 hours per module if you are studying full time. Each module is assessed through coursework, where you will need to answer a variety of assignments to show that you are able to apply your theoretical learning to practical situations.

Communication and networking via social media is an integral part of our Library Science masters course, and in preparation for professional practice, you are expected to engage with blogs, Twitter and other relevant communication media as part of your studies. Face-to-face participation in student and new professional forums including research seminars, workshops and conferences is actively promoted. You are encouraged to present your work (assignments, dissertation) to the wider LIS community for discussion and development.

The course culminates with an individual project. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently. The individual project (dissertation) allows you to demonstrate your ability to think and work independently, to be aware of and to comprehend current issues within the discipline and practice, to initiate ways of investigating and solving current problems or questions, and to deliver results and solutions on time.

The individual project is a substantial task. It is your opportunity to develop a research-related topic under the supervision of an academic member of staff. This is the moment when you can apply what you have learnt to solve a real-world problem or to develop further, contemporary conceptual theory in library science.

Modules

The MA/MSc in Library Science is offered as a one year full-time course, or two year part-time course. On successful completion of the course, you can choose between the award of MA or of MSc. This is usually based on the arts or science content of the work undertaken for the degree, and/or your career aspirations. The course structure and modules are the same for either award. The difference occurs in the focus of the assignments and the dissertation.

You can expect to study for approximately 40 hours per week full-time, and 20 hours per week part-time. The actual time required will vary according to the individual, and with existing experience and prior study.

The course comprises seven core modules and one elective module. These taught modules run during the first and second terms, whilst the third, summer term is reserved for the dissertation. Each of the modules counts for 15 credits, and requires approximately 150 hours work, of which 30 hours are face-to-face instruction (this may be lectures, seminars, group work, discussion or practical work), and 120 hours are self-directed study.

On successful completion of eight taught modules, students can progress to the dissertation. The dissertation is worth 60 credits, and takes around 400 hours. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently.

The goal of library and information science is to enable access to, use of, and consequent understanding of information. To do this, the discipline is concerned with the processes of the information communication chain: the creation, dissemination, management, organisation, preservation, analysis and use of information, instantiated as documents.

Core modules
-Library and Information Science Foundation (15 credits)
-Digital Information Technologies and Architecture (15 credits)
-Information Organisation (15 credits)
-Digital Libraries (15 credits)
-Information Management and Policy (15 credits)
-Research Methods and Communication (15 credits)
-Libraries and Publishing in the Information Society (15 credits)

Elective modules - you can choose one module from the following.
-Information Resources and Documentation (15 credits)
-Information law and policy (15 credits)
-Independent study (15 credits)
-Web applications development (15 credits)

Career prospects

Library Science MSc/MA graduates have an excellent record of finding suitable jobs and going on to successful careers, most commonly in public, academic and school libraries, consultancies, special libraries and information services and publishing. The Library Science postgraduate course is also an excellent preparation for further study and research.

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This CILIP-accredited course is about the creation, management and use of digital libraries and resources. It will introduce you to the strategic thinking and project management skills you need for a successful career. Read more

About the course

This CILIP-accredited course is about the creation, management and use of digital libraries and resources. It will introduce you to the strategic thinking and project management skills you need for a successful career. You’ll learn about digitisation, repositories, web creation and how to design digital libraries people want to use.

The course combines lectures from academics and professionals, seminars, small-group work and computer labs. We can also help you to develop leadership and management capabilities.

Your career

Effective use of information improves the world and makes a positive difference to our lives. It is also central to economic development. The rapid pace of technological change and the globalisation of markets means that organisations in all sectors must realise the value of information systems.
The world needs graduates who are information literate.

Our graduates work for all kinds of organisations, in the public and private sectors. Employers include:

Adidas; BBC; British Red Cross; Cambridge University; The Department of Health; Ernst and Young; GCHQ; Goldman Sachs; Hewlett-Packard CDS; House of Commons Library; Imperial College London; IBM; Kings College London; NHS; Pepsico; Pricewaterhouse Coopers; Stanford University

If you’re already an experienced professional, you can develop new skills and advance your career with one of our Professional Enhancement Programmes (page xxx).

Your subject

Our courses are research-led, which means you’ll learn about the latest concepts from academics who work with organisations to drive developments in this field. Alongside the theory and technical skills, you’ll develop some valuable attributes including effective communication, application of research methods and creative problem solving.

How we teach

All our courses (except our distance learning courses) include lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical laboratory classes, group work, online discussion, case studies and lectures by visiting speakers. Our MA Librarianship course also includes visits to library and information service organisations. You’ll be assessed using a wide variety of methods including essays, reports, small projects, in-class tests, presentations, posters, group work and a research-based dissertation.

Learning Environment

Our dedicated departmental teaching suite contains two networked laboratories with 60 computers and a 30-seat lecture room. Our state of the art iLab includes a Usability Lab and Digital Media Lab designed to collect research data into human–computer interaction.

The iSpace is an open plan, social learning area for students. It has display facilities, open-access PCs and bookable partitioned group work areas. There is Wi-Fi coverage throughout the department, and you can connect your own laptop to our network. Mobile devices and tables are available for you to borrow for project work.

We’re right in the middle of the campus and close to the Information Commons and the new Diamond building so you’ll be able to access the University’s many resources.

Core modules

Dissertation; Designing Usable Websites; Digital Multimedia Libraries; Management and Strategy for Digital Libraries; Information Retrieval: Search Engines and Digital Libraries; Research Methods and Dissertation Preparation.

Examples of optional modules

Including: Researching Social Media; Information Systems in Organisations; E-Business and E-Commerce; Database Design; Libraries, Information and Society; Introduction to Digital Humanities; Content Management Systems; Information Governance and Ethics; Data and Society: Business Intelligence; Academic and Workplace Library, Information and Knowledge Services; Human Computer Information Interaction; Archives and Record Management; Advanced Digital Humanities.

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Are you looking for a distance learning course that gives you the flexibility to combine your existing job, or other commitments, with a Masters-level qualification in the field of library management? This course combines core modules in information science with specialised modules in Information and Digital Literacy as well as Library Management, Leadership and Outreach. Read more
Are you looking for a distance learning course that gives you the flexibility to combine your existing job, or other commitments, with a Masters-level qualification in the field of library management? This course combines core modules in information science with specialised modules in Information and Digital Literacy as well as Library Management, Leadership and Outreach.

This course is designed equally for those who are already information professionals in libraries and those who are looking to break into the sector for the first time. To suit those who have existing work commitments, the course is taught via a flexible distance learning mode and it has a slightly extended duration of 16 months. If you would prefer to study full-time on campus, please see MSc Information Science.

All of Northumbria’s information science postgraduate courses are accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals. This accreditation makes our courses stand out and enhances their credibility and currency among employers, and is also crucial for progressing to Chartership status once qualified.

Accreditation

Accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) to assure students that programmes provide an excellent preparation for professional practice.

Learn From The Best

Our teaching staff include cutting-edge researchers whose specialisms overlap with the content of this course, helping ensure that teaching is right up-to-date. Specialisms include big data, data mining, decision-making, digital literacy, information behaviour, information retrieval systems, recommender systems, and the link between information science and cognitive psychology.

Our eminent academics have written books that regularly appear on reading lists for information science courses at universities all over the world. They also work as external examiners and reviewers of courses at other UK and non-UK universities.

Our course is delivered through the Northumbria iSchool, which is one of only six iSchools in the UK. A hallmark of an iSchool is an understanding that expertise in all forms of information is required for progress in science, business, education and culture. This expertise must cover the uses and users of information, the nature of information itself, as well as information technologies and their applications.

Information Science at Northumbria was established over 70 years ago and has developed in close collaboration with the profession. That dynamic working relationship has allowed us to not only reflect professional requirements, but also to be instrumental in understanding and shaping those requirements.

Teaching And Assessment

Our teaching is linked to what you want to learn and also to what you need to learn in order to achieve greater success in information science. Our long established relationship with employers ensures that you receive the most relevant and up-to-date knowledge to bring innovation, relevance, ethical sensitivity and currency to all you do. There is an emphasis on learning by doing; coursework will include projects, portfolios of work, reports and presentations as well as essays. All this helps you to make sense of the subject, getting a clear understanding of important concepts and theories.

While some assessments contribute to your final grade, there are other assessments that are provided purely to guide your progress and reinforce your learning. You can expect both your tutors and your peers to provide useful comments and feedback throughout the course.

Module Overview
Year One
KC7020 - Information Organisation and Access (Core, 20 Credits)
KC7022 - Information Systems and Technologies (Core, 20 Credits)
KC7023 - Research Methods and Professional Practice (Core, 20 Credits)
KC7025 - The library professional: management, leadership and outreach (Core, 20 Credits)

Year Two
KC7024 - User Behaviour and Interaction Design (Core, 20 Credits)
KC7026 - Masters Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)
KC7027 - Information and digital literacy (Core, 20 Credits)

Learning Environment

Northumbria uses a range of technologies to enhance your learning, with tools including web-based self-guided exercises, online tests with feedback, videos and tutorials. These tools support and extend the material that is delivered during lectures, and are available anywhere anytime. Group work and peer interaction feature prominently in our learning and teaching, this reflects the practices you’re likely to encounter within the working environment.

You will have 24/7 term-time access to Northumbria’s library, which has over half a million print books as well as half a million electronic books available online. Our library was ranked #2 in the Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey for 2015 and, since 2010, it has been accredited by the UK Government for Customer Service Excellence.

The University has advanced search software and database tools, including NORA Power Search that allows you to use a single search box to get fast results from across a wide and reliable range of academic resources. The use of such software and tools is an important aspect of our information science courses.

Research-Rich Learning

In fast-moving fields like information science it’s particularly important for teaching to take account of the latest research. Northumbria is helping to push out the frontier of knowledge in a range of areas including:
-Digital consumers, behaviours and literacy
-Digital socio-technical design
-Digital libraries, archives and records

As a student, you will be heavily engaged in analysing recent insights from the field of information science. You will undertake a major individual study that will require you to evaluate relevant literature as well as to develop your ideas within the context of existing research. Your study will be tailored to your particular interests but the underlying theme will be the relationships between information, people and technology. Many of our students publish their own research and present at professional and academic conferences, before or soon after graduating.

Give Your Career An Edge

This course is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals as well as the Archives and Records Association. This reflects the relevance of the curriculum, which is informed by contact with the employers and close professional links. The accreditation vital if you want to move on to Chartership status once qualified.

The topics and activities in the course have a strong emphasis on employability. For example you will develop practical skills in leadership and strategy within the context of library management. You will also learn how to evaluate and use a range of appropriate technologies for solving problems and delivering seamless services in libraries. Your knowledge and practical skills will help you take a lead on research-informed approaches that will give your employers a valuable advantage.

Your Future

Libraries are being transformed due to the spreading of digital literacy and the changing needs and expectations of users. More than ever before, the delivery of high-quality services relies on library and information professionals who have a strong grasp of the principles and practices of modern library management.

On graduation, you will be well placed to play a role in this new world of libraries. Employers are looking for information professionals who can develop fresh insights through mastery of their subject and critical scholarship. With your Masters qualification, you will be equipped to make a difference, advance your practice and make well-balanced judgements. You could work for a wide range of employers in the public, private and third sector, or you could progress in a career that you have already started. Your Masters qualification can also form the basis for further postgraduate studies at a higher level.

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Qatar has a bold vision to become a knowledge society. It is also committed to developing a world-class Qatar National Library (QNL) which will bridge with knowledge Qatar's heritage and future. Read more

Qatar has a bold vision to become a knowledge society. It is also committed to developing a world-class Qatar National Library (QNL) which will bridge with knowledge Qatar's heritage and future. This ground-breaking MA aims to nurture a world-class cadre of library professionals and train the future leaders of the sector.

About this degree

The programme provides students with an awareness of current issues and trends in library and information work. It fosters understanding of the processes by which information is produced, disseminated, controlled and recorded, and equips students with practical skills for the identification, location, management and organisation of information.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months) is also offered. Students complete all modules except the dissertation.

Core modules

  • Knowledge Organisation and Access
  • Collection Management
  • Research Methods in Information and Library Science
  • Reference and Information Services
  • Introduction to Management
  • Professional Awareness
  • Dissertation

Optional modules

Students choose two modules from the following:

  • The Book in the World
  • Digital Resources in the Humanities
  • Information Literacy
  • Interdisciplinary Methods for the Study of Cultural Heritage
  • Introduction to Archives and Preservation
  • Islamic Manuscripts
  • Library Systems and Data Management
  • Services to Children and Young People

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, private reading, seminars, practical classes, small group work, group project work, computer laboratory sessions, essay writing, and independent research. Except for short courses, all programmes are delivered in afternoon sessions. Students can access and use the virtual learning environment (Moodle) at UCL, which provides the opportunity to benefit from the expertise of UCL staff both in London and Qatar. Intensive short courses will also be delivered by visiting staff from UCL Information Studies (London). Assessment takes a variety of forms including: essays, portfolios, prepared practical work, individual and group project work, report writing, policy writing, presentations, peer assessment and the dissertation. There is also a written examination, attached to the professional awareness module, and accounting for 50% of the marks.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Library and Information Studies (UCL Qatar) MA

Careers

Graduates will be equipped to work in a wide network of settings including school libraries, libraries based in government ministries, and many more libraries in institutions such as museums and societies, and countless business libraries and archives.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The MA in Library and Information Studies at UCL Qatar has become the first degree programme of its kind in the region to be formally accredited by CILIP: the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals. The MA in Library and Information Studies is identical to the programme offered by UCL Information Studies in London – the UK’s largest facility for the teaching of library and information studies.

Students have the opportunity to network with leading library professionals from Qatar and the region and will undertake a placement in a local or international library.

Qatar is investing heavily in libraries, infrastructure and capacity building. This is an exceptionally exciting period for students and professionals who are looking to develop their career in the region.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The course is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP). It covers the creation, storage, retrieval and dissemination of information in organisations and society at large. Read more

Why this course?

The course is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP).

It covers the creation, storage, retrieval and dissemination of information in organisations and society at large. It encompasses both private and public sector libraries and information systems and services. This is along with related subjects such as management, publishing and the evaluation and use of information.

The course is for graduates in any discipline who wish to pursue a career in the field of information or library services.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/informationlibrarystudies/

You’ll study

Diploma and MSc students follow the same instructional course for the first two semesters.

If you meet the standard required to proceed to MSc, you’ll undertake a dissertation in the following three months.

Compulsory classes:
These classes are as follows:
- Organisation of Knowledge
- Information Retrieval & Access
- Information Law
- Library Technology & Systems
- Managing Information Services
- Libraries, Information & Society
- Research Methods

- Dissertation
This is an individual research project of up to 20,000 words on an approved topic. It allows you to pursue an area of specific interest, providing scope for original thought, research and presentation.

Work placement

There's an optional placement at the end of the second semester. The department helps to arrange this. Previous participating organisations include:
- NHS Scotland
- Scottish Television
- IDOX
- various national and local libraries
- Government agencies

Accreditation

The course is accredited by the CILIP.
Graduates will be entitled to become associate members of CILIP and will be eligible for chartership leading to the award of MCLIP, providing direct entry to a professional body and meeting the requirements of many specialist employers.

Pre-Masters Preparation Course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at the University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.

To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form , or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

Teaching methods include lectures, tutorials and practical laboratories. Dissertation is by supervision.

Assessment

Coursework assignments involve:
- individual work
- group projects
- exams
- practical work in computer laboratories

For the award of the MSc, you’ll be required to complete an individual project under supervision. This should contain an element of original research.

Careers

The course opens up opportunities in a range of jobs.

- Public sector
Job opportunities in this sector include working in:
- Universities
- Schools
- Museums and Archives
- NHS Scotland
- Public Libraries

- Private sector
Private sector opportunities include:
- Legal & Financial Institutions
- Media Companies
- Publishing
- Bookselling
- Industrial Firms
- Consultancy
- Scottish Television
- IDOX

Not for profit:
- Research Institutes
- Voluntary Organisations

How much will I earn?

Starting salaries for public librarians can be around £19,500 - £23,500.*
Gaining chartered status can increase salaries and with two to five years' experience chartered librarians could earn £23,500 - £30,000.*

*information is intended only as a guide.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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The MSc programme draws on knowledge and skills acquired in many years of providing specialist classes in local history, and profits from close links with local, social and economic historians elsewhere in the University. Read more
The MSc programme draws on knowledge and skills acquired in many years of providing specialist classes in local history, and profits from close links with local, social and economic historians elsewhere in the University. The programme is overseen by the University’s Continuing Education Board, and admission is through the Department for Continuing Education. All graduate students must apply also for membership of a college. Most choose to become members of Kellogg College, which caters particularly for part-time mature students and which is closely associated with the Department.

The Critchley Scholarship for 2015 entry:
We are pleased to announce a new scholarship which will be awarded to the applicant with the greatest academic potential who is applying for the course for entry in September 2015. The award will fund half of the EU/UK tuition fees for the course. All applicants will be considered for the award.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/msc-in-english-local-history

Introduction

Teaching and supervision on the MSc programme is provided by the Department’s University Lecturer, Dr Mark Smith, and specialist tutors from the Department and elsewhere in Oxford and further afield. An impression of the interests represented in the Department’s teaching and research supervision can be gained from the Advanced Papers currently offered as part of the Master’s course: Power and patronage in the later medieval localities; Kinship, culture and community: Provincial elites in early modern England; Poverty and the Poor Law in England, 1660-1800; Enclosure and rural change, 1750-1850; Religion and community in England, 1830-1914; The social history of English architecture, 1870-1940; the English suburb, 1800-1939.

The Department’s graduate students are members of the Continuing Education Graduate School and have access to the full range of Oxford University’s library, archive and computing facilities.

The course is designed to combine a systematic training in historical research techniques with the study of a range of major local historical themes and the chance to undertake an individually researched dissertation. It will be relevant to potential or practising teachers, archaeologists, environmental planners, archivists, librarians, museum professionals and teachers in adult education, and indeed anyone wishing to pursue the subject for its own sake.

IT skills

Please note that most Departmental courses require assignments to be submitted online, and although the online submission system is straightforward and has step by step instructions, it does assume students have access to a PC and a sufficient level of computing experience and skill to upload their assignments. Applicants should be familiar with the use of computers for purposes such as word-processing, using e-mail and searching the Internet.

College Affiliation

It is a requirement of Oxford University that Master of Science students are matriculated members of the University and one of its colleges. Masters students based in the Department for Continuing Education are encouraged to apply to become members of Kellogg College. In previous intakes almost all students on this course have chosen to join Kellogg. Continuing education and life-long learning in Oxford have been formally linked to the collegiate system of the University since 1990, when Kellogg College, the University’s 36th college, was established. Kellogg College is specifically geared to the needs of mature and part-time students

Libraries and computing facilities

Registered students receive an Oxford University card, valid for one year at a time, which acts as a library card for the Departmental Library at Rewley House and provides access to the unrivalled facilities of the Bodleian Libraries which include the central Bodleian, major research libraries such as the Sackler Library, Taylorian Institution Library, Bodleian Social Science Library, and faculty libraries such as English and History. Students also have access to a wide range of electronic resources including electronic journals, many of which can be accessed from home. Students on the course are entitled to use the Library at Rewley House for reference and private study and to borrow books. The loan period is normally two weeks and up to eight books may be borrowed. Students will also be encouraged to use their nearest University library. More information about the Continuing Education Library can be found at http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/conted

The University card also provides access to facilities at Oxford University Computing Service (OUCS), 13 Banbury Road, Oxford. Computing facilities are available to students in the Students'Computing Facility in Rewley House and at Ewert House.

Assessment

Assessment is based on a mix of coursework assignments and a dissertation. The assessment falls into two parts, the first of which is called by the University a Qualifying Test and the second of which is called the Final Examination.

The Qualifying Test

The Qualifying Test, which must be passed in order to proceed to the rest of the degree, consists of a total of three assignments related to the work of the first term.

Assignment 1: A review of a work of local history (500 words). 10% of the marks for the test.

Assignment 2: An essay on issues relating to the nature of local history (2,000-2,500 words). 40% of the marks for the test.

Assignment 3: An essay on issues relating to the sources and practices of local history, especially the relationship of fieldwork and/or quantification to other sources and approaches (2,500-3,000 words). 50% of the marks for the test.

The Final Examination
The second part of the assessment determines the final classification of the MSc and comprises eight written assignments and a dissertation.

There will be 2 x 2,500 word assignments for each of the Sources, Methods and Foundations papers. (In total the assignments for the Sources, Methods and Foundations papers comprise 10% of the marks for the final examination.)

There will be 2 x 5,000 word essays for each of the Advanced Papers. (In total the essays for the Advanced Papers comprise 40% of the marks for the final examination.)

There will be a dissertation of 15,000 words (The dissertation counts as 50% of the marks for the final examination.)

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This degree in Early Modern English Literature is taught with the British Library and provides a unique opportunity to study early modern literary works, including Shakespeare, in the light of recent critical approaches and as print and manuscript material artefacts. Read more

This degree in Early Modern English Literature is taught with the British Library and provides a unique opportunity to study early modern literary works, including Shakespeare, in the light of recent critical approaches and as print and manuscript material artefacts.

The required module taught at the British Library is specifically designed to teach students how to search collections of early modern manuscripts and rare books held in major research libraries worldwide and how to identify the agents involved in their production, transmission and preservation in libraries and private collections.

Ideal foundation for doctoral work and careers in the arts, education, curatorship and broadcasting.

Key Benefits

  • A strong tradition of Shakespeare and early modern literary studies at King's.
  • Unique access to unparalleled collections at the British Library and to the expertise of world-class curators, who will teach the core module and supervise some dissertations.
  • Close links with the London Shakespeare Seminar, the London Renaissance Seminar, and with the Institute of English Studies.
  • Located in the heart of literary London.

Description

Our Early Modern English Literature MA is an innovative and exciting partnership between the Department of English at King’s and the British Library. 

The course focuses on the transmission of key early modern literary texts, meaning both the circulation of literary texts in manuscript and print as well as the way they were received. The specific process through which a literary text reaches its readers or its audience is central to its interpretation. 

You will learn to read early modern handwriting, to transcribe neglected literary manuscripts and rare printed texts, and to edit them for the modern reader. In focusing on transmission, the course explores the impact of the materiality of the text and of the material conditions of its (re) production on the way it is interpreted.

The Material Legacy of Early Modern Literary Texts module, which is taught at the British Library, is specifically designed to teach you how to search collections of early modern manuscripts and rare books held in major research libraries worldwide, and how to identify the factors and people involved in their production, transmission and preservation in libraries and private collections.

Course purpose

Early Modern English Literature is taught with the British Library and provides a unique opportunity to study early modern literary works, including Shakespeare, in the light of recent critical approaches and as print and manuscript material artefacts. Ideal foundation for doctoral work and careers in the arts, education, curatorship and broadcasting.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student, we will provide you with four to six hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars. We will expect you to undertake 26 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide you with two to four hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars. We will expect you to undertake 13 hours of independent study.

Assessment

We assess all of our modules through coursework, normally with a 4,000-word essay. For your dissertation module, you will write a 4,000-word critical survey and a 15,000-word dissertation.

Regulating body

King’s College London is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England.



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This course will help you become a spatial planning expert - you will be able to advise clients on the use of land, and understand local authority controls relating to many aspects of policy such as transportation, communities, the environment and quality of the built environment. Read more
This course will help you become a spatial planning expert - you will be able to advise clients on the use of land, and understand local authority controls relating to many aspects of policy such as transportation, communities, the environment and quality of the built environment.

We will teach you the rationale behind spatial planning and encourage you to be a reflective practitioner, based on self awareness and the development of an ethical standpoint in planning practice.

Whether you are involved in planning in the public, private or community sectors, this is an opportunity for professional development and a chance to further your studies in spatial planning by building on your initial education or qualifications.

As one of our graduates you can apply for full membership of the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI) once you have completed two years of relevant planning experience and successfully completed the Assessment of Professional Competence (APC).

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: our University's results for the Architecture, Built Environment and Planning unit, which it entered for the first time, were impressive with 37% of its research being rated world leading or internationally excellent.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/townandregionalplanning_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

You will be able to access a wide range of career options in the planning profession - these could include opportunities in local and regional authorities and in the private sector. We have developed relationships with major clients, contractors and supply chains in the Yorkshire and Humberside region, and you will meet prospective employers through seminars and conferences.

- Planning Consultant
- Real Estate Consultant
- Town Planner

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

As host of the industry sector body, the School is establishing networks across the major clients, contractors and supply chains in the Yorkshire and Humberside region. This also includes links to the relevant professional bodies including the Royal Town Planning Institute, who accredit this award and via the Department of Communities and Local Government we receive a number of full time bursaries for students. This link and excellent opportunity is a mark of the standing and quality of the award.

The Centre for Urban Design and Environmental Management (CUDEM) is the key research centre to which teaching practice is linked. This link also provides a rich learning environment and offers opportunities to access case studies, site visits and interaction with local practitioners via regular conferences and seminars that are hosted via the centre.

We have previously provided work opportunities through placements and internships. Opportunities also exist for graduates to access a research degree to Doctorate level.

Modules

Theoretical Contexts (20 Credits)
Aims to develop students' understanding and critical awareness of the contemporary dynamics of places and communities, seen from a variety of theoretical viewpoints. It also seeks to develop a critical appreciation of the links between these theoretical concerns and changing priorities in planning and regeneration policies. Ethical and personal development considerations form an essential part of this module.

Planning & Making Spatial Strategies (20 Credits)
Reviews the historical evolution of the spatial planning system in the UK, to review its key purposes and principles, and to offer opportunities for students to prepare planning policies for localities of their choice.

Managing Places & Spaces (20 Credits)
Considers how places came to be, various attempts over the years to shape them according to visions of how we should live, an appreciation of current thinking regarding the criteria to be applied to planning contemporary development, the role of development managements in the English planning system, and an understanding of some key methodologies for evaluating the quality of existing places. This is used as the foundation for on which to put forward a development proposal for a city centre site.

Dissertation (40 Credits)
Develops and enhances research skills, connections between theory and practice, the capacity to conceptualise and theorise, together with independent and reflective learning. It serves as the key mechanism for students to develop specialist knowledge and skills in a research topic of their choice.

Policy Implementation & Appraisal (20 Credits)
Critically examines the political, material and organisational context for public policy implementation and evaluation by considering roles and functions of its key players and the influences of previous policy outcomes. It also evaluates a range of approaches to policy resource generation, monitoring and evaluation and their outputs and outcomes.

Strategic & European Contexts (20 Credits)
Requires students to reflect on the interplay of economic, spatial and environmental priorities and their impact on the development and use of land with regard to the potential of different approaches to spatial regeneration in different European regions. A foreign field trip forms an assessed part of this module.

Research Methods (20 Credits)
Explores the nature of research, the identification of researchable agendas, choice of methodologies and development of research plans and protocols together with techniques of data collection and usage. It is a key support mechanism for students to undertake the Dissertation.

Sustainable Communities (20 Credits)
Critically examines historical interpretations of sustainable communities and their policy dimensions and expressions. Students undertake a systematic analysis of a locality and generate sustainability strategies, working to local practitioners as clients and relating proposals to local delivery mechanisms.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Study Environments
Our libraries provide you with IT facilities, wireless networks and self-service machines where you can issue, return and renew your books. There are also informal, group and silent study environments.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. This one-year part-time course offers a unique opportunity for students to combine focused study of key historical themes and concepts in British and Western European history with either a broad-based approach to history or with the opportunity to specialise by period or in a branch of the discipline (political, social, economic, art, architectural and local). The course culminates in the research and preparation of a substantial dissertation.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies forms part of a two-year Master's programme. Students who successfully complete the Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies are eligible to apply to the Master's of Study in Historical Studies (https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-historical-studies).

This Historical Studies course offers a stimulating and supportive environment for study. As a student of Oxford University you will also be entitled to attend History Faculty lectures and to join the Bodleian Library. The University’s Museums and Art Galleries are within easy walking distance.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/postgraduate-certificate-in-historical-studies

Course content

Unit 1: Princes, States, and Revolutions
The first unit examines the interaction between the state and the individual from medieval to modern times and focuses upon authority, resistance, revolution and the development of political institutions. It introduces the development of scholarly debate, key historical themes and the critical analysis of documentary sources. Students explore disorder and rebellion in medieval and early modern England; the causes and impact of the British Civil Wars; and the causes and impact of the French Revolution.

Unit 2: European Court Patronage c.1400
The second unit explores cultural patronage in late medieval Europe and examines the diverse courtly responses to shared concerns and experiences, including the promotion of power and status; the relationship between piety and power; and the impact of dominant cultures. It introduces comparative approaches to history, the critical analysis of visual sources and the methodological issues surrounding the interpretation of material culture and the translation of written sources. Students compare the courts of Richard II of England, Philip the Bold and John the Fearless of Burgundy, Charles V and Charles VI of France, and Giangaleazzo Visconti of Milan.

Unit 3: Religious Reformations and Movements
The third unit examines the role of organised religion and religious movements in the lives of people in the past. It utilises case studies from different historical periods to explore the impact of local circumstances upon the reception and development of new ideas and further encourages engagement with historical debate and the interpretation of documentary and visual sources. Students explore: medieval monasticism; the English and European reformations of the sixteenth century; and religion and society in nineteenth-century England, including the rise of nonconformity, secularism and the Oxford Movement.

Unit 4: Memory and Conflict
The fourth unit focuses upon a central theme in the study of twentieth-century European history: how societies have chosen to remember (and forget) violent conflicts, and the relationship between public and private memory. It explores the challenges faced by historians when interpreting documentary, visual and oral sources in the writing of recent history. Students examine the theoretical context and methodological approaches to the study of memory and consider two case studies: World War I and the Spanish Civil War.

Unit 5: Special Subjects
In the final unit, students study a source-based special subject and research and write a dissertation on a related topic of their own choice. A range of subjects will be offered, varying from year to year, allowing specialization across both time periods and the historical disciplines. Examples include:

- Visualising Sanctity: Art and the Culture of Saints c1150-1500
- The Tudor Court
- The English Nobility c1540-1640
- The Great Indian Mutiny and Anglo-Indian Relations in the Nineteenth Century
- The British Empire
- Propaganda in the Twentieth Century

The on-line teaching modules

The first module provides a pre-course introduction to history and post-graduate study skills. The second focuses upon the analysis and interpretation of material sources, such as buildings and images and the third upon the analysis and interpretation of a range of documentary sources. All include a range of self-test exercises.

Libraries and computing facilities

Registered students receive an Oxford University card, valid for one year at a time, which acts as a library card for the Departmental Library at Rewley House and provides access to the unrivalled facilities of the Bodleian Libraries which include the central Bodleian, major research libraries such as the Sackler Library, Taylorian Institution Library, Bodleian Social Science Library, and faculty libraries such as English and History. Students also have access to a wide range of electronic resources including electronic journals, many of which can be accessed from home. Students on the course are entitled to use the Library at Rewley House for reference and private study and to borrow books. The loan period is normally two weeks and up to eight books may be borrowed. Students will also be encouraged to use their nearest University library. More information about the Continuing Education Library can be found at http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/conted.

The University card also provides access to facilities at Oxford University Computing Service (OUCS), 13 Banbury Road, Oxford. Computing facilities are available to students in the Students' Computing Facility in Rewley House and at Ewert House.

Course aims

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies course is designed to:

- provide a structured introduction to the study of medieval and modern British and European history;

- develop awareness and understanding of historical processes, such as continuity and change, comparative perspectives and the investigation of historical problems;

- provide the methodology required to interpret visual arts as historical evidence;

- equip students to evaluate and interpret historical evidence critically;

- promote interest in the concept and discipline of history and its specialisms;

- enable students to develop the analytical and communication skills needed to present historical argument orally and in writing;

- prepare students for progression to study at Master's level.

By the end of the course students will be expected to:

- display a broad knowledge and understanding of the themes and methodologies studied;

- demonstrate a detailed knowledge and understanding of key topics, the historical interpretation surrounding them and the relationship between local case-studies and the national perspective;

- utilise the appropriate critical and/or technical vocabulary associated with the disciplines, periods and themes covered;

- identify underlying historical processes, make cross-comparisons between countries and periods and explore historical problems;

- assess the relationship between the visual arts and the cultural framework within which they were produced;

- evaluate and analyse texts and images as historical evidence and utilise them to support and develop an argument;

- develop, sustain and communicate historical argument orally and in writing;

- reflect upon the nature and development of the historical disciplines and their contribution to national culture;

- demonstrate the skills needed to conduct an independent research project and present it as a dissertation within a restricted timeframe.

Assessment methods

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies is assessed through coursework. This comprises: four essays of 2,500 words each, two source-based exercises of 1,500 words each and a dissertation of 8,000 words. Students will write one essay following each of the first four units and the dissertation following unit 5. There will be a wide choice of assignment subjects for each unit and students will select a dissertation topic relating to their special subject with the advice of the course team. Students will be asked to write a non-assessed book review following the first pre-course online module and the source-based exercises will follow the second and third online modules.

Assignment titles, submission deadlines and reading lists will be supplied at the start of the course.

Tuition and study

A variety of teaching methods will be used in both the face-to-face and online elements of the course. In addition to lectures, PowerPoint slide presentations and tutor-led discussion, there will be opportunities for students to undertake course exercises in small groups and to give short presentations on prepared topics.

University lectures

Students are taught by the Department’s own staff but are also entitled to attend, at no extra cost, the wide range of lectures and research seminars organised by the University of Oxford’s History Faculty. Students are able to borrow books from both the Department’s library and the History Faculty Library, and are also eligible for membership of the Bodleian Library.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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Everything we do is aimed at helping you to appreciate the approaches and methods used by historians, and developing your knowledge of historical trends, processes and events over the past 300 years. Read more
Everything we do is aimed at helping you to appreciate the approaches and methods used by historians, and developing your knowledge of historical trends, processes and events over the past 300 years.

You will have the opportunity to explore a range of social and cultural developments in the history of Britain, Europe and the wider world. Throughout your study, you will work in small groups or individually, guided by your expert teaching team. Their historical research in areas such as urban history, the history of crime, environmental history, imperialism, sexuality and gender, migration, popular culture and social movement, is of an international standing and will feed into your learning.

Our teaching will give you the platform to reflect on historical interpretations of the past and conduct your own independent historical research.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: 38% of our research was judged to be world leading or internationally excellent in the Communication, Culture and Media Studies, Library and Information Management unit.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/socialhistory_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

You will develop a range of transferable skills valued by employers in areas such as teaching, local government, administration, management, the civil service, marketing, public relations and the non-profit sector. Your course will also provide you with an excellent grounding should you want to pursue further postgraduate study.

- Teacher
- Historical Researcher
- Lecturer
- Journalist

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You will work in small groups or individually with research-active historians throughout your period of study. Our history team has strengths in many areas and you will benefit from their expertise in urban history, the history of crime, environmental history, imperialism, sexuality and gender, migration, popular culture and social movement history.

Core Modules

Researching Cultures
This is an introduction to research skills and methods, exploring libraries, sources, archives and treatments of history through the theme of war. You will analyse the relationships between literary texts, historical documents, and films, as well as scrutinising how World War Two has been recorded, historicised, fictionalised and dramatised.

Underworlds: Representations of Crime, Police & the Criminal c.1700 to c.1945
You will study the representation of crime, criminals and police during a period which witnessed key changes in the criminal justice system, the rise of a policed society, and the emergence of print culture.

Sexuality, Gender & Popular Culture in Britain 1918-1970
According to some theorists, a preoccupation with sexuality is one of the defining features of Western modernity. You will explore current debates, relevant theoretical approaches and will be introduced to a range of source material including newspaper reports, film and popular literature.

Organised Crime in the Modern World: Global Criminal Cultures
Throughout history, as societies have become more organised, so too have their criminals. You will study a range of criminal organisations, exploring the role organised crime has played in both shaping and reacting to the ebb and flow of power and socio-economic development in the modern world.

European Cities: Making Urban Landscapes & Cultures since c.1945
You will examine urbanisation and metropolitan cultures of the cities within Europe during the second-half of the 20th century. We will ask you to consider the relationship between cities and the social, economic, political and cultural policies of local, national and supranational governments and other governing bodies.

Journeys & Discoveries: Travel, Tourism & Exploration, 1768-1996
This is an opportunity to consider the journeys, voyages and discoveries recounted in travel journals, guidebooks, colonial texts, memoirs and ethnographic studies. You will learn how travel, tourism and exploration has evolved - influenced by innovations in transport, health and media, public tastes, colonial policies and racial attitudes.

A Cultural Revolution? The Sixties in Comparative Perspective
Focusing on cultural, social and political elements of the 'long 1960s' (1958-1975), you will study a wide variety of political movements, social changes and cultural forms - such as music, film, TV, theatre and literature - looking at the United States, Britain and Western Europe, and the wider world.

Dissertation
You will undertake a sustained piece of research in social history on a topic selected by yourself and involving the use of both primary and secondary sources.You will design, plan, manage and complete a sustained research project, presenting your findings both orally and in writing.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Broadcasting Place
Broadcasting Place provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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We provide academic and professional development for English language teachers looking for career advancement. This includes innovative teaching, curriculum and creative materials development, teacher education or training and other teaching-related activities. Read more
We provide academic and professional development for English language teachers looking for career advancement. This includes innovative teaching, curriculum and creative materials development, teacher education or training and other teaching-related activities.

You will gain practical classroom experience, hands-on development of multimedia resources and materials development. There is the opportunity to pursue a specialism, such as ESOL, English for Academic Purposes, Teaching English to Young Learners or teacher training.

We currently offer two routes of study:

- Route One

This route is designed for experienced English language teachers, who are native speakers or have a high level of English. It will offer you professional training and development (including teaching practice) and can include entry for the widely recognised Delta qualification. If you already have the Delta or an equivalent qualification you can enter directly into semester two of this route or study with us by distance learning in September or January, with an expected completion time of approximately 18 months.

- Route Two

This route will offer you practical classroom experience, observation and language awareness for teaching purposes. It is designed for native and non-native speakers of English with some experience of, or an interest in, English language teaching. You can study this course full-time, part-time or distance learning in September or by distance learning starting in January, and you can expect to complete the course in approximately two and a half years.

- Teaching and Learning

Learning will take place through seminars, small group and individual tutorials, as well as independent learning. The course will include practical classroom experience and hands-on development of multi-media resources for English language teaching.

- Assessment

The assessments on the course aim to reflect real-life tasks for English language teaching professionals and include practical assignments such as developing resources, writing journal articles, giving conference presentations, reflecting on practice and analysing texts or language. The dissertation module involves a practical or research project related to English language teaching with a report or rationale. Route 1/Delta students will also complete the Cambridge ESOL assessments for Delta modules 1-3.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: twice as many of our staff - 220 - were entered into the research assessment for 2014 compared to the number entered in 2008.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/elt_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

On successful completion of this course you will have the skills and experience to be an effective English language teacher or to enter or gain promotion in a range of careers. These include teaching, publishing and other educational management roles.You can also choose to remain in education and obtain a PhD in a related area.

- English Language Teacher
- Materials Writer
- Director of Studies or other educational manager
- Teacher Educator

Careers advice:
The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

Our highly qualified and expert team have many years of experience successfully training teachers and developing innovative materials including a range of multimedia resources.

English Language Teaching at Leeds Beckett University is an approved Cambridge Delta Centre. This highly renowned professional qualification confers TEFLQ status as defined by the British Council accreditation scheme.

Modules

- Students on Route one will study:

Understanding Language, Methodology & Resources for Teaching (Delta Module one, 20 credits):
This will include first and second language acquisition; approaches and methods; and learner error and error analysis. (This module is not available for online learning)

Developing Professional Practice (Delta Module two, 20 credits):
This covers the following topics of teaching practice; lesson observation; evaluating, selecting and using resources and materials; and professional development. (This module is not available for online learning)

Extending Practice & ELT Specialism (Delta Module three, 20 credits):
This will look into researching a specialist area; course/ syllabus design; testing and assessment; and monitoring and evaluating courses.

Multimedia Resources & Independent Learning (20 credits):
You will learn about learner autonomy; virtual learning environments; and web-based technologies.

Materials Development (20 credits):
You will learn about issues such as materials evaluation and adaptation; authenticity; cultural considerations; and task design.

Methodology in Context (20 credits):
This area covers world English; intercultural awareness; sociolinguistics; English for academic purposes; English for young learners; English for specific purposes; and curriculum and syllabus.

Research in English Language Teaching (20 credits):
This will include research theories and methods; qualitative and quantitative research; and interpreting and analysing data. You will undertake a research project.

Dissertation (40 credits):
This double module involves either producing a practical project such as a set of materials; a corpus; a teacher training course; a syllabus or conducting a primary research project.

- Students on Route two will study:

Language Awareness (20 credits):
This will cover lexis; grammar; discourse analysis; phonology; and analysing language and texts for teaching purposes.

Methodology & Second Language Acquisition (20 credits):
You will learn about communicative language teaching; task-based learning; language content and integrated learning; lexical approach; total physical response; text-based approaches; language skills and strategies; and second language learning and acquisition.

Classroom Practice (20 credits):
This will include classroom observation; professional development; classroom management; lesson planning; and micro-teaching.

Multimedia Resources & Independent Learning (20 credits):
This will explore learner autonomy; virtual learning environments; and web-based technologies.

Materials Development (20 credits):
You will learn about issues such as materials evaluation and adaptation; authenticity; cultural considerations; and task design.

Methodology in Context (20 credits):
This subject will cover world English; intercultural awareness; sociolinguistics; English for academic purposes; English for young learners; English for specific purposes; and curriculum and syllabus.

Research in English Language Teaching (20 credits):
You will learn about research theories and methods; qualitative and quantitative research; and interpreting and analysing data.

Dissertation (40 credits):
This double module involves either producing a practical project such as a set of materials; a corpus; a teacher training course; a syllabus or conducting a primary research project.

Facilities

- Libraries
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Dedicated Support Team
A highly-skilled and dedicated support team whose job is to work with you through every step of your online learning.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Build cutting edge applications for phones, tablets and other mobile devices by studying a course developed by professionals for professionals. Read more
Build cutting edge applications for phones, tablets and other mobile devices by studying a course developed by professionals for professionals.

There is an overwhelming demand in the software and games industry for highly skilled application developers and we have launched this short course so you can create mobile application software and content for platforms such as iOS (iPhone) and Android.

The course is split into two key areas - Mobile Application Development and Mobile Games Prototyping - providing you with an opportunity practice your skills and develop professional standard mobile applications through project work.

If you are already working in the software development industry, this is excellent opportunity for professional development. You will look at the development of applications using two approaches - a WYSIWYG editor system and through the use of coding.

We'll enhance your understanding of the design and development of mobile device applications and, in addition to this, show you how applications can be used to benefit a range of business environments.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/mobileappdevelopment_apd

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

As the mobile device application industry continues to expand, the demand for highly-skilled professionals also increases. You will be able to offer employers expertise in creative content design alongside technical software development skills that can be applied to industries around the world.

A more entrepreneurial route is also available to you, setting up your own business and bringing apps to market. Our teaching team can provide support and advice if this is something you wish to pursue.

- Application Developer
- Software Developer
- Web Developer
- Applications Designer

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You will be taught by experts in the field - software developers, creative designers, games designers and technologists - staff who will give you help and advice with your career or with setting up your own entrepreneurial activities.

You will also benefit from our strong links with industry, with access to our guest speakers programme and industry led seminars, developing your knowledge through the experience of respected professionals in the sector.

We have excellent equipment and resources including state-of-the-art laboratories supporting software development, 2D and 3D content design, audio content production and high level content creation tools.

Modules

Mobile Games Prototyping
Develop advanced skills and a systematic understanding of the key aspects in mobile games prototyping.

Mobile Application Development
Investigate the architectures, platforms and techniques available to build applications for mobile devices.

Meg Soosay

Senior Lecturer

"Recent years have seen a massive growth in the development of apps for mobile devices. We’ll provide you with the opportunity to design and develop quality mobile applications for the growing market, teaching you the problems at the forefront of app development and how to overcome them."

Meg has extensive background in designing and evaluating positive user experiences using computing devices. She applies e-learning methods in her teaching, having worked on a number of JISC and EU-funded projects such as PC3 and EuroPlot. Your teaching team also includes Patrick Ingham, who has been working with android development since the first handsets arrived in the UK. Patrick is a great believer in mobile offering new ways of doing things and crafting better user experiences.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Broadcasting Place
Broadcasting Place provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Be part of a lively popular music research community that embraces everything from metal music to film scores with the opportunity to work alongside performers… Read more
Be part of a lively popular music research community that embraces everything from metal music to film scores with the opportunity to work alongside performers, composers and studio experts.This course is about the here and now - you will study everything from folk to jazz, right through to rock, hip-hop and dance, developing your knowledge of contemporary popular music.You'll join peers from backgrounds in cultural studies, sociology, music and the creative arts to explore today's local live music scene and its connection to the wider national and international industry. From getting out into the Leeds area and conducting ethnographic research into local gigs and events, to composing scores for film and television, you'll discover how a wide variety of communities fuse together to create what is recognised as a vibrant and expanding scene.Whether it's developing your music editing techniques in our studios, or organising events and liaising with artists at Leeds Festival, you'll gain the hands-on experience employers are looking for, gathering evidence for your major research project.This course is the perfect springboard to make contacts, help you discover the interconnectivity of popular music and culture, and really engage with a vibrant and varied scene which covers everything from metal right through to country.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/popularmusicandculture_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

With more festivals and independent producers and artists than ever before, the need for live music and industry professionals has soared.

Employment opportunities could be open to you in sound engineering, performance, teaching, song writing, production, music for film and television, music journalism, marketing and PR, and events organisation.

Alternatively you may wish to further your research by studying for a PhD.

- Performer
- Songwriter
- Sound Technician
- Events Organiser

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

As well as having access to modern, professional music studios, you'll benefit from being taught by a highly skilled and experienced teaching team, including Professor Karl Spracklen who is Secretary of the International Society for Metal Music Studies and the Editor of Metal Music Studies. You'll also have the chance to network with industry professionals during our guest lecture series. Previous speakers have included Leeds Festival boss Melvin Benn and chart-toppers Rudimental. We also have fantastic links with local and national music, arts and festival organisations, which help ensure you get the most from your course.

Core Modules

Popular Music as Leisure & Culture
Examine the importance of popular music as a form of leisure and culture. You will explore music subcultures through sociology, cultural geography, cultural studies and leisure theory.

Researching Popular Music & Culture
Develop an understanding of the strategies used in the study of popular music and culture, drawing on advanced approaches from sociology, musicology, cultural studies, ethnography, leisure and other relevant areas.

Popular Music Analysis
Examine performance, record production, video and reception and the meaning of music for your small scale, individual research project which focuses on the analysis of popular music artefacts.

Popular Music in Contemporary Culture
Engage in debate and discussion of how, where and why certain strands of musical productivity and creativity remain constantly part of the vocabulary of popular music.

Final Individual Project
Combine your learning into a significant piece of work, the nature of which will be determined by yourself and the course team.

Option Modules

Studio Production Skills
Produce a series of sound design projects and create your own systems for the purpose of manipulating/processing sound which will demonstrate your understanding of the concepts behind the tools used for sound design.

Creative Music Production
Develop a broad understanding of the creative possibilities of the studio environment by investigating a range of theoretical, technical, and creative approaches to the production process.

Music Industries in Context
Develop a range of theoretical perspectives drawing on contemporary research into the ecology of the music industries and how different stakeholders across the music sector work together.

Music Industries in Practice
Investigate a host of contemporary issues affecting the practice of operating in the music industries, focusing on one key area determined by your own interests.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Broadcasting Place
Broadcasting Place provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Push the boundaries of creative expression by developing your existing practice in areas such as art, graphics, sculpture, filmmaking, animation, sound and curating. Read more
Push the boundaries of creative expression by developing your existing practice in areas such as art, graphics, sculpture, filmmaking, animation, sound and curating. From working with practising arts on live projects and spending time using our outstanding facilities, to attending workshops, seminars and guest lectures, we'll help you gain the expertise you need to help drive your creativity forward.

You'll work on live projects and collaborations affiliated with external partners and agencies within our city, including Leeds City Art Gallery and The Henry Moore Institute, and beyond Leeds in cities such as Birmingham, London and Amsterdam. You'll also be partnered with a mentor - a renowned contemporary artist or curator - who will offer critical and constructive feedback, enabling you to reflect and improve your working practices.

Whether you're a recent graduate, someone who is looking to develop your own business further, or you're simply looking to reignite your passion for the creative arts, this short course is the ideal step which will allow you to research, develop and flourish in an area which is of particular interest to you.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/art_design_professional

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

Our course is ideal if you are aiming to develop your skills as a practising artist, designer, curator, publisher, writer or filmmaker. You might also be looking to bridge the gap between undergraduate and postgraduate study, or are hoping to set up your own enterprise. You may also broaden your employment prospects through work undertaken with industry professionals during your time on the course.

- Gallery Curator
- Exhibition Manager
- Artist/Designer
- Studio Manager

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

Based in the centre of Leeds, you'll be right in the heart of a city that has a thriving and dynamic creative community. Through strong links with local galleries, exhibitions and creative centres, you will have access to some of the best and most contemporary artists in the region and be able to expand your industry contacts.

With 110 contact hours spread over just nine months, you'll have quality one-to-one time with your personal tutor, be able to share ideas in group tutorials, meetings and seminars, and will spend time in our 3D workshops, digital print, photography, printmaking and video-editing facilities all based on site.

This short course is a great way to build your expertise for professional use, re-engage your creativity and embrace a subject you're passionate about, or develop your skills before applying for one of our masters qualifications.

Core Modules

Creative Practice
Identify, propose and negotiate a planned programme of work which articulates your personal practice.

Strategies for Practice
Explore the professional context of creative practice and study the organisational, entrepreneurial and process issues relevant to you.

Marion Harrison

Senior Lecturer in Fine Art and Course Leader

"I have worked in the school of Architecture, Art and Design for 15 years and I am continually impressed by our students’ diverse and idiosyncratic approaches to art and design practice. This new intensive course hopes to continue this tradition and create a new space for graduating students to develop their professional practice."

Marion has teaching experience in both further and higher education. She has taught undergraduate and postgraduate students at Leeds Beckett University, University for the Creative Arts and Sint Lukas, Brussels. She has also been an adviser to an independent international art school in Berlin since 2004 and currently runs her own practice which includes curating radio broadcasts, printmaking and photography.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Broadcasting Place
Broadcasting Place provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Music has an important role to play in secondary school education and can contribute to the development of all pupils, regardless of their previous experience or abilities. Read more
Music has an important role to play in secondary school education and can contribute to the development of all pupils, regardless of their previous experience or abilities.

Knowing how to practically apply your musical knowledge and understanding to a classroom environment will be a key element of your training. We will broaden your understanding of how pupils of differing abilities learn, enabling you to plan musical activities, both theoretical and practical, that will inspire all your students and will engage them in all aspects of music and learning.

We will develop you as a music teacher, giving you the skills and confidence to find innovative ways to translate your knowledge into a language pupils can understand. A key element of your training will be the hands-on experience you will acquire in the classroom, giving you the opportunity to grow your sureness, teaching ability and knowledge while trialling different music teaching methods so you can develop your own style.

This course is offered as School Direct only.

From the beginning of your course, you will be based in your provider school or within your partnership of schools. The majority of taught seminars will be organised and based in your provider school or alliance. Throughout your course, you will attend our Headingley Campus one day a week (usually a Friday) for key module seminars.

To view our full range of PGCEs, and for more information, please visit our teacher training pages (http://leedsbeckett.ac.uk/teach).

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/PGCE_music

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

Completing this course will enable you to be recommended for Qualified Teacher Status. Subject to ratification by the Department for Education, you will then be qualified as a secondary school teacher, with a specialism in music.

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

We have more than 100 years' experience of teacher training and you'll be supported by an experienced course team determined to see you flourish as an innovative music teacher. You will become part of a supportive teaching and learning community, where you will be able to pick up advice and tips from your course tutors and share ideas on lesson plans and classroom experiences with your fellow students.

Helping you to develop your confidence, identity and style through a critically reflective approach to your practice will form a fundamental element of your training.

To help with your preparations for your course, you will have the opportunity to attend a residential, where you will meet your tutors and fellow trainees, start to develop your support networks and discover how the outdoors can be used to inspire your teaching.

You will gain substantial training in a school environment. Many of the partnership schools involved in the delivery of your course are located in and around Leeds to ensure your travelling is limited and you will have the maximum time to prepare your lessons. You will complete three teaching placements in at least two contrasting schools, receiving support from your school mentor and University tutors.

You will learn from lecturers who have been practising teachers and are now active in educational research, benefiting from their practical experience and theoretical knowledge.

We provide ongoing training for all newly qualified teachers. On successful completion of your course, you will be able to enrol on our Newly Qualified Teacher module, giving you another valuable means of support as you start your teaching career.

There's lots of support available to help you fund your teaching training. Depending on your degree class, the subject you want to teach and the training programme you follow, you could be eligible for a bursary, scholarship or even a salary.

For more information, visit the National College for Teaching & Leadership website (https://getintoteaching.education.gov.uk/bursaries-and-funding).

Dr Tom Dobson

Senior Lecturer

"Training to teach at Leeds Beckett University gives you the best of both worlds. On campus, you will benefit from the expertise of our published academics; in schools and settings, you will learn from outstanding partner teachers."

Having taught English in secondary schools as well as undertaking writing projects in local primary schools, Tom completed his PhD which focused on boys’ writing during the transition stage from primary to secondary school. His thesis was recently published by Sense Academic Publishers.

Facilities

- School Practice Collection
Our School Practice Collection offers a wide range of journals, electronic resources and equipment selected specifically to help you prepare for your teaching practice.

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Headingley Campus
Our historic Headingley Campus is set in nearly 100 acres of parkland and offers easy access to Leeds city centre.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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