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The unique LLM in Legal Research gives you the crucial research and analytical skills that are in demand today - whether your ambitions focus on working in academia or in a commercial law firm. Read more

LLM in Legal Research

The unique LLM in Legal Research gives you the crucial research and analytical skills that are in demand today - whether your ambitions focus on working in academia or in a commercial law firm.

If you have a Bachelor's in law, a curious and analytical mind, and a desire to dig deep into complex legal issues, you'll find the LLM Legal Research to be a programme of unparalleled quality, opportunity, and relevance. Facilitated by Utrecht's Law Faculty- renowned throughout Europe for prolific and excellent legal research- this 2-year prestige Master's gives you the time and support to lay a solid foundation for an academic, commercial, PhD or public policy career. A maximum of 25 participants begin the LLM Legal Research each year. Challenging courses in research methodologies, academic writing, and the dynamics of law in the EU and international context prepare you to take on a variety of research projects, deepening your research skills and knowledge in your preferred legal field. Working with your professors you gain an academic network as well, helpful for future PhD research.

'The LLM has given me the opportunity to gain in-depth knowledge of my favourite field of law, while developing research skills and being surrounded by great professors. As icing on the cake, my Master Thesis is the foundation of my PhD research. What more do you want?' - Irene Aronstein, alumna

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The MRes is a research training Masters programme which provides rigorous training in socio-legal research skills to enable you to carry out doctoral-level research using legal and socio-legal methodology or, alternatively, to embark on a career as a specialist socio-legal researcher. Read more
The MRes is a research training Masters programme which provides rigorous training in socio-legal research skills to enable you to carry out doctoral-level research using legal and socio-legal methodology or, alternatively, to embark on a career as a specialist socio-legal researcher.

The programme is ESRC-recognised. This means it meets the research training requirements of the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and that you are eligible to apply for ESRC funding for PhD research. Only a handful of Law Schools in the UK offer ESRC recognised programmes in this field.

The taught programme offers research training in generic social-science skills, providing you with a solid basis in social science theory and methodology through modules offered to all social science postgraduates across the University. These are then built on within the socio-legal context through two skills-based modules offered by the Law School. Specialist modules reflect the socio-legal research expertise of staff. The supervised research dissertation will allow you to bring together the conceptual and practical skills acquired in the taught modules and demonstrate your understanding by applying them to your own research ideas in the socio-legal context. Teaching is mainly seminar and workshop based.

For further information on this programme please visit our website: http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/law/sociolegalmres

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Explore the relationship between crime and the law, from the criminal justice system and issues with reoffenders, to crime in the media and the glamorisation of drugs. Read more
Explore the relationship between crime and the law, from the criminal justice system and issues with reoffenders, to crime in the media and the glamorisation of drugs.

Our MSc Criminology and Socio-Legal Research forms part of our ESRC Doctoral Training Centre accreditation and combines training in current debates in criminology with an introduction to legal theory and legal methods. It provides a good basis if you wish to conduct criminological research with a socio-legal dimension.

On this course you investigate topics including:
-Philosophy of law and jurisprudence
-Ripping, remixing, and viral culture
-Surveillance and punishment
-The English legal system
-Methods of social control

This course should also interest you if you are without a background in law, as we make good use of legal materials, in addressing our sociological and criminological research questions.

Our Department of Sociology was rated top 10 in the UK for research quality (REF 2014), and we consistently receive strong student satisfaction scores, including 96% overall student satisfaction in 2015.

Our expert staff

We are a large and friendly department, offering a diverse range of research interests and with staff members who are committed to teaching, research and publication that covers a broad geographical spectrum.

Many have worked at the local level with local authorities, justice councils, community partnerships and charities. Others have worked at a national and international level with bodies like the United Nations, the European Commission’s Expert Group on Public Understanding of Science, Amnesty International, The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, the Home Office and national non-governmental organisations.

Specialist facilities

-Dedicated postgraduate support facilities
-Our renowned off-campus Graduate Conference takes place every February
-A unique Student Resource Centre where you can get help with your studies, access examples of previous students’ work, and attend workshops on research skills
-The Sociology common room is open all day Monday-Friday, is stocked with daily newspapers, magazines and journals, and has free drinks available
-Links with the Institute of Social and Economic Research, which conducts large-scale survey projects and has its own library, and the -UK Data Archive, which stores national research data like the British Crime Survey
-Our students’ Sociology Society, a forum for the exchange of ideas, arranging talks by visiting speakers, introducing you to various career pathways, and organising debates

Your future

This course provides excellent preparation for further academic study, and many of our postgraduates go on to successful academic careers, both in the UK and overseas.

Others have established careers in non-governmental organisations, local authorities, specialist think tanks, government departments, charities, media production, and market intelligence.

We work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Dissertation
-Legal Research and the English Legal System
-Approaches to Legal Theory
-Sociological Research Design
-Current Controversies in Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy
-Introduction to Quantitative Analysis (optional)
-Digital Economy (optional)

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Typically information governance/security and law have been taught as distinct subjects in different discipline areas. Read more
Typically information governance/security and law have been taught as distinct subjects in different discipline areas. In recognition of the relationship that exists between information governance/information security and the protection of personal data this programme brings together these subjects in one multi-disciplinary qualification.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Data Protection Law and Information Governance is a distance learning course that has been specifically designed to meet the needs of professionals already working in data protection and/or information governance. You will study three modules. The first of these, the legal research module, will develop your ability to undertake legal research and to present your research findings appropriately. In the second module you will develop your understanding of information governance and security principles that underpin the management of an organisation’s information assets. The third module will focus upon data protection law and practice.

The programme will not only provide you with valuable knowledge of current law and proposed developments to the law and to the principles of information governance, it will also enhance your ability to advise upon both information governance and data protection. The research, writing and presentation skills you will develop will also be of use to you in your working environment. Unlike typical CPD type learning this programme will challenge you to undertake critical evaluation of the law and to consider the application of information governance and security to your own/a chosen organisation.

Learn From The Best

This programme is delivered jointly by academics within Northumbria Law School and the iSchool, in the Faculty of Engineering and Environment. Northumbria Law School is actively involved in research and consultancy in the field of data protection, information sharing, freedom of information and privacy law. The iSchool, which delivers the information governance and security module, is widely recognised for its innovative distance and work-based learning programmes in information and records management and for its related research.

This course is delivered by a team of solicitors and academics with extensive experience in data protection and information governance, who are actively researching the area. In addition our team also boast memberships to key professional bodies, in addition to editing industry publications such as the Records Management Journal.

Teaching And Assessment

This course is primarily delivered online to provide flexibility and the ability for you to study at times convenient to you. We believe, however, that opportunities to engage with your tutors and with fellow students are an important part of your learning experience. On two of the modules you will be offered the opportunity to meet your tutors and attend lectures or workshops at the University at an optional study day. All of the content will be available online should you not be able to attend. On the third module you will be encouraged to engage with your tutor and with fellow students via the module discussion board.

Module Overview
KC7046 - Information Governance and Security (Core, 20 Credits)
LW7002 - Data Protection (Core, 20 Credits)
LW7003 - Legal Research (Core, 20 Credits)

Each taught module is assessed via written assignment. On the legal research module you will work in a group with other postgraduate students to undertake the research, writing and review of that assignment. On the data protection module and the information governance module you will submit an individual written assignment at the end of each module. As part of the assessment process you will be expected to undertake a critical evaluation of the law, and to consider information governance and security in your own or another chosen organisation.

Learning Environment

Your course will be delivered online using the latest innovative software. Learning materials such as module handbooks, assessment information, lecture presentation slides, recorded lectures and electronic reading lists will be available via our highly accessible e-learning platform, Blackboard. You can also access student support and other key University systems through your personal account.

Research-Rich Learning

Research Rich learning (RRL) is embedded across the programme, reflecting the pervasive research culture of the law school. Your student journey commences with the Legal Research module. This module will help you to gain a clear awareness and understanding of appropriate legal research methods and legal sources and how to cite those sources. In your subsequent modules your tutors will expose you to a range of academic literature covering substantive data protection law and relevant information governance and data security frameworks and principles. You will also develop your legal research skills further as your tutors encourage you to discuss, evaluate and critically examine relevant principles and frameworks and as you undertake your own research in order to complete your module assignments.

Give Your Career An Edge

It is envisaged that most students who study this programme will already be employed within the data protection/information governance fields. It recognises that the introduction of a new data protection regulation will result in significant challenges for professionals working in the data protection field, and seeks to help you to develop the skills and knowledge which you will need to do your job professionally notwithstanding the changing legislation framework.

Your Future

This course provides academic recognition of your knowledge of data protection and information governance law and your ability to apply that knowledge to practice. It also provides a strong foundation for further study. Should you decide upon completion of the programme that you wish to further develop your knowledge of information rights law or information governance/security then Northumbria Law School and the Faculty of Engineering and Environment both offer masters programmes in these fields. This programme provides you with a stepping stone towards study a Masters in Law (an LLM). Successful completion of this programme exempts you from study of the first three modules on the Pg Dip/LLM in Information Rights Law and Practice.

What Does Britain Leaving The EU Mean For This Course?

We can confirm that we will not be changing the course in light of the Brexit decision. The focus in this course will be the current legal framework, and any likely reforms including the GDPR. There are several reasons why the course will not be changed at this particular point. Firstly there are no changes to the current legal framework on data protection or environmental information. This is well explained in a statement by the information commissioner's office https://ico.org.uk/about-the-ico/news-and-events/news-and-blogs/2016/06/referendum-result-response/ and was reiterated by Baroness Neville-Rolfe, the Government Minister responsible for Data Protection, on 4 July. These statements also acknowledge that there is a need for reform in data protection and that would have to be seen in the context of European data protection laws. Although it is not clear what the exact relationship of the UK and EU will be in the future there is a recognition that there will be a need for equivalency of data protection law in the UK with other countries. The need for equivalency of the law is likely to be necessary whether the UK is part of the single market, or if it exits the European economic area, in order for EU countries to send data to us as part of the 8th principle (See Schedule 1 of the Data Protection Act 1998). As such the GDPR still has relevance in our understanding of what would be required to achieve equivalent protection and what likely reforms on data protection may be considered in the UK. From an educational perspective the examination of reforms such as the GDPR provide a useful mechanism to critique current data protection laws, allowing for the discussion of strengths and weaknesses, even if all those reforms are not ultimately adopted. We will of course keep the position under review, as we do with all our teaching areas in order to ensure that learning material reflects both the current law and likely changes to that law.

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The underlying philosophy of the LLM is to develop specialists in the field of International and Commercial Law. The programme attracts students from a wide variety of backgrounds with different experiences. Read more

Course outline

The underlying philosophy of the LLM is to develop specialists in the field of International and Commercial Law. The programme attracts students from a wide variety of backgrounds with different experiences. It stresses the importance of interaction between staff and student, as well as between student and student. We believe this is an essential element in the development of effective lawyers in this area.

Following successful completion of the LLM in International and Commercial Law, you should have developed a range of skills, which include:

• A sound understanding of each of the chosen areas of the law
• Confidence in the analysis of complex case-law
• The ability to make your argument convincingly, orally and in writing
• The ability to take a co-operative approach to problem solving

Start dates

Students may take the LLM over

• 12 months starting in September; or
• 9 months starting in January.

Teaching methods

Seminars are the primary teaching method for this course. They encourage the development of clear analytical skills and create a forum where you can test your ideas against the arguments of your peers. Whether you enter the legal profession or business world you will find it is essential to have developed persuasive abilities. LLM options are taught in the form of three hours of seminars spread over each of the teaching weeks of the course. LLM seminars for subjects which are also taught at LLB level take place in two hour blocks every fortnight.

You are expected to read the cases and other materials relevant to the particular seminar in advance. At the seminar you will be asked to support your opinions and discuss your analysis of the area with your fellow students. In some modules you may be expected to make a presentation on a topic given to you by your tutor. Whilst these tasks may seem daunting at the beginning of the year, you will rapidly gain confidence as your debating skills develop.

Where seminars are on a fortnightly basis, the course will be supported by three hours of lectures per week during the lecturing period. Seminars will complement the lecture series.

Course material is available on the University’s own Virtual Learning Environment (VLE), Moodle. This allows students to download lecture notes, submit assignments and share resources in an electronic forum both within the University’s computer network and remotely.

Specialist designations

Students can select specific modules to have their LLM designated as specialising in:

• International Trade and Maritime Law;
• International Oil and Gas Law; or
• Financial Services Law

Each designation requires the following to be taken:

• 20 unit Advanced Legal Research module;
• 40 unit Core module; and
• 120 units of Options.

The modules currently offered for the designations are as follows:

International Trade and Maritime Law

• Advanced Legal Research (20)
• International Trade and Maritime Law (40)

120 units of Options from:

• Commercial Conflict of Laws (20)
• Contemporary Issues in Indigenous Rights (20)
• International Intellectual Property (40)
• Law of Business Organisations (40)
• Law of World Trade (20)
• Marine Insurance (20)
• Dissertation (40)

International Oil & Gas Law

• Advanced Legal Research (20)
• International Oil and Gas Law and Policy (40)

120 units of Options from:

• Banking Law (40)
• Contemporary Issues in Indigenous Rights (20)
• Environmental Regulation and Energy Exploitation (20)
• EU Competition Law (20)
• International Trade and Maritime Law (40)
• Marine Insurance (20)
• Money Laundering, Offshore Banking and Asset Recovery (20)
• Dissertation (40)

Financial Services Law

• Advanced Legal Research (20)
• Banking Law (40)

120 units of Options from:

• Law of Business Organisations (40)
• Commercial Conflict of Laws (20)
• EU Competition Law (20)
• Marine Insurance (20)
• Money Laundering, Offshore Banking and Asset Recovery (20)
• Securities Regulation (20)
• Dissertation (40)

*Subject to final approval

Non-designated LLM

Students who wish to have an LLM in International and Commercial Law without a designation must take

• Advanced Legal Research (20)

160 units of Options from

• Banking Law (40)
• Commercial Conflict of Laws (20)
• Contemporary Issues in Indigenous Rights (20)
• Environmental Regulation and Energy Exploitation (20)
• Intellectual Property Law (40)
• International Human Rights (20)
• International Medical Law & Ethics (20)
• International Oil and Gas Laws and Policy (40)
• International Trade and Maritime Law (40)
• Law of Business Organisations (40 units)
• Law of War (20)
• Law of World Trade (20)
• Marine Insurance (20)
• Money Laundering, Offshore Banking and Asset Recovery (20)
• Public International Law (40)
• Dissertation (40)

September start

The September start allows students to take more time to adjust to postgraduate studies. In the first term students must take the Advanced Legal Research module and choose Money Laundering, Offshore Banking and Asset Recovery, Contemporary Issues in Indigenous Rights, or EU Competition Law. All the modules are then available from January onwards, subject always to there being sufficient students opting for them

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This LLM Law is designed to provide a flexible educational experience that enables law graduates, non-law graduates and lawyers to develop their specialist legal interests at postgraduate level. Read more

Why take this course?

This LLM Law is designed to provide a flexible educational experience that enables law graduates, non-law graduates and lawyers to develop their specialist legal interests at postgraduate level.

Develop your expertise in very practical and sought-after subjects through taught units and supervised research on a course that promotes individual choice for your future careers.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Choose to take this course in full-time or part-time mode – whichever suits you best
Tap in to our Library’s vast selection of electronic resources, which can be accessed from anywhere with an internet connection
Focus on particular areas of academic interest or develop a wider range of skills and knowledge

What opportunities might it lead to?

The Chartered Institute of Legal Executives (CILEx) Level 6 Diploma in Law and Practice is offered as an option for law graduates on our LLM programmes, giving you the opportunity to obtain its Graduate Fast Track Diploma together with your postgraduate law degree. After graduating this will enable you to apply for work as a legal executive or paralegal and following three years of qualifying employment, you can apply to be admitted as a Chartered Fellow of the Institute of Legal Executives.

The benefits are clear:

An opportunity to obtain relevant employment straight after graduation without the need for further study or a Training Contract
A recognised professional qualification in addition to your degree
As a Chartered Fellow of the Institute of Legal Executives, you have similar rights and opportunities of partnership as a solicitor.

Module Details

The full-time mode of this course lasts for one year and you will follow either the law route or the non-law route.

Law Route

Those who hold a UK law degree or equivalent will undertake a dissertation/professional practitioner project and four units from the following list:

CILEX Level 6 (this unit is only available to those who hold a qualifying law degree)
Community Legal Research Project
Corporate Governance: Theory, Law and Practice
Employment Law
Global Corporate Responsibility
Intellectual Property Law
International and European Business Law
International Commercial Arbitration
Work-based Learning Unit
Non-Law Route

Those who do not hold a UK law degree or equivalent will be enrolled on the non-law route and will undertake the following units:

Legal Approach to Business
Dissertation/Professional Practitioner Project
In addition, you will undertake three units from the following list:

Community Legal Research Project
Corporate Governance: Theory, Law and Practice
Employment Law
Global Corporate Responsibility
Intellectual Property Law
International and European Business Law
International Commercial Arbitration
Work-based Learning Unit


The part-time mode of this course lasts three years and you will follow either the law route or the non-law route.

Law Route

Those who hold a UK law degree or equivalent will undertake the following units:

Year One

You will undertake two units from the following list:

CILEX Level 6 (this unit is only available to those who hold a qualifying law degree)
Community Legal Research Project
Corporate Governance: Theory, Law and Practice
Employment Law
Global Corporate Responsibility
Intellectual Property Law
International and European Business Law
International Commercial Arbitration
Work-based Learning Unit

Year Two

You will undertake two units from the following list (excluding units undertaken in the first year):

CILEX Level 6 (this unit is only available to those who hold a qualifying law degree)
Community Legal Research Project
Corporate Governance: Theory, Law and Practice
Employment Law
Global Corporate Responsibility
Intellectual Property Law
International and European Business Law
Work-based Learning Unit

Year Three

In the final year, you will complete and submit your dissertation/professional practitioner project.

Non-Law Route

Those who do not hold a UK law degree or equivalent will be enrolled on the non-law route and will undertake the following units:

Year One

You will undertake the following compulsory unit:

Legal Approach to Business

You will also undertake one unit from the following list:

Community Legal Research Project
Corporate Governance: Theory, Law and Practice
Employment Law
Global Corporate Responsibility
Intellectual Property Law
International and European Business Law
International Commercial Arbitration
Work-based Learning Unit

Year Two

You will undertake two units from the following list (excluding units undertaken in the first year):

Community Legal Research Project
Corporate Governance: Theory, Law and Practice
Employment Law
Global Corporate Responsibility
Intellectual Property Law
International and European Business Law
International Commercial Arbitration
Work-based Learning Unit
Year Three

In the final year, you will complete and submit your dissertation/professional practitioner project.

Programme Assessment

You will be expected to attend eight hours of class time per week if you are on the full-time course whereas for the part-time course you attend approximately four hours per week. You will be encouraged to undertake independent study with time also devoted to group problem solving, discussion and debate.

The majority of the units will be assessed via exams, however much of your time will also be spent researching and writing your dissertation which concentrates on a topic of your choice.

Student Destinations

The LLM in Law provides a springboard for many career paths. It allows potential law lecturers to develop expertise in a variety of subjects and provides the basis for a career in business or the public sector. It could also enable law practitioners to pursue new subject specialities.

Additionally, Law graduates who complete the CILEx option may apply for membership status of the Chartered Institute of Legal Executives (CILEx). Membership of CILEx and success on this LLM course will provide a real edge when competing for trainee legal executive opportunities.

Roles our graduates have taken on include:

Designated detention officer
Legal clerk
Paralegal assistant
Business development executive

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We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-psychology/. Read more
We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-psychology/

Supervision can be offered in any of the areas of departmental activity.

During your first year you may take a range of taught modules including research design and analysis, methodology, theoretical issues, and statistics; requirements will vary depending on any postgraduate research training you have already undertaken.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

You will attend and contribute to research seminars, and through departmental and Goldsmiths-wide modules you are also encouraged to develop practical skills such as public speaking, poster preparation, scientific writing, and how to deal with the media.

You meet regularly with your supervisor at every stage, and develop a structured approach to designing, executing, analysing and writing up your research.

You will have access to the Department of Psychology's range of laboratories, testing rooms and research equipment. You have an annual allowance to contribute towards your research expenses and participation in at least one national or international conference.

What kind of research could I do?

We are able to support research in most areas of psychology. Some students have already formulated specific research ideas before they apply here, and find a supervisor in the department who is able to help them develop these into a doctoral research programme; if this applies to you, see information on the expertise of all our staff and contact any who you think may be able to help you to pursue these.

Other students are attracted by the research interests of our staff, and may decide to undertake a project which has been suggested by them and which relates to their ongoing research. To explore these or other research ideas, start by emailing the member of staff whose research interests you. Each staff member will discuss research ideas with you via email, skype or phone; and you are very welcome to visit staff at Goldsmiths to discuss your options further.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Denise Barry.

Structure

Our postgraduate students are offered a stimulating study environment in which to research their higher degree.

We have a thriving postgraduate school with some 40 current students on full-time and part-time programmes, including mature students and students from the EU and overseas.

We provide training modules in research methods in your first year, a regular report/presentation schedule, and excellent computing/research facilities.

If you are thinking of doing an MPhil at Goldsmiths, the first step is to get in touch with any members of our staff whose research is in line with your interests.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

Training and support

All our MPhil students are assigned a specific research supervisor (or sometimes joint supervisors).

As well as receiving ongoing support and guidance from their allocated supervisor(s), our students undergo comprehensive training in psychological research methods (unless they already hold an MSc approved by the ESRC) in line with current ESRC training guidelines, which includes quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. This is mainly during the first year of registration (or first two years for part-time students. Our MPhil students also attend various short generic research skills and methods training (CRT) modules run by the College, also in their first year (or first two years if part-time).

Our students have full access to the Department's excellent facilities for lab and field research, and first-rate technical support is available from the Department's five-strong team of full-time technical staff.

Your progress

You may have the option to upgrade to a PhD after 12 months full-time, or 20 months part-time.

Your progress on your thesis is regularly monitored by the Department's Postgraduate Programmes Committee. The Head of Department can recommend suspension from the programme at any stage if progress is not satisfactory.

Postgraduate facilities

All full-time students have their own workplace and a networked computer with access to programmes for their research needs, plus email and internet facilities. Part-time students also have access to a networked computer, generally shared between two or three students. In addition, we have a lab solely for the use of postgraduates, and a postgraduate computing room. We also run a psychological test library for staff and students.

Seminars and presentations

Our postgraduates have regular opportunities to meet up with other students and to make contact with staff.

The Department runs a number of active visiting lecturer seminar programmes and a weekly Postgraduate Seminar Series, at which students learn about the research of their colleagues, and receive guidance on topics such as giving presentations or writing up a thesis. There are also several specialised research groups (including affective neuroscience, consciousness studies, development and social processes, occupational psychology, visual cognition) open to staff, researchers and postgraduate students which hold regular discussion sessions and talks.

All postgraduates are invited to attend an annual Research Seminar Weekend in an informal setting at Cumberland Lodge in Windsor Great Park, which is funded by the Department. Here, we have a programme of internal and external speakers.

In addition, our annual Postgraduate Poster Party gives students the opportunity to update the Department on their work.

Conferences

Besides the yearly presentation to the Department, our postgraduates are strongly encouraged to present their work, eg as a paper or poster, at external conferences and financial support is set aside for this. Some recent presentations by postgraduates include:

-Priming for depth-rotated objects depends on attention. (Vision Sciences, Sarasota)
-Imagining objects you have never seen: Imagery in individuals with profound visual impairment. (BPS Annual Conference)
-Modelling dopaminergic effects on implicit and explicit learning tasks. (Annual Summer Interdisciplinary Conference)
-Individual differences in affective modulation of the startle reflex and emotional stroop task. (BPS Conference)
-Evolution and psi: Investigating the presentiment effect as an adapted behaviour. (Society for Psychical Research 25th International Conference)
-Presence: Is your heart in it? (4th Annual International Workshop on Presence)
-The effects of state anxiety on the suggestibility and accuracy of child eyewitnesses. (11th European Conference of Psychology and Law)
-The psychosocial sequelae of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. (6th Scientific Meeting of the Stroke Association)
-The role of Electrophysiology in Human Computer Interaction. (HCI Conference)
-Categorical shape perception. Experimental Psychology Society and Belgian Psychological Society)
-Schizotypy, eye movements, and the effects of neuroticism. (10th Biennial Meeting of the International Society for the Study of Individual (ISSID))
-Eye movements in siblings of schizophrenic patients. (World Congress of Biological Psychiatry, Berlin, Germany)

Assessment

Thesis and viva voce.

Department

Psychology at Goldsmiths is ranked joint 3rd in the UK for the quality of our research**

**Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

How does music affect mood?
Why do some people believe in the paranormal?
How do people with autism think?

In the Department of Psychology we try and investigate questions like this, conducting research that’s relevant to a range of sectors and industries – from advertising to education, and from banking to the public sector.

You’ll be taught by experts in the field, who are carrying out research that’s world class. And you’ll learn in a department with excellent specialist and general-purpose research laboratories, including:

EEG and brain stimulation labs for neuroscience research
a visual perception and attention laboratory equipped with state-of-the-art eye tracking systems
an infant lab
in-house technical support staff

Skills & Careers

You will receive training in and develop wide-ranging research skills, including:

database searching and bibliographic skills
managing and analysing data
presentation and communication skills
quantitative and qualitative research methods
handling legal and ethical issues in research
research design
project management

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body. Supervision can be offered in any of the areas of departmental activity, as reflected in the research interests of our staff. Please contact a member of staff in the department, before making a formal application, and establish that they would be willing to supervise you in a research area of common interest.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

An approximate timeline of training and research plans and an outline of a previous research project in which you have played a leading role (for instance, a study you conducted for your undergraduate or MSc degree). The personal statement in the Departmental form will be structured in a different way to that on the College form. Please see guidelines on the form itself. Finally, your supervisor will be required to provide a statement detailing ways in which the project fits into their overall research programme and the wider research interests and facilities of the Department. Guidance on how to structure these is given on the form. Please do not exceed the word length, and DO NOT submit additional material emanating from your previous research (e.g. copies of dissertations, published papers) as this will not be read. Note that all aspects of the application are required for an application to be considered.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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An increasingly globalised economy requires international commercial law professionals to have a wide range of knowledge on issues relevant to international commerce, such as the World Trade Organisation and the law of international trade, and legal research. Read more
An increasingly globalised economy requires international commercial law professionals to have a wide range of knowledge on issues relevant to international commerce, such as the World Trade Organisation and the law of international trade, and legal research. The PG Cert in International Commercial Law has been designed as a starting point for international commercial law professionals and legal practitioners who want to continue their professional development in this area. You will gain specialist legal knowledge within a practical context, whilst developing expertise in chosen areas and enhancing your research skills.

With maximum flexibility in mind, this distance learning course allows you to work towards the LLM in International Commercial Law in stages. Once you have completed the PG Cert you have the option to continue to PG Dip then onto LLM.

Learn From The Best

Study on the PG Cert in International Commercial Law and you will learn from inspirational academics that have a real passion for their subject. The course has been designed with input from the sector and shaped by internationally excellent research to ensure the course is up-to-date and relevant.

Lecturers on this course have research expertise and practice-based experience in the areas of partnership law, travel law, legal education, international business transactions, international commercial litigation, international commercial arbitration and corporate personality; knowledge that you can draw on as you progress through the course.

The course is delivered by Northumbria Law School, three times winners of the prestigious “Best Law School” accolade, awarded by the Attorney General’s Student Pro Bono Awards.

Teaching And Assessment

This innovative distance learning PG Cert in International Commercial Law course is delivered through three core modules. You will examine legal aspects of international trade, world trade organisation law, and legal research, with an emphasis on the practical application of the law in a professional environment. You will learn through a combination of online lectures and seminars and eLearning technology.

You are able to tailor the course to suit your interests and career aspirations as once you have completed the PG Cert you have the option to take an additional three modules and exit with the PG Dip or choose to then complete a 15,000-17,000-word project, based on an area related to your own practice or intended practice and graduate with the LLM in International Commercial Law.

Module Overview
LW7003 - Legal Research (Core, 20 Credits)
LW7042 - Law of International Trade (Core, 20 Credits)
LW7044 - World Trade Organisation Law (Core, 20 Credits)

Learning Environment

Technology Enhanced Learning (‘TEL’) is an integral part of this innovative distance learning course. The eLearning portal provides access to detailed learning materials including lecture materials, study notes, discussion boards, virtual classrooms, self-evaluative tasks and opportunities to engage with your tutor and fellow students.

We offer optional study days in the Law School to help distance learning students get the best out of the course. Panopto software will be used to record teaching activity taking place on study days and the footage will be made available online, meaning that you can learn at your own pace and at times that suit you.

Research-Rich Learning

Research is embedded throughout the course, and you will encounter all quadrants of research rich learning: research-tutored, research-led, research-based, and research-orientated. Starting with Legal Research, you will be exposed to a variety of research-informed experiences within subject modules.

Law School research focuses on the areas of Law and Society, Legal Education and Professional Skills, and the Centre for Evidence and Criminal Justice Studies. These internationally recognised groups act as a focus for research activity across the Law School, and their work feeds into the courses to ensure taught course content is informed by research developments in the sector.

Give Your Career An Edge

The PG Cert is designed to enhance your employability in the international commercial law arena. Employers in the legal profession actively encourage practitioners to undertake continuing professional development and this course provides the most flexible option with the ability to graduate with a PG Cert or continue on to PG Dip and LLM.

Throughout the course, you will be supported in reflecting upon your own practice, applying legal skills to the common problems you are experiencing or are likely to experience in practice, examining policies and undertaking independent legal research to update your knowledge. The course is accredited for Continuing Professional Development (CPD) by the Law Society of England and Wales and the General Council of the Bar of England and Wales.

You will also have access to specialist careers support within the Law School, including employer engagement sessions.

Your Future

The PG Cert in International Commercial Law has been designed to meet the distinct, identified needs of international commercial law professionals and legal practitioners. It will also enhance their employability of both lawyers and non-lawyers working in international commerce, as well as law graduates.

You will graduate fully equipped with expert legal knowledge, greater awareness of legal commercial issues, the ability to apply specialist knowledge to practical problems and to critically evaluate legal issues in the context of international commercial law. You will develop your critical, analysis, research and the professional and reflective skills to progress in this exciting field.

The nature of the course means that, on completion, the majority of graduates progress to the PG Dip and LLM International Commercial Law.

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Research Profile. Read more

Research Profile

The research interests of academic staff and graduate students in Ethics and Practical Theology encompass a range of theoretical and practical approaches to ethics, religion and theology, including environmental ethics, peace-building and reconciliation, ethical theory, and pastoral and practical theology.

You can find out more and identify a potential supervisor by looking at the School of Divinity’s * Staff Profiles, which give details of research interests and publications, and email addresses.

You are encouraged to contact a potential supervisor to discuss your research project before making a formal application. In the Ethics and Practical Theology research area, projects are often interdisciplinary. If this is the case, you may be jointly supervised with a subject specialist from another School in the University.

At the School of Divinity you will join a community of around 150 research students, drawn from around the world, and from a variety of religious and non-religious backgrounds.

You will study in a stimulating environment. The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranked the School’s research environment at 100% world-leading / internationally excellent, second in the UK on this front in theology and religion. This outstanding result reflects the vibrancy of the School’s research culture.

Training and Support

The ethos of the Graduate School is to promote excellence in postgraduate study, within a stimulating and supportive environment. We value equality and diversity in the School community, and an academic culture that is both critical and constructive.

At the start of the academic year, you will be invited to Welcome Week, an intensive introduction to study and life in Edinburgh. Some events are especially for international students new to Scotland and the UK, but everything is open to all.

In the first weeks, the School provides a general orientation to research skills and to wider opportunities for training and support.

From your first days as a PhD or MPhil student, you will work 1:1 with your primary research supervisor.

Your progress will be tracked, through regular supervisions and milestone reviews, to ensure that you get the support you need to bring your project to fruition.

You will be part of the research seminar in Theology and Ethics, to which visiting speakers are invited and to which postgraduates present work-in-progress.

You can also engage with the work of the * Centre for Theology and Public Issues.

You will be able to follow taught courses that contribute to your interests and research needs, and can also take advantage of opportunities to learn ancient and modern languages.

If you are a PhD student, after successful completion of your first year, you will be eligible to apply for tutoring opportunities, to gain teaching experience.

A University review (2015) commended the Graduate School for providing excellent support: responsive to student feedback; proactive in helping new postgraduates to adjust to their studies and to life in Scotland; enthusiastic and practical in promoting career development. The postgraduate student committee works closely with the School to make the research student experience the best it can be.

Facilities

The School of Divinity, one of the largest centres for the study of religion in the United Kingdom, is located in the historic setting of New College, close to Edinburgh Castle and overlooking Princes Street.

Resources for research are excellent. You can draw on the outstanding holdings of New College Library, the University of Edinburgh’s main library, and the nearby National Library of Scotland. New College Library has one of the largest theology collections in the UK, with more than a quarter of a million items and a large and rich manuscript collection. The University library exceeds 2.25 million volumes. The National Library of Scotland – a ‘legal deposit’ library like the British Library in London and the university libraries of Oxford and Cambridge – is just around the corner.

The School provides an extensive programme of weekly research seminars and special guest lectures. In addition, three research centres provide a special focus for activity: the Centre for the Study of Christian Origins; the Centre for Theology and Public Issues; the Centre for the Study ofWorld Christianity.

You will have access to excellent study facilities, dedicated to postgraduates. PhD and MPhil students have access 24/7, and can request an allocated desk. Masters by Research students have shared study space. All areas have printing/scanning and computer facilities. The main postgraduate study wing has a kitchen. New College has an on-site cafe that is open during term time.

Research Opportunities

You can choose from three research programmes: two Masters programmes and the PhD. Each takes a different amount of time: the Masters by Research, full-time, takes a year; the MPhil takes two years; a PhD takes at least three. More detail is given below.

Masters by Research If you have academic training in theology or religious studies (or another relevant subject), and would like to develop your interest with a focus on a particular area, the Masters by Research may interest you. This programme can be taken either as a ‘Master of Theology by Research’ or as a ‘Master of Science by Research’ – the difference is only in the name. You can study full-time (one year) or part-time (two years). Your pattern of study can either be three supervised research essays followed by a 15,000 word dissertation, or a 30,000 word dissertation. Most students take the ‘research essays + shorter dissertation’ path. All students receive research training.

Master of Philosophy (MPhil) Studying for an MPhil commits you to at least two years’ full-time study and to writing a thesis of up to 50,000 words. You will have regular 1:1 supervision and work with advice from two supervisors. During the first year you explore your chosen area of research and refine your research proposal. At around the nine-month mark, you will submit a draft chapter for discussion at a Review Board, together with a developed proposal for the whole thesis. On the basis of your progress-to date, and the prospects for your research, the Review Board will make recommendations on the continuation of your studies into the second year.

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) Research for a PhD will require you to undertake at least three years’ full-time study, and to write a thesis of up to 100,000 words. You will have regular 1:1 supervision and work with advice from two supervisors. For admission to the PhD programme, you will need to show a proven ability to sustain independent research under supervision, normally in the form of a masters programme that includes a dissertation. From the beginning, the British pattern of PhD studies focusses on working towards the thesis – there is little or no coursework. This means that from the start you need to be well-prepared in any special skills you need for your research project, including languages. You will also need to be competent in academic writing in English. During the first year you explore your chosen area of research and refine your research proposal. At around the nine-month mark, you will submit a draft chapter for discussion at a Review Board, together with a developed proposal for the whole thesis. On the basis of your progress-to date, and the prospects for your research, the Review Board will make recommendations on the continuation of your studies into the second year. After that, you will have an annual review to discuss your progress.



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The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. Read more
The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. In either case, the student completes a program of research training that includes the Ethnographic Research Methods, Statistical Analysis and the Research Training Seminar as well as a language option. All MaRes students are assigned a supervisor at the start of the year, who will help the student choose other relevant course options. Candidates must also submit a number of research related assignments which, taken together with the dissertation, are equivalent to approximately 30,000 words of assessed work. All students write an MA dissertation, but for students progressing on to a PhD, the MA dissertation will take the form of a research report that will constitute the first part of the upgrade document for the PhD programme.

The MaRes is recognised by the ESRC.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/

Aims and Outcomes

The MA is designed to train students in research skills to the level prescribed by the ESRC’s research training guidelines. It is intended for students with a good first degree (minimum of a 2.1) in social anthropology and/or a taught Masters degree in social anthropology. Most students would be expected to progress to PhD registration at the end of the degree. By the end of the program students will:

- Have achieved practical competence in a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods and tools;
- Have the ability to understand key issues of method and theory, and to understand the epistemological issues involved in using different methods.

In addition to key issues of research design, students will be introduced to a range of specific research methods and tools including:

- Interviewing, collection and analysis of oral sources, analysis and use of documents, participatory research methods, issues of triangulation research validity and reliability, writing and analysing field notes, and ethnographic writing.

- Social statistics techniques relevant for fieldwork and ethnographic data analysis (including chi-square tests, the T-test, F-test, and the rank correlation test).

Discipline specific training in anthropology includes:

- Ethnographic methods and participant observation;
- Ethical and legal issues in anthropological research;
- The logistics of long-term fieldwork;
- Familiarisation with appropriate regional and theoretical literatures;
- Writing-up (in the field and producing ethnography) and communicating research results; and
- Language training.

The Training Programme

In addition to optional courses that may be taken (see below), the student must successfully complete the following core course:

- Research Methods in Anthropology (15 PAN C011).

This full unit course is composed of Ethnographic Research Methods (15 PAN H002, a 0.5 unit course) and Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research (15PPOH035, a 0.5 unit course hosted by Department of Politics and International Studies).

MA Anthropological Research Methods students and first year MPhil/PhD are also required to attend the Research Training Seminar which provides training in the use of bibliographic/online resources, ethical and legal issues, communication and team-working skills, career development, etc. The focus of the Research Training Seminar is the development and presentation of the thesis topic which takes the form of a PhD-level research proposal.

Dissertation

MA/MPhil Students meet regularly with their supervisor to produce a systematic review of the secondary and regional literature that forms an integral part of their dissertation/research proposal. The dissertation, Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology (15 PAN C998), is approximately 15,000 words and demonstrates the extent to which students have achieved the key learning outcomes during the first year of research training. The dissertation takes the form of an extended research proposal that includes:

- A review of the relevant theoretical and ethnographic literature;
- An outline of the specific questions to be addressed, methods to be employed, and the expected contribution of the study to anthropology;
- A discussion of the practical, political and ethical issues likely to affect the research; and
- A presentation of the schedule for the proposed research together with an estimated budget.

The MA dissertation is submitted no later than mid-September of the student’s final year of registration. Two soft-bound copies of the dissertation, typed or word-processed, should be submitted to the Faculty of Arts and Humanities Office by 16:00 and on Moodle by 23:59 on the appropriate day.

Exemption from Training

Only those students who have clearly demonstrated their knowledge of research methods by completing a comparable program of study in qualitative and quantitative methods will be considered for a possible exemption from the taught courses. All students, regardless of prior training, are required to participate in the Research Training Seminar.

Programme Specification 2013/2014 (msword; 128kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/file39765.docx

Teaching & Learning

This MA is designed to be a shortcut into the PhD in that two of its components (the Research Methods Course and the Research Training Seminar, which supports the writing of the dissertation) are part of the taught elements of the MPhil year. Students on this course are also assigned a supervisor with whom they meet fortnightly as do the MPhil students. The other two elements of the course are unique to each student: and might include doing one of the core courses from the other Masters degrees (Social Anthropology, Anthropology of Development, Medical Anthropology, Anthropology of Media, Migration and Diaspora, or Anthropology of Food), as well as any options that will build analytical skills and regional knowledge, including language training. The MaRes can also be used to build regional expertise or to fill gaps in particular areas such as migration or development theory.

The dissertation for the MaRes will normally be assessed by two readers in October of the following year (that is, after the September 15th due date). Students who proceed onto the MPhil course from the MA will then have the first term of the MPhil year to write a supplementary document that reviews the dissertation and provides a full and detailed Fieldwork Proposal. This, along with research report material from the original MA dissertation, is examined in a viva voce as early as November of the first term of the MPhil year by the same examiners who have read the dissertation. Successful students can then be upgraded to the PhD in term 1 and leave for fieldwork in term 2 of the first year of the MPhil/PhD programme. This programme is currently recognised by the ESRC and therefore interested students who are eligible for ESRC funding can apply under the 1+3 rubric. (ESRC)

Destinations

Students of the Masters in Anthropological Research Methods develop a wide range of transferable skills such as research, analysis, oral and written communication skills.

The communication skills of anthropologists transfer well to areas such as information and technology, the media and tourism. Other recent SOAS career choices have included commerce and banking, government service, the police and prison service, social services and health service administration. Opportunities for graduates with trained awareness of the socio-cultural norms of minority communities also arise in education, local government, libraries and museums.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This is an advanced practice-based research programme for students wishing to extend their research into the areas of film, photography and electronic arts- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mres-filmmaking-photography-electronic-arts/. Read more
This is an advanced practice-based research programme for students wishing to extend their research into the areas of film, photography and electronic arts- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mres-filmmaking-photography-electronic-arts/

The programme is particularly relevant for students who have an MA degree and are looking to postion and develop their research and practice work.

It will be tailor-made to your individual research area and practice, giving you the opportunity to develop research skills and pursue your own area of interest.

You'll work closely with a personal supervisor to develop your work in the areas of filmmaking, photography and digital arts.

You’ll also receive training and guidance in ethical and legal obligations, and be encouraged to accommodate feminist, anti-racist, decolonising and other appropriate approaches to your chosen subject.

The programme meets the needs of two groups:

students who have completed an MA in Filmmaking, Photography, or Electronic Arts and cognate programmes (for example, our MA in Photography: The Image & Electronic Arts)
film, photography and electronic arts professionals who wish to extend their research-based practice

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Sean Cubitt.

Structure

A personalised programme
The programme is personalised for each student, and is based on your individual research into your chosen practice. It gives you the opportunity to develop appropriate research skills and to pursue a research practice project of your own design, developed and reworked in discussion with a personal supervisor.

The curriculum is personalised for individual students, but all students will share a common curriculum and receive training and guidance in ethical and legal obligations, and be encouraged to accommodate feminist, anti-racist, decolonising and other appropriate approaches to their chosen subject.

The course will add value to recent MA practice graduates and to film, photography and electronic arts professionals by giving a deeper and more specialised engagement in a major research project supervised by staff experienced in both creative and professional research. Research training will give you the skills to design and complete your own research and to work to research briefs.

All students undertake the Practice-Based Research Methods Seminar in the first term, producing a detailed 5000 word project outline at the end. They will also take in the second term one of a selected range of optional modules to help develop their critical and theoretical awareness. In the first term, they begin work with their personal supervisor on the design and execution of their project. Supervision will determine the specific means used: some students will embark directly on a single piece of work; others may undertake a series of workshop-based activities.

Aims

The programme's subject-specific learning outcomes require you to think critically about a range of issues concerning the media, understood in the widest sense, and to be able to justify their views intellectually and practically. The central outcome will be to design and conduct a substantial practice-based research project.

As appropriate to each individual project, you will be encouraged to analyse, contextualise, historicise, and theorise your chosen medium with reference to key debates in history, sociology, anthropology and philosophy of film and the media. You will learn to produce high quality research under time constraints, by working independently.

All students will develop a range of transferable qualities and skills necessary for employment in related areas. These are described by the Quality Assurance Agency as: ‘the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility, decision-making in complex and unpredictable situations, and the independent learning ability required for continuing professional development’. You will be guided to work independently and to think through the intellectual issues.

Progress is carefully monitored, to make sure that you are making progress towards the achievement of the outcomes. Different kinds of practical and intellectual skills are required for each part of the programme. In consultation with supervisors, you will be guided to the most appropriate practical and intellectual approaches, and to the most appropriate technical and critical sources.

Structure

You take the following modules:

Practice-Based Research Methods (30 credits)
This module provides research methods training for the MRes in Film Photography and Electronic Arts, and may be taken by practice-based students in the MPhil programme in Media and Communications. In all years it will address the legal and ethical constraints operating on research by practice. In any given year, the syllabus will address such topics as technique (colour, composition, editing, post-production, sound-image relations, text-image relations), anti-racist, feminist and decolonial critique; hardware and software studies; environmental impacts of media production, dissemination and exhibition; media critical approaches to art, political economy, and truth. The interests of students and supervisors will guide the selection of specific content of the course in its delivery, whose aim is to inculcate advanced thinking on the making, delivery and audiences for research-based practice.

Research Project (120 credits)
The project in the MRes Film, Photography and Electronic Arts comprises a portfolio of practical work (such as photographs, video, film, installation, websites or other digital/print material) alongside a textual component. The work submitted should be original, and be as integral to the research aims, processes and outcomes of the project as the textual component. The final project as a whole will therefore demonstrate the integration of its practical and research components, so that text and practice reflect critically on each other. The length of the textual element should normally be between 5,000 and 10,000 words. The practical component should be a ‘substantial’ body of work. Given the potential range of media that can be used, and their differing potential relationships with the research process and the textual component, it is impossible to be precise. In the case of film/video it would normally entail the submission of a work (or works) of about 25 minutes in length (or more), but detailed requirements will be worked out on a case-by-case basis.

Students will undertake to design and conduct a substantial practice-based research project in collaboration with their supervisor. The project will be informed by research, as appropriate, into the materials, techniques and critical contexts of production, distribution and exhibition in audiovisual, electronic image and allied arts. As appropriate to each individual project, students will be encouraged to analyse, contextualise, historicise, and theorise their chosen medium with reference to key debates in history, sociology, anthropology and philosophy of film and the media, especially in relation to anti-racist, decolonial, feminist, environmental and other key ethical and political dimensions of their aesthetic practice. They will learn to produce high quality research under pressure, by working independently. The exact conceptual and methodological direction of the research must initially come from the student, though this will be developed and reworked in discussion with the personal supervisor. Areas of research can be drawn from a wide remit, including the full range of media and cultural forms of contemporary societies and may be theoretical or empirical; technically- or more academically-based. Projects which are conceptually coherent, and practicable in their aims and methods can be considered, subject only to the in-house expertise of staff. The module encourages the development of knowledge and skills specific to the production, distribution and exhibition of contemporary media.

Assessment

There are two assessment points:

A: You are required to write one 5,000 word essay linked to the Practice-Based Research Methods seminar. The exact theme and title will be decided in discussion between you and your supervisor and relate to your specialist field of research, but as a guide it will demonstrate your readiness to undertake the project through critical evaluation of legal, ethical, critical and reflexive parameters and functions of practice-based research.

In addition, you will be assessed in the option module you undertake during the Spring Term.

B: The project in the MRes Film, Photography and Electronic Arts comprises a portfolio of practical work (such as photographs, video, film, installation, websites or other digital/print material) alongside a textual component. The work submitted should be original, and be as integral to the research aims, processes and outcomes of the project as the textual component. The final project as a whole will therefore demonstrate the integration of its practical and research components, so that text and practice reflect critically on each other.

Department

We are ranked:
22nd in the world for communication and media studies**
1st in the UK for the quality of our research***

**QS World University Rankings by subject 2015
***Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

We’ve also been ranked by LinkedIn as one of the top graduate universities for media professionals, because so many of our graduates go on to find jobs in the industry.

The department includes some of the top academics in the world for this discipline – the pioneers of media, communications and cultural studies. They actively teach on our programmes, and will introduce you to current research and debate in these areas. And many of our practice tutors are industry professionals active in TV, film, journalism, radio and animation.

We also run EastLondonLines.co.uk – our 24/7 student news website – which gives students the opportunity to gain experience working in a real-time news environment.

And we run regular public events featuring world-renowned writers and practitioners that have recently included Danny Boyle, Gurinda Chadha, Noel Clark and Tessa Ross. So you’ll get to experience the latest developments and debates in the industry.

Skills & Careers

The course is designed to support students who wish to strengthen their opportunities in professional media, including the media industries and creative practice, private sector firms, public sector institutions and civil society organisations with communications departments.

We envisage that a small proportion of graduates will seek careers in teaching, including secondary and higher education, in which case their projects and supervision will be tailored to that end.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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In the current knowledge economy and information age, the demand for social, market and marketing research has increased substantially as organizations have recognized the growing need for research on which key policy and strategic decisions are based. Read more
In the current knowledge economy and information age, the demand for social, market and marketing research has increased substantially as organizations have recognized the growing need for research on which key policy and strategic decisions are based. The Research Analyst graduate certificate program focuses on the theoretical, practical and ethical underpinnings of research, while also equipping you with the statistical, technical and professional skills necessary to do applied research in a variety of different settings throughout the public and private sectors.

In this program, you will focus on all of the major aspects of the research process including research design, information retrieval and evaluation, data collection, analysis and interpretation, and the preparation and presentation of the research findings.

Special features of the program include an emphasis on professional, ethical and legal implications when designing research studies; new research technologies for data collection; analysis; presentation; proposal writing; research entrepreneurship; project management; and program evaluation.

Professional Accreditations

This program is recognized by the Marketing Research and Intelligence Association (MRIA) as being an official post-graduate program designate. This enables graduates of the program to take advantage of Pathway 1 to the Certified Marketing Research Professional (CMRP) designation.

Course detail

Upon successful completion of the program, a graduate will:

• Retrieve, process, and present market research information and findings using current online and stand-alone information technology tools.
• Conduct social and market research with a high degree of accuracy and reliability, which can inform major organizational and business decisions.
• Write documentation to collect, and support the collection, of data for social and market research projects.
• Interpret qualitative and quantitative research through the analysis and presentation of empirical data to meet the needs and objectives of the client.
• Ensure that all analysis of numerical and text data is consistent with the appropriate principles of descriptive statistics and techniques of statistical inference.
• Design and implement research projects for international and domestic populations with varied cultural and linguistic demographic profiles.
• Formulate plans for social and market research that will meet the needs of the client and follow all theoretical, practical, ethical, and legal guidelines related to the collection of data and the privacy of personal information.
• Design and implement research projects that address the unique characteristics of public, private or not-for-profit organizations.
• Prepare applications for the research ethical review board in an effective manner.
• Complete all work in accordance with ethical, legislative, and professional requirements and standards.

[Modules]]

Semester 1
• RAPP 5001: Surveying Society
• RAPP 5002: Qualitative Research Methods 1
• RAPP 5003: Spreadsheet and Table Management
• RAPP 5004: Quantitative Research Methods 1
• RAPP 5005: Research Communication and Proposal Writing Skills
• RAPP 5006: Research Ethics and Standards

Semester 2
• RAPP 5011: Research Seminar
• RAPP 5012: Qualitative Research Methods 2
• RAPP 5013: Research Management
• RAPP 5014: Quantitative Research Methods 2
• RAPP 5015: Database Management
• RAPP 5016: New Research Technologies
• RAPP 5021: Research Analyst Placement

Work Placement

Students complete a twelve-week placement beginning in May, which allows them to gain invaluable practical and professional experience.

Your Career

Graduates of this program may find employment as analysts, community and social development officers, consumer advisers, economic policy researchers, education policy researchers, health and social policy development officers, health policy researchers, housing policy analysts, market and marketing researchers, program officers, research consultants, and social survey researchers.

How to apply

Click here to apply: http://humber.ca/admissions/how-apply.html

Funding

For information on funding, please use the following link: http://humber.ca/admissions/financial-aid.html

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International trade is a complex and ever evolving area, requiring practitioners to be at the cutting edge of the subject. Read more
International trade is a complex and ever evolving area, requiring practitioners to be at the cutting edge of the subject.

On the LLM International Trade Law you will acquire a wide range of knowledge on issues relevant to international trade, such as international sale contracts, carriage of goods and international dispute resolution and in areas such as international finance, intellectual property, international energy law and transnational competition law. You will gain specialist legal knowledge within a practical context, whilst developing expertise in these areas and enhancing your research skills.

With maximum flexibility in mind, this distance learning course allows you to work towards your LLM in stages. To access the LLM you will have previously completed the awards of Postgraduate Certificate and Postgraduate Diploma.

Students are required to pass three modules: Legal Research, International Sale Contracts, and Carriage of Goods. There are no examinations for each module. Instead, students research and write a 3,000 word essay on a topic selected by the module tutor. They graduate with the PgCert International Trade Law and may, if they wish, continue on to study for the PgDip International Trade Law the next academic year.

Learn From The Best

Study on the LLM International Trade Law and you will learn from inspirational academics that have a real passion for their subject. The course is accredited by the Law Society of England and Wales and the General Council of the Bar of England and Wales, and is shaped by internationally excellent research to ensure the course is up-to-date and relevant.

Lecturers on this course have research expertise and practice-based experience in the areas of international business transactions; international commercial litigation; international commercial arbitration, international public procurement regulation; comparative corporate and financial law, and EU law; knowledge that you can draw on for your LLM project.

The course is delivered by Northumbria Law School, three times winners of the prestigious “Best Law School” accolade, awarded by the Attorney General’s Student Pro Bono Awards.

Teaching And Assessment

On this innovative distance learning LLM International Trade Law course you will acquire a wide range of knowledge on issues relevant to international trade, such as international sale contracts, carriage of goods and international dispute resolution and in areas such as international finance, intellectual property, international energy law and transnational competition law. There is an emphasis on reflective practice and applying what you have learnt to your own organisation.

You will learn through a combination of online lectures and seminars and eLearning technology, able to tailor the course to suit your interests and career aspirations. Modules are assessed through coursework and for the award of LLM, you will complete a 15,000-17,000-word project, based on an area related to your own practice or intended practice.

Module Overview
LW7003 - Legal Research (Core, 20 Credits)
LW7036 - Carriage of Goods (Core, 20 Credits)
LW7051 - International Sale Contracts (Core, 20 Credits)

Learning Environment

The eLearning Portal provides students with written materials that are the equivalent to ten (10) one-hour lecture periods and five (5) two-hour workshop periods on the FT LLM International Trade Law. Written lecture materials tend to focus on the delivery of a particular legal topic and written workshop materials tend to focus on the actual application of topics in practical situations which business persons or lawyers would encounter. The DL PgCert/PgDip/LLM International Trade Law is practically oriented.

There is an on-line surgery at the beginning of each module with the module tutor, and an optional Study Day is held on campus on a Saturday near the beginning of each module. The Study Day is recorded using Panopto so that students who are unable to attend in person can view and listen to the day’s learning activities. There is no difference in the substantive content of each module between the DL PgCert/PgDip International Trade Law and the FT LLM International Trade Law.

Research-Rich Learning

Research rich learning (RRL) is embedded through the programme. Law School research focuses on the areas of Law and Society, Legal Education and Professional Skills, and the Centre for Evidence and Criminal Justice Studies. These internationally recognised groups act as a focus for research activity across the Law School, and their work feeds into the courses to ensure taught course content is informed by research developments in the sector.

The LLM culminates in the project module in which you will undertake a piece of independent legal research, informed by current practice and advanced scholarship and research, including a critical awareness and evaluation of current issues and developments in the field.

Give Your Career An Edge

The LLM is designed to enhance your career prospects in the international trade law arena. You will be encouraged to reflect upon your own practice, applying legal skills to the common problems you are experiencing or are likely to experience in practice, examine policies and undertake independent legal research to update your knowledge. You will have the opportunity to produce a project in your chosen field undertaking research and personal development in an area of particular relevance to your work.

The course is accredited for Continuing Professional Development (CPD) by the Law Society of England and Wales and the General Council of the Bar of England and Wales.

Your Future

The LLM International Trade Law course has been designed to meet the needs of practitioners in business and industry and law firms engaged in the area of international trade law.

You will graduate fully equipped with expert legal knowledge, greater awareness of legal commercial issues, and the ability to critically evaluate legal issues in the context of international trade law. You will be able to further develop your intellectual curiosity, to recognise uncertainty in the law, to produce and present reasoned arguments and to offer creative solutions to complex legal and ethical problems. You will develop your critical, analysis, research and the professional and reflective skills necessary for practice in this exciting field.

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The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas. Read more
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas.

Studying for a Master's in Law (LLM) at Kent means having the certainty of gaining an LLM in a specialist area of Law. The Kent LLM gives you the freedom to leave your choice of specialism open until after you arrive, your specialism being determined by the modules you choose.

About Kent Law School

Kent Law School (KLS) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

In addition to learning the detail of the law, students at Kent are taught to think about the law with regard to its history, development and relationship with wider society. This approach allows students to fully understand the law. Our critical approach not only makes the study of law more interesting, it helps to develop crucial skills and abilities required for a career in legal practice.

The Law School offers its flagship Kent LLM at the University’s Canterbury campus (and two defined LLM programmes at the University’s Brussels centre). Our programmes are open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field.

You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by Kent Law School was ranked 8th in the UK for research intensity. We were also ranked 7th for research power and in the top 20 for research output, research quality and research impact.

An impressive 99% of our research was judged to be of international quality and the School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Course structure

You can tailor your studies to your particular needs and interests to obtain an LLM or Diploma in a single specialisation, in two specialisations jointly, or by choosing a broad range of modules in different areas of law to obtain a general LLM or Diploma in Law.

As a student on the LLM at Canterbury, your choice of specialisation will be shaped by the modules you take and your dissertation topic. To be awarded an LLM in a single specialisation, at least three of your six modules must be chosen from those associated with that specialisation with your dissertation also focusing on that area of law. The other three modules can be chosen from any offered in the Law School. All students are also required to take the Legal Research and Writing Skills module. To be awarded a major/minor specialisation you will need to choose three modules associated with one specialisation, and three from another specialisation, with the dissertation determining which is your 'major' specialisation.

For example, a student who completes at least three modules in International Commercial Law and completes a dissertation in this area would graduate with an LLM in International Commercial Law; a student who completes three Criminal Justice modules and three Environmental Law modules and then undertakes a dissertation which engages with Criminal Justice would graduate with an LLM in Criminal Justice and Environmental Law.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

LW919 - Legal Research and Writing Skills (5 credits) - http://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW919
LW801 - Intellectual Property (20 credits) - http://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW801
LW802 - International Business Transactions (20 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW802
LW810 - International Law on Foreign Investment (20 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW810
LW814 - Public International Law (20 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW814
LW815 - EU Constitutional and Institutional Law (20 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW815
LW839 - Environmental Quality Law (20 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW839
LW844 - Legal Aspects of Contemporary International Problems (20 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW844
LW847 - World Trade Organisation (WTO) Law and Practice I (20 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW847
LW852 - European Environmental Law and Policy (20 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW852
More available - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/327/law#!structure

Assessment

The postgraduate programmes offered within the Law School are usually taught in seminar format. Students on the Diploma and LLM programmes study three modules in each of the autumn and spring terms. The modules normally are assessed by a 4-5,000-word essay. Students undertaking an LLM degree must write a dissertation of 15-20,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide a postgraduate qualification of value to those intending to play a leading role in any field of law
- provide a detailed knowledge and high level of understanding of a range of specialised subject areas
- provide more broadly-based communication skills of general value to those seeking postgraduate employment
- provide a sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and particular contexts in which law operates
- provide a degree of specialisation in areas of public international law of individual interest from among the wide range of LLM/PDip options that are available and which require you to engage with academic work which is at the frontiers of scholarship
- encourage you to develop a critical awareness of the operation of public international law, particularly in contexts which are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution
- provide you with the skills to undertake supervised research on an agreed topic in law and to encourage the production of original and evaluative commentary that meets high standards of scholarship (applies to LLM only)
- encourage you to develop critical, analytical and problem-solving skills which can be applied to a wide range of contexts
- develop your skills of academic legal research, particularly by the written presentation of arguments in a manner which meets relevant academic conventions
- assist those students who are minded to pursue academic research at a higher level in acquiring a sophisticated grounding in the essential techniques involved by following a specialised module in research methods (applies to LLM only)
- contribute to widening participation in higher education by taking account of the past experience of applicants in determining admissions whilst ensuring that all students that are admitted possess the potential to complete the programme successfully.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Many students at our Brussels centre who undertake internships are offered contracts in Brussels immediately after graduation. Others have joined their home country’s diplomatic service, entered international organisations, or have chosen to undertake a ‘stage’ at the European Commission, or another EU institution.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Information about the internship programme for LLM students can be found on the Kent Law School Employability blog - http://blogs.kent.ac.uk/klsemployability/postgraduates/llm-internships/

Learn more about Kent

Visit us - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/visit/openday/pgevents.html

International Students - https://www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent/

Why study at Kent? - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

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Understanding how the law operates within a commercial context is essential for any successful business, from small enterprises with a local focus to multinational organisations trading across the globe. Read more
Understanding how the law operates within a commercial context is essential for any successful business, from small enterprises with a local focus to multinational organisations trading across the globe. We designed the PG Cert Business Law to meet the needs of members of the business community who are interested in learning about the ways in which the law impacts on business activity.

The course develops the professional and reflective skills necessary for practice in business and industry or law firms. You will be equipped with the expert knowledge and theory to tackle increased legislation in fields such as employment law, intellectual property rights, international trade and finance law.

Please note, optional module choices will be grouped and will run in designated blocks, meaning some module combinations will not be possible. Although every effort is made to ensure that these modules are offered, there may be occasions, for example due to staff sabbaticals, where a module may not be offered or module running order may change.

Learn From The Best

The academics associated with this course have a strong legal and academic background and bring this expertise to their teaching. They combine a range of research interests with professional responsibilities which include membership of the Congress of Fellows of the Center for International Legal Studies (CILS); membership of the College of Arbitrators of the CILS; fellowship in International Commercial Arbitration of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators; fellowship of the International Center for Conflict Prevention and Resolution (CPR); and involvement in a wide range of research activities.

Research interests include teaching and learning; clinical legal education; World Trade Organisation Law; transnational competition law; international dispute resolution; and intellectual property law.

Teaching And Assessment

As a distance learning course, the key principle of your postgraduate provision is that of reflective practice, placing you at the centre of the learning process. You will be provided with detailed teaching and learning plans for each taught module, available via the eLearning portal. Materials include electronic reading lists and digitised material where possible, self-evaluative tasks and opportunities to engage with your tutor and fellow students. Each taught module includes an optional study day at the University, which is also made available online.

The programme is open to students who hold an appropriate degree or comparable professional qualification and those without a degree or equivalent but who have suitable work experience. You will therefore benefit from learning alongside a diverse mix of students from different professions and academic backgrounds.

Module Overview
LW7003 - Legal Research (Core, 20 Credits)
LW7034 - International Dispute Resolution (Optional, 20 Credits)
LW7036 - Carriage of Goods (Optional, 20 Credits)
LW7037 - Commercial Contracts (Optional, 20 Credits)
LW7039 - Intellectual Property (Optional, 20 Credits)
LW7042 - Law of International Trade (Optional, 20 Credits)
LW7043 - Transnational Competition Law (Optional, 20 Credits)
LW7044 - World Trade Organisation Law (Optional, 20 Credits)
LW7051 - International Sale Contracts (Optional, 20 Credits)

Learning Environment

This distance learning course is delivered through the University’s eLearning platform ‘Blackboard’ which supports the provision of interactive learning materials and provides access to assessment tasks, online discussion forums and collaborative online learning. Blackboard Collaborate will be used to facilitate online engagement and support during the modules.

We offer optional study days to help distance learning students get the best out of the course. Panopto software will be used to record teaching activity taking place on study days; this will be made available online, meaning that you can learn at your own pace and at times that suit you.

An online early ‘surgery’ session with your course leader gives you the opportunity to discuss expectations, explore issues and provide guidance.

Research-Rich Learning

During the course you will encounter all quadrants of research rich learning: research-tutored, research-led, research-based, and research-orientated.

Your journey begins with Legal Research, enabling you to gain a clear awareness and understanding of appropriate methods and methodologies, before two specialist modules. There are no examinations. Assessment for the two specialist modules is by means of a 3,000 word research essay on a topic selected by the module tutor.

Give Your Career An Edge

The curriculum provides a practical focus on two modules, in addition to the Legal Research module, that students elect at their option from the areas of English commercial law, international commercial law, and international trade law. It will enable you to apply legal skills to common problems you are experiencing or are likely to experience in practice, provide you with skills necessary to reflect upon and develop policies relevant to you own workplace, and enable you to undertake independent legal research to update your knowledge.

The course is designed to be practical and directly applicable to your working life. You will be able to use the skills, knowledge, understanding and research within your working environment.

Your Future

This course will equip you with the transferable skills you need for employability, and an insight into leadership qualities that graduate employers seek out. You will develop your intellectual curiosity, learning to recognise uncertainty in the law, to produce and present reasoned arguments and to offer creative solutions to legal and ethical problems. You will develop the ability to critically evaluate source material in your chosen field and to apply your knowledge in a practical context.

The PG Cert Business Law develops the knowledge and expertise you will need to address the impact of increased legislation and the complex legal rules facing businesses today. Graduates may be employed in business, government, and legal positions, and they may enhance their employment prospects or employment advancement.

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