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Masters Degrees (Legal Research)

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Are you curious, analytical and ready to take on new challenges in a dynamic academic environment? Are you interested in writing academic texts, engaging in debate, and tackling complicated legal issues? Would you like to be given the opportunity to complete an in-depth Master’s-level programme in law that extends beyond the standard one-year period? If so, the two-year. Read more

Are you curious, analytical and ready to take on new challenges in a dynamic academic environment? Are you interested in writing academic texts, engaging in debate, and tackling complicated legal issues? Would you like to be given the opportunity to complete an in-depth Master’s-level programme in law that extends beyond the standard one-year period? If so, the two-year Legal Research Master’s at Utrecht University may be the perfect choice for you!

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF A GROWING NEED FOR LEGAL RESEARCHERS

For legal practitioners and academics alike, legal research skills are increasingly important. Law firms have a growing need for thorough, well-trained lawyers with excellent writing skills and a research-oriented mindset. The Legal Research programme will help you to become the type of well-rounded lawyer that our changing society needs.

BECOME A PERCEPTIVE AND ANALYTIC THINKER

Legislative, judicial and executive bodies at the international, national and local levels as well as companies, non-profit organisations and universities need sharp analytical thinkers. Traditional law courses do not always provide graduates with the required knowledge and skills to meet this demand. Utrecht University developed the two-year Legal Research Master’s programme to fill this need.

The Legal Research Master’s programme offers you an excellent foundation for further studies at the PhD level as well as prepares you for a legal career as a practitioner in the commercial, public service or academic sectors. As part of this programme, you will complete courses in legal research skills as well as in your chosen field. You will also spend approximately one year engaged in legal research projects and writing a Master’s thesis.



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The MRes is a research training Masters programme which provides rigorous training in socio-legal research skills to enable you to carry out doctoral-level research using legal and socio-legal methodology or, alternatively, to embark on a career as a specialist socio-legal researcher. Read more
The MRes is a research training Masters programme which provides rigorous training in socio-legal research skills to enable you to carry out doctoral-level research using legal and socio-legal methodology or, alternatively, to embark on a career as a specialist socio-legal researcher.

The programme is ESRC-recognised. This means it meets the research training requirements of the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and that you are eligible to apply for ESRC funding for PhD research. Only a handful of Law Schools in the UK offer ESRC recognised programmes in this field.

The taught programme offers research training in generic social-science skills, providing you with a solid basis in social science theory and methodology through modules offered to all social science postgraduates across the University. These are then built on within the socio-legal context through two skills-based modules offered by the Law School. Specialist modules reflect the socio-legal research expertise of staff. The supervised research dissertation will allow you to bring together the conceptual and practical skills acquired in the taught modules and demonstrate your understanding by applying them to your own research ideas in the socio-legal context. Teaching is mainly seminar and workshop based.

For further information on this programme please visit our website: http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/law/sociolegalmres

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Explore the relationship between crime and the law, from the criminal justice system and issues with reoffenders, to crime in the media and the glamorisation of drugs. Read more
Explore the relationship between crime and the law, from the criminal justice system and issues with reoffenders, to crime in the media and the glamorisation of drugs.

Our MSc Criminology and Socio-Legal Research forms part of our ESRC Doctoral Training Centre accreditation and combines training in current debates in criminology with an introduction to legal theory and legal methods. It provides a good basis if you wish to conduct criminological research with a socio-legal dimension.

On this course you investigate topics including:
-Philosophy of law and jurisprudence
-Ripping, remixing, and viral culture
-Surveillance and punishment
-The English legal system
-Methods of social control

This course should also interest you if you are without a background in law, as we make good use of legal materials, in addressing our sociological and criminological research questions.

Our Department of Sociology was rated top 10 in the UK for research quality (REF 2014), and we consistently receive strong student satisfaction scores, including 96% overall student satisfaction in 2015.

Our expert staff

We are a large and friendly department, offering a diverse range of research interests and with staff members who are committed to teaching, research and publication that covers a broad geographical spectrum.

Many have worked at the local level with local authorities, justice councils, community partnerships and charities. Others have worked at a national and international level with bodies like the United Nations, the European Commission’s Expert Group on Public Understanding of Science, Amnesty International, The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, the Home Office and national non-governmental organisations.

Specialist facilities

-Dedicated postgraduate support facilities
-Our renowned off-campus Graduate Conference takes place every February
-A unique Student Resource Centre where you can get help with your studies, access examples of previous students’ work, and attend workshops on research skills
-The Sociology common room is open all day Monday-Friday, is stocked with daily newspapers, magazines and journals, and has free drinks available
-Links with the Institute of Social and Economic Research, which conducts large-scale survey projects and has its own library, and the -UK Data Archive, which stores national research data like the British Crime Survey
-Our students’ Sociology Society, a forum for the exchange of ideas, arranging talks by visiting speakers, introducing you to various career pathways, and organising debates

Your future

This course provides excellent preparation for further academic study, and many of our postgraduates go on to successful academic careers, both in the UK and overseas.

Others have established careers in non-governmental organisations, local authorities, specialist think tanks, government departments, charities, media production, and market intelligence.

We work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Dissertation
-Legal Research and the English Legal System
-Approaches to Legal Theory
-Sociological Research Design
-Current Controversies in Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy
-Introduction to Quantitative Analysis (optional)
-Digital Economy (optional)

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Our Law and Society (Legal Research) LLM is an ideal preparation for a PhD. It will give you the knowledge, insights and analytical skills to proceed to a career in academia or the public, voluntary or private sectors. Read more

Our Law and Society (Legal Research) LLM is an ideal preparation for a PhD. It will give you the knowledge, insights and analytical skills to proceed to a career in academia or the public, voluntary or private sectors.

The LLM can be taken as a standalone course before undertaking PhD study.

It also forms the initial training component for the four-year (LLM plus PhD) ESRC Northern Ireland/ North East (NINE) Doctoral Training Centre.

The course is ideal if you want to gain advanced research skills that will allow you to progress to PhD level study in the field of law and society. You will have an opportunity to study key legal topics relevant to law and society and choose from a range of optional modules suited to your specific interests.

You will study governance and policy in the national, European and international context. You will develop knowledge and expertise in:

  • legal problem-solving
  • qualitative and quantitative research methods
  • the key principles in a variety of legal subjects

Delivery

Modules are taught by our expert academic staff over the first and second semesters through a combination of:

  • interactive lectures
  • workshops
  • seminars

All of our workshops and seminars are taught in small groups, where we encourage lively discussion and debate.

Assessment is through a variety of methods, including:

  • essays
  • written exams
  • the dissertation.

FACILITIES:

We are committed to pursuing academic excellence and fostering an intellectually challenging and supportive environment in which our students can excel.

We regularly host conferences and seminars with internationally renowned guest speakers. We encourage you to attend these events as they cover a wide range of important legal, political, economic and social issues.

Our facilities include:

  • a dedicated Law Library
  • LLM study space with computer suite
  • a student common room
  • a large lecture theatre
  • purpose-built mooting room
  • wi-fi connectivity throughout the school.


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Typically information governance/security and law have been taught as distinct subjects in different discipline areas. Read more
Typically information governance/security and law have been taught as distinct subjects in different discipline areas. In recognition of the relationship that exists between information governance/information security and the protection of personal data this programme brings together these subjects in one multi-disciplinary qualification.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Data Protection Law and Information Governance is a distance learning course that has been specifically designed to meet the needs of professionals already working in data protection and/or information governance. You will study three modules. The first of these, the legal research module, will develop your ability to undertake legal research and to present your research findings appropriately. In the second module you will develop your understanding of information governance and security principles that underpin the management of an organisation’s information assets. The third module will focus upon data protection law and practice.

The programme will not only provide you with valuable knowledge of current law and proposed developments to the law and to the principles of information governance, it will also enhance your ability to advise upon both information governance and data protection. The research, writing and presentation skills you will develop will also be of use to you in your working environment. Unlike typical CPD type learning this programme will challenge you to undertake critical evaluation of the law and to consider the application of information governance and security to your own/a chosen organisation.

Learn From The Best

This programme is delivered jointly by academics within Northumbria Law School and the iSchool, in the Faculty of Engineering and Environment. Northumbria Law School is actively involved in research and consultancy in the field of data protection, information sharing, freedom of information and privacy law. The iSchool, which delivers the information governance and security module, is widely recognised for its innovative distance and work-based learning programmes in information and records management and for its related research.

This course is delivered by a team of solicitors and academics with extensive experience in data protection and information governance, who are actively researching the area. In addition our team also boast memberships to key professional bodies, in addition to editing industry publications such as the Records Management Journal.

Teaching And Assessment

This course is primarily delivered online to provide flexibility and the ability for you to study at times convenient to you. We believe, however, that opportunities to engage with your tutors and with fellow students are an important part of your learning experience. On two of the modules you will be offered the opportunity to meet your tutors and attend lectures or workshops at the University at an optional study day. All of the content will be available online should you not be able to attend. On the third module you will be encouraged to engage with your tutor and with fellow students via the module discussion board.

Module Overview
KC7046 - Information Governance and Security (Core, 20 Credits)
LW7002 - Data Protection (Core, 20 Credits)
LW7003 - Legal Research (Core, 20 Credits)

Each taught module is assessed via written assignment. On the legal research module you will work in a group with other postgraduate students to undertake the research, writing and review of that assignment. On the data protection module and the information governance module you will submit an individual written assignment at the end of each module. As part of the assessment process you will be expected to undertake a critical evaluation of the law, and to consider information governance and security in your own or another chosen organisation.

Learning Environment

Your course will be delivered online using the latest innovative software. Learning materials such as module handbooks, assessment information, lecture presentation slides, recorded lectures and electronic reading lists will be available via our highly accessible e-learning platform, Blackboard. You can also access student support and other key University systems through your personal account.

Research-Rich Learning

Research Rich learning (RRL) is embedded across the programme, reflecting the pervasive research culture of the law school. Your student journey commences with the Legal Research module. This module will help you to gain a clear awareness and understanding of appropriate legal research methods and legal sources and how to cite those sources. In your subsequent modules your tutors will expose you to a range of academic literature covering substantive data protection law and relevant information governance and data security frameworks and principles. You will also develop your legal research skills further as your tutors encourage you to discuss, evaluate and critically examine relevant principles and frameworks and as you undertake your own research in order to complete your module assignments.

Give Your Career An Edge

It is envisaged that most students who study this programme will already be employed within the data protection/information governance fields. It recognises that the introduction of a new data protection regulation will result in significant challenges for professionals working in the data protection field, and seeks to help you to develop the skills and knowledge which you will need to do your job professionally notwithstanding the changing legislation framework.

Your Future

This course provides academic recognition of your knowledge of data protection and information governance law and your ability to apply that knowledge to practice. It also provides a strong foundation for further study. Should you decide upon completion of the programme that you wish to further develop your knowledge of information rights law or information governance/security then Northumbria Law School and the Faculty of Engineering and Environment both offer masters programmes in these fields. This programme provides you with a stepping stone towards study a Masters in Law (an LLM). Successful completion of this programme exempts you from study of the first three modules on the Pg Dip/LLM in Information Rights Law and Practice.

What Does Britain Leaving The EU Mean For This Course?

We can confirm that we will not be changing the course in light of the Brexit decision. The focus in this course will be the current legal framework, and any likely reforms including the GDPR. There are several reasons why the course will not be changed at this particular point. Firstly there are no changes to the current legal framework on data protection or environmental information. This is well explained in a statement by the information commissioner's office https://ico.org.uk/about-the-ico/news-and-events/news-and-blogs/2016/06/referendum-result-response/ and was reiterated by Baroness Neville-Rolfe, the Government Minister responsible for Data Protection, on 4 July. These statements also acknowledge that there is a need for reform in data protection and that would have to be seen in the context of European data protection laws. Although it is not clear what the exact relationship of the UK and EU will be in the future there is a recognition that there will be a need for equivalency of data protection law in the UK with other countries. The need for equivalency of the law is likely to be necessary whether the UK is part of the single market, or if it exits the European economic area, in order for EU countries to send data to us as part of the 8th principle (See Schedule 1 of the Data Protection Act 1998). As such the GDPR still has relevance in our understanding of what would be required to achieve equivalent protection and what likely reforms on data protection may be considered in the UK. From an educational perspective the examination of reforms such as the GDPR provide a useful mechanism to critique current data protection laws, allowing for the discussion of strengths and weaknesses, even if all those reforms are not ultimately adopted. We will of course keep the position under review, as we do with all our teaching areas in order to ensure that learning material reflects both the current law and likely changes to that law.

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Edinburgh Law School is renowned for its research excellence. We strive to produce work that has real-world reach and influence. Read more

Edinburgh Law School is renowned for its research excellence. We strive to produce work that has real-world reach and influence. Our postgraduate research body is key to the School’s research activities and we work hard to ensure that our research students are fully engaged with staff and projects across all our legal disciplines.

If you are considering following an academic research career, Edinburgh Law School can provide a supportive and inspiring environment to help you take your first steps towards carving out your own research specialism.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework we were ranked 4th in the UK for the breadth and quality of our research. We have research excellence in a vibrant range of fields, spanning an exciting spectrum of law, socio-legal studies and criminology.

LLM by Research programmes

LLM degrees by Research

The LLM by Research presents an excellent opportunity to focus on a period of dedicated research, and is a fantastic bridge to doctoral study. We offer two LLM by Research programmes:

LLM by Research in Law

As a student on this programme, you will consolidate and build on the legal research and writing skills you acquired during your undergraduate legal studies, by planning and completing a 30,000-word dissertation. You will work independently but under specialist academic supervision, within your chosen field of law.

The topic of your dissertation can be chosen from any of the School’s legal research fields in which we have supervisory expertise, including commercial law, criminal law and evidence, criminology, EU law, IP, media and technology law, international law, legal history and legal theory, medical law, private law, and public law.

The programme will enhance and develop your ability to manage and engage with both primary legal sources and academic literature on your chosen topic, present critical and engaged legal arguments, and maintain the coherence of those arguments over a substantial piece of written work.

The framework of the LLM by Research allows you time and intellectual space to work in your chosen field, and to refine and develop this initial phase of the project for future doctoral work.

The programme does not have formal coursework elements, other than initial training seminars alongside PhD students. This makes the LLM by Research a particularly attractive option for those wishing to undertake postgraduate research on a part-time basis, while pursuing legal practice or other employment.

LLM by Research in Legal Research

The LLM in Legal Research is an innovative programme designed to offer you the opportunity to undertake in-depth, guided study in an area in which you wish to specialise.

Through core, taught courses you will develop an understanding of the basics of legal research, legal scholarship and research methods, while the dissertation allows you to undertake a piece of supervised independent research in which to practice these skills. Your dissertation topic may be chosen from any of the Law School’s research fields in which we have supervisory expertise, including commercial law, criminal law and evidence, criminology, EU law, IP, media and technology law, international law, legal history and legal theory, medical law, private law, and public law.

You will take 80 credits worth of courses (semester-long courses are 20 credits and full-year courses are 40 credits), chosen from the wide selection offered by Edinburgh Law School.

This is supplemented by a 15,000-word independent dissertation, carried out under academic supervision, which forms the bulk of the programme.



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The underlying philosophy of the LLM is to develop specialists in the field of International and Commercial Law. The programme attracts students from a wide variety of backgrounds with different experiences. Read more

Course outline

The underlying philosophy of the LLM is to develop specialists in the field of International and Commercial Law. The programme attracts students from a wide variety of backgrounds with different experiences. It stresses the importance of interaction between staff and student, as well as between student and student. We believe this is an essential element in the development of effective lawyers in this area.

Following successful completion of the LLM in International and Commercial Law, you should have developed a range of skills, which include:

• A sound understanding of each of the chosen areas of the law
• Confidence in the analysis of complex case-law
• The ability to make your argument convincingly, orally and in writing
• The ability to take a co-operative approach to problem solving

Start dates

Students may take the LLM over

• 12 months starting in September; or
• 9 months starting in January.

Teaching methods

Seminars are the primary teaching method for this course. They encourage the development of clear analytical skills and create a forum where you can test your ideas against the arguments of your peers. Whether you enter the legal profession or business world you will find it is essential to have developed persuasive abilities. LLM options are taught in the form of three hours of seminars spread over each of the teaching weeks of the course. LLM seminars for subjects which are also taught at LLB level take place in two hour blocks every fortnight.

You are expected to read the cases and other materials relevant to the particular seminar in advance. At the seminar you will be asked to support your opinions and discuss your analysis of the area with your fellow students. In some modules you may be expected to make a presentation on a topic given to you by your tutor. Whilst these tasks may seem daunting at the beginning of the year, you will rapidly gain confidence as your debating skills develop.

Where seminars are on a fortnightly basis, the course will be supported by three hours of lectures per week during the lecturing period. Seminars will complement the lecture series.

Course material is available on the University’s own Virtual Learning Environment (VLE), Moodle. This allows students to download lecture notes, submit assignments and share resources in an electronic forum both within the University’s computer network and remotely.

Specialist designations

Students can select specific modules to have their LLM designated as specialising in:

• International Trade and Maritime Law;
• International Oil and Gas Law; or
• Financial Services Law

Each designation requires the following to be taken:

• 20 unit Advanced Legal Research module;
• 40 unit Core module; and
• 120 units of Options.

The modules currently offered for the designations are as follows:

International Trade and Maritime Law

• Advanced Legal Research (20)
• International Trade and Maritime Law (40)

120 units of Options from:

• Commercial Conflict of Laws (20)
• Contemporary Issues in Indigenous Rights (20)
• International Intellectual Property (40)
• Law of Business Organisations (40)
• Law of World Trade (20)
• Marine Insurance (20)
• Dissertation (40)

International Oil & Gas Law

• Advanced Legal Research (20)
• International Oil and Gas Law and Policy (40)

120 units of Options from:

• Banking Law (40)
• Contemporary Issues in Indigenous Rights (20)
• Environmental Regulation and Energy Exploitation (20)
• EU Competition Law (20)
• International Trade and Maritime Law (40)
• Marine Insurance (20)
• Money Laundering, Offshore Banking and Asset Recovery (20)
• Dissertation (40)

Financial Services Law

• Advanced Legal Research (20)
• Banking Law (40)

120 units of Options from:

• Law of Business Organisations (40)
• Commercial Conflict of Laws (20)
• EU Competition Law (20)
• Marine Insurance (20)
• Money Laundering, Offshore Banking and Asset Recovery (20)
• Securities Regulation (20)
• Dissertation (40)

*Subject to final approval

Non-designated LLM

Students who wish to have an LLM in International and Commercial Law without a designation must take

• Advanced Legal Research (20)

160 units of Options from

• Banking Law (40)
• Commercial Conflict of Laws (20)
• Contemporary Issues in Indigenous Rights (20)
• Environmental Regulation and Energy Exploitation (20)
• Intellectual Property Law (40)
• International Human Rights (20)
• International Medical Law & Ethics (20)
• International Oil and Gas Laws and Policy (40)
• International Trade and Maritime Law (40)
• Law of Business Organisations (40 units)
• Law of War (20)
• Law of World Trade (20)
• Marine Insurance (20)
• Money Laundering, Offshore Banking and Asset Recovery (20)
• Public International Law (40)
• Dissertation (40)

September start

The September start allows students to take more time to adjust to postgraduate studies. In the first term students must take the Advanced Legal Research module and choose Money Laundering, Offshore Banking and Asset Recovery, Contemporary Issues in Indigenous Rights, or EU Competition Law. All the modules are then available from January onwards, subject always to there being sufficient students opting for them

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This LLM Law is designed to provide a flexible educational experience that enables law graduates, non-law graduates and lawyers to develop their specialist legal interests at postgraduate level. Read more

Why take this course?

This LLM Law is designed to provide a flexible educational experience that enables law graduates, non-law graduates and lawyers to develop their specialist legal interests at postgraduate level.

Develop your expertise in very practical and sought-after subjects through taught units and supervised research on a course that promotes individual choice for your future careers.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Choose to take this course in full-time or part-time mode – whichever suits you best
Tap in to our Library’s vast selection of electronic resources, which can be accessed from anywhere with an internet connection
Focus on particular areas of academic interest or develop a wider range of skills and knowledge

What opportunities might it lead to?

The Chartered Institute of Legal Executives (CILEx) Level 6 Diploma in Law and Practice is offered as an option for law graduates on our LLM programmes, giving you the opportunity to obtain its Graduate Fast Track Diploma together with your postgraduate law degree. After graduating this will enable you to apply for work as a legal executive or paralegal and following three years of qualifying employment, you can apply to be admitted as a Chartered Fellow of the Institute of Legal Executives.

The benefits are clear:

An opportunity to obtain relevant employment straight after graduation without the need for further study or a Training Contract
A recognised professional qualification in addition to your degree
As a Chartered Fellow of the Institute of Legal Executives, you have similar rights and opportunities of partnership as a solicitor.

Module Details

The full-time mode of this course lasts for one year and you will follow either the law route or the non-law route.

Law Route

Those who hold a UK law degree or equivalent will undertake a dissertation/professional practitioner project and four units from the following list:

CILEX Level 6 (this unit is only available to those who hold a qualifying law degree)
Community Legal Research Project
Corporate Governance: Theory, Law and Practice
Employment Law
Global Corporate Responsibility
Intellectual Property Law
International and European Business Law
International Commercial Arbitration
Work-based Learning Unit
Non-Law Route

Those who do not hold a UK law degree or equivalent will be enrolled on the non-law route and will undertake the following units:

Legal Approach to Business
Dissertation/Professional Practitioner Project
In addition, you will undertake three units from the following list:

Community Legal Research Project
Corporate Governance: Theory, Law and Practice
Employment Law
Global Corporate Responsibility
Intellectual Property Law
International and European Business Law
International Commercial Arbitration
Work-based Learning Unit


The part-time mode of this course lasts three years and you will follow either the law route or the non-law route.

Law Route

Those who hold a UK law degree or equivalent will undertake the following units:

Year One

You will undertake two units from the following list:

CILEX Level 6 (this unit is only available to those who hold a qualifying law degree)
Community Legal Research Project
Corporate Governance: Theory, Law and Practice
Employment Law
Global Corporate Responsibility
Intellectual Property Law
International and European Business Law
International Commercial Arbitration
Work-based Learning Unit

Year Two

You will undertake two units from the following list (excluding units undertaken in the first year):

CILEX Level 6 (this unit is only available to those who hold a qualifying law degree)
Community Legal Research Project
Corporate Governance: Theory, Law and Practice
Employment Law
Global Corporate Responsibility
Intellectual Property Law
International and European Business Law
Work-based Learning Unit

Year Three

In the final year, you will complete and submit your dissertation/professional practitioner project.

Non-Law Route

Those who do not hold a UK law degree or equivalent will be enrolled on the non-law route and will undertake the following units:

Year One

You will undertake the following compulsory unit:

Legal Approach to Business

You will also undertake one unit from the following list:

Community Legal Research Project
Corporate Governance: Theory, Law and Practice
Employment Law
Global Corporate Responsibility
Intellectual Property Law
International and European Business Law
International Commercial Arbitration
Work-based Learning Unit

Year Two

You will undertake two units from the following list (excluding units undertaken in the first year):

Community Legal Research Project
Corporate Governance: Theory, Law and Practice
Employment Law
Global Corporate Responsibility
Intellectual Property Law
International and European Business Law
International Commercial Arbitration
Work-based Learning Unit
Year Three

In the final year, you will complete and submit your dissertation/professional practitioner project.

Programme Assessment

You will be expected to attend eight hours of class time per week if you are on the full-time course whereas for the part-time course you attend approximately four hours per week. You will be encouraged to undertake independent study with time also devoted to group problem solving, discussion and debate.

The majority of the units will be assessed via exams, however much of your time will also be spent researching and writing your dissertation which concentrates on a topic of your choice.

Student Destinations

The LLM in Law provides a springboard for many career paths. It allows potential law lecturers to develop expertise in a variety of subjects and provides the basis for a career in business or the public sector. It could also enable law practitioners to pursue new subject specialities.

Additionally, Law graduates who complete the CILEx option may apply for membership status of the Chartered Institute of Legal Executives (CILEx). Membership of CILEx and success on this LLM course will provide a real edge when competing for trainee legal executive opportunities.

Roles our graduates have taken on include:

Designated detention officer
Legal clerk
Paralegal assistant
Business development executive

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The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. Read more
The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. In either case, the student completes a program of research training that includes the Ethnographic Research Methods, Statistical Analysis and the Research Training Seminar as well as a language option. All MaRes students are assigned a supervisor at the start of the year, who will help the student choose other relevant course options. Candidates must also submit a number of research related assignments which, taken together with the dissertation, are equivalent to approximately 30,000 words of assessed work. All students write an MA dissertation, but for students progressing on to a PhD, the MA dissertation will take the form of a research report that will constitute the first part of the upgrade document for the PhD programme.

The MaRes is recognised by the ESRC.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/

Aims and Outcomes

The MA is designed to train students in research skills to the level prescribed by the ESRC’s research training guidelines. It is intended for students with a good first degree (minimum of a 2.1) in social anthropology and/or a taught Masters degree in social anthropology. Most students would be expected to progress to PhD registration at the end of the degree. By the end of the program students will:

- Have achieved practical competence in a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods and tools;
- Have the ability to understand key issues of method and theory, and to understand the epistemological issues involved in using different methods.

In addition to key issues of research design, students will be introduced to a range of specific research methods and tools including:

- Interviewing, collection and analysis of oral sources, analysis and use of documents, participatory research methods, issues of triangulation research validity and reliability, writing and analysing field notes, and ethnographic writing.

- Social statistics techniques relevant for fieldwork and ethnographic data analysis (including chi-square tests, the T-test, F-test, and the rank correlation test).

Discipline specific training in anthropology includes:

- Ethnographic methods and participant observation;
- Ethical and legal issues in anthropological research;
- The logistics of long-term fieldwork;
- Familiarisation with appropriate regional and theoretical literatures;
- Writing-up (in the field and producing ethnography) and communicating research results; and
- Language training.

The Training Programme

In addition to optional courses that may be taken (see below), the student must successfully complete the following core course:

- Research Methods in Anthropology (15 PAN C011).

This full unit course is composed of Ethnographic Research Methods (15 PAN H002, a 0.5 unit course) and Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research (15PPOH035, a 0.5 unit course hosted by Department of Politics and International Studies).

MA Anthropological Research Methods students and first year MPhil/PhD are also required to attend the Research Training Seminar which provides training in the use of bibliographic/online resources, ethical and legal issues, communication and team-working skills, career development, etc. The focus of the Research Training Seminar is the development and presentation of the thesis topic which takes the form of a PhD-level research proposal.

Dissertation

MA/MPhil Students meet regularly with their supervisor to produce a systematic review of the secondary and regional literature that forms an integral part of their dissertation/research proposal. The dissertation, Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology (15 PAN C998), is approximately 15,000 words and demonstrates the extent to which students have achieved the key learning outcomes during the first year of research training. The dissertation takes the form of an extended research proposal that includes:

- A review of the relevant theoretical and ethnographic literature;
- An outline of the specific questions to be addressed, methods to be employed, and the expected contribution of the study to anthropology;
- A discussion of the practical, political and ethical issues likely to affect the research; and
- A presentation of the schedule for the proposed research together with an estimated budget.

The MA dissertation is submitted no later than mid-September of the student’s final year of registration. Two soft-bound copies of the dissertation, typed or word-processed, should be submitted to the Faculty of Arts and Humanities Office by 16:00 and on Moodle by 23:59 on the appropriate day.

Exemption from Training

Only those students who have clearly demonstrated their knowledge of research methods by completing a comparable program of study in qualitative and quantitative methods will be considered for a possible exemption from the taught courses. All students, regardless of prior training, are required to participate in the Research Training Seminar.

Programme Specification 2013/2014 (msword; 128kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/file39765.docx

Teaching & Learning

This MA is designed to be a shortcut into the PhD in that two of its components (the Research Methods Course and the Research Training Seminar, which supports the writing of the dissertation) are part of the taught elements of the MPhil year. Students on this course are also assigned a supervisor with whom they meet fortnightly as do the MPhil students. The other two elements of the course are unique to each student: and might include doing one of the core courses from the other Masters degrees (Social Anthropology, Anthropology of Development, Medical Anthropology, Anthropology of Media, Migration and Diaspora, or Anthropology of Food), as well as any options that will build analytical skills and regional knowledge, including language training. The MaRes can also be used to build regional expertise or to fill gaps in particular areas such as migration or development theory.

The dissertation for the MaRes will normally be assessed by two readers in October of the following year (that is, after the September 15th due date). Students who proceed onto the MPhil course from the MA will then have the first term of the MPhil year to write a supplementary document that reviews the dissertation and provides a full and detailed Fieldwork Proposal. This, along with research report material from the original MA dissertation, is examined in a viva voce as early as November of the first term of the MPhil year by the same examiners who have read the dissertation. Successful students can then be upgraded to the PhD in term 1 and leave for fieldwork in term 2 of the first year of the MPhil/PhD programme. This programme is currently recognised by the ESRC and therefore interested students who are eligible for ESRC funding can apply under the 1+3 rubric. (ESRC)

Destinations

Students of the Masters in Anthropological Research Methods develop a wide range of transferable skills such as research, analysis, oral and written communication skills.

The communication skills of anthropologists transfer well to areas such as information and technology, the media and tourism. Other recent SOAS career choices have included commerce and banking, government service, the police and prison service, social services and health service administration. Opportunities for graduates with trained awareness of the socio-cultural norms of minority communities also arise in education, local government, libraries and museums.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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International trade is a complex and ever evolving area, requiring practitioners to be at the cutting edge of the subject. Read more
International trade is a complex and ever evolving area, requiring practitioners to be at the cutting edge of the subject.

On the LLM International Trade Law you will acquire a wide range of knowledge on issues relevant to international trade, such as international sale contracts, carriage of goods and international dispute resolution and in areas such as international finance, intellectual property, international energy law and transnational competition law. You will gain specialist legal knowledge within a practical context, whilst developing expertise in these areas and enhancing your research skills.

With maximum flexibility in mind, this distance learning course allows you to work towards your LLM in stages. To access the LLM you will have previously completed the awards of Postgraduate Certificate and Postgraduate Diploma.

Students are required to pass three modules: Legal Research, International Sale Contracts, and Carriage of Goods. There are no examinations for each module. Instead, students research and write a 3,000 word essay on a topic selected by the module tutor. They graduate with the PgCert International Trade Law and may, if they wish, continue on to study for the PgDip International Trade Law the next academic year.

Learn From The Best

Study on the LLM International Trade Law and you will learn from inspirational academics that have a real passion for their subject. The course is accredited by the Law Society of England and Wales and the General Council of the Bar of England and Wales, and is shaped by internationally excellent research to ensure the course is up-to-date and relevant.

Lecturers on this course have research expertise and practice-based experience in the areas of international business transactions; international commercial litigation; international commercial arbitration, international public procurement regulation; comparative corporate and financial law, and EU law; knowledge that you can draw on for your LLM project.

The course is delivered by Northumbria Law School, three times winners of the prestigious “Best Law School” accolade, awarded by the Attorney General’s Student Pro Bono Awards.

Teaching And Assessment

On this innovative distance learning LLM International Trade Law course you will acquire a wide range of knowledge on issues relevant to international trade, such as international sale contracts, carriage of goods and international dispute resolution and in areas such as international finance, intellectual property, international energy law and transnational competition law. There is an emphasis on reflective practice and applying what you have learnt to your own organisation.

You will learn through a combination of online lectures and seminars and eLearning technology, able to tailor the course to suit your interests and career aspirations. Modules are assessed through coursework and for the award of LLM, you will complete a 15,000-17,000-word project, based on an area related to your own practice or intended practice.

Module Overview
LW7003 - Legal Research (Core, 20 Credits)
LW7036 - Carriage of Goods (Core, 20 Credits)
LW7051 - International Sale Contracts (Core, 20 Credits)

Learning Environment

The eLearning Portal provides students with written materials that are the equivalent to ten (10) one-hour lecture periods and five (5) two-hour workshop periods on the FT LLM International Trade Law. Written lecture materials tend to focus on the delivery of a particular legal topic and written workshop materials tend to focus on the actual application of topics in practical situations which business persons or lawyers would encounter. The DL PgCert/PgDip/LLM International Trade Law is practically oriented.

There is an on-line surgery at the beginning of each module with the module tutor, and an optional Study Day is held on campus on a Saturday near the beginning of each module. The Study Day is recorded using Panopto so that students who are unable to attend in person can view and listen to the day’s learning activities. There is no difference in the substantive content of each module between the DL PgCert/PgDip International Trade Law and the FT LLM International Trade Law.

Research-Rich Learning

Research rich learning (RRL) is embedded through the programme. Law School research focuses on the areas of Law and Society, Legal Education and Professional Skills, and the Centre for Evidence and Criminal Justice Studies. These internationally recognised groups act as a focus for research activity across the Law School, and their work feeds into the courses to ensure taught course content is informed by research developments in the sector.

The LLM culminates in the project module in which you will undertake a piece of independent legal research, informed by current practice and advanced scholarship and research, including a critical awareness and evaluation of current issues and developments in the field.

Give Your Career An Edge

The LLM is designed to enhance your career prospects in the international trade law arena. You will be encouraged to reflect upon your own practice, applying legal skills to the common problems you are experiencing or are likely to experience in practice, examine policies and undertake independent legal research to update your knowledge. You will have the opportunity to produce a project in your chosen field undertaking research and personal development in an area of particular relevance to your work.

The course is accredited for Continuing Professional Development (CPD) by the Law Society of England and Wales and the General Council of the Bar of England and Wales.

Your Future

The LLM International Trade Law course has been designed to meet the needs of practitioners in business and industry and law firms engaged in the area of international trade law.

You will graduate fully equipped with expert legal knowledge, greater awareness of legal commercial issues, and the ability to critically evaluate legal issues in the context of international trade law. You will be able to further develop your intellectual curiosity, to recognise uncertainty in the law, to produce and present reasoned arguments and to offer creative solutions to complex legal and ethical problems. You will develop your critical, analysis, research and the professional and reflective skills necessary for practice in this exciting field.

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This advanced course in human rights taught by international experts offers a unique and distinctive focus on the theories and practice of rights, producing a vibrant environment for exploring this significant area of law and policy. Read more

This advanced course in human rights taught by international experts offers a unique and distinctive focus on the theories and practice of rights, producing a vibrant environment for exploring this significant area of law and policy.

This programme will give you advanced knowledge, greater understanding and critical insights into current systems of human rights legal protection and human rights debates.

You’ll explore different domestic, regional and international human rights legal systems to analyse how rights have been legalised, developed and enforced through the theory and practice of human rights.

You’ll investigate the law relating to the protection of life and human dignity, freedom from torture and other ill treatment, freedom of expression, and human rights with regard to media organisations, terrorism, health care, the family and disabled people.

You’ll benefit from the expertise of leading academics in a stimulating research environment. Our research groups include:

Course content

The compulsory modules studied will give you the opportunity to:

  • examine the concept of rights in political philosophy
  • explore global and local human rights concerns
  • investigate the impact of international human rights
  • analyse the relevance of international human rights to domestic law.

Compulsory modules will also enable you to hone your legal research and writing skills, which you’ll be able to demonstrate in your dissertation – an independent piece of research on your chosen topic.

If you study with us, you’ll also benefit from our academic skills programme. This 10-week programme runs alongside your taught academic programme, and is specifically designed to meet the needs of home and international students in the School of Law. It allows you to refine and develop the academic and transferable skills to excel during your taught postgraduate programmes, as well as prepare for professional roles after graduation.

The wide-ranging list of optional modules means that you can explore a diverse range of related subjects of interest to you.

If you’re a part-time student, you’ll take three compulsory modules and choose one or two optional modules in your first year. You’ll then take the compulsory dissertation module and one or two optional modules in your second year to complete your programme.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • European Human Rights 15 credits
  • Postgraduate Legal Research Skills 15 credits
  • International Human Rights 30 credits
  • Dissertation 60 credits

Optional modules

  • International Human Rights and Disabled People 15 credits
  • EU Discrimination Law 15 credits
  • Cyberlaw: Regulation of Cyberspace 15 credits
  • Globalisation and Crime 15 credits
  • World Trade Organisation Law 15 credits
  • Global Human Rights Advocacy 30 credits
  • Global Governance through Law 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read International and European Human Rights Law LLM Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read International and European Human Rights Law LLM Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

This programme is taught through a range of weekly lectures and seminars held on a two-weekly basis. You’re strongly advised to attend the weekly lectures on international human rights and international law, particularly if you’ve not previously studied international law.

Independent study is integral to this programme – not just to prepare for classes but to develop research and other critical skills. You’ll be expected to carry out advanced levels of legal research and participate fully in seminars.

Assessment

Most modules are assessed by essays. This is usually the most effective method for you to showcase your advanced legal research.

Career opportunities

Students who have graduated from this degree often choose careers that centre on or involve understanding and applying human rights law and developing policies at organisational level. Further training is required but many also go on to practise as lawyers or legal advisors.

Our alumni include people working at the European Commission, United Nations, non-governmental organisations and in the government sector. Others have chosen to follow academic careers.

Careers support

The School of Law offers career and personal development support through the School of Law Careers Advisor. The School also arranges career development workshops, seminars and one-to-one sessions for students on all postgraduate programmes.

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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International law is a dynamic subject which has to respond to real world problems. It directly affects states but is increasingly a matter of concern for public and private international and national organisations and individuals. Read more

International law is a dynamic subject which has to respond to real world problems. It directly affects states but is increasingly a matter of concern for public and private international and national organisations and individuals. Given contemporary and future global problems – for example, protecting human rights and security and the conservation of resources – the significance of international law is growing in a multipolar world.

This programme will enhance your understanding and challenge preconceptions of the complex legal and political nature of international law-making and governance and explore the often competing concepts that infuse the subject of international law.

You’ll investigate and apply the theories, principles and rules of international law to novel problems, real-world and hypothetical scenarios, and examine the rules, legal and political bodies such as the Security Council and the International Court of Justice and underlying policies governing international law.

You’ll benefit from the expertise of leading academics in a stimulating research environment. Our research groups include:

Course content

This programme includes Global Governance Through Law and International Human Rights Law as compulsory modules, and offers many optional modules in specialised subjects in international law. You’ll critically engage with a rich collection of contemporary themes set against the background of the concerns and activities of states and non-state actors in the international community.

You’ll also examine controversial areas of international law including how human rights laws are developed, how international laws are made and to what extent they are applied, the structure of relevant institutions such as the UN, the development of legal norms and the monitoring of states.

The programme will give you the opportunity to:

  • explore the legal nature of international law on a global, regional and local level
  • examine the impact of international law on contemporary problems
  • consider how international law has failed to address certain issues and may be harnessed to tackle future problems
  • investigate principles relating to sovereignty, universality, jurisdiction, territory, self-determination and human rights
  • hone your legal research and writing skills, which you’ll demonstrate in your dissertation.

If you study with us, you’ll also benefit from our academic skills programme. This 10-week programme runs alongside your taught academic programme, and is specifically designed to meet the needs of home and international students in the School of Law. It allows you to refine and develop the academic and transferable skills to excel during your taught postgraduate programme, as well as prepare for professional roles after graduation.

The wide-ranging list of optional modules means that you can explore a mixture of related subjects of interest to you.

If you're a part-time student, you’ll take three compulsory modules in your first year and two optional modules. In your second year, you’ll carry out your dissertation and study one or two optional modules.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Postgraduate Legal Research Skills 15 credits
  • Dissertation 60 credits
  • Global Governance through Law 30 credits

Optional modules

  • International Human Rights and Disabled People 15 credits
  • European Human Rights 15 credits
  • Alternative Dispute Resolution 15 credits
  • International Corporate Rescue 15 credits
  • World Trade Organisation Law 15 credits
  • International Economic Law 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read International Law LLM Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read International Law LLM Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Teaching is through seminars and lectures in which a high level of student engagement and discussion is expected. You are encouraged to carry out significant advanced levels of independent legal research.

Assessment

Most modules are assessed by essays. This is usually the most effective method for you to showcase advanced legal research.

Career opportunities

Students who have graduated from this degree often choose careers that centre on or involve understanding and applying international law and developing policies at organisational level. Further training is required but many also go on to practise as lawyers or legal advisors.

Our alumni include people working at the EU Commission, at the United Nations, non-governmental organisations and in the government sector.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website



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This programme offers an advanced introduction to the study of Law with a specific emphasis on socio-legal methodology. It provides you with an excellent preparation for doctoral study in the area of socio-legal research, serving as a qualification in its own right and a platform for PhD study. Read more

This programme offers an advanced introduction to the study of Law with a specific emphasis on socio-legal methodology. It provides you with an excellent preparation for doctoral study in the area of socio-legal research, serving as a qualification in its own right and a platform for PhD study.

Why this programme

  • There is a strong emphasis on research training. You are introduced to legal research methodologies, the ethics of legal research, key traditions of legal inquiry and basic concepts of legal thought.
  • You are also given a solid grounding in qualitative and quantitative research methodologies.
  • You will benefit from our excellent facilities including the dedicated School of Law library; our main University library also contains our extensive collection of legal materials and official publications and is a European Documentation Centre. 
  • We have a very vibrant mooting programme and a dedicated Moot Courtroom. We have an outstanding record of success and you can participate in internal, national and international mooting competitions. 
  • We organise a series of lectures featuring talks from highly successful judges and lawyers.

Programme structure

You will take five core courses and one optional course, followed by a dissertation on a specialised topic.

Core courses

  • Advanced legal methods 2: Jurisprudence of concepts
  • Applied qualitative methods OR Intro to social theory for researchers
  • Applied legal methods 1A: Legal research methodologies OR Advanced legal methods 1B: Traditions of legal enquiry
  • Qualitative research methods
  • Quantitative data analysis

Optional courses may include

  • Fundamentals of international law
  • United Nations law.

Career prospects

The programme provides you with an excellent foundation for an academic career in this field.



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This full-time programme offers students the opportunity to work towards an LLM qualification and a Postgraduate Diploma in Bar Professional Training over two years. Read more
This full-time programme offers students the opportunity to work towards an LLM qualification and a Postgraduate Diploma in Bar Professional Training over two years.

The aim of the programme is to enhance the knowledge and skills students will attain from the Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC) by simultaneously developing their knowledge and understanding of a specific area of law through their study under an LLM programme. The LLM programme requires students to undertake a project of 15,000 – 17,000 words in a subject linked to an area of study under the BPTC, thus enhancing their Bar qualification, knowledge, research skills and employability.

The programme offers a different pathway to students who would like to attain an award under the Bar Professional Training Course but would, at the same time, like to enhance their legal research skills through the completion of a project.

This course is in the process of being updated - please view the website for the latest updates: https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/master-of-laws-bar-practice-ft-dtfbap6/

Programme Content

During the programme student develop a range of essential skills, which include:
-Advocacy
-Drafting
-Opinion Writing
-Conference Skills
-Resolution of Disputes Out of Court

Evidence, criminal litigation and civil litigation are also taught as discrete subjects, as well as being integrated with the main skill areas.

All students choose two specialist options. Current options include:
-Civil Practice
-Clinical Negligence and Personal Injury
-Chancery Practice
-Commercial Practice
-Criminal Practice
-Employment Practice
-Family Practice
-Landlord and Tenant
-Student Law Office – students will work in Northumbria’s Student Law Office, which is the largest student law clinic in the country, working on real legal problems for members of the public, subject to maximum numbers.

The programme focuses on legal research and coherent presentation of legal research in a written form. Students will complete a legal research and study skills module designed to enable them to improve their writing and research skills in preparation for a project of 15,000 – 17,000 words. The project title is chosen by the student in an area related to their BPTC studies.

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This course prepares students for undertaking social research and evaluation, leading to careers in research, research management and commissioning or using research. Read more

Introduction

This course prepares students for undertaking social research and evaluation, leading to careers in research, research management and commissioning or using research. Our MSc is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the research training guidelines for undertaking a PhD in Sociology, Social Policy, Social Work or Socio-legal Studies, as well as preparing you for an ESRC-recognised interdisciplinary PhD in Families, Relationships and Demographic Change and Social Care. A course on Applied Social Research (Criminology) is also available.

Accreditation

The course is recognised as research training by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) for those who are studying or going on to study for a PhD (+3), and is also recognised by the ESRC for Master’s Course plus Research Studentship (1+3) purposes.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Diploma
- Study methods: Part-time, Full-time
- Start date: Full-time: September Part-time: September/January See
- Course Director: Richard Simmons

Course objectives

- Provide you with the skills and knowledge base required to collect, analyse and report qualitative and quantitative data, taking account of ethics, reliability and validity
- Enable you to examine critically the theoretical foundations that underpin social scientific research
- Enable you to examine issues concerning comparative social research
- Develop your understanding of the relationship between research and policy, and the meanings of evaluation, its terminology, practice and use

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Structure and content

The MSc/Postgraduate Diploma in Applied Social Research comprises six compulsory taught core modules, and (for the MSc) a dissertation.
The modules are: The Nature of Social Enquiry; Research Design and Process; Introduction to Information Technology and Library Services (not formally assessed); Quantitative Data Analysis; Qualitative Data Analysis; Comparative Social Research; Policy Analysis and Evaluation Research.
These modules comprise a series of reading groups in which a number of central ideas are debated.

In addition to the modules, you will complete the following:
- Research Dissertation: MSc students must undertake an original social science research study and complete a research dissertation with academic supervision.

Examples of recent dissertation topics include:
- A Study of High Risk Behaviour
- Young People and National Identity
- Substance Use Prevalence and Looked-after Young People in Scotland
- Women’s Decisions about Returning to Work After Childbirth

Delivery and assessment

Teaching methods are designed for each module to facilitate your acquisition of skills and progressive development. You are expected to participate in lectures, seminars, tutorials, computer-based workshops and group work.
Full-time and part-time MSc/Diploma students experience a range of different forms of assessment across the compulsory taught modules. These include essays, critical review essays, book reviews, research proposals, a computer lab-based assessment for quantitative data analysis and the research dissertation. There are no examinations.

Why Stirling?

REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Rating

In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), 95 percent of the research in Applied Social Science at Stirling was ‘Internationally Excellent’ with the top 10 percent of that judged to be ‘World-leading’.

Career opportunities

Over the past five years, over half of our graduates have entered social research-related careers in the public, voluntary and private sectors, for example, a manager commissioning research for a local authority, a research fellow at a university and a senior research executive for a European-wide commercial research organisation.
In general, one in ten graduates have enhanced their practice in current posts by undertaking studies in Applied Social Research, with support from their employer. Over one third of our graduates continue with academic study and undertake a PhD.

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