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Masters Degrees (Legal History)

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Programme draws on academic activities organised by the Forum for Legal and Historical Research at Reading. Combination of skills-focused training, guided research and writing. Read more
  • Programme draws on academic activities organised by the Forum for Legal and Historical Research at Reading
  • Combination of skills-focused training, guided research and writing
  • Emphasis on independent research
  • Suitable for those considering legal practice or a PhD
  • Studied part-time, will benefit researchers and practitioners wishing to develop their knowledge and skills in new directions

What will you study?

Sample modules:

  • Archival internship
  • Research seminar presentation
  • History and the management of an archive
  • Sourcing the past
  • Research dissertation

Please note that all modules are subject to change. Please see our modules disclaimer for more information.

What career can you have?

A postgraduate law degree will open many doors for you, not only in specialised areas of employment, such as law firms, European and intergovernmental and non-governmental organisations (NGOs), but also in academia (with further postgraduate study), the media (journalism and broadcasting), the civil service, and other branches of public service.

Graduates from our LLM programmes have gone on to work for a range of national and international law firms, as lawyers and as in-house legal counsel for large multinational companies in the UK and abroad, as well as international organisations and NGOs.



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The MA in Queer History is a pioneering programme in one of the most exciting areas of historical enquiry, giving a voice to those who throughout much of history have been denied one. Read more

The MA in Queer History is a pioneering programme in one of the most exciting areas of historical enquiry, giving a voice to those who throughout much of history have been denied one.

This MA provides a comprehensive introduction to the themes and methods of Queer History as well as laying a solid foundation in general historical study. It offers a first-rate overview of important thought and methods from the fields of queer theory as well as the histories of gender and the body and sexuality.

This programme aims to historicise often binary categories, such as male/female, heterosexuality/homosexuality, active/passive, and uncover the processes through which these categories came to be seen as ‘natural’. It further pays close attention to questions of power, including how sexual orientation and race throughout history have often become interlinked in asymmetrical, oppressive ways.

Students conclude the programme with a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic of their own choice. The dissertation research is aided by access to the shared library and archival resources of the wider University of London and the city of London, one of the world’s queer capitals. Goldsmiths aims to build the Archive of Queer Life Histories and involve MA students in this process.

Modules & structure

The emphasis of the MA is in the Early Modern and Modern periods. Both the Western invention of ‘homosexuality’ in the 1860s and the emancipatory movements, especially of the post-1969, post-Stonewall period, figure prominently.

You will take 3 core modules, as well as optional modules to the value of 60 credits.

Core modules

Optional modules

Skills & careers

The programme will build skills in data gathering and analysis as well as effective written and spoken communication to prepare students for jobs in diversity administration in private business, government, National Government Organisations, the education sector and legal professions.

As opposed to primarily theory-oriented subjects the programme will lay a solid empirical foundation in queer history, arguably the best possible basis for sexual diversity jobs.



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Develop your understanding of history and of the nature of historical research with this flexible course that encourages you to develop as independent researcher. Read more
Develop your understanding of history and of the nature of historical research with this flexible course that encourages you to develop as independent researcher.

Course overview

The MA Historical Research is for students who want to develop their understanding of history and of the nature of historical research. It is a flexible course that will encourage you to develop as an independent researcher. You will be able to pursue your interests in history while discovering the ways in which historians work. You will also engage with the intellectual, practical and social facets of the profession.

Core modules emphasise the nature of the discipline or historical research, its evolution (History in the Past or Historians on History) and the preparatory work for independent research (The Profession of the Historian or the Dissertation Feasibility Study). These modules will give you the grounding needed to engage with your own research project in the dissertation module.

Design your MA studies according to your preferred methods of learning. If you prefer to work independently you may choose to opt for the Extended History Dissertation, whereas if you prefer more taught elements you can opt for the History Dissertation. This will allow you to place more or less emphasis on independent work and research. The Extended History Dissertation is a great opportunity for those wanting to move on to further research or who want to develop a career in which research is a key element. In both cases, the project will be negotiated with the teaching team to reflect both you and your lecturers’ research interests.

The course is designed to implement the research-led curriculum of the university in which you become involved in research through the guidance of research-active members of staff - all staff members on the teaching team are research active.

You will graduate with a firm grounding in the way history evolves through an understanding of the nature of the discipline in all its diversity and of the challenges it faces. This, combined with an engagement with a specific subject area, will foster a critical understanding of history, necessary for a wide range of careers in research, academia, law, journalism and the cultural sector.

Course content

The course mixes taught elements with independent research and self-directed study. There is flexibility to pursue personal interests in considerable depth, with guidance from Sunderland's supportive tutors.

Core module:
-History in the past (15 Credits)
-Historians on History (15 Credits)
-History in the past (15 Credits)
-Historians on History (15 Credits)
-Dissertation Feasibility study (30 Credits)
-The profession of the historian (15 Credits)
-The Profession of the historian (Symposium/Webinar) (15 Credits)

Dissertation modules:
-History Dissertation (60 Credits)
-Extended History Dissertation (90 Credits)

Optional modules (for students choosing the Dissertation module HISM40) would typically include:
-Suicide Until the Reformation
-Suicide Since the Reformation
-Law, Family and Community Relations 1550-1800
-Law, Treason and Rebellion 1550-1800
-Britain Between the Wars: The Changing Party System
-Britain Between the Wars: The Challenges of the Inter War Years
-Foundations of Liberty - Obedience and Resistance
-Foundations of liberty - Religious toleration
-Human Rights in History: Ideas and Movements
-Human Rights in History: Organizations, Activists and Campaigns
-Revolution in Science and Art 1870-1920
-Revolution in Science and Art 1870-1920

You will normally choose your options during the induction week when the full list of optional modules available that year will be presented to you. The number of optional modules offered will depend on the size of the cohort and the availability of staff. Not all options will be available every year. In any one academic year no more than three optional modules (3 x 15 credits) will be offered. Optional modules all run in Semester 2.

Facilities & location

The University of Sunderland has excellent facilities that have been boosted by multi-million pound redevelopments.

University Library Services
We’ve got thousands of books and e-books on topics related to history, with many more titles available through the inter-library loan service. We also subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date academic and industry articles.

Some of the most important sources for your course include:
-House of Commons Parliamentary Papers including bills, registers and journals
-Early English Books Online, which provides digital images of virtually every work printed in England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland and British North America during 1473-1800
-Eighteenth Century Collections Online, which provides 136,000 full-text publications from 1701-1800
-Periodicals Archive Online, which provides digitised literary journals
-Archival Sound Recordings with over 12,000 hours of recordings
-JSTOR (short for ‘Journal Storage’), which provides access to important journals across the humanities, social sciences and sciences
Lexis, which provides access to legal information as well as full-text newspaper articles
-Nineteenth Century British Library Newspapers, with full runs of 48 titles
-Screen Online (BFI), which is an online encyclopaedia of British film and television, featuring clips from the vast collections of the BFI National Archive
-SocINDEX with full-text articles, which is probably the world's most comprehensive and highest-quality sociology research database

Archives
The Murray Library at the University also contains the physical archive of the North East England Mining Archive and Resource Centre. This contains mining records, technical reports, trade union records and health & safety information.

IT provision
When it comes to IT provision you can take your pick from hundreds of PCs as well as Apple Macs in the David Goldman Informatics Centre and St Peter’s library. There are also free WiFi zones throughout the campus. If you have any problems, just ask the friendly helpdesk team.

Course location
The course is based at the Priestman Building on City Campus, just a few minutes from the main Murray Library and close to Sunderland city centre. It’s a very vibrant and supportive environment with excellent resources for teaching and learning.

Employment & careers

This course is relevant to a wide range of professions, highlighting as it does critical and analytical skills and an ability to develop and effectively advance an argument. A large number of transferable skills will be gained: research skills, writing skills, presentation skills, analytical and critical skills. These will be valuable in a huge range of careers and activities.

The course has been designed with employability in mind, with a focus on the way research skills can be transferred to the work place.

History by nature is a subject that includes a number of transferable skills such as critical thinking, collecting and analysing data critically, working independently and to a deadline, developing a coherent argument, writing, and oral skills. The QAA Subject Benchmark statement for History (December 2014) lists the some following (§3.3):
-Self discipline
-Independence of mind, and initiative
-A questioning disposition and the ability to formulate and pursue clearly defined questions and enquiries
-Ability to work with others, and to have respect for others' reasoned views
-Ability to gather, organise and deploy evidence, data and information; and familiarity with appropriate means of identifying, finding, retrieving, sorting and exchanging information
-Analytical ability, and the capacity to consider and solve problems, including complex problems to which there is no single solution
-Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of both oral and written expression
-Imaginative insight and creativity
-Awareness of ethical issues and responsibilities that arise from research into the past and the reuse of the research and writing of others

These transferable skills will be fostered through each module and particularly emphasised in core modules. Furthermore, the research skills module The profession of the historian Symposium/Webinar will involve the organisation of a mini symposium. You will be expected to engage with some of the administrative and practical skills involved in organising an academic event.

During the dissertation feasibility study, you will be expected to deliver papers to an audience of staff and peers, allowing you to practice your oral and presentational skills.

MA Historical Research graduates can expect to be employed in:
-Teaching
-Archives
-Libraries
-Museums
-Journalism
-Law

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The Postgraduate Certificate in Family and Local History is an online distance learning course aimed at developing the skills needed to study family and local history. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Family and Local History is an online distance learning course aimed at developing the skills needed to study family and local history. The course helps you to identify and use archives and other resources which are an important and sometimes neglected aspect of researching family history. Archives will help you discover more about the world that your ancestors lived in.

Aims of the Programme

This programme teaches the skills and methodologies necessary to investigate the history of families and neighbourhoods within the wider context of social history.

The courses are online, easy to use and fully supported. You can do them wherever you live and can log onto the site at whatever time you wish to study. You will work your way through the courses with other students and will be able to discuss the topics on a discussion forum. Your tutor will provide support and guidance throughout.

If you want to go further with your family and local history research and to learn in a supportive, enjoyable and interactive environment, these courses are for you.

"Being able to take a program like this when one lives thousands of miles away from the school and fellow classmates is an incredible feeling. I have really enjoyed my time at Dundee."

This programme provides students with:
Skills in finding and interpreting archive sources for family and local history.
An understanding of how to read old handwriting and to recognise common forms of documents.
Knowledge of family history and archive websites and published sources that will help you with your research - for yourself or for others.
A thorough understanding of record types, the reasons for their creation, their location and the information they contain.
An expertise in finding, analysing and interpreting archival records for family and local history research.
An awareness of the historical context in which the records were created and used.
A knowledge of archival theory as it applies to research.
An understanding of the legal and ethical issues relating to research using archival records.

The course is available by distance learning to students off-campus, throughout the world.

Students study a series of core and optional modules which have full academic accreditation from the University of Dundee. The programme is delivered by distance learning via the University of Dundee's Virtual Learning Environment which ensures a supportive and interactive learning environment, with frequent contact between students and tutors.

Centre for Archive and Information Studies

The Centre for Archive and Information Studies (CAIS) is part of the University's Archive, Records Management and Museum Services (ARMMS) which is responsible for the care and development of the University's historical collections, the management of systems to control business records and compliance with information legislation across the University.

CAIS offers postgraduate and undergraduate distance learning programmes for information professionals and family and local historians, delivered in an interactive online environment and allowing flexible part time study.

CAIS also conducts a number of associated activities such as hosting a range of presentations, seminars and conferences, the attraction of external funding and occasional taught training courses in collaboration with experts in the field throughout the UK and beyond.

Course Content and Structure

Mlitt degree:

To qualify for the MLitt in Family and Local History, students must complete a total of 180 credits.
Compulsory modules total 40 credits:
Skills and sources for Family and Local History in Scotland or England - 20 credits
Scots or English Palaeography and Diplomatic - 20 credits
Students can then choose to study a selection of optional modules, to equal 80 credits.

The list of options can be found on the CAIS website. 20 credit modules last for 15 weeks, 10 credit modules last for 9 weeks. Finally, a dissertation of 18,000 words is completed (60 credits).

PG Certificate:
To qualify for the Certificate in Family and Local History, students must complete a total of 60 credits. Students must complete one of the following core modules, but they can elect to study both if they so desire:
Skills and Sources for Family and Local History in Scotland (20 credits)
Skills and Sources for Family and Local History in England (20 credits)
Students can then choose to study a selection of optional modules to complete their total of 60 credits.

Assessment

Essays/reports; contribution to module (through online tasks and discussion board debate), dissertation of 18,000 words for MLitt students.

Student Support

The programme is delivered by distance learning via the University of Dundee's web-based Virtual Learning Environment which ensures a supportive and interactive learning environment, with frequent contact between students and tutors. The VLE gives access to study materials, links to on-line journals, discussion boards and research guides. Module tutors provide regular feedback and support to the students.

Optional study days are available for some of the modules and optional student visits will be arranged.

Professional Accreditation

All CAIS programmes are accredited by the UK Archives and Records Association and The Records and Information Management (RIM) Professionals Australasia.

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This programme gives you the opportunity to study ancient history at an advanced level, developing your interest in the ancient world and providing an excellent preparation for further graduate research. Read more

This programme gives you the opportunity to study ancient history at an advanced level, developing your interest in the ancient world and providing an excellent preparation for further graduate research.

Edinburgh is one of the leading centres in the UK for the study of ancient history, in the chronological, geographical and methodological scope of the research interests of our staff. The range and content of our courses reflect staff research strengths in Greek, Hellenistic, Roman and Late Antique topics. Greek and Latin language courses are always offered. Our particular strengths lie in the legal, institutional, social and economic history of the Greek and Roman worlds, as well as in political theory and practice, Hellenistic history, and late antique history.

As a student on this programme, you will develop your skills in critical thinking, clear writing and research, verbal presentation and critical analysis.

Programme structure

Most teaching takes place in small-group seminars and the programme is designed to allow both breadth of coverage and specialisation. The specialised compulsory course will provide you with the key methodological and practical skills required of researchers in all classical subjects, while the options offer a large degree of flexibility, allowing you to develop or consolidate your language skills and explore a diverse range of historical topics in depth. Independent research, in the form of a dissertation, forms a substantial component of the programme, challenging you to build on the material and approaches covered in the taught courses and develop your research skills.

You will complete one compulsory course and select a further three skills courses and an additional two options from a wide range on offer.

The compulsory course is:

  • Skills and Methods in Classics

Option courses previously offered include those listed below. Option courses change from year to year and those available when you start your studies may be different from those shown in the list:

  • Elementary Latin (PG) 1
  • Elementary Greek (PG) 1
  • Elementary Latin (PG) 2
  • Elementary Greek (PG) 2
  • Intermediate Latin (PG) 1
  • Intermediate Greek (PG) 1
  • Intermediate Latin (PG) 2
  • Intermediate Greek (PG) 2
  • A Period of Ancient History 1
  • A Period of Ancient History 2
  • A Topic in Late Antique and Byzantine History 1
  • The Hellenistic City
  • Constantinople: The History of a Medieval Megalopolis from * Constantine the Great to Suleyman the Magnificent
  • Archaeology of the Roman Economy
  • Classical Greek Sculpture
  • Space, Place and Time: the archaeology of built environments
  • Byzantine Archaeology: The archaeology of the Byzantine empire and its neighbours AD 500-850.
  • Conflict archaeology: materialities of violence
  • Bronze Age Civilisations of the Near East and Greece
  • Etruscan Italy, 1000 - 300 BC
  • Gallia from the Third Century BC to Augustus

Learning outcomes

  • considerable familiarity with many aspects of ancient history and the principal challenges, approaches and issues involved in their study
  • specialist understanding of the intellectual background of ancient history as a distinct discipline
  • development of existing reading/writing skills, through critical assessment of written work
  • advanced appreciation of a wide range of methodologies involved in evaluating and employing sources of ancient historical evidence, through participation in core course and assessed work
  • the option to further develop language skills (normally Greek and Latin), which can be acquired by instruction and assessed exercises
  • specialist understanding of at least one significant field of research in associated cultural history, developed and assessed through a 15,000-word dissertation.

Career opportunities

This programme can form the stepping stone to many career options,such as further academic research, museum and art curation, literary translation or analysis, education or public heritage. Recent graduates in Classics are now putting their skills to use as tutors, archivists, writers and conference coordinators for a range of employers including the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB).



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The Law School has over 30 academic staff and offers supervision across the full range of legal subjects and approaches. See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/. Read more

Research Degrees (MPhil/PhD)

The Law School has over 30 academic staff and offers supervision across the full range of legal subjects and approaches.

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/

Your studies

The Law School has over 30 academic staff and offers supervision across the full range of legal subjects and approaches.
Particular strengths include: Commercial Law; Criminal Law; Criminal Justice and Criminology; European Law; Public Law, and Legal History. The doctoral programme in law is a structured programme requiring completion of a minimum number of taught modules and of research leading to the completion of a thesis.
These modules include a compulsory course Introduction to Advanced Research in Law, and optional courses in qualitative and quantitative research methods, substantive areas of law and in other areas where skills may be required, for example languages or economics.
Students are assigned to a main supervisor before arrival, who is supported by a team of two other members of academic staff with expertise in the field of research.
Coming to UCD Sutherland School of Law creates the possibility of expert supervision by leading researchers in a wide variety of fields. We have the largest group of academic lawyers in Ireland and leading researchers of high international standing across many of the main fields of law including European Union law, commercial law, criminology, criminal justice and criminal law, constitutional law and governance, human rights, legal history and private law.

Academic Profile

Ian O’Donnell ia a Professor of Criminology in UCD. He is Ireland’s foremost expert and commentator in his field. Ian has carried out active research in criminology, and published widely on the subject.
His new co-authored book is: Coercive Confinement in Ireland: Patients, Prisoners and Penitents Patients, Prisoners and Penitents.

Ian o’Donnell
Professor of Criminology, UCD

Scholarships

The University and UCD Sutherland School of Law have a list of scholarships that are open to Irish, EU and International applicants.
For further information please see http://www.ucd.ie/scholarships
International students may wish to visit: http://www.ucd.ie/international

Why you should choose UCD

In the state-of-the-art UCD Sutherland School of Law, graduate students engage in advanced study with internationally renowned specialists to develop the transformative potential of law.

The School is ranked by the authoritative QS World University Rankings as Ireland's number one law school and amongst the world's 100 leading law schools. Students benefit from the School’s strong links with university partners; businesses; NGOs; and, domestic, EU and international governments.
We place particular emphasis on the quality and breadth of our graduate programmes across Diploma, Masters and Doctoral levels. Our graduate degrees are available on a full-time or part-time basis, beginning in either January or September.
We also offer part-time Diploma programmes and single subject certificates with the possibility of securing CPD points and building study up to achieve diploma or masters awards.

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Edinburgh Law School is renowned for its research excellence. We strive to produce work that has real-world reach and influence. Read more

Edinburgh Law School is renowned for its research excellence. We strive to produce work that has real-world reach and influence. Our postgraduate research body is key to the School’s research activities and we work hard to ensure that our research students are fully engaged with staff and projects across all our legal disciplines.

If you are considering following an academic research career, Edinburgh Law School can provide a supportive and inspiring environment to help you take your first steps towards carving out your own research specialism.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework we were ranked 4th in the UK for the breadth and quality of our research. We have research excellence in a vibrant range of fields, spanning an exciting spectrum of law, socio-legal studies and criminology.

LLM by Research programmes

LLM degrees by Research

The LLM by Research presents an excellent opportunity to focus on a period of dedicated research, and is a fantastic bridge to doctoral study. We offer two LLM by Research programmes:

LLM by Research in Law

As a student on this programme, you will consolidate and build on the legal research and writing skills you acquired during your undergraduate legal studies, by planning and completing a 30,000-word dissertation. You will work independently but under specialist academic supervision, within your chosen field of law.

The topic of your dissertation can be chosen from any of the School’s legal research fields in which we have supervisory expertise, including commercial law, criminal law and evidence, criminology, EU law, IP, media and technology law, international law, legal history and legal theory, medical law, private law, and public law.

The programme will enhance and develop your ability to manage and engage with both primary legal sources and academic literature on your chosen topic, present critical and engaged legal arguments, and maintain the coherence of those arguments over a substantial piece of written work.

The framework of the LLM by Research allows you time and intellectual space to work in your chosen field, and to refine and develop this initial phase of the project for future doctoral work.

The programme does not have formal coursework elements, other than initial training seminars alongside PhD students. This makes the LLM by Research a particularly attractive option for those wishing to undertake postgraduate research on a part-time basis, while pursuing legal practice or other employment.

LLM by Research in Legal Research

The LLM in Legal Research is an innovative programme designed to offer you the opportunity to undertake in-depth, guided study in an area in which you wish to specialise.

Through core, taught courses you will develop an understanding of the basics of legal research, legal scholarship and research methods, while the dissertation allows you to undertake a piece of supervised independent research in which to practice these skills. Your dissertation topic may be chosen from any of the Law School’s research fields in which we have supervisory expertise, including commercial law, criminal law and evidence, criminology, EU law, IP, media and technology law, international law, legal history and legal theory, medical law, private law, and public law.

You will take 80 credits worth of courses (semester-long courses are 20 credits and full-year courses are 40 credits), chosen from the wide selection offered by Edinburgh Law School.

This is supplemented by a 15,000-word independent dissertation, carried out under academic supervision, which forms the bulk of the programme.



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Conduct an independent research project in your chosen area of professional legal practice*, and top up your current qualification to an LLM in just six months to a year. Read more
Conduct an independent research project in your chosen area of professional legal practice*, and top up your current qualification to an LLM in just six months to a year. We’ll give you training in research skills that will prove invaluable in your future career, and a dedicated supervisor for advice and support.

Overview

If you’ve completed the Legal Practice Course or Bar Professional Training Course, or you’re a practising solicitor or barrister who has taken the former Law Society Final Examinations or BVC, this course will top up your qualification to an LLM Legal Practice.

If you’re an overseas lawyer then, subject to taking the Qualified Lawyers' Transfer Scheme (QLTS/QLTT) and/or gaining university accreditation of prior learning and experience, you could also be eligible to apply.

Our course lets you explore your chosen area of legal professional practice in depth. You could focus on part of your current professional practice, an area that you wish to work in, or one that’s of academic interest to you.* Whichever you choose, you'll develop your research skills over a four-day seminar series. You'll learn to interrogate hard-copy and electronic sources; create and conduct surveys, questionnaires and interviews; and write-up and present your research findings. You’ll then apply these skills when researching and writing a 15,000-word dissertation.

The research skills you develop on this course are in great demand by employers in the legal profession.

We have three study days on campus in Chelmsford, but at other times you'll work independently with support from a dedicated supervisor. Your supervisor will help you to develop your research proposal or hypothesis, discuss your methodology (including ethics clearance) and act as a mentor throughout your time with us.

Our staff have been recognised for the quality of their work. In 2014, the Government acknowledged our ‘world-leading’ research in its Research Excellence Framework.

Teaching times: two Fridays from 10am-4pm in semester 1; one Friday from 10am-1pm in semester 2.

*choice of topics subject to approval and availability of supervision within Anglia Law School.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/legal-practice-top-up

Careers

This course will give you an in-depth understanding of your chosen area of legal practice to use in your future career, and teach you vital research skills that are in great demand in the legal profession and beyond.

Assessment

You’ll demonstrate your understanding of your chosen research area through a 15,000-word dissertation, which you’ll normally submit by the end of March if you study full-time, or September if you study part-time.

Where you'll study

Whether you aim to work in the creative industries or the social sciences, the legal profession or public service, the Faculty of Arts, Law & Social Sciences will provide you with the skills and knowledge you need for professional life.

Our lively, diverse community and ambitious academic environment will broaden your horizons and help you develop your full potential - many of our courses give you the chance to learn another language, study abroad or undertake work placements as you study.

If you’re interested in art, music, drama or film, check out our packed programme of events. Together with our partners in the creative and cultural industries, we’re always working to enrich the cultural life of the university and the wider community.

Our research is groundbreaking and internationally recognised, with real social impact. We support the Cultures of the Digital Economy Research Institute (CoDE), whose projects include interactive music apps and documenting lifesaving childbirth procedures, as well as nine international research clusters, such as the Centre for Children's Book Studies and the Labour History Research Unit.

In the Research Excellence Framework 2014, six of our subject areas were awarded world-leading status: Law; Art and Design; English Language and Literature, Communication, Cultural and Media Studies; History; Music, Drama, Dance and Performing Arts.

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This MA is unique in combining the study of Buddhism, Buddhist art, and the techniques and conservation of Buddhist art. Offered by The Robert H. Read more
This MA is unique in combining the study of Buddhism, Buddhist art, and the techniques and conservation of Buddhist art. Offered by The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Art and Conservation at The Courtauld, the MA was established as a one-year degree in 2013. In order to build on and expand the strengths of the programme, the MA is changing in 2017 to a two-year degree taught in collaboration with SOAS.

The MA now brings together world-famous institutions: The Courtauld for the study of art history and conservation, and SOAS for the study of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Drawing on the unique strengths of the two institutions and their exceptional faculties, the new curriculum of the MA provides detailed and systematic teaching over two years. Each discipline is introduced, expanded and integrated to allow students to obtain the best possible learning experiences and skills acquisition. Designed to provide increased specialisation over the two years, the course culminates in research and a substantial dissertation in the final months.

Offered once every two years, applications are now invited for the programme beginning autumn 2017. Taught by a wide range of specialists from both The Courtauld and SOAS, the MA also benefits from teaching by visiting experts. The course includes study trips to museums in the UK and Europe, and a longer study trip to India to develop an appreciation of Buddhist art in its original contexts. Students also benefit from conferences and public events regularly held by the Ho Centre at The Courtauld.

Drawing also on the research and conservation work undertaken by The Courtauld’s Conservation of Wall Painting Department in Bhutan, China and India, this MA is specifically designed to equip students with knowledge of:

‌•the central concepts of Buddhism, and their historical diffusion;
‌•the history of Buddhist art in its various religious, social and cultural contexts;
‌•the materials and techniques involved in the making of various types of Buddhist art;
‌•approaches to the conservation of Buddhist art, including understanding of the ethical, technical and administrative issues involved.

This MA provides a comprehensive grounding in the history of Buddhism, Buddhist art and its conservation for those intending to pursue further specialist conservation education, and for those who wish to proceed into related fields such as art-historical research, curating, and site-management.

About eight students are accepted on the MA. Applicants from different academic and geographical backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Previous experience in any of the fields covered by the MA is not required.

Please Note: Plans are being made for the redevelopment of The Courtauld’s home at Somerset House. The project, called Courtauld Connects, will include the development of state-of-the-art teaching and research facilities. During the redevelopment the location of some teaching will move. Further information on Courtauld Connects will be published on The Courtauld’s website over the coming months.

Programme Structure

This two-year MA combining the study of Buddhism, Buddhist art, and the techniques and conservation of Buddhist art, is structured to provide increased specialisation during the course, with a substantial dissertation at the end. The programme consists of interwoven strands. Led by Professor David Park and Dr Giovanni Verri at The Courtauld, and by Dr Christian Luczanits and Dr Vincent Tournier at SOAS, it includes teaching by a wide range of specialists from both institutions and from elsewhere. Some strands will be taught at The Courtauld or on-site, while for others students will join classes at SOAS.

Year 1
The objectives of this year are to provide a grounding in the concepts of Buddhism and their historical diffusion; an appreciation of the chronological development, regional variations and major themes of Buddhist art; an understanding of the making of different types of Buddhist art, and of the ethical, legal and other issues underlying the conservation and display of Buddhist art; and an interdisciplinary exposure to the imagining and presentation of Buddhas and their achievements in South Asia, juxtaposing the textual perspective with what is communicated through imagery. The formal teaching is reinforced through a study trip in the second term to museums in Paris or elsewhere in Europe, and in the third term by a longer study trip to India.

‌•Strand 1: Critical Concepts in Buddhist Studies Convenor: Vincent Tournier (SOAS) This course is designed to provide a broad understanding of the major processes and dynamics at work in the growth and development of Buddhism as a pan-Asian religion, and with the key methodological tools required to approach this major cultural force in its fascinating diversity.

•Strand 2: History of Buddhist Art Convenors: David Park (The Courtauld) & Christian Luczanits (SOAS) This course provides an overview of Buddhist art with regard to its chronological development, regional variations, major themes, and the multiplicity of different media. Buddhist art in collections will also be studied, examining aspects of collecting and display.

•Strand 3: The Making of Buddhist Art, and Conservation Principles Convenor: Giovanni Verri (The Courtauld) This course provides an introduction to the making of Buddhist art from its origins. Primary sources and technical studies are used to understand the different types of materials employed. It will also provide an introduction to the principles, ethics and other issues underlying the conservation and display of Buddhist art.

•Strand 4: Imag(in)ing Buddahood in South Asia Convenors: Christian Luczanits & Vincent Tournier (SOAS) This course engages in an interdisciplinary manner with the central idea of Buddhism, as it developed within and beyond its South Asian cradle. Bringing together the expertise of an art historian and a historian of Buddhist thought, it will provide exposure to a diversity of approaches to textual, iconographic, and archaeological sources, to understand how Buddhas and their achievements were imagined, presented and encountered by Buddhist practitioners.

‌•Strand 5: Study trip to museums in Europe To examine Buddhist art in major museums in Paris or elsewhere, considering art-historical, technical and conservation aspects, as well as display and management issues.

•Strand 6: Fragile Inheritance: the Conservation of Buddhist Art Convenor: David Park (The Courtauld) To examine the measures directly involved in the preservation of Buddhist art in museums and in situ; and to examine particular major case studies in detail with regard to the legal, ethical, management, practical and other issues involved.

Year 2
Strand 6 continues in Year 2. More specialised teaching is introduced in a variety of areas: texts, and their relationship to Buddhist objects; the scientific examination and imaging of Buddhist art; and a choice of specialised courses in Buddhist studies and Buddhist art, allowing students to pursue particular interests and to assist in the choice of dissertation topic. The dissertation, undertaken over a period of fourteen weeks, should consider an aspect of the original techniques, conservation, management, curating, history or use of Buddhist art.

‌•Strand 6: Fragile Inheritance: the Conservation of Buddhist Art Continued from Year 1

•Strand 7: Texts on and around Buddhist objects Convenors: David Park (The Courtauld) & Vincent Tournier (SOAS) This course will

‌-explore the many ways by which texts inform, respond to, and accompany Buddhist objects across Asian societies. It will, in particular, -explore the Text-Image relationship, examining how textual and visual narratives respond to each other. It will introduce students to the methods of epigraphy and codicology, including the increasing use of imaging technologies.

‌•Strand 8: Analysis and Imaging of Buddhist Art Convenor: Giovanni Verri (The Courtauld) This course provides an introduction to methods of examination and analysis through the use of visual observations and scientific instruments, and an introduction to and basic instruction in the technical imaging of Buddhist art including multispectral imaging.

•Strand 9: Choice of one of the following specialised courses in Buddhist Studies and one in Buddhist Art at SOAS Students will select these courses in consultation with their tutors, on the basis of their previous background and career objectives; options will also depend on availability at SOAS. This further specialism will aid students in their choice of dissertation topic. Presentations and discussions at The
Courtauld will enable students to harmonise their experience.

Specialised Course in Buddhist Studies

-Buddhism in Tibet (Ulrich Pagel)
-Chinese Buddhism in the Pre-modern Period (Antonello Palumbo)
-East Asian Buddhist Thought (Lucia Dolce)
-The Buddhist Conquest of Central Asia (Ulrich Pagel)
-Specialised Course in Buddhist Art

-Buddhist and Hindu Art of the Maritime Silk Route (Peter Sharrock)
-Collecting and Curating Buddhist Art in the Museum (Louise Tythacott)
-Illustrated Manuscript Cultures of Southeast Asia (Anna Contadini & Farouk Yahya)
-Sacred Art and Architecture of Ancient Korea (Charlotte Horlyck)
-The Figure of the Buddha: Theory, Practice and the Making of Buddhist Art History (Ashley Thompson)
-Tibetan Buddhist Monuments in Context (Christian Luczanits)

‌•Strand 10: Dissertation: A major component of the MA is a 12,000-word dissertation, undertaken in the second and third terms of Year 2. The dissertation topic should focus on the original techniques, conservation, management, curating, history, or use of Buddhist art. Students are encouraged to design their research to reflect the interdisciplinary nature of the MA. Selection of the topic will be undertaken in the first term of Year 2 in consultation with course tutors, and will include assessment of the state of research, and production of an illustrated outline proposal with references.Topics have been varied; those of the previous one-year MA have included:

-19th– and early 20th-century copies and photographs of the Ajanta murals;
-narrative and biography in early Tibetan teacher portraits;
-tree and forest imagery in Buddhist Yamato-e handscroll paintings;
-technical study and investigation of Nagthangs;
-materials and techniques of red dyed gold from Southeast Asia;
-the influence of Tibetan Buddhism on Ming Imperial porcelains;
-examination and assessment of the environmental conditions of the Textile Museum of Bhutan.This range demonstrates the scope for students to research avenues that significantly develop their individual interests and skills, while also providing a contribution to the field.

Teaching Methods

Teaching methods and work required of the students are related to each strand and include:

‌•lectures: to impart factual information;
‌•seminars: to provide a forum for open discussion, and to allow assessment of the development of the individual student’s critical abilities;
‌•student seminars: to develop skills in gathering, organising and presenting a body of information, including visual material;
‌•essays: to develop skills in written communication and research methodology;
‌•reports: on the study trips;
‌•tutoring: to provide individual guidance, and to allow monitoring of the student’s progress.

How to Apply

Before starting your application, please ensure that you read and refer to the following three sets of information. Then access our Online Application System by selecting the relevant "Apply Now” link from the table of courses, below.

Follow this link for the information: http://courtauld.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-how-to-apply

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Who is it for?. Students come from leading institutions across the world and from a range of undergraduate disciplines including history, economics, English, and policy, philosophy and economics. Read more

Who is it for?

Students come from leading institutions across the world and from a range of undergraduate disciplines including history, economics, English, and policy, philosophy and economics. Students often know whether they want to become a barrister or work as a solicitor when they arrive, but some students use the programme as a means to make that decision. A significant proportion of our GDL students go on to become barristers.

Objectives

The City Law School’s Graduate Diploma in Law programme is nationally renowned. Since its inception in 1977, it has trained students at an extremely rigorous level, covering the seven core foundation subjects that are prerequisites for progression to professional legal training.

The programme is unique in that it introduces students to legal ethics as well as covering the core content. Students are encouraged to think about their reasons for practising law, and how they will find value in practice. The course has also been designed to be accessible and student-focused; at The City Law School we welcome students’ questions and offer significant one-to-one support.

From Martha Spurrier, Director of Liberty, to Dinah Rose, the QC Barrister who helped Julian Assange fight his extradition from the UK to Sweden, our alumni set the benchmark for legal practice across the world. Our academic team is also globally renowned and includes Professor Panos Koutrakos, the Jean Monnet Professor of European Law and Joint Editor of European Law Review, and Professor Martin Dixon, Specialist in Land Law from Queens’ College Cambridge.

Accreditation

The seven modules are prescribed by two external bodies which have jurisdiction over the course - the Solicitors Regulation Authority and the Bar Standards Board.

Placements

Placements are not a formal requirement of the programme, but gaining experience of legal practice is encouraged. If students secure a mini pupillage, (a week in chambers), we support this use of their time.

Academic facilities

As a City Law School student you will benefit from everything City has to offer including the Learning Success department and Lawbore, an online resource designed to help you find the information you need for the course modules.

The City Law School has its own dedicated administration team and you also have access to two legal libraries, one at the Gray’s Inn campus and the other based on site at our Northampton Square campus.

Within the Gray’s Inn library you will find rooms for group study sessions and rooms for recording demo advocacy sessions.

As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

The seven foundation subjects and additional legal ethics course are taught over one year by lectures and tutorials which occupy around 16 hours each week. Every week you will attend a two-hour lecture in six of the seven foundation subjects (Contract law lectures are in an online format) and a tutorial in each subject every fortnight.

In addition to The City Law School's own lecturers, you will also be taught by visiting lecturers from other prestigious institutions, including Cambridge and Oxford. There will also be time for personal study to prepare for lectures and tutorials. Instruction in the use of legal materials and in legal research methods (including use of electronic retrieval systems) is also an integral part of the course. The City Law School's award-winning Lawbore website also offers an online portal of resources from a legal link directory to a careers and alumni blog.

Assessment

Formal assessment is based on written examinations held at the end of the course; formative coursework set throughout the year will help to prepare you for these examinations. You will be awarded City's Graduate Diploma in Law upon successful completion of coursework and examinations.

Opportunities

As a student at City, University of London you will have unlimited access to City's Careers, Student Development & Outreach service where dedicated careers advisors will provide you with tailored advice. Our strong links with the profession mean that we can bring the legal world to you.

Throughout the year we organise a variety of events, so you can build your network and meet representatives from leading solicitors’ firms and barristers’ chambers.

At The City Law School we run an annual internal mooting competition where you can act as a counsel to argue a point of law before a judge. Mooting is a great way to develop your research and analysis skills whilst also learning how to structure and present a legal argument.

Another way in which you can gain invaluable experience and develop your legal skills is to volunteer with one of our pro bono organisations. Pro bono work gives you an excellent opportunity to use your time and knowledge to offer legal advice to those who may otherwise not have access it.

Modules

In just one year, you will study the seven core foundation subjects that you would cover during a qualifying undergraduate law degree. The academic programme and examinations are of first-degree level with some elements of Masters level study, and involve work that is normally covered by undergraduates over at least 18 months. A strong emphasis is placed on developing your analytical and research skills to make sure you are fully prepared for practice.

Career prospects

By successfully completing this course students are qualified to progress to either of the two professional courses that all UK lawyers are required to take: the Legal Practice Course (LPC) for solicitors and the Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC) for barristers.

As a School we are ambitious for our students. You can progress to the LPC if you are looking to be a solicitor, or choose the BPTC if you see yourself working as a barrister. The School’s graduates are guaranteed a place on our LPC and we strongly advise you to apply for our BPTC.



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This Masters programme offers an interdisciplinary approach to studying the history of collecting and collections from an international perspective. Read more

This Masters programme offers an interdisciplinary approach to studying the history of collecting and collections from an international perspective. In particular, it focuses on the trajectory of artefacts through time and space and their historical legacy. Subjects covered include methodological approaches and legal issues relating to provenance and restitution, illegal trafficking of cultural objects, connoisseurship, taste, the patterns of collecting and viewing both private and public and the politics of display. The programme will move the collective debate beyond the usual focus on the Western tradition.

Why this programme

  • This programme is unique to Scotland and the UK as it combines aspects of art history and law and places them in a broad international context.
  • You will learn from world-leading researchers and develop expert knowledge in this specialised area of art history.
  • Glasgow’s civic and university collections are some of the richest and most diverse in Europe and are of international standing. The University’s own Hunterian Museum and Art gallery is the oldest public museum in Scotland and has extensive holdings covering fine art, geology, anatomy and the history of medicine. The new facilities at Kelvin Hall support object-based study as a number of courses will include handling sessions of the objects in the collections.
  • Work placement opportunities are offered within the programme on a competitive basis. In addition to Scottish institutions, work placements take place in the Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C.
  • Our research forum provides you with a lively and stimulating introduction to methodological debates within art history. It provides a sense of art history’s own history as well as contemporary concerns and practice, examining the beliefs and values that have informed various forms of historical and visual analysis and enquiry. It is focused around a series of seminars or workshops run by members of staff and visiting academics.

Programme structure

The programme structure comprises of four core courses and a dissertation (these are compulsory). In addition you can choose two optional courses, either from the ones provided within the programme or from available courses across the College of Arts.

The dissertation (15,000 words in length, including footnotes but excluding bibliography) will be on a topic chosen in consultation with the tutors and programme convenors. You will also have an opportunity to take part in a field trip.

The learning and teaching approaches covered in the programme include: lectures (built around case studies), seminars and discussions (supported by relevant published sources), handling sessions and supervision.

Career prospects

This Masters programme is intended to provide you with a strong foundation from which to embark upon a career in the visual arts, the art market, museums and galleries, heritage and historic properties.

Graduates have gone on to hold positions in museums and galleries (both public and private) in Scotland and elsewhere in the UK and have, more broadly, entered the commercial, cultural and heritage sectors in a number of roles. The programme also provides an excellent platform for you to move into PhD studies and an academic career.



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Our MSc / PGDip in Social Science Research Methods aims to provide advanced training in research methods across the full range of the social sciences. Read more
Our MSc / PGDip in Social Science Research Methods aims to provide advanced training in research methods across the full range of the social sciences.

You will be provided with a thorough theoretical and practical knowledge of how to construct effective research studies, of the variety of data collection methods available to the social scientist and of the principal methods of analysing social scientific data. You will also be introduced to the political and ethical frameworks within which social science research is conducted, and to some of the ways in which the results of social science research are disseminated.

The course pathways have ESRC recognition and they each provide the appropriate training basis for proceeding to a PhD. These programmes provide extensive opportunities for interdisciplinary study, the application of social research expertise for occupational career development, and the pursuit of substantive areas of interest at postgraduate level. 

Socio-legal studies pathway:

The School of Law and Politics has a well established reputation for outstanding research across the range of legal studies which makes a vital contribution to scholarship and the development of the law. The 2014 Research Excellence Framework recognised the School as a leading legal research institution, with most activity classed as world-leading or internationally excellent.

This pathway builds on our long established reputation for scholarship in the area of socio-legal studies is focused on the newly established Centre for Law and Society and the Journal of Law and Society which the School founded and has hosted for almost 40 years. It is enriched by extensive collaboration with the Department of Politics and International Relations, as well as other Schools in the University and beyond.  

Structure

• PGDip:

The course can be completed in one year with full-time study or in two years by part-time study.

You will be required to complete six 20-credit modules - five core research modules and one specialist pathway module.

In all modules, you will have the opportunity to engage with literature and research relevant to your pathway.

For a list of modules for the FULL-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/social-science-research-methods-socio-legal-studies-pgdip

For a list of the modules for the PART-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/social-science-research-methods-socio-legal-studies-pgdip-part-time

• MSc:

The course can be completed in one year with full-time study or in three years by part-time study.

You will be required to complete six 20-credit modules - five core research modules and one specialist pathway module. In all modules you will have the opportunity to engage with literature and research relevant to your pathway.

On successful completion of the taught component, you will prepare a dissertation of a maximum 20,000 words. The 60-credit dissertation component requires independent study. You will choose your dissertation topic in agreement with your supervisor.

For a list of modules for the FULL-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/social-science-research-methods-socio-legal-studies-msc

For a list of the modules for the PART-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/social-science-research-methods-socio-legal-studies-msc-part-time

Teaching

Your programme will be made up of scheduled learning activities (including lectures, seminars, tutorials and practical sessions) and guided independent study.

You will be expected to actively engage in all the educational activities on your programme of study, to prepare for and attend all scheduled teaching activities, and continue your development as an independent and self-directed learner.

Career Prospects

This programme provides knowledge and expertise suitable for careers in research and development, business, market studies, public agencies at international, national and local levels, education, teaching and other public services work, and voluntary organisations.
It also provides appropriate training for proceeding to a PhD.

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Prepare for a legal career in international commerce with this LLM from Anglia Law School. Further your knowledge of the latest issues and case studies in commercial law, especially principles of international contracts related to commercial activities. Read more
Prepare for a legal career in international commerce with this LLM from Anglia Law School. Further your knowledge of the latest issues and case studies in commercial law, especially principles of international contracts related to commercial activities. You’ll be supported by research-active staff with backgrounds in professional practice, and work alongside students from around the world.

Overview

Our LLM course offers a combination of theory and practical application that's relevant to the demands of international commercial practice, and in particular the relationship between legal disciplines and commercial undertakings.

It will give you the necessary background and legal expertise to work in international commercial law, or a range of other intellectually demanding roles – or to pursue academic research at the highest level.

You’ll investigate areas like commercial contracts, transnational commercial law and dispute resolution, but will also have the chance to specialise in your own areas of interest, such as international governance or company law.

Throughout the course you’ll develop research skills vital both to your assignments and your future career. Our teaching team consists of professionally qualified legal practitioners as well as research-active academics; in 2014, the Government acknowledged our ‘world-leading’ law research*. You can be confident you’ll receive up-to-date advice career advice as well as the latest legal theory and case studies.

Here in Cambridge, you’ll study alongside students from all over the world, giving you first-hand experience of working in a global context. Our facilities include modern teaching rooms and a mock courtroom.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/international-commercial-law

Careers

This course will give you the legal skills and knowledge you need to work in an international legal practice, as well as related careers. It will allow you to demonstrate a highly developed ability to conduct legal or legally-related academic research – a skill that’s in great demand in the legal profession and others.

Our past students enjoy careers in international law firms, legal departments of international corporations, government departments and international agencies.

Modules

Core modules:
Commercial Contracts
Business Law in the Global Context
International Law Research
Dispute Resolution
Transnational Commercial Law
Major Research Project in International and European Business Law

Optional modules:
International Governance
Comparative Company Law

Assessment

You’ll show your progress through a combination of assessments, such as coursework in which you’ll develop a critical view on a current issue in the area you're studying, and presentations.

All students take our core modules, but please note that the availability of optional modules is subject to demand.

Where you'll study

Whether you aim to work in the creative industries or the social sciences, the legal profession or public service, the Faculty of Arts, Law & Social Sciences will provide you with the skills and knowledge you need for professional life.

Our lively, diverse community and ambitious academic environment will broaden your horizons and help you develop your full potential - many of our courses give you the chance to learn another language, study abroad or undertake work placements as you study.

If you’re interested in art, music, drama or film, check out our packed programme of events. Together with our partners in the creative and cultural industries, we’re always working to enrich the cultural life of the university and the wider community.

Our research is groundbreaking and internationally recognised, with real social impact. We support the Cultures of the Digital Economy Research Institute (CoDE), whose projects include interactive music apps and documenting lifesaving childbirth procedures, as well as nine international research clusters, such as the Centre for Children's Book Studies and the Labour History Research Unit.

In the Research Excellence Framework 2014, six of our subject areas were awarded world-leading status: Law; Art and Design; English Language and Literature, Communication, Cultural and Media Studies; History; Music, Drama, Dance and Performing Arts.

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The MA Gender Studies and Law at SOAS caters for students with a variety of backgrounds and objectives. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The MA Gender Studies and Law at SOAS caters for students with a variety of backgrounds and objectives:

- those coming from Women’s Studies or Gender Studies who wish to engage more deeply with gender theory in relation to regional specialisation and to connect this with legal knowledge, especially, but not exclusively, the societies of Asia, Africa and the Middle East;

- those coming from Asian, African or Middle Eastern Studies who wish to incorporate the study of gender and law into their own areas of expertise; and

- those having previously trained in particular disciplines, such as Anthropology, Comparative Literature, Cultural and Media Studies, History, Politics, Religious Studies, Sociology, Refugee/Diaspora Studies etc.

This programme provides:

- specialised research training in Gender Studies, in addition to focused study of feminist legal theories and a particular area of law. This pathway is suitable for students considering advanced postgraduate research in Gender Studies with a regional specialisation;

- a broad MA programme for students with some background in Women’s Studies, Gender Studies, and Area Studies etc. who wish to enhance their knowledge of gender in relation to cross-cultural legal issues;

- a special interest MA, which enables students to study gender issues in depth in relation to a particular regional or disciplinary specialisation alongside the acquisition of knowledge of feminist legal approaches and a study of a legal sub-discipline.

The MA Gender Studies and Law at SOAS is a unique programme, its principal aim being to re-focus issues prioritised in western Gender Studies and Legal Theory on the complex specificities of Asia, Africa and the Near and Middle East. Jointly housed by the Centre for Gender Studies and the School of Law, the programme offers the specialised study of gender and law in relation to the cultures of Asia, Africa and the Middle East, together with rigorous training in, and questioning of, contemporary gender theory. In terms of gender theory, it offers a solid foundation with sufficient breadth and depth to facilitate a range of specialist pathways. In terms of specialisation, it draws on the expertise of internationally recognised scholars of Asian, African and Middle Eastern Studies at SOAS.

Email:

Phone: 020 7898 4367

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/genderstudies/genderlaw/

Structure

Students take courses to the value of four units and complete a dissertation (which is also the assessment for the fourth course Feminist Legal Theory).

All students take the Preliminary course in law, legal reasoning and legal methods. This is a compulsory component which runs as an intensive two-week course in September, prior to the start of term.

All students take the compulsory core courses Gender Theory and the Study of Asia, Africa and the Middle East and Feminist Legal Theory (Dissertation). Further options include a wide range of gender and gender-related courses from a comprehensive list. Students also choose one Law option from the general MA in Law list (subject to course convenor approval).

Upon completion of coursework and written examinations in May/June, students will write a 10,000 word dissertation based on material acquired from Feminist Legal Theory.

- Programme Specification 15/16 (pdf; 175kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/genderstudies/genderlaw/file101845.pdf

Materials

Students will have access to a wealth of study resources available in the SOAS Library and in nearby institutions such as the British Library, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, University College London Library and Senate House Library.

Teaching & Learning

Courses are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

Each taught course has its own approved methods of assessment, designed to address the particular learning outcomes of that course. Assessment methods may include essays, weekly reaction papers, unseen, seen or take-home examinations, research projects, individual or group presentations, translations, learning journals, oral examinations etc., as appropriate.

Students are also required to attend regular seminars organised by the Centre for Gender Studies, details of which are included in the handbook and further details of which are advertised on the Centre’s website and notice board.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Gain theoretical and practical insights into law through an interdisciplinary approach to legal theory, systems, policymaking, history, and ethics. Read more
Gain theoretical and practical insights into law through an interdisciplinary approach to legal theory, systems, policymaking, history, and ethics.

KEY LEARNING OUTCOMES

Through the master’s degree in the field of legal studies you gain:
-An understanding of the impact of legal issues on diverse fields and institutions.
-Deeper insight on how concepts of justice have evolved and how the law functions within diverse segments of society.
-Solid grounding in the rhetoric of legal discourse.

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

The degree includes nine courses—at least three taken on campus—and a thesis.

-Get started. You begin with three admission courses from the program curriculum. This is your opportunity to demonstrate your commitment and ability to perform well as a Harvard student
-Apply to the program. While you are completing your third admission course, you submit your application. We have application periods in the fall, spring, and summer.
-Continue your studies, online and on campus. As you progress through the program, you choose from courses offered on campus or online, in the fall, spring, or summer. To fully experience Harvard, you take at least three courses on campus as part of your degree.
-Complete your thesis. Working with a thesis director, you conduct in-depth research on a topic relevant to your work experience or academic interests, producing publishable quality results. You’ll emerge with a solid understanding of how research is executed and communicated.
-Graduate with your Harvard degree. You participate in the annual Harvard Commencement, receiving your Harvard University degree: Master of Liberal Arts (ALM) in extension studies, field: Legal Studies.

COST

Affordability is core to our mission. Our 2016–17 graduate tuition is $2,550 per course; the total tuition cost of earning the graduate degree is approximately $25,500.

FINANCIAL SERVICES

The Student Financial Services staff can assist you in identifying funds that will help you meet the costs of your education. You can find more information here: http://www.extension.harvard.edu/tuition-enrollment/financial-aid

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