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Masters Degrees (Legal History)

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Programme draws on academic activities organised by the Forum for Legal and Historical Research at Reading. Combination of skills-focused training, guided research and writing. Read more
  • Programme draws on academic activities organised by the Forum for Legal and Historical Research at Reading
  • Combination of skills-focused training, guided research and writing
  • Emphasis on independent research
  • Suitable for those considering legal practice or a PhD
  • Studied part-time, will benefit researchers and practitioners wishing to develop their knowledge and skills in new directions

What will you study?

Sample modules:

  • Archival internship
  • Research seminar presentation
  • History and the management of an archive
  • Sourcing the past
  • Research dissertation

Please note that all modules are subject to change. Please see our modules disclaimer for more information.

What career can you have?

A postgraduate law degree will open many doors for you, not only in specialised areas of employment, such as law firms, European and intergovernmental and non-governmental organisations (NGOs), but also in academia (with further postgraduate study), the media (journalism and broadcasting), the civil service, and other branches of public service.

Graduates from our LLM programmes have gone on to work for a range of national and international law firms, as lawyers and as in-house legal counsel for large multinational companies in the UK and abroad, as well as international organisations and NGOs.



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The MA in Queer History is a pioneering programme in one of the most exciting areas of historical enquiry, giving a voice to those who throughout much of history have been denied one. Read more

The MA in Queer History is a pioneering programme in one of the most exciting areas of historical enquiry, giving a voice to those who throughout much of history have been denied one.

This MA provides a comprehensive introduction to the themes and methods of Queer History as well as laying a solid foundation in general historical study. It offers a first-rate overview of important thought and methods from the fields of queer theory as well as the histories of gender and the body and sexuality.

This programme aims to historicise often binary categories, such as male/female, heterosexuality/homosexuality, active/passive, and uncover the processes through which these categories came to be seen as ‘natural’. It further pays close attention to questions of power, including how sexual orientation and race throughout history have often become interlinked in asymmetrical, oppressive ways.

Students conclude the programme with a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic of their own choice. The dissertation research is aided by access to the shared library and archival resources of the wider University of London and the city of London, one of the world’s queer capitals. Goldsmiths aims to build the Archive of Queer Life Histories and involve MA students in this process.

Modules & structure

The emphasis of the MA is in the Early Modern and Modern periods. Both the Western invention of ‘homosexuality’ in the 1860s and the emancipatory movements, especially of the post-1969, post-Stonewall period, figure prominently.

You will take 3 core modules, as well as optional modules to the value of 60 credits.

Core modules

Optional modules

Skills & careers

The programme will build skills in data gathering and analysis as well as effective written and spoken communication to prepare students for jobs in diversity administration in private business, government, National Government Organisations, the education sector and legal professions.

As opposed to primarily theory-oriented subjects the programme will lay a solid empirical foundation in queer history, arguably the best possible basis for sexual diversity jobs.



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Master the theory and practice of international business law. Further your knowledge of the latest legal issues, and develop advanced analytic and research skills for work in international law firms or other high-level international careers. Read more

Master the theory and practice of international business law. Further your knowledge of the latest legal issues, and develop advanced analytic and research skills for work in international law firms or other high-level international careers.

Overview

  • Master advanced international law in the English language, alongside legal practitioners from diverse jurisdictions and backgrounds
  • Benefit from small classes: receive close support and form lifelong friendships
  • Study at the centre of Cambridge’s legal quarter, halfway between the crown count and county court
  • Join a Law School with satisfied students: our law undergraduates were the UK’s most satisfied in 2015 and 2016*
  • Volunteer for our Law Clinic: put legal theory into practice by helping members of the public
  • Get first-hand advice and guidance from a professional on our mentoring scheme
  • Receive access to the University of Cambridge’s Squire Law Library

The Complete University Guide 2015 and The Times and Sunday Times University League Table 2016

Develop your legal skills to an advanced level

On our LLM International Business Law, you will develop the necessary skills to critically appraise how international laws are created and enforced. Your legal reasoning, critical analysis, research skills and independent judgement will all be exercised as you learn to apply legal discourse to the regulation of transnational business.

Learn the fundamental themes, and specialise

Our core modules will introduce you to the fundamental themes in the higher study of international trade law, and allow you to examine, and critically reflect upon, the choices businesses must make about the methods of resolving commercial disputes. On our optional modules, you can specialise in areas such as competition law in the international context, corporate governance, or comparative company law.

At the end of the course, you will use all the skills and knowledge you have learned to research and complete a Major Project in the area of international business law that most interests you, under expert supervision.

Benefit from small classes

All of our modules involve small group seminar work complemented by independent study, allowing you to tackle each issue one at a time and giving you a clear distinction between them. Our small classes will allow you to receive dedicated support from lecturers and form close friendships with your fellow students.

Get support from diverse experts

Throughout the course, you will receive support and advice from dedicated staff who are expert in their fields. These include Course Leader Tom Serby and Dr Sarita Patil-Woolhouse (both of whom practised as commercial lawyers in the City of London after graduating from the University of Cambridge); Dr Ana Keglević Steffek (an author of leading texts on commercial law) and Professor Rohan Kariyawasam (Harvard Fulbright scholar, and member of E15 consultancy group on the China belt road project).

Master international law in the English language

English Law provides the basis for many legal traditions and principles worldwide, particularly in America and Commonwealth countries such as India, Malaysia and Nigeria. Studying International Law in the English Language will give you a unique insight into how the grammar of law was shaped, as well as advanced skills in a language used all over the world.

Course Leader: Tom Serby

Careers

Transferable skills

Our LLM will help you develop professional skills including logical reasoning, critical analysis, research and independent judgement, along with an understanding of the complex interplay between infrastructure, content, competition, social policy, punishment and trade in the international arena, and a greater capacity for legal communication.

These skills will prepare you for international practice and academic research at the highest level, but are also transferable to a range of other intellectually demanding roles, such as legal departments of international corporations, government departments and other international agencies.

Employability events and opportunities

Volunteer for our Law Clinic and practise your legal skills in a real-life setting. Work alongside local solicitors, providing pro bono advice to people who have limited access to legal resources.

Join our mentoring scheme: partner with a professional from a regional law firm to get first-hand advice and guidance.

Our employability service also organise many focused events, such as careers fairs specifically for law students.

Access to legal resources

Cambridge has three courts, all close to ARU’s campus, where you can attend cases relevant to your studies: the Cambridgeshire Magistrates CourtCambridge Crown Court and Cambridge County and Family Court. The benefits of attending court cases for law students have been outlined in a recent Guardian article.

You can receive access to the University of Cambridge’s world-renowned Squire Law Library, where you will find resources including rare antiquarian legal history materials, a historical Labour Law collection and numerous old editions of prominent legal texts.

Access our own extensive library facilities on-campus, including an online digital library. All our LLM students receive a two-hour session with a dedicated Law School Librarian during Semester One and Semester Two. This will introduce you to research skills, and is carried through into the Research module.

Extracurricular law activities

Join our Law Society and take part in national competitions including mooting and Client Interviewing (won by ARU a record six times), or contribute to our Anglia Law Review. Mooting and Client Interviewing will further develop many of your transferable skills, including teamworking, public speaking, research and analysis, listening and responding, creative thinking and empathy.



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Master the theory and practice of international commercial law. Further your knowledge of the principles of international contracts relating to commercial activities, and develop advanced analytic and research skills for work in international legal practice or other high-level international careers. Read more

Master the theory and practice of international commercial law. Further your knowledge of the principles of international contracts relating to commercial activities, and develop advanced analytic and research skills for work in international legal practice or other high-level international careers.

  • Master advanced international law in the English language, alongside legal practitioners from diverse jurisdictions and backgrounds
  • Benefit from small classes: receive close support and form lifelong friendships
  • Study at the centre of Cambridge’s legal quarter, halfway between the crown count and county court
  • Join a Law School with satisfied students: our law undergraduates were the UK’s most satisfied in 2015 and 2016*
  • Volunteer for our Law Clinic: put legal theory into practice by helping members of the public
  • Get first-hand advice and guidance from a professional on our mentoring scheme
  • Receive access to the University of Cambridge’s Squire Law Library

The Complete University Guide 2015 and The Times and Sunday Times University League Table 2016

Develop your legal skills to an advanced level

On our LLM International Commercial Law, you will develop the necessary skills to critically appraise how laws relating to international commercial practice are created and enforced. Your legal reasoning, critical analysis, research skills and independent judgement will all be exercised as you learn to apply legal discourse to the regulation of commercial undertakings.

Learn the fundamental themes, and specialise

Our core modules will introduce you to the fundamental themes in the higher study of international commercial law, such as commercial contracts, transnational commercial law and international commercial arbitration. On our optional modules, you can choose to study either corporate governance or comparative company law.

At the end of the course, you will use all the skills and knowledge you have learned to research and complete a Major Project in the area of international commercial law that most interests you, under expert supervision.

Benefit from small classes

All of our modules involve small group seminar work complemented by independent study, allowing you to tackle each issue one at a time and giving you a clear distinction between them. Our small classes will allow you to receive dedicated support from lecturers and form close friendships with your fellow students.

Get support from diverse experts

Throughout the course, you will receive support and advice from dedicated staff who are expert in their fields. These include Course Leader Tom Serby and Dr Sarita Patil-Woolhouse (both of whom practised as commercial lawyers in the City of London after graduating from the University of Cambridge); Dr Ana Keglević Steffek (an author of leading texts on commercial law) and Professor Rohan Kariyawasam (Harvard Fulbright scholar, and member of E15 consultancy group on the China belt road project).

Master international law in the English language

English Law provides the basis for many legal traditions and principles worldwide, particularly in America and Commonwealth countries such as India, Malaysia and Nigeria. Studying International Law in the English Language will give you a unique insight into how the grammar of law was shaped, as well as advanced skills in a language used all over the world.

Course Leader: Tom Serby

Careers

Transferable skills

Our LLM will help you develop professional skills including logical reasoning, critical analysis, research and independent judgement, along with an understanding of the complex interplay between infrastructure, content, competition, social policy, punishment and trade in the international arena, and a greater capacity for legal communication.

These skills will prepare you for international practice and academic research at the highest level, but are also transferable to a range of other intellectually demanding roles, such as legal departments of international corporations, government departments and other international agencies.

Employability events and opportunities

Volunteer for our Law Clinic and practise your legal skills in a real-life setting. Work alongside local solicitors, providing pro bono advice to people who have limited access to legal resources.

Join our mentoring scheme: partner with a professional from a regional law firm to get first-hand advice and guidance.

Our employability service also organise many focused events, such as careers fairs specifically for law students.

Access to legal resources

Cambridge has three courts, all close to ARU’s campus, where you can attend cases relevant to your studies: the Cambridgeshire Magistrates CourtCambridge Crown Court and Cambridge County and Family Court. The benefits of attending court cases for law students have been outlined in a recent Guardian article.

You can receive access to the University of Cambridge’s world-renowned Squire Law Library, where you will find resources including rare antiquarian legal history materials, a historical Labour Law collection and numerous old editions of prominent legal texts.

Access our own extensive library facilities on-campus, including an online digital library. All our LLM students receive a two-hour session with a dedicated Law School Librarian during Semester One and Semester Two. This will introduce you to research skills, and is carried through into the Research module.

Extracurricular law activities

Join our Law Society and take part in national competitions including mooting and Client Interviewing (won by ARU a record six times), or contribute to our Anglia Law Review. Mooting and Client Interviewing will further develop many of your transferable skills, including teamworking, public speaking, research and analysis, listening and responding, creative thinking and empathy.



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The Law School has over 30 academic staff and offers supervision across the full range of legal subjects and approaches. See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/. Read more

Research Degrees (MPhil/PhD)

The Law School has over 30 academic staff and offers supervision across the full range of legal subjects and approaches.

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/

Your studies

The Law School has over 30 academic staff and offers supervision across the full range of legal subjects and approaches.
Particular strengths include: Commercial Law; Criminal Law; Criminal Justice and Criminology; European Law; Public Law, and Legal History. The doctoral programme in law is a structured programme requiring completion of a minimum number of taught modules and of research leading to the completion of a thesis.
These modules include a compulsory course Introduction to Advanced Research in Law, and optional courses in qualitative and quantitative research methods, substantive areas of law and in other areas where skills may be required, for example languages or economics.
Students are assigned to a main supervisor before arrival, who is supported by a team of two other members of academic staff with expertise in the field of research.
Coming to UCD Sutherland School of Law creates the possibility of expert supervision by leading researchers in a wide variety of fields. We have the largest group of academic lawyers in Ireland and leading researchers of high international standing across many of the main fields of law including European Union law, commercial law, criminology, criminal justice and criminal law, constitutional law and governance, human rights, legal history and private law.

Academic Profile

Ian O’Donnell ia a Professor of Criminology in UCD. He is Ireland’s foremost expert and commentator in his field. Ian has carried out active research in criminology, and published widely on the subject.
His new co-authored book is: Coercive Confinement in Ireland: Patients, Prisoners and Penitents Patients, Prisoners and Penitents.

Ian o’Donnell
Professor of Criminology, UCD

Scholarships

The University and UCD Sutherland School of Law have a list of scholarships that are open to Irish, EU and International applicants.
For further information please see http://www.ucd.ie/scholarships
International students may wish to visit: http://www.ucd.ie/international

Why you should choose UCD

In the state-of-the-art UCD Sutherland School of Law, graduate students engage in advanced study with internationally renowned specialists to develop the transformative potential of law.

The School is ranked by the authoritative QS World University Rankings as Ireland's number one law school and amongst the world's 100 leading law schools. Students benefit from the School’s strong links with university partners; businesses; NGOs; and, domestic, EU and international governments.
We place particular emphasis on the quality and breadth of our graduate programmes across Diploma, Masters and Doctoral levels. Our graduate degrees are available on a full-time or part-time basis, beginning in either January or September.
We also offer part-time Diploma programmes and single subject certificates with the possibility of securing CPD points and building study up to achieve diploma or masters awards.

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The PGDip/MLitt in Legal and Constitutional Studies is an interdisciplinary programme run jointly by the Schools of History and International Relations. Read more

The PGDip/MLitt in Legal and Constitutional Studies is an interdisciplinary programme run jointly by the Schools of History and International Relations.

Highlights

  • Students have the opportunity to work on an individual and small-group basis with internationally leading scholars in the fields of legal, constitutional and historical research.
  • The flexible nature of the programme makes it suitable both for those wishing to go on to doctoral research and for those wishing only to take a year’s specialist study.
  • The compulsory modules equip students with knowledge of different theoretical approaches to law, legal history and constitutionalism, using the past to interrogate and investigate current issues and controversies.

Teaching format

Over two semesters, students take six modules taught through a range of group seminars, workshops, one-to-one discussion and supervised independent research projects. The specialist modules are designed to be flexible enough to enable students to choose their own areas of in-depth study and include individually tailored research training and guidance. Module assessment comprises coursework; there are no final exams for this programme. 

MLitt students will research and write a 15,000-word dissertation as their final assessment piece.

Further particulars regarding curriculum development.

Modules

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



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Master the theory and practice of international law, both private and public. Develop advanced analytic and research skills for professional practice and other high-level international careers. Read more

Master the theory and practice of international law, both private and public. Develop advanced analytic and research skills for professional practice and other high-level international careers.

  • Master advanced international law in the English language, alongside legal practitioners from diverse jurisdictions and backgrounds
  • Benefit from small classes: receive close support and form lifelong friendships
  • Study at the centre of Cambridge’s legal quarter, halfway between the crown count and county court
  • Join a Law School with satisfied students: our law undergraduates were the UK’s most satisfied in 2015 and 2016*
  • Volunteer for our Law Clinic: put legal theory into practice by helping members of the public
  • Get first-hand advice and guidance from a professional on our mentoring scheme
  • Receive access to the University of Cambridge’s Squire Law Library

*The Complete University Guide 2015 and The Times and Sunday Times University League Table 2016

Develop your legal skills to an advanced level

On our LLM International Law, you will develop the necessary skills to critically appraise how international laws are created and enforced. Your legal reasoning, critical analysis, research skills and independent judgement will all be exercised as you learn to apply legal discourse to the regulation of transnational commercial, political and social interactions.

Learn the fundamental themes, and specialise

Our core modules will introduce you to the fundamental themes in the higher study of international law, the key principles of private and public international law, and an overview of international human rights and criminal law. On our optional modules, you can specialise in areas such as legal frameworks for media industries, synergies between European and international law, or more traditional topics such as comparative company law and international arbitration.

At the end of the course, you will use all the skills and knowledge you have learned to research and complete a Major Project in the area of international law that most interests you, under expert supervision.

Benefit from small classes

All of our modules involve small group seminar work complemented by independent study, allowing you to tackle each issue one at a time and giving you a clear distinction between them. Our small classes will allow you to receive dedicated support from lecturers and form close friendships with your fellow students.

Get support from diverse experts

Throughout the course, you will receive support and advice from dedicated staff who are expert in their fields. These include Course Leader Tom Serby and Dr Sarita Patil-Woolhouse (both of whom practised as commercial lawyers in the City of London after graduating from the University of Cambridge); Dr Ana Keglević Steffek(an author of leading texts on commercial law) and Professor Rohan Kariyawasam (Harvard Fulbright scholar, and member of E15 consultancy group on the China belt road project).

Course Leader: Tom Serby

Careers

Transferable skills

Our LLM will help you develop professional skills including logical reasoning, critical analysis, research and independent judgement, along with an understanding of the complex interplay between infrastructure, content, competition, social policy, punishment and trade in the international arena, and a greater capacity for legal communication.

These skills will prepare you for international practice and academic research at the highest level, but are also transferable to a range of other intellectually demanding roles, such as working for international NGOs and other agencies, or public service.

Employability events and opportunities

Volunteer for our Law Clinic and practise your legal skills in a real-life setting. Work alongside local solicitors, providing pro bono advice to people who have limited access to legal resources.

Join our mentoring scheme: partner with a professional from a regional law firm to get first-hand advice and guidance.

Our employability service also organise many focused events, such as careers fairs specifically for law students.

Access to legal resources

Cambridge has three courts, all close to ARU’s campus, where you can attend cases relevant to your studies: the Cambridgeshire Magistrates CourtCambridge Crown Court and Cambridge County and Family Court. The benefits of attending court cases for law students have been outlined in a recent Guardian article.

You can receive access to the University of Cambridge’s world-renowned Squire Law Library, where you will find resources including rare antiquarian legal history materials, a historical Labour Law collection and numerous old editions of prominent legal texts.

Access our own extensive library facilities on-campus, including an online digital library. All our LLM students receive a two-hour session with a dedicated Law School Librarian during Semester One and Semester Two. This will introduce you to research skills, and is carried through into the Research module.

Extracurricular law activities

Join our Law Society and take part in national competitions including mooting and Client Interviewing (won by ARU a record six times), or contribute to our Anglia Law Review. Mooting and Client Interviewing will further develop many of your transferable skills, including teamworking, public speaking, research and analysis, listening and responding, creative thinking and empathy.



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Develop your understanding of history and of the nature of historical research with this flexible course that encourages you to develop as independent researcher. Read more
Develop your understanding of history and of the nature of historical research with this flexible course that encourages you to develop as independent researcher.

Course overview

The MA Historical Research is for students who want to develop their understanding of history and of the nature of historical research. It is a flexible course that will encourage you to develop as an independent researcher. You will be able to pursue your interests in history while discovering the ways in which historians work. You will also engage with the intellectual, practical and social facets of the profession.

Core modules emphasise the nature of the discipline or historical research, its evolution (History in the Past or Historians on History) and the preparatory work for independent research (The Profession of the Historian or the Dissertation Feasibility Study). These modules will give you the grounding needed to engage with your own research project in the dissertation module.

Design your MA studies according to your preferred methods of learning. If you prefer to work independently you may choose to opt for the Extended History Dissertation, whereas if you prefer more taught elements you can opt for the History Dissertation. This will allow you to place more or less emphasis on independent work and research. The Extended History Dissertation is a great opportunity for those wanting to move on to further research or who want to develop a career in which research is a key element. In both cases, the project will be negotiated with the teaching team to reflect both you and your lecturers’ research interests.

The course is designed to implement the research-led curriculum of the university in which you become involved in research through the guidance of research-active members of staff - all staff members on the teaching team are research active.

You will graduate with a firm grounding in the way history evolves through an understanding of the nature of the discipline in all its diversity and of the challenges it faces. This, combined with an engagement with a specific subject area, will foster a critical understanding of history, necessary for a wide range of careers in research, academia, law, journalism and the cultural sector.

Course content

The course mixes taught elements with independent research and self-directed study. There is flexibility to pursue personal interests in considerable depth, with guidance from Sunderland's supportive tutors.

Core module:
-History in the past (15 Credits)
-Historians on History (15 Credits)
-History in the past (15 Credits)
-Historians on History (15 Credits)
-Dissertation Feasibility study (30 Credits)
-The profession of the historian (15 Credits)
-The Profession of the historian (Symposium/Webinar) (15 Credits)

Dissertation modules:
-History Dissertation (60 Credits)
-Extended History Dissertation (90 Credits)

Optional modules (for students choosing the Dissertation module HISM40) would typically include:
-Suicide Until the Reformation
-Suicide Since the Reformation
-Law, Family and Community Relations 1550-1800
-Law, Treason and Rebellion 1550-1800
-Britain Between the Wars: The Changing Party System
-Britain Between the Wars: The Challenges of the Inter War Years
-Foundations of Liberty - Obedience and Resistance
-Foundations of liberty - Religious toleration
-Human Rights in History: Ideas and Movements
-Human Rights in History: Organizations, Activists and Campaigns
-Revolution in Science and Art 1870-1920
-Revolution in Science and Art 1870-1920

You will normally choose your options during the induction week when the full list of optional modules available that year will be presented to you. The number of optional modules offered will depend on the size of the cohort and the availability of staff. Not all options will be available every year. In any one academic year no more than three optional modules (3 x 15 credits) will be offered. Optional modules all run in Semester 2.

Facilities & location

The University of Sunderland has excellent facilities that have been boosted by multi-million pound redevelopments.

University Library Services
We’ve got thousands of books and e-books on topics related to history, with many more titles available through the inter-library loan service. We also subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date academic and industry articles.

Some of the most important sources for your course include:
-House of Commons Parliamentary Papers including bills, registers and journals
-Early English Books Online, which provides digital images of virtually every work printed in England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland and British North America during 1473-1800
-Eighteenth Century Collections Online, which provides 136,000 full-text publications from 1701-1800
-Periodicals Archive Online, which provides digitised literary journals
-Archival Sound Recordings with over 12,000 hours of recordings
-JSTOR (short for ‘Journal Storage’), which provides access to important journals across the humanities, social sciences and sciences
Lexis, which provides access to legal information as well as full-text newspaper articles
-Nineteenth Century British Library Newspapers, with full runs of 48 titles
-Screen Online (BFI), which is an online encyclopaedia of British film and television, featuring clips from the vast collections of the BFI National Archive
-SocINDEX with full-text articles, which is probably the world's most comprehensive and highest-quality sociology research database

Archives
The Murray Library at the University also contains the physical archive of the North East England Mining Archive and Resource Centre. This contains mining records, technical reports, trade union records and health & safety information.

IT provision
When it comes to IT provision you can take your pick from hundreds of PCs as well as Apple Macs in the David Goldman Informatics Centre and St Peter’s library. There are also free WiFi zones throughout the campus. If you have any problems, just ask the friendly helpdesk team.

Course location
The course is based at the Priestman Building on City Campus, just a few minutes from the main Murray Library and close to Sunderland city centre. It’s a very vibrant and supportive environment with excellent resources for teaching and learning.

Employment & careers

This course is relevant to a wide range of professions, highlighting as it does critical and analytical skills and an ability to develop and effectively advance an argument. A large number of transferable skills will be gained: research skills, writing skills, presentation skills, analytical and critical skills. These will be valuable in a huge range of careers and activities.

The course has been designed with employability in mind, with a focus on the way research skills can be transferred to the work place.

History by nature is a subject that includes a number of transferable skills such as critical thinking, collecting and analysing data critically, working independently and to a deadline, developing a coherent argument, writing, and oral skills. The QAA Subject Benchmark statement for History (December 2014) lists the some following (§3.3):
-Self discipline
-Independence of mind, and initiative
-A questioning disposition and the ability to formulate and pursue clearly defined questions and enquiries
-Ability to work with others, and to have respect for others' reasoned views
-Ability to gather, organise and deploy evidence, data and information; and familiarity with appropriate means of identifying, finding, retrieving, sorting and exchanging information
-Analytical ability, and the capacity to consider and solve problems, including complex problems to which there is no single solution
-Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of both oral and written expression
-Imaginative insight and creativity
-Awareness of ethical issues and responsibilities that arise from research into the past and the reuse of the research and writing of others

These transferable skills will be fostered through each module and particularly emphasised in core modules. Furthermore, the research skills module The profession of the historian Symposium/Webinar will involve the organisation of a mini symposium. You will be expected to engage with some of the administrative and practical skills involved in organising an academic event.

During the dissertation feasibility study, you will be expected to deliver papers to an audience of staff and peers, allowing you to practice your oral and presentational skills.

MA Historical Research graduates can expect to be employed in:
-Teaching
-Archives
-Libraries
-Museums
-Journalism
-Law

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The Master of Laws (LLM) programme provides an ideal opportunity for students to acquire or develop their expertise in specialist legal subject areas informed by world-class, research-led teaching. Read more

The Master of Laws (LLM) programme provides an ideal opportunity for students to acquire or develop their expertise in specialist legal subject areas informed by world-class, research-led teaching. An LLM is an ideal way to advance a career in law.

About this degree

Students are equipped with advanced academic legal skills and knowledge which can be applied in further study or careers in legal practice, public service or industry. They develop a knowledge and understanding of law in its context, the skills necessary for analysis of complex legal issues, and research expertise.

Students complete 180 credits (120 credits of taught modules and a 60-credit dissertation).

Full-time students complete all 180 credits in 12 months. Part-time students spread their credits over 2 years, or with flexible study, over 3-5 years.

Core modules

  • Independent Research Essay

Optional modules

We have over 70 modules on offer and specialist LLM degrees in a range of subject areas, including:

  • Comparative Law
  • Competition Law
  • Corporate Law
  • Criminal Justice, Family and Social Welfare
  • Energy Law
  • Environmental Law and Policy
  • European Union Law
  • Human Rights Law
  • Intellectual Property Law
  • International Banking and Finance Law
  • International Commercial Law
  • International Law
  • Jurisprudence and Legal Theory
  • Law and Economics
  • Legal History
  • Litigation and Dispute Resolution
  • Maritime Law
  • Public Law

In addition to Laws module options, students may select up to 30 credits of taught Master's modules from another UCL department, providing the modules form part of a coherent programme of study for the award of Master of Laws (LLM) and registration is approved by the relevant department.

Independent Research Essay

All students undertake a 12,000-word independent research essay (60 credits) on a self-selected topic of law.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, research exercises and guided self-study and research. Each module is supported by a dedicated webpage containing a syllabus, learning materials, reading lists and assessment information. Taught module assessment may be through unseen examinations, coursework essays, oral presentations or a combination of assessment formats, usually undertaken in term three. The 12,000 word independent research essay is submitted at the end of the programme.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Law LLM

Careers

Most graduates pursue a career in the legal profession. On completing the LLM some students choose to pursue a professional qualification in order to qualify as a solicitor or barrister. Our graduates go on to work in a wide range of areas, including for human rights organistations and corporate law firms, whilst others choose to remain in academia as researchers or lecturers. 

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Associate Lawyer, Linklaters
  • Barrister, Government of Antigua and Barbuda
  • Civil Servant, Cabinet Office
  • Competition Court Attorney Clerk, Competition Tribunal
  • PhD Law, University College London (UCL)

Employability

The LLM enables students to develop skills which are highly sought after. The programme teaches students to think critically, develop and deliver a cogent argument, research effectively and write for a legal audience.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL is one of the world's top universities. UCL Laws is based in the centre of London, embedded in the heart of the UK's elite legal community. UCL's LLM students are granted access to the renowned Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, which has its own extensive library.

UCL Laws has a remarkable teaching and research community. We are deeply committed to the quality and relevance of our graduate education. Students are taught by internationally renowned academics, at the cutting edge of their fields, and leading legal practitioners from major City firms.

Students joining from the 2018/19 academic year will experience studying in cutting-edge teaching and learning rooms and new social and common spaces following a £24 million two-year redevelopment of Bentham House.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Laws

84% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Prepare to become one of tomorrow's legal innovators in a rapidly changing world. Immigration. Copyright. Public Policy. All facets of our life—both domestically and globally—are impacted and shaped by the various aspects of law. Read more

Prepare to become one of tomorrow's legal innovators in a rapidly changing world.

Immigration. Copyright. Public Policy.

All facets of our life—both domestically and globally—are impacted and shaped by the various aspects of law. Learn how to become one of tomorrow's legal innovators in a rapidly changing and globalized world by taking courses in our Legal Studies major.

Join an elite cohort of students learning in a dynamic, experiential environment. You'll learn from professors who not only bring their years of experience to the classroom, but who also love to teach law. Study alongside U.S. undergraduate students who are also preparing for advanced studies in law. This unique program provides rich opportunities to study with domestic students and experience Northern California's diverse Bay Area culture.

The core curriculum focuses on U.S. law, entrepreneurship and legal change. Learn more about sample courses.

CURRICULUM

During your semester-long stay with us, you'll take two 4-unit Core Courses, a 4-unit elective from our general Legal Studies curriculum and a 1-unit course that introduces you to UC Berkeley and prepares you to be a successful student.

The Core Courses introduce you to the fundamentals of U.S. law, entrepreneurship and legal change.

Specialize your learning with an elective in business law, constitutional law, criminal law, immigration law, intellectual property law or international law. By taking an elective, you'll explore the broad impact of legal ideas and institutions through the lens of economics, history, philosophy, politics, psychology or sociology.

In each of your courses, you'll learn alongside domestic students, creating rich and vibrant conversations as you discuss each topic.

CORE COURSES

  • AMERICAN LAW AND LEGAL INSTITUTIONS
  • LAW, TECHNOLOGY AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP
  • HOW TO BERKELEY

ELECTIVES

  • FOUNDATIONS OF LEGAL STUDIES
  • THEORIES OF LAW AND SOCIETY
  • U.S. SUPREME COURT AND PUBLIC POLICY
  • PUNISHMENT, CULTURE AND SOCIETY
  • AMERICAN LEGAL AND CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY
  • PSYCHOLOGY OF DIVERSITY AND DISCRIMINATION IN AMERICAN LAW
  • IMMIGRATION AND CITIZENSHIP
  • LAW AND ECONOMICS II: GOVERNMENT AND REGULATION
  • INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS
  • COMPARATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL LAW: THE CASE OF ISRAEL
  • DEMOCRACY AND DIVERSITY
  • DATA PREDICTION AND LAW
  • GANDHI, LAW AND CIVIL RIGHTS
  • BASIC LEGAL VALUES
  • COMPARATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL LAW

* Courses subject to change.

THAT'S BERKELEY

Imagine yourself living in Berkeley, California, and learning from some of the most preeminent legal minds in the world.

You'll be spending a lot of time inside the classroom learning exciting new subjects and outside of the classroom studying. But we want to make sure that you have time to experience Berkeley and San Francisco Bay Area life to its fullest. Take advantage of various co-curricular activities for a fully immersive learning experience on the Berkeley campus.

Take part in activities such as:

  • Graduate school admission workshops
  • Cohort lunches
  • Immersive California trips
  • Visits from Bay Area and national private law firms and public-interest law organizations
  • Networking events hosted by Berkeley Pre-Law Society
  • Career-advising programs


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The Postgraduate Certificate in Family and Local History is an online distance learning course aimed at developing the skills needed to study family and local history. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Family and Local History is an online distance learning course aimed at developing the skills needed to study family and local history. The course helps you to identify and use archives and other resources which are an important and sometimes neglected aspect of researching family history. Archives will help you discover more about the world that your ancestors lived in.

Aims of the Programme

This programme teaches the skills and methodologies necessary to investigate the history of families and neighbourhoods within the wider context of social history.

The courses are online, easy to use and fully supported. You can do them wherever you live and can log onto the site at whatever time you wish to study. You will work your way through the courses with other students and will be able to discuss the topics on a discussion forum. Your tutor will provide support and guidance throughout.

If you want to go further with your family and local history research and to learn in a supportive, enjoyable and interactive environment, these courses are for you.

"Being able to take a program like this when one lives thousands of miles away from the school and fellow classmates is an incredible feeling. I have really enjoyed my time at Dundee."

This programme provides students with:
Skills in finding and interpreting archive sources for family and local history.
An understanding of how to read old handwriting and to recognise common forms of documents.
Knowledge of family history and archive websites and published sources that will help you with your research - for yourself or for others.
A thorough understanding of record types, the reasons for their creation, their location and the information they contain.
An expertise in finding, analysing and interpreting archival records for family and local history research.
An awareness of the historical context in which the records were created and used.
A knowledge of archival theory as it applies to research.
An understanding of the legal and ethical issues relating to research using archival records.

The course is available by distance learning to students off-campus, throughout the world.

Students study a series of core and optional modules which have full academic accreditation from the University of Dundee. The programme is delivered by distance learning via the University of Dundee's Virtual Learning Environment which ensures a supportive and interactive learning environment, with frequent contact between students and tutors.

Centre for Archive and Information Studies

The Centre for Archive and Information Studies (CAIS) is part of the University's Archive, Records Management and Museum Services (ARMMS) which is responsible for the care and development of the University's historical collections, the management of systems to control business records and compliance with information legislation across the University.

CAIS offers postgraduate and undergraduate distance learning programmes for information professionals and family and local historians, delivered in an interactive online environment and allowing flexible part time study.

CAIS also conducts a number of associated activities such as hosting a range of presentations, seminars and conferences, the attraction of external funding and occasional taught training courses in collaboration with experts in the field throughout the UK and beyond.

Course Content and Structure

Mlitt degree:

To qualify for the MLitt in Family and Local History, students must complete a total of 180 credits.
Compulsory modules total 40 credits:
Skills and sources for Family and Local History in Scotland or England - 20 credits
Scots or English Palaeography and Diplomatic - 20 credits
Students can then choose to study a selection of optional modules, to equal 80 credits.

The list of options can be found on the CAIS website. 20 credit modules last for 15 weeks, 10 credit modules last for 9 weeks. Finally, a dissertation of 18,000 words is completed (60 credits).

PG Certificate:
To qualify for the Certificate in Family and Local History, students must complete a total of 60 credits. Students must complete one of the following core modules, but they can elect to study both if they so desire:
Skills and Sources for Family and Local History in Scotland (20 credits)
Skills and Sources for Family and Local History in England (20 credits)
Students can then choose to study a selection of optional modules to complete their total of 60 credits.

Assessment

Essays/reports; contribution to module (through online tasks and discussion board debate), dissertation of 18,000 words for MLitt students.

Student Support

The programme is delivered by distance learning via the University of Dundee's web-based Virtual Learning Environment which ensures a supportive and interactive learning environment, with frequent contact between students and tutors. The VLE gives access to study materials, links to on-line journals, discussion boards and research guides. Module tutors provide regular feedback and support to the students.

Optional study days are available for some of the modules and optional student visits will be arranged.

Professional Accreditation

All CAIS programmes are accredited by the UK Archives and Records Association and The Records and Information Management (RIM) Professionals Australasia.

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Edinburgh Law School is renowned for its research excellence. We strive to produce work that has real-world reach and influence. Read more

Edinburgh Law School is renowned for its research excellence. We strive to produce work that has real-world reach and influence. Our postgraduate research body is key to the School’s research activities and we work hard to ensure that our research students are fully engaged with staff and projects across all our legal disciplines.

If you are considering following an academic research career, Edinburgh Law School can provide a supportive and inspiring environment to help you take your first steps towards carving out your own research specialism.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework we were ranked 4th in the UK for the breadth and quality of our research. We have research excellence in a vibrant range of fields, spanning an exciting spectrum of law, socio-legal studies and criminology.

LLM by Research programmes

LLM degrees by Research

The LLM by Research presents an excellent opportunity to focus on a period of dedicated research, and is a fantastic bridge to doctoral study. We offer two LLM by Research programmes:

LLM by Research in Law

As a student on this programme, you will consolidate and build on the legal research and writing skills you acquired during your undergraduate legal studies, by planning and completing a 30,000-word dissertation. You will work independently but under specialist academic supervision, within your chosen field of law.

The topic of your dissertation can be chosen from any of the School’s legal research fields in which we have supervisory expertise, including commercial law, criminal law and evidence, criminology, EU law, IP, media and technology law, international law, legal history and legal theory, medical law, private law, and public law.

The programme will enhance and develop your ability to manage and engage with both primary legal sources and academic literature on your chosen topic, present critical and engaged legal arguments, and maintain the coherence of those arguments over a substantial piece of written work.

The framework of the LLM by Research allows you time and intellectual space to work in your chosen field, and to refine and develop this initial phase of the project for future doctoral work.

The programme does not have formal coursework elements, other than initial training seminars alongside PhD students. This makes the LLM by Research a particularly attractive option for those wishing to undertake postgraduate research on a part-time basis, while pursuing legal practice or other employment.



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This programme gives you the opportunity to study ancient history at an advanced level, developing your interest in the ancient world and providing an excellent preparation for further graduate research. Read more

This programme gives you the opportunity to study ancient history at an advanced level, developing your interest in the ancient world and providing an excellent preparation for further graduate research.

Edinburgh is one of the leading centres in the UK for the study of ancient history, in the chronological, geographical and methodological scope of the research interests of our staff. The range and content of our courses reflect staff research strengths in Greek, Hellenistic, Roman and Late Antique topics. Greek and Latin language courses are always offered. Our particular strengths lie in the legal, institutional, social and economic history of the Greek and Roman worlds, as well as in political theory and practice, Hellenistic history, and late antique history.

As a student on this programme, you will develop your skills in critical thinking, clear writing and research, verbal presentation and critical analysis.

Programme structure

Most teaching takes place in small-group seminars and the programme is designed to allow both breadth of coverage and specialisation. The specialised compulsory course will provide you with the key methodological and practical skills required of researchers in all classical subjects, while the options offer a large degree of flexibility, allowing you to develop or consolidate your language skills and explore a diverse range of historical topics in depth. Independent research, in the form of a dissertation, forms a substantial component of the programme, challenging you to build on the material and approaches covered in the taught courses and develop your research skills.

You will complete one compulsory course and select a further three skills courses and an additional two options from a wide range on offer.

The compulsory course is:

  • Skills and Methods in Classics

Option courses previously offered include those listed below. Option courses change from year to year and those available when you start your studies may be different from those shown in the list:

  • Elementary Latin (PG) 1
  • Elementary Greek (PG) 1
  • Elementary Latin (PG) 2
  • Elementary Greek (PG) 2
  • Intermediate Latin (PG) 1
  • Intermediate Greek (PG) 1
  • Intermediate Latin (PG) 2
  • Intermediate Greek (PG) 2
  • A Period of Ancient History 1
  • A Period of Ancient History 2
  • A Topic in Late Antique and Byzantine History 1
  • The Hellenistic City
  • Constantinople: The History of a Medieval Megalopolis from * Constantine the Great to Suleyman the Magnificent
  • Archaeology of the Roman Economy
  • Classical Greek Sculpture
  • Space, Place and Time: the archaeology of built environments
  • Byzantine Archaeology: The archaeology of the Byzantine empire and its neighbours AD 500-850.
  • Conflict archaeology: materialities of violence
  • Bronze Age Civilisations of the Near East and Greece
  • Etruscan Italy, 1000 - 300 BC
  • Gallia from the Third Century BC to Augustus

Learning outcomes

  • considerable familiarity with many aspects of ancient history and the principal challenges, approaches and issues involved in their study
  • specialist understanding of the intellectual background of ancient history as a distinct discipline
  • development of existing reading/writing skills, through critical assessment of written work
  • advanced appreciation of a wide range of methodologies involved in evaluating and employing sources of ancient historical evidence, through participation in core course and assessed work
  • the option to further develop language skills (normally Greek and Latin), which can be acquired by instruction and assessed exercises
  • specialist understanding of at least one significant field of research in associated cultural history, developed and assessed through a 15,000-word dissertation.

Career opportunities

This programme can form the stepping stone to many career options,such as further academic research, museum and art curation, literary translation or analysis, education or public heritage. Recent graduates in Classics are now putting their skills to use as tutors, archivists, writers and conference coordinators for a range of employers including the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB).



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We are interested in hearing from students with research proposals covering all aspects of medieval and early modern history, life and culture. Read more
We are interested in hearing from students with research proposals covering all aspects of medieval and early modern history, life and culture.

Academic staff interests include: early modern material culture; late medieval art history; medieval and early modern religious history; Anglo-Saxon archaeology and liturgy; early modern politics; medieval and early modern drama; and textual editing.

At present, research topics include: the Reformation; visual and manuscript culture; community; the plays of John Lyly; medieval ecclesiastical architecture; female sexuality and transexuality; priory management; deviant and vernacular language; and kingship. You will be part of a vibrant and varied community of researchers from different disciplines.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/152/medieval-and-early-modern-studies

The Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMS)

We are an interdisciplinary centre for the study of Medieval and Early Modern periods. Our 28 teaching staff are drawn from English, History, Architecture, Classical & Archaeological Studies, History & Philosophy of Art, and the Canterbury Archaeological Trust.

MEMS offers a successful, interdisciplinary MA programme, which attracts students from across the world. A thriving community of enterprising, supportive graduate students study for research degrees and benefit from the Centre’s involvement in the prestigious EU-funded Erasmus Mundus doctoral programme, Text and Event in Early Modern Europe (TEEME). We have close relationships with Canterbury Cathedral and the Archaeological Trust, which allow our students access to a wide range of unique historical, literary and material evidence.

Study support

- Postgraduate resources

Canterbury Cathedral Archives and Library have unparalleled holdings of manuscripts and early printed books. Kent’s Templeman Library holds a good stock of facsimiles, scholarly editions, monographs and journals, and we are within easy reach of the British Library, The National Archives, and other London research libraries. There are good online computing facilities across campus and, in addition, our students have special access to postgraduate computer terminals and the postgraduate student room provided by the School of History.

The Centre runs a weekly research seminar, and special termly, public lectures to which we welcome distinguished speakers. These events are at the heart of the Centre’s activities. We also run a full programme of conferences and colloquia.

- Dynamic publishing culture

Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Historical Research; English Historical Review; Renaissance Studies; Medium Aevum; Transactions of the Royal Historical Society; and Studies in the Age of Chaucer.

- Researcher Development Programme

Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Research areas

The research interests of our staff cover areas as broad as: religion, ideas, material culture, theatre and performance culture, gender, economy, food and drink, legal history, war, visual culture, politics, architecture, history of books and manuscripts, environment and travel, art history, and literature.

Careers

The transferable skills gained from this postgraduate programme are enhanced by the University of Kent’s employability initiative and careers advice service. Many of our recent graduates have gone on to careers in heritage, museum or archivist work. Some go on to pursue research in the area, many continuing with PhDs at Kent or other higher education institutions.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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LLB Law. Senior Status degree is ideal for non-law graduates outside the UK to gain a qualifying law degree in two years. . As a LLB Law (Senior Status Degree) student you will. Read more

LLB Law: Senior Status degree is ideal for non-law graduates outside the UK to gain a qualifying law degree in two years. 

As a LLB Law (Senior Status Degree) student you will:

  • Gain a sound grounding in the Law of England and Wales
  • Learn how to apply legal concepts in a practical environment
  • Gain transferable skills, including team working, communication, presentation, problem-solving, research and analytical skills

Key Features of the LLB Law (Senior Status Degree) 

  • Graduates achieve an LLB accredited Law degree
  • This course covers all the compulsory foundation modules required for a qualifying law degree

Choosing law will enable you to expand your intellectual skills in the context of a discipline which touches upon every aspect of human endeavour. As the degree progresses you will notice a marked improvement in your ability to manage large amounts of materials, to express yourself in an organised and convincing manner both in writing and orally, and to evaluate the strength of arguments you encounter. Not only will this give you a sense of personal satisfaction, but you will also have acquired skills which are highly relevant to a range of career options attracting competitive salaries.

Modules on the LLB Law (Senior Status Degree) Programme

Modules on the LLB Law (Senior Status Degree) may include:

Year 1

  • Contract Law 1
  • European Law 1
  • Public Law 1
  • Tort 1
  • Contract 2
  • European Law 2
  • Public Law 2
  • Tort Law 2
  • Family Law: Adult Relationships
  • Commercial Sales
  • Environmental Law 1 - Regulatory Law Approaches
  • Employment Law: Rights and Obligations
  • Medical Law
  • Human Rights Law
  • Human Rights & Social Justice
  • Planning Law
  • Family Law: Parents & Children
  • World Trade Law
  • Nature Conservation Law
  • Employment Law: Enforcing Rights
  • International Dispute Settlement
  • Foundations in Legal Practice
  • Media Law

Year 2

  • Criminal Law 1
  • Land Law 1
  • Equity and Trusts 1
  • Criminal Law 2
  • Equity and Trusts 2
  • Land Law 2
  • Family Law: Adult Relationships
  • Commercial Sales
  • Legal History of Wales
  • Environmental Law 1 - Regulatory Law Approaches
  • Planning Law
  • Employment Law: Rights and Obligations
  • Competition Law: Regulation of Agreements
  • Terrorism: The Legal Response
  • Criminal Evidence
  • Human Rights Law
  • Cybercrime
  • Human Rights & Social Justice
  • Medical Law
  • International Law - Principles and Procedures
  • Jurisprudence
  • Company Law: Incorporation, Constitution and Control
  • Sports Law and Liability
  • Legislation
  • Miscarriage of Justice Project
  • Clinical Legal Education
  • Family Law: Parents & Children
  • World Trade Law
  • Criminal Procedure and Sentencing
  • Nature Conservation Law
  • Employment Law: Enforcing Rights
  • Competition Law: Regulation of Dominance
  • Human rights-based research with children
  • Criminal Evidence Law and Psychology
  • Foundations in Legal Practice
  • Media Law
  • International Dispute Settlement
  • Company Law: Governance, Rights and Liquidation
  • Legal Issues in Sport
  • Multi-level Governance
  • Cymraeg y Gyfraith
  • Comparative Constitutional Law
  • Miscarriage of Justice Project
  • Clinical Legal Education
  • Street Law
  • Medical Law: Reproduction

Graduate Employability and Careers

The College of Law and Criminology takes a proactive approach to enhancing graduate employability. The College offers a range of local, national and international work placements, professional courses and the advice and support to help you develop the skills to achieve your ambitions.

Our Law graduates find careers in:

  • Advice Worker
  • Barrister
  • Barrister's Clerk
  • Chartered Accountant
  • Chartered Legal Executive
  • Civil Service
  • Company Secretary
  • Lecturer
  • Licensed Conveyancer
  • Patent Attorney
  • Police
  • Researcher
  • Solicitor
  • Stockbroker
  • Trading Standards Officer


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