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Masters Degrees (Law Of The Sea)

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Why this course?. The world's oceans and seas are crucial to sustaining life on Earth. They can reduce poverty, ensure food security, and address equity issues. Read more

Why this course?

The world's oceans and seas are crucial to sustaining life on Earth. They can reduce poverty, ensure food security, and address equity issues. This means we must understand the relationship between the International Law of the Sea and other elements of international law concerning sustainable development. 

The International Law of the Sea is always developing. At the moment, negotiations are ongoing in New York, for instance, towards the development of a new legally-binding instrument on the conservation and sustainable use of marine biodiversity in areas beyond national jurisdiction. 

This course focuses on the interface between the International Law of the Sea and other areas of international law. These areas include international biodiversity; human rights; trade; and investment law. It'll give you the knowledge and skills you need to understand ocean governance and all it contains. You'll receive advanced, specialised and comprehensive knowledge of the science, policy and international law of ocean governance. You'll also learn about other areas of international law related to sustainable development. You'll build upon your analytical skills to understand and contribute to the ongoing development and implementation of the International Law of the Sea. Upon graduating from this course, you'll be able to take part in international negotiations of the Law of the Sea and other related processes.

World-leading experts

You'll be taught by world-leading experts and practitioners. They'll draw upon cutting-edge academic research and their direct involvement in ocean law and governance processes. 

Flexible learning

We offer a flexible blended-learning programme. It's a great option if you're an early or mid-career professional who may not be able to take a whole year off to study. You'll study remotely aside from two one-week intensive residential sessions in Scotland. These sessions give you the opportunity to strengthen your expertise and skills and build upon your professional network.

Background

To study this course, you should have relevant work experience in ocean governance or a background in ocean science and/or policy. You don't need a previous law degree.

What you'll study

We cover a wide range of area of expertise in ocean governance essential from a sustainable development perspective:

  • the protection of the marine environment
  • the management of marine and coastal biodiversity
  • the relationship between climate change and oceans
  • food security and fisheries sustainability
  • the opportunities and challenges of blue growth (tourism, hydrocarbon and mineral resources exploitation and exploration, shipping and commerce, marine renewables) 

Employability 

Your international employability is at the heart of this course. The taught elements of the course will equip you with the skills and knowledge to pursue or advance careers in international organisations and national governments involved in international, regional, EU and/or transnational oceans law matters. You'll also be qualified to work within think tanks, consultancy firms, private companies and non-governmental organisations that operate at international, regional, national and sub-national level. The course directors will provide tailored advice on international careers.

Facilities

Our library has a wide range of law reports, legislation, serials and monographs. It also has key law report series and houses extensive collections in government publications and other related areas. You'll have access to a wide range of electronic information, which you can access from home. This includes all major legal databases and course materials.

Course content

All classes are worth 20 credits. This course is available full-time and part-time, with three potential exit points. 

Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert)

You'll receive 60 by completing three classes

Who's it for?

Ideal for time-constrained professionals with some background in this area. If you're looking to further specialise while deepening your understanding of the interface with sustainable development, this is the option for you.

Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip)

You'll receive 120 credits by completing all six modules.

Who's it for?

This option may be more suited to time-constrained professionals with no background in International Law of the Sea.

Master’s degree (LLM)

You'll gain 80 credits by completing all six modules and preparing a dissertation.

Who's it for?

This is a good option if you're considering a research-oriented career. It could lead you to academia, think-tanks, governments or relevant international organisations.

Learning & teaching

The blended-learning format of this course comprises two intensive residential sessions in Scotland and distance-learning sessions online.

The first residential session takes place during the second week of October (allowing you to conduct preparatory readings during the month of September), and the second residential in early January. During the residential sessions, teaching is conducted in a seminar style. Students will be provided with a reading list and a set of questions to prepare prior to each seminar. Guest speakers will act as facilitators of discussion among students. Seminars are complemented by individual and group presentations and exercises; “lounge sessions” to discuss informally with global experts current challenges in the field of oceans governance and sustainable development, and the status of ongoing international negotiations; and social and professional networking activities.

The distance-learning component of the programme will engage students in further readings to deepen students’ knowledge on specific areas addressed during the residential sessions, online discussion forums and a variety of skill-enhancing exercises, with the continuous support of the programme directors.

Assessment

Assessment takes a variety of forms to hone different skills: coursework assignments, including essays, group discussions and presentations. Some of the assessments will be based on real-life assignments that the teaching staff have engaged within the context of their practical experience in international consultancies, with a view to developing and enhancing students’ skills of immediate relevance to global employers. Students seeking award of the Master’s Degree (LLM) will need to complete a dissertation, which will allow them to hone further their skills in legal research, analysis and reasoning



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The course will appeal to applicants who are interested in the law of the sea and international law, but who do not necessarily want to study the commercial aspects of a Maritime Law degree. Read more
The course will appeal to applicants who are interested in the law of the sea and international law, but who do not necessarily want to study the commercial aspects of a Maritime Law degree.

The course focusses predominantly on international law, with a particular emphasis on the law of the sea. Students will acquire expertise in the multifaceted interface between the different fields of international law, whilst also developing specialist knowledge of the law pertaining to the sea. The skills learnt on this programme are adaptable to work in international bodies (e.g. the UN), international courts and tribunals, and international law firms; as well as in roles relating to piracy or marine pollution (e.g. the ICC Commercial Crime Services, the International Maritime Organisation, the Marine Management Organisation and the Maritime and Coastguard Agency).

Employment Opportunities
Graduates of this programme will have employment opportunities with international law firms; international organisations (e.g. United Nations, World Bank, World Trade Organisation, European Union); international courts and tribunals; ‘think tanks’ and research centres; and non-governmental organisations and government (e.g. Ministries of Justice and Foreign Affairs). Some graduates may also progress to teaching and/or research.

Compulsory modules:

Research Methods
Public International Law
International Law of the Sea
Dissertation (on a topic within the international law of the sea)
Optional modules (choose three):

International Environmental Law
International Criminal Law
International Law of Armed Conflict
Admiralty Law
International Human Rights Law
Structure
Programmes commencing in September:

Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits.

The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Programmes commencing in January:

Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits.

The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.undertaken during the period of June to September.

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The LLM (Marine and Maritime Law) at the School of Law, University College Cork is a new programme which brings together the best legal expertise in the field in Ireland. Read more

The LLM (Marine and Maritime Law) at the School of Law, University College Cork is a new programme which brings together the best legal expertise in the field in Ireland. It covers a range of legal topics from purely Shipping and Maritime Law to Marine Environmental Protection and International Law of the Sea. The programme gives the opportunity to students to work with the best Maritime and Marine Lawyers in the country, under the academic overview of a highly reputable and internationally acclaimed law school. The LLM integrates theoretical and practical learning of the law, and connects module contents with marine and maritime activities taking place in Cork, such as marine environmental research, marine renewables, law enforcement at sea, fisheries management, shipping and port activities. It is a programme based on flexible workload arrangements, and suitable to law graduates and marine and maritime professionals alike. 

Diploma Option

Applicants for the LLM (Marine and Maritime Law) Degree also have the option of registering for a Postgraduate Diploma in Marine and Maritime Law.  Students take 60 credits of taught masters’ modules from those on offer for the LLM (Marine and Maritime Law Law). The Postgraduate Diploma can be completed over 9 months full-time or 18 months part-time. Those who wish to apply for the Diploma should contact  for application details. 

This shorter programme may be attractive to legal professionals and others who may prefer not to make an initial commitment to a full master’s programme. Graduates of the Postgraduate Diploma may further progress their studies by completing a 15,000 word research dissertation and graduating with a Masters in Law (LLM).   

The Diploma Fee is €5,300 Full-time €2,650 part-time

The LLM (Marine and Maritime Law) offers a wide choice of options, allowing students to either specialise in their preferred area of marine or maritime law, or to take a broad range of diverse modules.  

Credits

Students must take 60 credits of taught modules, and complete a dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words worth 30 credits. 

The programme modules include:

  • Admiralty Law
  • Climate Change and Energy Law
  • Sale, Insurance and Carriage of Goods at Sea
  • Ship Finance
  • Introduction to Law of the Sea
  • Global Maritime Security
  • Marine Environmental Law
  • Port Law
  • Natural Resources Law
  • International Environmental Law
  • Method of Environmental Law 

clinical module on Law of the Sea in Practice give students the opportunity to understand the practice of law enforcement at sea, and includes access to the Naval Service at Cork. 

The practical aspect to marine law is also available through science-based, non-law modules on GIS, Remote Sensing and Characteristics of the Marine Environment. 

Also, students will have access to certain non-programme but complementary modules, such as:

  • Planning Law
  • Heritage Law
  • International Refugee Law
  • Enforcement and Sanctions in Antitrust Law
  • EU Competition Law
  • International Criminal Law
  • International Human Rights Law
  • Cybercrime
  • e-Commerce Law

The LLM (Marine and Maritime Law) in the School of Law, UCC builds on the expertise and reputation of researchers and professionals in Cork and in Ireland to offer a world-class education in Marine Law and in Maritime Law. Whether students are law graduates or marine/maritime professionals, the programme provides them with an in-depth theoretical and practical knowledge and analysis of Marine and Maritime Law. 

Please visit the School of Law website here for up to date information on the programme.

Programme regulations are available in the College Calendar 

Please see the Book of Modules for a more detailed description of programme modules.

Additional Teaching Mode Information

The part-time option will be taught during weekdays working hours over 2 years.

Course Practicalities

The course involves a combination of lectures and directed study, and clinical learning. Programme modules are scheduled on Fridays and Saturdays in order to facilitate a flexible workload programme to students, particularly those with a professional career. Non-programme modules are available throughout the week, and where available through digital recording.

Assessment 

Generally students are examined by continuous assessment throughout the year and the dissertation must be submitted in September. Individual module assessments can be viewed in the Book of Modules 

Who teaches this course

This is what makes this course unique. Teachers on the LLM (Marine and Maritime Law) are both from within and from outside the School of Law, so that the programme benefits from nation-wide expertise in the field. The UCC School of Law collaborates closely with the Irish Maritime and Energy Resource Cluster (MarEI and the Naval Service) and Maritime Law practitioners. See the School of Law website to see the Programme Team.

Why choose this course

The LLM (Marine and Maritime Law) at UCC connects in a single hub the leading marine and maritime research and practice in Ireland. Students have the unique opportunity to learn from internationally acclaimed researchers and practitioners. The programme puts the law in practice in the fields of shipping and marine environmental research. Through a clinical module, students have the opportunity to learn about law enforcement at sea, including through access to a naval ship at Cork. The programme is built on what Ireland does best in the marine and maritime world, and from there it reaches international excellence.

Skills and Careers Information

The course allows students to acquire an education in Marine Law, or in purely commercial Maritime Law. The LLM (Marine and Maritime Law) prepares them to access professions with the following bodies:

  • Legal professions
  • Governmental and regulatory agencies
  • Local government
  • Industry
  • Utilities
  • Infrastructure developers
  • Non-governmental organisations (NGOs)
  • Marine, maritime and Environmental consultancy
  • International organisations / secretariats
  • Academia


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The LLM (Environmental and Natural Resources Law) is a new programme which takes advantage of a concentration of legal expertise in the field at the School of Law, University College Cork. Read more

The LLM (Environmental and Natural Resources Law) is a new programme which takes advantage of a concentration of legal expertise in the field at the School of Law, University College Cork. Academic staff at the Law School currently hold advisory roles with a wide range of Irish and international agencies and organisations, including the European Environment Agency, the Environmental Protection Agency, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, an Bord Pleanála (Irish Planning Board), European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, Aquaculture Licences Appeals Board, etc. The LLM programme offers a wide variety of legal topics ranging across traditional areas of environmental law, policy and regulation, as well as planning and land-use law, heritage protection, international environmental law, marine environmental law, natural resources law and human rights law. It aims to prepare graduates for a variety of careers in the broader environmental regulatory space, including in the legal professions, governmental and regulatory agencies, environmental NGOs, compliance roles in industry, academia and environmental consultancy. The LLM seeks to integrate theoretical and practical aspects of the application of environmental and natural resources law, and to connect module content with legal and regulatory frameworks operating locally, nationally, regionally and globally. To the greatest degree possible, the programme is based on flexible workload arrangements, to suit recent law graduates and environmental professionals alike. 

Applicants for the LLM (Environmental and Natural Resources Law) Degree also have the option of registering for a Postgraduate Diploma in Environmental and Natural Resources Law.  Students take 60 credits of taught masters’ modules from those on offer for the LLM (Environmental and Natural Resources Law). The Postgraduate Diploma can be completed over 9 months full-time or 18 months part-time. Those who wish to apply for the Diploma should contact  for application details. 

This shorter programme may be attractive to legal professionals and others who may prefer not to make an initial commitment to a full master’s programme. Graduates of the Postgraduate Diploma may further progress their studies by completing a 15,000 word research dissertation and graduating with a Masters in Law (LLM). 

The LLM (Environmental and Natural Resources Law) offers a wide choice of options, allowing students to take a broad range of diverse modules.  

Students must take 60 credits of taught modules, and complete a dissertation of 15,000 words worth 30 credits. 

The programme modules include:

  • Climate Change and Energy Law
  • Method in Environmental Law
  • Environmental Law in Practice
  • International Environmental Law
  • Introduction to Planning Law
  • Legal Concepts for Heritage and Environment
  • Marine Environmental Law
  • Natural Resources Law 

Exposure to technical aspects of the application of environmental and natural resources law to marine law is also available to students through optional science-based, non-law modules on GIS, Remote Sensing and Characteristics of the Marine Environment. 

In addition, students will have access to selected non-programme but complementary modules, covering such areas as Law of the Sea, International and European Human Rights Law, Corporate Insolvency Law, EU Competition Law, International Refugee Law, International Criminal Law, etc. 

The LLM (Environmental and Natural Resources Law) builds on the expertise and reputation of a cohort of dedicated academic researchers in Cork to offer a world-class education in this field. Whether students are (recent) law graduates or other environmental professionals, the programme will provide them with a critical, in-depth theoretical and practical understanding of the key issues arising in environmental and natural resources law, policy and regulation. 

Please visit the School of Law website here for up to date information on the programme.

Programme regulations are available in the College Calendar 

Please see the Book of Modules for a more detailed description of programme modules.

Additional Teaching Mode Information

The part-time option will be taught during weekday working hours over 2 years.

Course Practicalities

The course involves a combination of lectures and directed study. Some programme modules (those offered in conjunction with the LLM Marine and Maritime Law, i.e. Marine Environmental Law, Natural Resources Law, International Environmental Law) are scheduled on Fridays and Saturdays, in order to facilitate a flexible workload programme to students, particularly those with a professional career. Others will run on various days of the week throughout the Semester, but will employ Panopto lecture-capture technology (digital recordings made available via Blackboard) in order to maximise workload flexibility and accessibility to students, particularly those with a professional career. Non-programme modules will mainly run throughout the semester and, where possible, will be available through digital recording.

Assessment

Individual module assessments can be viewed in the Book of Modules. Most programme and non-programme modules are assessed by way of continuous assessment (essays).

Who teaches this course

The teaching staff at UCC specialising in environmental and natural resources law is one of the programmes key strengths. UCC teaching staff on the LLM (Environmental and Natural Resources Law) include: Prof Owen McIntyre, Dr Áine Ryall, Dr Bénédicte Sage-Fuller, Dr Phyllis Comerford, Dr Anne-Marie O’Hagan, Prof Irene Lynch-Fannon, Dr. Bjorn-Oliver Magsig and Dr. Eva Barrett. As a national programme, modules will also have contributions from other Irish academics in the field. UCC School of Law benefits from strong links with key environmental agencies and organisations at the national and international levels, upon which we expect to rely for a full programme of guest speakers. For a full list of school members see the School of Law website here  

Why choose this course

This programme aims to equip graduates to participate and excel in any aspect of professional engagement with environmental and natural resources law, policy or regulation, and to develop a rewarding career in this field with, for example, the legal professions, governmental and regulatory agencies, industry, NGOs or academia. The programme adopts a global perspective, with a focus on international and comparative law and on the techniques of environmental regulation, which are universal in their application and relevance.    



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study International Maritime Law at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study International Maritime Law at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The sea constitutes two-thirds of the entire planet and is of fundamental importance to human activity, sustaining life, providing commerce and navigational routes and a substantial proportion of our natural resources. Taking into account the need to regulate such a wide range of sea-related transactions, this specialised LLM has been developed with a view to providing students with a sound and relevant body of information and understanding of Shipping Law. The course focuses on various aspects of maritime law, from the different contracts for the carriage of goods to marine insurance, international trade and law of the sea.

Key Features of International Maritime Law

Swansea University has been at the forefront of international research in the area of international maritime law. The LLM in International Maritime Law course is thereby built upon the wide range of high calibre research produced by the members of the Institute of International Shipping and Trade Law, who are also teaching at the LLM in International Maritime law. Teaching is research-led and practice-driven aiming at producing global graduates educated and equipped for distinguished personal and professional achievement. Teaching methods are geared towards our students’ needs, conducted mainly through seminars and tutorials in small classes.

The LLM in International Maritime Law requires commitment to study throughout one calendar year. Students are given the opportunity to develop a number of important skills which are not only essential to those wishing to become lawyers but are valuable, transferable skills in themselves in other employment contexts. The Department of Postgraduate Legal Studies offers its postgraduate students dedicated resources, including IT facilities and teaching rooms. Students are fully supported by the College's dedicated Law Librarian and the Law Library holds an extensive selection of legal materials and on-line services such as Lexis and Westlaw. Students are encouraged to make full use of the facilities offered by the Postgraduate Faculty and, in particular, to take advantage of training sessions run by the Faculty, such as the legal research methods and Employability sessions, as well as of the Visiting Lectures’ series.

Modules

The LLM in International Maritime Law is modular, with students required to accumulate 180 credits to graduate. In appropriate circumstances, a student may graduate with a merit or distinction. Each programme is divided into two parts: Part I consists of 4 taught modules each weighted at 30 credits.

Students undertaking an LLM in International Maritime Law are required to take four modules from the following list. At least two of the options must be drawn from the asterisked (*) modules.

Admiralty Law (*)

Carriage of Goods by Sea, Land and Air (*)

Charterparties: Law and Practice (*)

Law of the Sea (*)

Marine Insurance Law (*)

Oil and Gas Law: Contracts and Liabilities (*)

E-Commerce

International Commercial Arbitration

International Trade Law

Ship and other Mobile Assets Finance Law

Part II is composed of two projects (LLM Research Projects) and is weighted at 60 credits. The LLM Research Projects will customarily be researched and written up over the summer period following the successful completion of the taught modules and are designed to enable LLM students to develop their research skills.

For further information on modules, please visit the LLM in International Maritime Law page.

Extra-Curricular Activities

Throughout their studies, LLM students are provided with the opportunity to take part in a number of extra-curricular activities and enhance their practical understanding of shipping, insurance and commercial practice. Such activities include;

- employability lectures

- guest lecture series delivered inter alia by former judges, directors of international organisations and prominent partners from city law firms

- networking events, including an Annual LLM Career Fair

- visits to a number of leading enterprises within the City of London which also give our students another chance to network with professionals working in the commercial and maritime field

- mooting training throughout the year, including tailored guidance and weekly training classes

- free English language classes designed to assist you in improving your critical legal thinking and writing

Careers and Employability

The International Careers Adviser at Swansea runs weekly workshops for international students for example, on how to improve career prospects and improve interview techniques. The Postgraduate Department also employs two dedicated LLM employability officers who run a series of talks to develop the skills of LLM students and inform their career plans.

The Department also enjoys close links with many City law firms. For example, one of our professors on the LLM programme was a senior partner, and is now a consultant with, Ince & Co, a leading London law firm, specialising in international trade, insurance and shipping law. The ISTLprovides training programmes for London City solicitors, P & I Clubs and shipping organisations. The Swansea LLM is well known internationally. Many of our graduates secure employment shortly after completing their degrees. Several international firms keep a close relationship with the Department of Shipping and Trade Law and regularly send representatives for guest lectures and graduate recruitment purposes. Also every year the Department hosts the LLM Careers Fair which is attended by representatives from a wide range of local and international organisations. The Fair enables our LLM students to meet and talk face to face with prospective employers. For further information on the Employability initiatives, please visit http://www.swansea.ac.uk/law/shipping-trade-law-department/llmemployabilityinitiativesandresults/.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study International Commercial and Maritime Law at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study International Commercial and Maritime Law at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The wide range of LLM degrees including LLM in International Commercial and Maritime Law offered by the Swansea College of Law and Criminology gives students the advantage of choice and specialism. For the student who does not wish to specialise to that extent, the College of Law and Criminology offers a general LLM postgraduate degree (LLM in International Commercial and Maritime Law). This general LLM provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, qualities, skills and other attributes in both Commercial and Maritime Law by choosing specialised modules from both areas of law.

Key Features of International Commercial and Maritime Law

The LLM in International Commercial and Maritime Law course is built upon the wide range of research of high calibre produced by the members of the Institute of International Shipping and Trade Law, who are also teaching diverse modules at the course. Teaching is research-led and practice-driven aiming at producing global graduates educated and equipped for distinguished personal and professional achievement. Teaching methods on the International Commercial and Maritime Law LLM are geared towards our students’ needs, conducted mainly through seminars and tutorials in small classes.

The LLM in International Commercial and Maritime Law requires commitment to study throughout one calendar year. Students on the International Commercial and Maritime Law course are given the opportunity to develop a number of important skills which are not only essential to those wishing to become lawyers but are valuable, transferable skills in themselves in other employment contexts. The Shipping and Trade Law Department offers its students dedicated resources, including IT facilities and teaching rooms. Students on the International Commercial and Maritime Law course are fully supported by the College's dedicated Law Librarian and the Law Library holds an extensive selection of legal materials and on-line services such as Lexis and Westlaw. Students are encouraged to make full use of the facilities offered by the Postgraduate Faculty and, in particular, to take advantage of training sessions run by the Faculty, such as the legal research methods and Employability sessions, as well as of the Visiting Lectures’ series.

Modules

The LLM in International Commercial and Maritime Law degree is modular, with students required to accumulate 180 credits to graduate. In appropriate circumstances, a student of the International Commercial and Maritime Law course may graduate with a merit or distinction. Each programme is divided into two parts: Part I consists of 4 taught modules each weighted at 30 credits. Students pursuing the LLM in International Commercial and Maritime Law may choose any four options from the modules listed below. At least one module must be chosen from the asterisked (*) modules and at least one module from the double asterisked (**) modules.

Admiralty Law (*)

Carriage of Goods by Sea, Land and Air (*)

Charterparties: Law and Practice (*)

Law of the Sea (*)

Marine Insurance Law (*)

Oil and Gas Law: Contracts and Liabilities (*)

Competition Law (**)

E-Commerce (**)

International Corporate Law and Governance (**)

International Intellectual Property Law (**)

International Trade Law (**)

Law of Intellectual Assets Management and Transactions (**)

Law and Practice relating to International Banking and Commercial Payments (**)

Ship and other Mobile Assets Finance Law (**)

International Commercial Arbitration

Part II is composed of two projects (LLM Research Projects) and is weighted at 60 credits. The LLM Research Projects will customarily be researched and written up over the summer period following the successful completion of the taught modules and are designed to enable LLM students to develop their research skills.

For further information on modules please visit the LLM in International Commercial and Maritime Law page.

Extra-Curricular Activities

Throughout their studies, LLM in International Commercial and Maritime Law students are provided with the opportunity to take part in a number of extra-curricular activities and enhance their practical understanding of shipping, insurance and commercial practice. Such activities include;

- employability lectures

- guest lecture series delivered inter alia by former judges, directors of international organisations and prominent partners from city law firms

- networking events, including an Annual LLM Career Fair

- visits to a number of leading enterprises within the City of London which also give our students another chance to network with professionals working in the commercial and maritime field

- mooting training throughout the year, including tailored guidance and weekly training classes

- free English language classes designed to assist you in improving your critical legal thinking and writing

Careers & Employability

The International Careers Adviser at Swansea runs weekly workshops for international students, for example, on how to improve career prospects and improve interview techniques. The Postgraduate Department also employs two dedicated LLM employability officers who run a series of talks to develop the skills of LLM students and inform their career plans.

The Department also enjoys close links with many City law firms. For example, one of our professors on the LLM programme was a senior partner, and is now a consultant with, Ince & Co, a leading London law firm, specialising in international trade, insurance and shipping law. The IISTL provides training programmes for London City solicitors, P&I Clubs and shipping organisations. Many of our graduates secure employment shortly after completing their degrees. Several international firms keep a close relationship with the Shipping and Trade Law Department and regularly send representatives for guest lectures and graduate recruitment purposes. Also every year the Department hosts the LLM Careers Fair which is attended by representatives from a wide range of local and international organisations. For further information on the Employability initiatives, please visit http://www.swansea.ac.uk/law/shipping-trade-law-department/llmemployabilityinitiativesandresults/



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Oil, Gas and Renewable Energy Law at Swansea University – winner of the ‘Postgraduate’ category at the WhatUni? Student Choice Awards 2017. Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Oil, Gas and Renewable Energy Law at Swansea University – winner of the ‘Postgraduate’ category at the WhatUni? Student Choice Awards 2017.

The business of hydrocarbon energy supply remains one of the most fundamental aspects of global commerce and natural resources law in the modern era. It is not limited to exploitation of petroleum but encompasses many different aspects of law and business, from protecting the intellectual property rights of new oil and gas technology, to complex joint venture contracts, and to compensation regimes for pollution liability.

Key Features of Oil, Gas and Renewable Energy Law

  • A thriving academic environment committed to excellence in teaching and research, which provides an exceptional student experience, as evidenced by our PTES results.
  • A professional but friendly environment with pastoral support and free English language classes which attracts students from all over the world.
  • Lectures delivered by outstanding academics at the forefront of scholarship in their areas of expertise, which they combine with skilled and innovative teaching.
  • Exemption from level 2 education requirements of CIArb membership allowing you to apply to be awarded the level of Member of the Institute or MCIArb., if you successfully complete the International Commercial Arbitration module.
  • Extra-curricular activities such as mooting and summer schools abroad.
  • A wide range of employability initiatives. Our employability initiatives and close links with the legal practice bear fruit as Swansea LLM alumni are particularly well placed in the job market all over the world.

Modules in Oil, Gas and Renewable Energy Law

The LLM in Oil, Gas and Renewable Energy Law is modular, with students required to accumulate 180 credits to graduate. In appropriate circumstances, an Oil, Gas and Renewable Energy Law student may graduate with a merit or distinction. Each programme is divided into two parts: Part I consists of 4 taught modules each weighted at 30 credits.

Following the successful completion of the taught modules, Oil, Gas and Renewable Energy Law students proceed to Part II, which is composed of two projects (LLM Research Projects). At least one of the LLM Research Projects must be written in the area of International and Transnational Aspects of Oil and Gas Law or Oil & Gas Law: Contracts and Liabilities.  The LLM in Oil, Gas and Renewable Energy Law Research Projects will customarily be researched and written up over the summer period and are designed to enable LLM in Oil, Gas and Renewable Energy Law students to develop their research skills.

Modules in the LLM in Oil, Gas and Renewable Energy Law may include:

  • Oil and Gas Law: Contracts and Liabilities
  • International and Transnational Aspects of Oil and Gas Law
  • International Commercial Arbitration
  • Law of Intellectual Assets Management and Transactions
  • Law of the Sea
  • Law of International Trade
  • Charterparties: Law and Practice
  • The Law of Marine Insurance
  • Law and Practice relating to in International Banking and Commercial Payments

For further information on the modules of the Oil, Gas and Renewable Energy Law programme, please visit the LLM in Oil, Gas and Renewable Energy Law page.

Careers and Employability

Employability has always been on the top of our agenda. To that end we organise a number of initiatives for enhancing our LLM in Oil, Gas and Renewable Energy Law students’ employability. These include:

  • Tailor-made employability advice by two dedicated Employability Officers
  • A series of guest lectures delivered who give our LLM in Oil, Gas and Renewable Energy Law students an insight of the practice.
  • The unique opportunity to get involved in mooting,.
  • Close links with the legal practice and various elements of the shipping and business sectors.
  • The annual LLM Careers Fair, which gives the opportunity to our Oil, Gas and Renewable Energy Law students to meet and discuss their future aspirations with representatives from an array of local and international law firms.
  • Networking events and visits to leading enterprises within the City of London with a view to enhancing our students’ practical understanding of shipping and insurance practice.

Teaching and Assessment

Teaching is conducted in small classes and our students always find an opportunity to participate in discussions and put their views across. Teaching in the LLM in Oil, Gas and Renewable Energy Law modules is supported by the use of our Blackboard virtual learning environment, which facilitates online teaching and learning. Through Blackboard, students have access to course materials, handouts, and lecture notes, as well as shared areas for group work, online discussions, and exchanging ideas with fellow students. 

All LLM in Oil, Gas and Renewable Energy Law modules are assessed by a combination of coursework and examination, with an equal weighting of 50% normally given to each component in the final total assessment.

Meet our Students

Ole Ollmann (Germany – LLM in Oil and Gas Law, now Oil, Gas and Renewable Energy Law)

Whilst working on his dissertations, Ole was offered an internship at Hapag-Lloyd AG, one of the oldest and most respected shipping companies in Germany and a leading globally operating container line. During his three month internship, Ole was involved in the day to day bunker procurement and bunker trade practice in the bunkering department. Ole was offered valuable inside into oil markets, trading and hedging practice as well as procurement strategies of a large container line. He procured bunker fuels for ships, prepared the necessary documentation and also dealt with bunker claims.

In addition, he dealt with general matters of the relevant law, such as general terms and conditions of sale and charter party terms pertaining to bunker fuel. Ole found his internship a great experience which gave him an opportunity to put into practice the knowledge gained during the LLM program. After completion of his internship, Ole moved to a permanent position in the chartering / operations department of a specialised tanker owner and operator.



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Learning and living Europe. Study in 3 cities! Berlin - Nice - Rome or Istanbul. The. Master in Advanced European and International Studies - European integration and global studies. Read more

Learning and living Europe: Study in 3 cities! Berlin - Nice - Rome or Istanbul

The Master in Advanced European and International Studies - European integration and global studies provides an overarching and extensive view of the political, social, economic and cultural issues of the present times. Its encompassing teaching method at the crossroads of theory and practice helps the students to gain thorough academic expertise in European affairs as well as a first hand-insight into the work as a Policy Officer at a European institution or international organisation. With its leitmotiv "Learning and living Europe", the programme follows an original approach that distinguishes it from other Master's courses in European Studies and International Relations: the European integration and global studies programme is taught in English and takes place in three different study locations: Berlin, Nice, Rome or Istanbul. After two common terms, the participants have the possibility to chose between two options for the spring term: they can opt to finish their studies either in Rome or in Istanbul.

Programme

Berlin, Germany

The academic year starts in Berlin (from October to December), it encompasses classes on the basics of all the four modules (Conflict and cooperation in the international system, European integration and external action; Federalism and multi-level governance; Globalisation and sustainable development), completed by the seminar « Project cycle management », the core part of the fifth module "Professional Skills Workshops".

Nice, France

In Nice, teaching focuses on the current international order, examining the reasons for conflict and the perspectives for cooperation. Lectures explore Europe's policies in diverse fields (trade, democracy promotion, conflict resolution, climate change, development aid) to explain how important a role the EU plays on the international stage.

At the same time, the programme looks into the current challenges the European integration project is facing (euroscepticism, the challenges of economic governance, Brexit, refugee crisis). During this term, students take their mid-term exams.

A one-week study trip takes the students to European and international institutions in Brussels, Strasbourg and Luxembourg. Visits to the European Council, the European Commission and NATO are highlights of the stay in Brussels, whereas Strasbourg hosts not only the headquarters of the Council of Europe and the European Court of Human Rignts, but also the plenary sessions of the European Parliament.

Rome, Italy or Istanbul, Turkey

According to their choice, students will do their third trimester either in Rome or in Istanbul.

In Rome, special focus is given to the Mediterranean region and Africa with particular emphasis on the issues of migration, poverty and food security. Students will visit relevant UN institutions.

In Istanbul, students study the changing EU-Turkey relations and focus on area studies of the Black Sea region, the Caucasus including ENP, and Central Asia.

During the third term, students have the opportunity to advance in their research work, as they are free of obligations from mid-May to mid-June to work on their thesis. The programme concludes with the defence of the thesis and oral exams. With their graduation, students become part of CIFE’s worldwide Alumni network.

Teaching Modules

Conflict and cooperation in the international system

A theoretically grounded approach to revisit the continuities and changes of international relations. Following a theoretical introduction into the grand schools of thought of international relations theory, we will approach the interdisciplinary field of conflict and violence studies. From its very beginning, understanding and explaining questions of war and peace has been at the heart of 'International Relations' as an academic discipline. A special focus will be given to inter-group violence and inter-state conflicts in both the Mediterranean and Eastern Europe: from the Western Balkans to Cyprus, from Israel to Palestine, from Ukraine to Syria.

European Integration and external action

This module aims at familiarising the students, who could well become the next generation of European and international decision-makers, with an expert knowledge of the structures, institutions, and problems of the European Union.We focus firstly on the historical development of European integration and then go on to analyse the Union’s institutions and study the basics of EU law. The last part of the program is devoted to the different policies of the EU and especially emphasises the challenges of enlargement.

Federalism, multi-level governance and conflict resolution

For the last fifteen years, federalism has known a revival as an international field of studies. In this framework, three major developments can be considered. The first is the study of the European Union, not analysed any more as a process of integration but in terms of federal institutional comparative approach. The second development is multi-level governance, that can be conceived as an extension of federalism as it deals with any form of multi-tier institutional system. This cooperative/competitive approach has appeared to understand the institutional consequences of the process of globalisation in post-industrialised societies, and of the subsequent changing of nature of sovereignty in the relevant states. Eventually, federalism has become a tool of conflict resolution, in order to resolve violent conflicts all over the world.

Economy, globalisation and sustainable development

The module puts a specific focus on the role of the EU as an economic actor on the global stage, with its opportunities and challenges driven both by European specific evolutions and globalisation trends. Finally, the module proposes an introduction to global sustainable development issues (climate change, access to water, etc.), as they are among the most decisive challenges that will shape the future of the world economy.

Professional Skills Workshops

This module equips the participants with the professional skills and competences that will enable them to work in the context of the European and international organisations. They will take actively part in several simulation games and follow workshops on project cycle management, intercultural management, as well as on mediation and negotiation.

Application deadline is 30 June of the current year.



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The CIA launches drones to “legally” kill Al-Qaida leaders. An arbitrator rules that anti-smoking policies infringe a bilateral investment treaty. Read more
The CIA launches drones to “legally” kill Al-Qaida leaders. An arbitrator rules that anti-smoking policies infringe a bilateral investment treaty. A father is suddenly detained at the airport as his name appears on a no-fly list.

After recent decades of rule of law promotion, the need to “legally” harm, detain, profit or pollute has transformed how policy moves are now performed and contested on the world stage.

This has elevated the significance of international legal rules for a range of governmental, corporate and societal actors, who each compete to devise legal norms, characterisations and strategies to address global political and economic problems.

Thus, international law has become a central domain of struggle across a variety of pressing policy challenges, ranging from robotised military strategies, territorial claims spurred by climate change, the global projection of EU rules, to transnational blacklists.

Our LLM in International Law provides a programme of study that responds to increasing complexity in the international legal order; where international law evolves through transformations such as global counter-terrorism, global value chains, and foreign investment arbitration.

Our academic staff are at the forefront of teaching, research and practice in international law, and our LLM modules encompass subfields that range from European Union law, public international law, and the law of the sea, to the law of armed conflict and tade and investment law.

The programme is delivered at our Brussels School of International Studies (BSIS) in conjunction with our law school.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/139/international-law

- Extended programme
The extended programme allows students the opportunity to study their subject in greater detail, choosing a wider range of modules, and also provides the opportunity to spend one term at the Canterbury campus. The extended programme is ideal for students who require extra credits, or would like to have more time to pursue an internship.

About the Brussel School of International Studies

The Brussels School of International Studies is a multidisciplinary postgraduate School of the University of Kent bringing together the disciplines of politics, international relations, law and economics to provide in-depth analysis of international problems such as conflict, security, development, migration and the political economy and legal basis of a changing world order.

We are a truly international School, our students are drawn from over 50 countries. The strong international composition of our staff and student body contributes significantly both to the academic as well as to the social experience at BSIS. The value-added benefit of a location in Brussels gives students exposure to the workings of major international organisations such as the EU and NATO and the many international and non-governmental organisations based in Brussels. Students have the opportunity of an internship with one of these organisations.

About Kent Law School

The Kent Law School is a top-ten UK law school renowned for its critical style of teaching. You learn more than just the black-letter law: we want you to understand how different legal regimes came about and how they may be interpreted, challenged or possibly changed.

This aim is complemented by the real-world advantage of studying in the capital of the European Union; mere hours from the International Court of Justice in The Hague, the European Court of Justice in Luxembourg, and the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg.

Course structure

We are committed to offering flexible study options at the School and enable you to tailor your degree to meet your needs by offering start dates in September and January; full- and part-time study; split-site options, and allowing students to combine two fields of study leading to the award of a degree that reflects both disciplines.

Specialisations

The LLM in International Law allows students to choose secondary areas of specialisation from the range of programmes offered at BSIS. Thus, a focused programme of study can be constructed by studying International Law in the context of International Relations; International Conflict and Security; EU External Relations, and other subject areas we cover.

This leads to the award of a LLM degree in, for example, 'International Law with EU External Relations'.

Standard and extended versions

The LLM is offered in both a standard version (90 ECTS credits) and an extended version (120 ECTS credits) and in each case students may take the programme with or without a secondary specialisation. Those on the extended version will take more modules to gain extra credit.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Many students at our Brussels centre who undertake internships are offered contracts in Brussels immediately after graduation. Others have joined their home country’s diplomatic service, entered international organisations, or have chosen to undertake a ‘stage’ at the European Commission, or another EU institution.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Who is it for?. This course will be of interest to individuals who seek a deeper understanding of the many dimensions of public international law from both a theoretical and practical perspective. Read more

Who is it for?

This course will be of interest to individuals who seek a deeper understanding of the many dimensions of public international law from both a theoretical and practical perspective. As this course has an international dimension it will appeal to students from around the world and at all stages of their legal education and professional experience.

Objectives

The Specialist LLM in Public International Law concentrates on the development of a thorough and critical understanding of Public International Law, the law governing the interaction of states. The last decade or so has seen tremendous challenges for International Law including matters relating to armed conflict, commercial relations and human rights. This course gives you the opportunity to trace and evaluate some of these practical and theoretical developments guided by leading academics and expert practitioners.

City's LLM in Public International Law takes a contemporary approach to the study of international law. You may choose from an extensive list of electives including the law of treaties, human rights, economic law, law of the sea and others.

All electives adopt a curriculum that is cutting edge in its theoretical approach and a skill-based methodology to enable you to develop your knowledge and skills in the subject in the best manner possible.

Placements

Each year a small number of internships become available and you will be provided with information about such opportunities and how to apply during the year of your study.

Academic facilities

As a City Law School student you will benefit from everything the institution has to offer including the Learning Success department and Lawbore, an online resource designed to help you find the information you need for the course modules. All course modules have online depositories through Moodle.

As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

You will benefit from City, University of London’s extensive library of hard copy and electronic resources, including its comprehensive database of domestic and international caselaw, legislation, treaties and legal periodicals. There are two law-specific libraries – one at the Gray’s Inn campus and one at our Northampton square campus -  with individual study spaces and dedicated rooms for group work.

Additionally, we are a short walk away from the British Library and the Law Library of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies.

Teaching and learning

This course is taught by leading academics as well as visiting practitioners including barristers and solicitors who work in private practice and in legal departments of major companies.

Assessment

All modules are structured as 10-weekly two-hour seminars which comprise both lectures as well as interactive tutorials. All modules are supported by our online learning platform - Moodle. Assessment is by way of coursework which comprises 100% of the final mark in each module. Each module carries the same weight in terms of the overall qualification.

You will be allocated a dedicated supervisor for your dissertation who will help you develop a specific topic and provide support in terms of resources, content and structure.

Modules

As with all LLM specialisms at City, University of London, you may take either five modules and a shorter dissertation (10,000 words) or four modules and a longer dissertation (20,000 words). All modules are of the same duration and are taught per term (September – December or January – April) rather than the whole academic year. If you take four modules you will take two per term in each term and if you take five modules you will have three in one term and two in the other. Dissertations are written during the summer term when there are no classes.

In order to obtain this specialism, you must choose at least three modules from within this specialism and write their dissertation on a subject within the specialism.

  • 10,000 word Supervised Dissertation (30 credits) or
  • 20,000 word Supervised Dissertation (60 credits)

Specialism modules

Choose from the following 30 credit modules:

  • Air and Space Law
  • Comparative Constitutional Law
  • International Law of the Sea
  • Public International Law
  • International Human Rights in Law and Practice
  • International Investment Law
  • Minorities and Indigenous Peoples in International Law
  • International Law and the Global Economy
  • International Criminal Law: the Practitioner Perspective
  • International Criminal Law: Crimes and Institutions
  • Law and War
  • World Trade Law

For your remaining modules you can choose from more than 50 modules covering a diverse range of subjects.

Career prospects

As a graduate of this specialist LLM in Public International Law you will be well placed to pursue careers in this area of law in private practice, in house in a legal practice, policy and government, non-governmental organisations, and a wide range of non-legal careers in the field of publc international law.

The City Law School has a vibrant Pro Bono programme including our award-winning commercial law clinic for tech start-ups Start-Ed.



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The addition of an LLM specialism in International Shipping Law enhances the current offering of specialist LLM degrees offered by the Centre for Commercial Law Studies (CCLS) within the School of Law, making Queen Mary the only college within the University of London to offer a specialism in this subject. Read more
The addition of an LLM specialism in International Shipping Law enhances the current offering of specialist LLM degrees offered by the Centre for Commercial Law Studies (CCLS) within the School of Law, making Queen Mary the only college within the University of London to offer a specialism in this subject.

English law is frequently selected by contracting parties as the applicable law of shipping contracts, with London being chosen as the forum for the resolution of any disputes that may arise, whether in the courts or by arbitration. Thus London is in many ways unrivalled in the UK as a location to undertake studies in this area of law: it is home to the British Maritime Law Association (BMLA) (the UK subsidiary of the Comité Maritime International (CMI)), the London Maritime Arbitrators Association (LMAA) and also to the vast majority of the top-tier law firms for Shipping Law in the UK, as ranked in the Legal 500 and the Chambers & Partners Guides.

Located as it is, in the centre of London, CCLS is the ideal place to read for an LLM degree in International Shipping Law: students will enjoy access to the many resources that the Centre has to offer, including its membership of the BMLA, as well as the resources of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (IALS) Library and the libraries of neighbouring London Colleges.

Teaching on modules offered under the International Shipping Law specialism will be enhanced by the contribution of distinguished guest speakers, including legal practitioners from City law firms with many years of experience in maritime law, and experts from the International Maritime Law Institute (IMLI), established under the auspices of the International Maritime Organization (IMO). New modules in maritime law subjects will also be available to students selecting other LLM specialisms.

Internships

International shipping company, Andros Maritime Agencies, is to run three internships for LLM in International Shipping Law and LLM in Insurance Law students at QMUL. Read more about the shipping law internships.

Taught modules

Modules:



To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of International Shipping Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM available modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.
◦ QLLM050 International Commercial Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM058 International Law of the Sea (45 credits)
◦ QLLM181 Legal Aspects of Paperless Trade (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM182 / QLLG006 Charterparties: Law and Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM183 / QLLG005 Protection and Indemnity Clubs: Law and Practice (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM300 / QLLG001 Marine Insurance Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM301 / QLLG003 Maritime Arbitration (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM302 / QLLG004 Carriage of Goods (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM303 / QLLG002 Wet Shipping Law: Collisions and Other Incidents at Sea (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM322 Admiralty Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM383 / QLLG008 International Regulation of Shipping (sem 1)
◦ QLLM384 Law of the Sea, Navigational Freedoms and Practice (sem 2)

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With globalisation, international law is becoming increasingly important and this course prepares you for a future career in the international arena. Read more

With globalisation, international law is becoming increasingly important and this course prepares you for a future career in the international arena. Our LLM is one of the oldest and most popular courses in international law in London. It attracts students from every nationality and background, not only those who have previously studied law, but also those with a degree in political science, international relations, or other relevant discipline. This creates a uniquely vibrant and stimulating learning environment in which to study international Law.

The LLM International Law at Westminster Law School is taught in our central London campus, just a short distance from most major British institutions and international organisations. The Course can be taken full-time or part-time, and we have both a September and a January start each year.

Our teaching team is composed of world-renowned scholars that are leading the way in their respective subjects, including - but not limited to - international human rights law, the law of armed conflict, development law, energy and climate change law, international cyber security law, refugee law, the law of the sea, international courts and tribunals. In past years, the teaching team organised study visits to international organisations and to international courts in London and The Hague.

We also have a Research Group, International Law at Westminster, which conducts important research projects on topical international law issues. These projects have received external funding because of their importance and their potential impact. The Group also regularly organises events in which students are invited to participate.

Westminster Law School hosts the local Chapter of the International Law Students Association (ILSA), of which interested students can become members. The Chapter organises events in close collaboration with the International Law at Westminster research group.

Every year, the Oxford University Press Prize is awarded to the best LLM International Law student.

The course will enhance your understanding of the key principles of public international law, the main developments within the public international law framework and the process of globalisation and its significance for international law.

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Please note that option modules are subject to student demand and staffing availability, therefore not all modules will necessarily be offered in the same academic year.

Core modules

Option modules

Career path

LLM International Law graduates have worked for organisations such as Amnesty International, the United Nations, EU organisations, law and consultancy firms such as Deloitte, professional associations like the European Banking Federation, or in legal departments within governments.

After being awarded the LLM, some graduates have undertaken further academic study by doing a research (PhD) degree.



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Your programme of study. The General Law programme at Aberdeen is one of the best programmes in terms of scope and areas of interest you can choose to study at advanced level. Read more

Your programme of study

The General Law programme at Aberdeen is one of the best programmes in terms of scope and areas of interest you can choose to study at advanced level. If your first degree was in a specific area of law there is nothing preventing you from choosing another area of law completely or a complementary area. You could study environmental law areas such as oil and gas law, energy and environmental law, low carbon energy transition with further environmental regulation. If you are more interested in criminal law you could look at Criminology, the politics of human rights, humanitarian law.  If you are more interested in business you might choose international law, intellectual property law, world trade organisation or for business with a creative aspect you might think about specialist in cultural property issues or law for business and arts and museums law.  There are many possible mixes of these general areas of law you might want to explore. Employment possibilities are huge from this range of areas of law and include all notable areas to practise law and careers within the legal profession to welfare sectors such as employment, business, HR and finance.

Law careers

You may become a Barrister if you wish to represent people at High Court and Magistrates court to put legal argument forward for decision. You could start off as a legal executive to later qualify as a solicitor with further training or after a number of years experience you may wish to become a judge. If you want some work experience you could become a court usher. Other careers include a Paralegal. This role undertakes much of a lawyers role in drafting documents, meetings and contracts.  If you decide your law degree is useful for other areas you may look at Civil Service careers, become a politician, work in the police, city, or teach.

This programme is ideal if you want to be a generalist to an advanced level rather than a specialist in a specific area of law. You develop your analysis and research skills and you have the option of wide ranging courses to choose from which stretches your intellectual thinking capabilities in a top 10 School of Law (Complete University Guide 2018)

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

Compulsory

  • Critical Legal Thinking and Scholarship

Optional (4 courses 2 in Semester 1 and 2)

  • International Energy and Environmental Law
  • Oil and Minerals for Good
  • Low Carbon Energy Transition: Renewable Energy Law
  • International Law: A Time of Challenges
  • The Politics of Human Rights
  • Oil and Gas Law
  • International Commercial Arbitration
  • International Commercial Arbitration In the Asia Pacific
  • Private International Law: Concepts and Institutions
  • Issues in Criminal Justice
  • World Trade Organisation: Gatt
  • Comparative Contract Law for International Transactions
  • International Intellectual Property: Frameworks and Challenges
  • International Criminal Law
  • Copyright and Patents
  • Private International Law - Jurisdiction, Recognition and Enforcement

Semester 2

Optional

  • Cultural Property Issues: Law, Art and Museums
  • Principles of Environmental Regulation
  • Choice of Law for Business
  • International Humanitarian Law
  • Low Carbon Energy Transition: Nuclear Energy and Carbon Capture and Storage
  • Criminal Evidence and Proof
  • Criminal Law
  • The use of Force in International Law
  • Trade Marks and Brand Development
  • International Trade and Finance Law
  • Private International Law of Family Law
  • International Human Rights Law
  • Carriage of Goods By Sea
  • Oil and Gas Law: Taxation of Upstream
  • Downstream Energy Law
  • Commercialising Innovation and Law
  • Commercial Tax Law and Policy
  • International Investment Law and Arbitration in the Energy Sector

Semester 3

  • Dissertation

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • You are taught by a School of Law ranked 10th in the UK (The Complete University Guide 2018). The University has been teaching and researching law since the Middle Ages.
  • You develop skills which are vital to the legal profession in a highly personalised environment with high contact from your lecturers.
  • You get a great range of options which you can tailor to your own requirements and build upon your undergraduate degree and experience to widen your career options, and you can take your qualifications further with programmes such as International Arbitration and Dispute Resolution

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • 12 Months or 24 Months
  • Full Time or Part Time
  • January or September

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page and the latest postgraduate opportunities

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

Your Accommodation

Campus Facilities

Find out more about living in Aberdeen and living costs

You may be interested in:



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Under the programme, students must complete four compulsory modules, and choose from a range of optional modules. Modules will be delivered primarily through small group seminars. Read more

Under the programme, students must complete four compulsory modules, and choose from a range of optional modules. Modules will be delivered primarily through small group seminars. Attendance is mandatory for these seminars, which have been chosen as the primary means of delivering material to students due to the advanced nature of the course. Small group seminars encourage participation and the development of communications skills. They also allow students to benefit from close contact with the academics teaching on the programme, many of which are also experienced practitioners and consultants in their respective fields of expertise.

The compulsory modules ensure that students develop an in-depth understanding of the fundamentals of international law and governance and become familiar with current debates in the field.

Optional modules then allow students to explore particular aspects of international law and governance, such as aspects of international and regional law, international dispute settlement, international human rights, international humanitarian law and international economic law, in greater depth.

The completion of optional modules, together with the dissertation, allow for development of students’ subject specific knowledge as the programme progresses. The development of the students’ skills is achieved mainly through the combination of the compulsory module in Applied Research Methods in Law, taught in Michaelmas term, and the students’ pursuit of the dissertation, supervision for which begins at the start of Epiphany term. Through these modules, students can practise their skills intensely, whilst continuing to acquire a deeper level of specialised knowledge on their chosen topic. 

An important objective of the LLM in International Law and Governance programme is to provide students with skills that will enable them to thoroughly analyse and interpret legal sources, literature, and cases, and to research and formulate an independent opinion on international legal questions. Students will also learn to clearly present their findings both orally and in writing to international legal specialists, to participate actively in academic debate, and to apply this advanced academic knowledge in public international law in a professional context.

As such, an LLM in International Law and Governance will provide students with an excellent foundation to pursue an international law career, whether it is in legal practice, employment in international institutions, or employment in non-governmental organisations. The LLM qualification will also be an excellent vehicle for the further development of research skills and, as such, also offers entry into further postgraduate study and, in particular, doctoral research.

Core modules

  • Fundamentals in International Law (unless a similar module has already been studied)
  • Fundamental Issues of International Legal Governance
  • Applied Research Methods in Law
  • Dissertation (of 10,000, 15,000 or 20,000 words).

Optional modules

Please note: not all modules necessarily run every year, and we regularly introduce new modules. The list below provides an example of the type of modules which may be offered.

  • Advanced Issues in International Economic Law
  • Comparative and Transnational Law
  • Global Environmental Law
  • Global Financial Law
  • Global Institutions
  • International Co-operation in Criminal Matters in Europe
  • International Counter Terrorism: Theory and Practice
  • International Investment Law
  • International Humanitarian Law
  • International Protection of Human Rights
  • International Trade Law & Policy
  • International Perspectives on Law and Gender
  • Introduction to International Criminal Justice
  • Introduction to European Union Law
  • Law of Oil and Gas Contracts
  • Law of the Sea

Course Learning and Teaching

This programme involves both taught modules and a substantial dissertation component. Taught modules are delivered by a mixture of lectures and seminars. Although most lectures do encourage student participation, they are used primarily to introduce chosen topics, identify relevant concepts, and introduce the student to the main debates and ideas relevant to the chosen topic. They give students a framework of knowledge that students can then develop, and reflect on, through their own reading and study.

Seminars are smaller-sized, student-led classes. Students are expected to carry out reading prior to classes, and are usually set questions or problems to which they will apply the knowledge they have developed. Through class discussion, or the presentation of student papers, students are given the opportunity to test and refine their knowledge and understanding, in a relaxed and supportive environment.

The number of contact hours in each module will reflect that module’s credit weighting. 15-credit modules will have, in total, 15 contact hours (of either lectures or seminars); 30-credit modules will have 30 contact hours. Students must accumulate, in total, between 90 and 120 credits of taught modules for the programme (depending upon the length of their dissertation).

In addition to their taught modules, all students must produce a dissertation of between 10,000 and 20,000 words. The dissertation is intended to be the product of the student’s own independent research. Each student is allocated a dissertation supervisor, and will have a series of (usually four) one-to-one meetings with their supervisor over the course of the academic year.

Finally, all taught postgraduate students on this programme, are encouraged to attend the various events, including guest lectures and seminars, organised through the School’s research centres, including Law and Global Justice at Durham, the Human Rights Centre, the Centre for Criminal Law and Criminal Justice, and the Durham European Law Institute.



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The LLM in Law and International Security will offer a unique overview of how different types of law, including international law, define and regulate a range of different security issues ranging from terrorism and war crimes through to maritime security. Read more

The LLM in Law and International Security will offer a unique overview of how different types of law, including international law, define and regulate a range of different security issues ranging from terrorism and war crimes through to maritime security. It should be of interest to a wide range of individuals concerned both academically and professionally with contemporary security issues, challenges and problems. The course is taught by academics specialist in their field and who contribute to current legal and policy debates. It has been set up in such a way as to allow a flexible and contextual approach to the topics discussed.

The programme offers excellent career prospects for those wishing to pursue careers with international organisations such as the United Nations, the Council of Europe, the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO), the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), the Organisation of American States, the African Union and the Arab League.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

Teachings and Learning is predominantly through weekly synchronous and asynchronous online workshops. The learning ethos is to draw on the range and experience of our diverse student cohort

Our extensive e-law library facility gives access to many legal and academic sources from within and outside the jurisdiction.

Modules are assessed by coursework which comprises of a 1000 word essay plan which feeds into a 3000 word essay. This method of assessment has proved very popular with students as it provides useful feedback for their final submissions.

The course is supported by the University’s web-based Blackboard facility with ICT an integral part of the programme. The University subscribes to extensive electronic legal data bases and journals while all students are registered users of UCLan’s network with a dedicated network space accessible remotely.

GRADUATE CAREERS

As well as international career prospects, this LLM also offers excellent domestic career prospects such as central and local governments; social work, probation, youth and community work; and the police, prison and immigration services. Security litigation is also a growing area of legal practice.

The programme offers excellent career prospects for those wishing to pursue careers with international organisations such as the United Nations, the Council of Europe, the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO), the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), the Organisation of American States, the African Union and the Arab League.

FURTHER INFORMATION

This LLM will introduce students to the substantive doctrine, values and policies of international criminal law by looking at different academic perspectives on international criminal law (ICL) and national, regional and international security as well as the nature, sources and rationale for ICL. Consideration will be given to the institutions of ICL: UN, ICJ, ICTY, ICTR and ICC as well as the history and development of the ICC (International Criminal Court). The 1998 Rome Statute, ICC Jurisdiction, internal organisation, and the first completed trials will be covered and students will be asked to critique the ICC using constitutional and political arguments for and against its creation and maintenance. Core offences under ICL such as genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, crime of aggression and torture will be examined alongside the defences to ICL charges. There will be a detailed case study of the legal prohibition of incitement to genocide and associated racism demonstrating the challenges to regional and international security.

Transnational police and security cooperation such as Interpol, Europol and Eurojust will be considered as well as the transnational legal dimensions to “national security” including within the context of the European and international human rights law and policy.

Students will develop an understanding of how international law functions in the maintenance of maritime security and peaceful uses of the oceans. The general legal framework, the UN Law of the Sea Convention and IMO Regulations will all be considered. Piracy and maritime terrorism and the freedom of the seas and navigational rights will be examined as well as the proliferation of security initiatives, maritime interdiction and maritime boundary disputes.

Terrorism has been a significant challenge to international peace and security for many years: especially since the advent of Islamist terror groups such as Al-Qaeda in Afghanistan and Pakistan in the late 1990s, culminating many atrocities. This LLM examines incidents of international terrorism and the obligations states have to protect themselves from acts and threats of terrorism. Transnational legal responses to terrorism will also be considered together with an assessment of the rights of individuals suspected of terrorism in the pursuit of protecting human security.

The programme will provide students with expertise, analytical and reflective skills. The programme aims to provide a learning experience that will enable students to develop their academic ability, to further develop their careers and to assist them in making a positive contribution to the wider, global and national community.

Lancashire Law School won 'Highly Commended Legal Education Provider of The Year 2017' by the Solicitors Journal Awards 



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