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Masters Degrees (Law Enforcement)

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This degree aims to deliver an understanding of the contemporary security and intelligence environment in western democracies, focusing particularly on the law enforcement environment in the UK. Read more

Course outline

This degree aims to deliver an understanding of the contemporary security and intelligence environment in western democracies, focusing particularly on the law enforcement environment in the UK. Start dates are available in January, April and September.

There is a national and international need for graduates to acquire the skills to analyse security and intelligence matters. Emphasis is placed on relating academic and historical analyses to contemporary problems and policy questions especially in the UK but also to western states in general. This course uniquely uses a degree of “practice” expertise within those delivering the programme.

This MA is aimed at both those seeking professional skills and those requiring a more general grounding in this subject. Graduates will be able to demonstrate deep knowledge and understanding of security and intelligence issues. For the Law Enforcement intelligence community in particular, this programme offers one component of “professionalisation” within the growing and increasingly significant career pathway of intelligence within the overall arena of policing in the contemporary UK.

The five modules and dissertation on an agreed topic fit together to deliver a strong contemporary security and intelligence focus for students by:

- providing a robust theoretical model, or argued thesis in which a student’s research, reading and writing may be placed;
- outlining and examining the key priority geopolitical threats facing the UK;
- exploring the context in which security and intelligence agencies and the law enforcement intelligence sector are required to operate.

Drawing on the extensive practitioner experience of some of the fellows of the University of Buckingham Centre for Security and Intelligence Studies (BUCSIS), it examines carefully and in detail the security and intelligence tradecraft and machinery which interface with these threats, paying due attention to a number of plans for reform both in the UK and beyond.

Find out more about our Department of International Studies http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/economics-international.

About BUCSIS

BUCSIS was established in 2008 as a world-class centre for research into the key Security and Intelligence issues facing the UK and the world in the 21st century. The Centre is headed by a leading academic in the field, Professor Anthony Glees, and is supported by a research and teaching team led by Dr Julian Richards, a Security Studies specialist with a long experience of working in the UK government on defence and security policy issues. More information about BUCSIS.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/ma/law-enforcement-security-intelligence.

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This general LLM programme is the ideal choice for students wishing to expose themselves to diverse areas of advanced legal scholarship. Read more

Programme description

This general LLM programme is the ideal choice for students wishing to expose themselves to diverse areas of advanced legal scholarship.

Edinburgh Law School offers a very wide range of specialist courses, many taught by internationally recognised experts in their fields.

At present, key areas of research and teaching include:

international law
commercial and corporate law
criminal law
international economic law
international banking and finance
medical ethics
criminology
intellectual property
information technology law
European law
private law
comparative law
human rights
public law.

This allows students on the general LLM to take courses which make up a diverse and challenging curriculum and through which they will be able to develop a broad expertise in cutting-edge legal scholarship.

Programme structure

The programme structure for 2017/18 is currently being finalised. You will take a total of 120 credits in taught courses, 60 in each semester, which may include the following:

Commercial Law

Choose a maximum of 40 credits:

Company Law (40 credits, full year course)
Contract Law in Europe (40 credits, full year course)
The Law of International Trade (40 credits, full year course)
Corporation Law and Economics (20 credits, semester 1)
International Commercial Arbitration (20 credits, semester 1)
Principles of Corporate Finance Law (20 credits, semester 1)
The Law of Secured Finance (20 credits, semester 1)
Comparative Corporate Governance (20 credits, semester 2)
Corporate Social Responsibility and the Law (20 credits, semester 2)
European Labour Law (20 credits, semester 2)
Insolvency Law (20 credits, semester 2)
Principles of Insurance Law (20 credits, semester 2)

Criminal Law and Evidence

Choose a maximum of 60 credits:

General Principles of Criminal Law (20 credits, semester 1)
Current Issues in Criminal Law (20 credits, semester 2)
Sexual Offending and the Law (20 credits, semester 2)

Criminology

Choose a maximum of 60 credits:

Criminological Research Methods (40 credits, full year course)
Theoretical Criminology (20 credits, semester 1)
Criminal Justice and Penal Process (20 credits, semester 1)
Global Crime and Insecurity (20 credits, semester 1)
Cybercrime (20 credits, semester 2)
Mental Health and Crime (20 credits, semester 2)
Responding to Global Crime and Insecurity (20 credits, semester 2)
Surveillance and Security (20 credits, semester 2)

EU Law

Choose a maximum of 60 credits:

EU Competition Law (40 credits, full year course)
EU Constitutional Law (20 credits, semester 1)
EU Fundamental Rights Law (20 credits, semester 2)

IP, Media and Technology Law

Choose a maximum of 40 credits:

Intellectual Property Law 1: Copyright and Related Rights (20 credits, semester 1)
International Intellectual Property System (20 credits, semester 1)
The Legal Challenges of Information Technologies (20 credits, semester 1)
Robotics and the Law (20 credits, semester 1)
Contemporary Issues in the Law and Policy of e-Commerce, the Digital Economy and International Information Governance (20 credits, semester 2)
Data Protection and Information Privacy (20 credits, semester 2)
Information: Control and Power (20 credits, semester 2)
Intellectual Property - Law and Society (20 credits, semester 2)
International and European Media Law (20 credits, semester 2)
Law and New Technologies: Artificial Intelligence, Risk and the Law (20 credits, semester 2)
Law of E-Commerce (20 credits, semester 2)
Managing Intellectual Property (20 credits, semester 2)

International Law

Choose a maximum of 40 credits:

Fundamental Issues in International Law (40 credits, full year course)
International Criminal Law (40 credits, full year course)
International Environmental Law (40 credits, full year course)
WTO Law (40 credits, full year course)
History and Theory of International Law (20 credits, semester 1)
International Climate Change Law (20 credits, semester 1)
International Human Rights Law (20 credits, semester 1)
International Investment Law (20 credits, semester 1)
International Law of the Sea (20 credits, semester 1)
Advanced Issues in International Economic Law (20 credits, semester 2)
Diplomatic Law (20 credits, semester 2)
EU Climate Change and Energy Law (20 credits, semester 2)
Inter-State Conflict and Humanitarian Law (20 credits, semester 2)

Legal History and Legal Theory

Choose a maximum of 60 credits:

Traditions of Legal Inquiry (20 credits, semester 1)
Reasoning with Precedent (20 credits, semester 1)
Law and the Enlightenment (20 credits, semester 2)
The Anatomy of Public Law (20 credits, semester 2)

Medical Law

Choose a maximum of 60 credits:

Fundamental Issues in Medical Jurisprudence (20 credits, semester 1)
Risk and Regulation: Health and the Environment (20 credits, semester 1)
Contemporary Issues in Medical Jurisprudence (20 credits, semester 2)
Life Sciences, Society and Law (10 credits, semester 2)
Medical Negligence (10 credits, semester 2)

Private Law

Choose a maximum of 60 credits:

Comparative Property Law (20 credits, semester 1)
Delict and Tort (20 credits, semester 1)
Principles of International Tax Law (20 credits, semester 1)
Comparative and International Trust Law (20 credits, semester 2)
EUCOTAX Wintercourse (20 credits, semester 2)
Family Law in Comparative Perspectives (20 credits, semester 2)
International Private Law: Jurisdiction and Enforcement of Judgments (20 credits, semester 2)
Principles of European Tax Law (20 credits, semester 2)

Public Law

Choose a maximum of 60 credits:

Human Rights and Conflict Resolution (20 credits, semester 2)
Human Rights Law in Europe (20 credits, semester 2)
The Anatomy of Public Law (20 credits, semester 2)

Learning outcomes

By the end of this programme, you should have acquired a more sophisticated understanding of your chosen subjects, including the diverse functions of law in contemporary society, differing approaches to the subject and a greater familiarity with research materials and methods.

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The LLM in Commercial and Corporate Law covers a broad range of commercially focussed modules that draw on the wealth of commercial expertise across the School of Law. Read more
The LLM in Commercial and Corporate Law covers a broad range of commercially focussed modules that draw on the wealth of commercial expertise across the School of Law.

LLM in Commercial and Corporate Law deals with the global and regional regulation of international trade, structuring and managing international business transactions, and the economic foundations of trade and corporate law.

Professional Module Exemptions

The Chartered Banker Institute (CBI) has recognised masters programmes offered by the School of Economics and Finance for advanced standing for the Chartered Banker Diploma. Graduates can proceed directly to the Chartered Banker Diploma with no requirement for prior underpinning study, recognising the high level of commonality of elements within LLM programme content against the CBI’s Diploma modules.

Students on the LLM programme who take both the QLLM136 Ethics in Business and in Finance and QLLM007 Banking Law modules will be eligible for exemption from the Chartered Banker Diploma compulsory module: Professionalism Regulation and Ethics.

Taught modules

Modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Commercial and Corporate Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of available LLM modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated.

Note: Not all of the modules will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change.

Please refer the toe QMUL Law website for a full list and information on the modules for this programme.

Below is an example of some of the modules for this programme .
◦◦ QLLM011 Company Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM021 Corporate Governance (45 credits)
◦ QLLM025 E-Commerce Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM050 International Commercial Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM060 International Merger Control (45 credits)
◦ QLLM062 International Tax Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM068 Law of Economic Crime (45 credits)
◦ QLLM069 Law of Finance and Foreign Investment in Emerging Economies (45 credits)
◦ QLLM076 Media Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM080 Multinational Enterprises and the Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM087 Taxation Principles and Concepts (45 credits)
◦ QLLM095 Intellectual Property and the Creative Industries (45 credits)
◦ QLLM120 Business Taxation (45 credits)
◦ QLLM124 European Union Competition Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM128 Telecommunications Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM138 General Principles of Insurance Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM139 Insurance Regulation (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM141 Insurance Contracts (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM142 Reinsurance Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM145 Intellectual Property in Business (45 credits)
◦ QLLM150 Strategic Decision Making for Lawyers (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM151 Negotiation Theory and Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM155 Principles of Regulation (Sem1)
◦ QLLM164 Elements of Islamic Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM165 Islamic Finance and Commercial Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM179 International and Comparative Petroleum Law and Contracts (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM180 US International Taxation (45 credits)
◦ QLLM181 Legal Aspects of Paperless Trade (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM182 / QLLG006 Charterparties: Law and Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM191 Competition and Regulation in EU Healthcare Markets (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM192 Market Integration and Regulation in the European Internal Market (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM300 / QLLG001 Marine Insurance Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM302 / QLLG004 Carriage of Goods (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM305 Cartels, Collusion and Competition Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM306 Competition enforcement: From investigation to sanctions (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM316 Chinese Business Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM324 Comparative Contract Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM328 Digital Intellectual Property Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM329 Informational Technology Transactions (sem 2)
◦ QLLM330 Comparative Copyright Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM331 International Copyright: International Treaties and Cross-Border Litigation (sem 1)
◦ QLLM332 Comparative Law of Patents and Trade Secrets (sem 1)
◦ QLLM333 International Law of Patents and Related Rights (sem 2)
◦ QLLM334 Licensing Intellectual Property (sem 1)
◦ QLLM335 Intellectual Property and Fashion: Art and Design (sem 1)
◦ QLLM337 Design and Intellectual Property: EU and US
◦ QLLM338 International and Comparative Law of Unfair Competition (sem 1)
◦ QLLM339 The Law of Registered Trade Marks (sem 2)
◦ QLLM340 Global Intellectual Property: Fundamental Principles (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM341 Global Intellectual Property: Technology and Policy (sem 2)
◦ QLLM342 Interactive Entertainment and Intellectual Property Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM343 Interactive Entertainment Law: Contracts and Regulation (sem 2)
◦ QLLM345 The Business of Film (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM348 Music Industry Contracts (sem 2)
◦ QLLM354 Information Security and the Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM360 Banking Law: International (sem 1)
◦ QLLM361 Banking Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM362 International Finance Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM363 International Finance Law Applied (sem 2)
◦ QLLM366 Regulation of Financial Markets (sem 1)
◦ QLLM368 Corporate Rescue and Cross-border Insolvency (sem 1)
◦ QLLM369 Financial Distress and Debt Restructuring (sem 2)
◦ QLLM370 WTO Law: Market Access and Non-Discrimination (sem 1)
◦ QLLM371 WTO Law: Trade Remedies and Regulatory Issues (sem 2)
◦ QLLM372 Corporate Finance Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM373 Mergers and Acquisitions (M and As) (sem 2)
◦ QLLM376 International Economic Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM377 EU Financial and Monetary Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM378 Securities Regulation (sem 2)
◦ QLLM385 Alternative Dispute Resolution: Theory and Context (sem 1)
◦ QLLM386 Alternative Dispute Resolution: Selected Issues (sem 2)
◦ QLLM391 International Construction Contracts and Dispute Resolution (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM392 International Commercial Arbitration (sem 1)
◦ QLLM395 International Commercial Litigation (sem 1)
◦ QLLM396 Commercial Conflicts of Laws (sem 2)
◦ QLLM400 United States Energy Law, Regulation and Policy (sem 1)
◦ x CCLE019 Accounting for Lawyers (Sem 1)
◦ x CCLE021 International Macroeconomics for Lawyers (Sem 1)
◦ x CCLE026 Financial Models and Derivatives in a Legal Context (45 credits)
◦ x CCLE027 Financial Models and Application to Corporate Finance (45 credits)

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This specialist LLM International Commercial Law builds on your undergraduate study by deepening your understanding of international business law, as well furthering your commercial awareness in this area. Read more
This specialist LLM International Commercial Law builds on your undergraduate study by deepening your understanding of international business law, as well furthering your commercial awareness in this area. The course is designed for those intending to practice law in the field of international commercial law.

The course covers key principles of international business law and the international sale of goods. Alongside this, it explores the reputational and litigation risks associated with corporate social responsibility and human rights. Optional modules include 'Mediation and negotiation' and 'International commercial arbitration'.

Students interested in Chinese business law can opt to take part in a study visit to China organised in co-operation with the Confucius Institute and may choose an aspect of this topic for their dissertation. You'll also be encouraged and supported to obtain placements with London law firms and partner legal organisations.

This course is subject to validation and content may change.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/international-commercial-law-llm

Modules

- Research methods
You'll study research methods and prepare a research proposal for your dissertation. You may opt to study Mandarin Level 1 and take part in a study visit to China for an introduction to the Chinese Legal System and Business Law as a preparation for your dissertation.

- Principles of international business law
This module examines the nature, history and sources of international commercial law; the role of conflict of laws in international business law and international commercial dispute resolution; the relevance of comparative law to international business law and the various instruments (international conventions, model laws etc.) and institutions (including UNIDROIT, UNCITRAL, ICC, the Hague Conference on Private International Law) responsible for the harmonization of international business law.

- The international sale of goods
This module examines the usual legal structures of international sales transactions. It covers the rules governing the sales contract, and related issues such as letters of credit, bills of lading and Incoterms. The module examines transnational sources of law, particularly the UN Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (Vienna 1980), and exemplary domestic laws from both common law and civil law jurisdictions, including the United States' Uniform Commercial Code, English law, French law and German law.

- International business, human rights and CSR
The module examines issues in the field of business and human rights and the international context of corporate social responsibility, which are of central importance in an era of increasing globalization. The module will assess the intersection of transnational business operations and efforts to promote international human rights. The module begins with a review of the international debate on corporate responsibility to respect human rights, and traces the emergence, within the UN, of the "Protect, Respect and Remedy" Framework. Cases and mechanisms are examined through which corporations might be held accountable for their impact on human rights. The module also examines the ways in which both domestic and international legal systems seek to regulate the problem of corruption and bribery, looking at the Bribery Act 2010 and the United Nations Convention against Corruption.

- Dissertation
The Dissertation module requires completion of a 15000 words Master's level dissertation in an area consistent with, and appropriate to (and, if relevant, the specialist pathway within) the degree being sought. You'll be required to virtually independently conceive, plan and execute an appropriate piece of research based on firm academic foundations. In doing so, the dissertation is required to address an issue or matter of some importance within the areas and/or disciplines encompassed across the Master's degree being sought.

Plus two optional modules from:

- International and comparative company law
The purpose of this module will be to compare the main principles governing the law of corporations within major legal systems. Examples will be drawn from both within the common-law, comparing the separate development in common-law jurisdictions of themes derived from a common source, and the civil law, comparing the differences between civil and common-law views on the characteristics and functions of corporate bodies. The cross-border framework for corporations, including existing EU law and proposals, will also be examined as will the rise of the multinational company

- International commercial arbitration
International commercial arbitration is a process of resolving business disputes between or among transnational parties through the use of arbitrators rather than courts. The course will examine the conceptual and practical issues relating to matters such as the decision to arbitrate, the arbitration agreement, the relevant law, the structure and process of international arbitration and the recognition and enforcement of arbitral awards.

- Mediation and negotiation
The theory and practice of mediation and negotiation, including practical role based exercises to develop professional skills and experience.

All modules are assessed by coursework, except for 'International business, human rights and CSR' which is assessed by an oral presentation.

Employability

This course is focused on the professional practice of international commercial law and seeks to develop professional skills and experience as well as academic knowledge. Key skills include dispute resolution and you'll be encouraged and supported to seek relevant legal placements alongside your studies.

The course requires an undergraduate degree in law, so your existing knowledge of basic principles, concepts and theories, combined with this specialism will give your career in the area a head start.

An LLM is also beneficial if you want to go into teaching law.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

The School of Law and Social Sciences enjoys strong links with the local, London legal profession, including law firms, the Southwark Legal Advice Network and the South London Law Society. LSBU hosts the Confucius Institute.

Placements

You can choose to study Mandarin Level 1 and take part in a study visit to China for an introduction to the Chinese legal system and business law as preparation for your dissertation. You'll also be encouraged and supported to seek a law firm placement in London.

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The Specialist LLM course in Public International Law provides a critical understanding of the principles within which public international law operates, raising issues of treaty interpretation and enforcement across a range of sub-disciplines. Read more
The Specialist LLM course in Public International Law provides a critical understanding of the principles within which public international law operates, raising issues of treaty interpretation and enforcement across a range of sub-disciplines.

Who is it for?

This course will be of interest to individuals who seek a deeper understanding of the many dimensions of public international law from both a theoretical and practical perspective. As this course has an international dimension it will appeal to students from around the world and at all stages of their legal education and professional experience.

Objectives

The Specialist LLM in Public International Law concentrates on the development of a thorough and critical understanding of Public International Law, the law governing the interaction of states. The last decade or so has seen tremendous challenges for International Law including matters relating to armed conflict, commercial relations and human rights. This course gives you the opportunity to trace and evaluate some of these practical and theoretical developments guided by leading academics and expert practitioners.

City's LLM in Public International Law takes a contemporary approach to the study of international law. You may choose from an extensive list of electives including the law of treaties, human rights, economic law, law of the sea and others.
All electives adopt a curriculum that is cutting edge in its theoretical approach and a skill-based methodology to enable you to develop your knowledge and skills in the subject in the best manner possible.

Placements

Each year a small number of internships become available and you will be provided with information about such opportunities and how to apply during the year of your study.

Academic facilities

As a City Law School student you will benefit from everything the institution has to offer including the Learning Success department and Lawbore, an online resource designed to help you find the information you need for the course modules. All course modules have online depositories through Moodle.

As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

You will benefit from City, University of London’s extensive library of hard copy and electronic resources, including its comprehensive database of domestic and international caselaw, legislation, treaties and legal periodicals. There are two law-specific libraries – one at the Gray’s Inn campus and one at our Northampton square campus - with individual study spaces and dedicated rooms for group work.

Additionally, we are a short walk away from the British Library and the Law Library of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies.

Teaching and learning

This course is taught by leading academics as well as visiting practitioners including barristers and solicitors who work in private practice and in legal departments of major companies.

Assessment

All modules are structured as 10-weekly two-hour seminars which comprise both lectures as well as interactive tutorials. All modules are supported by our online learning platform - Moodle. Assessment is by way of coursework which comprises 100% of the final mark in each module. Each module carries the same weight in terms of the overall qualification.

You will be allocated a dedicated supervisor for your dissertation who will help you develop a specific topic and provide support in terms of resources, content and structure.

Modules

As with all LLM specialisms at City, University of London, you may take either five modules and a shorter dissertation (10,000 words) or four modules and a longer dissertation (20,000 words). All modules are of the same duration and are taught per term (September – December or January – April) rather than the whole academic year. If you take four modules you will take two per term in each term and if you take five modules you will have three in one term and two in the other. Dissertations are written during the summer term when there are no classes.

In order to obtain this specialism, you must choose at least three modules from within this specialism and write their dissertation on a subject within the specialism.
-10,000 word Supervised Dissertation (30 credits)
OR
-20,000 word Supervised Dissertation (60 credits)

Specialism modules - choose from the following 30 credit modules:
-Air and Space Law
-Comparative Constitutional Law
-International Law of the Sea
-Public International Law
-Law of Treaties
-International Human Rights in Law and Practice
-International Investment Law
-Minorities and Indigenous Peoples in International Law
-International Dispute Settlement
-International Responsibility of States and International Organisations
-Law of International Organisations
-International Law and the Global Economy
-International Criminal Law: the Practitioner Perspective
-International Criminal Law: Crimes and Institutions
-Law and War
-World Trade Law

For your remaining modules you can choose from more than 50 modules covering a diverse range of subjects.

Career prospects

As a graduate of this specialist LLM in Public International Law you will be well placed to pursue careers in this area of law in private practice, in house in a legal practice, policy and government, non-governmental organisations, and a wide range of non-legal careers in the field of publc international law.

The City Law School has a vibrant Pro Bono programme including our award-winning commercial law clinic for tech start-ups Start-Ed. Students who complete the LLM may wish to continue their academic studies by enrolling in a PhD offered by The City Law School. Master and research students are encouraged to play an active role in our activities, which include a series of seminars organised by the International Law and Affairs Group at the City Law School.

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This is the first ever doctorate degree designed for professionals working in law enforcement, policing, security, government and the private sector who wish to hone their professional and research skills in a PhD-level qualification, but with a more practical, career-orientated focus - study can be customised to suit working needs and the course attracts a diverse range of professionals. Read more
This is the first ever doctorate degree designed for professionals working in law enforcement, policing, security, government and the private sector who wish to hone their professional and research skills in a PhD-level qualification, but with a more practical, career-orientated focus - study can be customised to suit working needs and the course attracts a diverse range of professionals.

More about this course

This is the first postgraduate doctorate level qualification in the UK which is specifically designed for professionals working in law enforcement and policing, security, government, private sector, and the 'wider criminal justice family' who wish to hone both their professional and research skills. This unique course provides both theoretical and relevant practical skills development for those who wish to further their careers in policing, security, community policing, legal occupations and social research methodology.

The course is very international in nature. Past students have come from Canada, Africa, the EU, Caribbean countries as well as the UK. The course contains a balanced content of international law enforcement and security issues, and also local community level problems. The taught modules and assignments are tailored as much as possible to assisting the individual students’ chosen thesis area.

The course aims to produce professionally competent and informed practitioners who have a sophisticated understanding of wider policing theories and advanced research skills and abilities. As well as developing teamwork, leadership and presentation skills, the course will help you acquire the skills and knowledge to tackle complex occupational or professional problems in challenging and diverse situations.

Methods include reports, essay and presentations. You will also be assessed on your thesis.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Knowledge-Based Policing 1 (core, 30 credits)
-Knowledge-Based Policing 2 (core, 30 credits)
-Policing and Society in Context (core, 30 credits)
-Policing, Leadership and Ethics (core, 30 credits)
-Research Methods 1 (core, 30 credits)
-Research Methods 2 (core, 30 credits)

After the course

The course will be of direct benefit to law enforcement officers who wish to progress their careers through a high-level doctoral qualification. As this qualification is more interactive and practical than a traditional PhD, it is an opportunity to gain a recognised qualification while making a significant contribution to your professional environment.

Visa information for international students

As a part-time programme this course does not qualify for a Tier 4 visa. Non-EU students will have to attend the study weekends on short-term study visas.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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Degree. Master of Laws (LL.M.). Specialization. European and Transnational Law of Intellectual Property and Information Technology. Read more

Key points

Degree: Master of Laws (LL.M.).

Specialization: European and Transnational Law of Intellectual Property and Information Technology.

Language of instruction: English.

Duration: 1 year (1 October to 30 September).

Workload: 60 ECTS credits.

Admission requirements: bachelor's degree plus 1 year of professional experience.

Tuition fee: 7,800 euros; early applicants 7,200 euros.

Application deadline: 30 June.

Maximum number of participants: 30.

Overview

The LL.M. in European and Transnational Intellectual Property and Information Technology Law (LIPIT) is a postgraduate program directed at providing the in-depth understanding of legal issues arising from the creation and use of literary or artistic works, mechanical or scientific inventions, digital information, and other intangible assets. It covers a wide variety of subjects, including copyright, patents, trademarks, telecommunications, electronic commerce, information security, and data protection.

Because it is more and more common for transactions with intellectual property and information technology products to transcend national boundaries, this LL.M. Program is conceived as distinctly international and comparative in nature. Solutions from various legal systems are often presented when examining modern problems of the IP and IT law, and cases spreading over two or more countries are regularly discussed and analyzed. One consequence of such an approach is that this Program is suitable for lawyers and other professionals from different countries, rather than being limited to one particular jurisdiction.

Besides the Program's international character, strong emphasis is placed on establishing the direct link to practice. Many classes are taught by experienced attorneys and other practitioners. In lectures and seminars, legal issues are examined largely through analyzing real court cases, identifying concrete common problems and searching for effective solutions to them. Through hands-on workshops and projects, newly acquired knowledge is further enhanced and developed into readily applicable practical skills.

Target group

The main target group of this LL.M. Program is lawyers working or wishing to work with creative and innovative industries. The Program is designed to expand their expertise in the IP and IT law by focusing on issues and aspects that are usually not included in a regular legal studies curriculum, for example the cross-border enforcement of rights stemming from the IP and IT law.

Since the branches of IP and IT Law lie at the intersection of the law with technology, science and arts, the Program is also open to engineers, computer scientists, media managers, and other professionals seeking to enhance their understanding of legal regulation, policies, and mechanisms of protection in the fields of intellectual property and information technology. As a result, Program participants can benefit from exchanging opinions, engaging in group projects and other forms of cooperation with graduates of other disciplines, which helps them to better understand different angles and perspectives of the topics they study.

Besides the variety of academic and professional backgrounds, we also strive to achieve diverse geographic representation in the selection of each year's Program participants. Such diversity enriches classroom discussions and collaborative activities by ensuring the exchange and application of ideas and approaches from various legal systems and cultural environments.

Program duration

Your studies at the LIPIT Program will normally take around one year (from October to September). During this time, you will have to obtain 60 ECTS credits, including 20 credits for a completion of a master's thesis. If your total post-secondary education lasted less than 4 years, you might be required to earn more credits in order to be awarded the LL.M. degree. In this case, our educational adviser will help you to work out an individual study plan that will allow you to earn the required credits without exceeding the normal Program duration.

Program language

Considering the international makeup of the Program, English has been chosen as its language of instruction. Therefore, in order to be admitted to the Program, applicants will have to demonstrate that their English language skills are sufficient for the purposes of higher education.

Though knowledge of German language is not a pre-requisite for admission, it is certainly very useful for managing everyday life and studies in Germany. Therefore, we encourage our international students to learn some German before the beginning of the Program and to take advantage of numerous language learning opportunities offered by the University of Göttingen while studying here. Specifically, students can attend all the courses offered by the University's language center (ZESS) free of charge.

Curriculum

In order to gain your LL.M. degree, you will have to obtain at least 60 ECTS credits. 20 credits will be awarded for the completion of the individual master's module, which involves the preparation and writing of a master's thesis. The remaining 40 ECTS credits can be obtained by completing a sufficient number of group study modules, each of which equals to at least 5 ECTS credits. The list of modules can vary slightly from year to year, but the examples below generally provide a good idea of the available modules:

Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Law
Fundamentals of Information Technology Law
Advanced Intellectual Property Law
Advanced Information Technology Law
E-Commerce Law
Competition Law
Data Protection Law
Media and Telecommunications Law
Information Technology and Legal Informatics
Economic Foundations of IP and IT Law
International and Comparative IP and IT Law
Transnational Enforcement of IP and IT Law

Why study in Göttingen?

The University of Göttingen is constantly ranked among the best German higher education institutions in various national and international university rankings. Since its foundation in 1737, it has provided excellent study and research opportunities to students and scholars from all over the world, including more than 40 Nobel Prize winners. Besides the instruction and guidance from prominent professors and other experts, Göttingen students benefit from the access to first-class study facilities, for example Göttingen State and University Library, which is one of the largest libraries in Germany, containing around 8 million items and providing access to numerous legal and other scholarly databases.

Göttingen University's Faculty of Law enjoys excellent reputation for teaching, research, and professional development. Throughout the centuries of its existence, it has been renowned for advancing the legal science and offering outstanding legal training by eminent jurists like Johann Stephan Pütter or Rudolf von Jhering. Consequently, Göttingen has always been a very attractive place for those wishing to study law, including some famous historic figures like Otto von Bismarck or Wilhelm von Humboldt.

A number of attractive features make studying law in Göttingen especially rewarding. For example, legal education here has a strong link to practice, offering classes not only by professors, but also by practicing attorneys and other practitioners. In addition, many professors are also active outside the academia, for example as legal advisers, members of legislative commissions or judges of highest courts.

Another appealing aspect of Göttingen Law Faculty is its internationality. As well as hosting students from all over the world and providing numerous exchange opportunities, the Faculty also offers classes by visiting professors from other countries and is involved in continuous international cooperation through various dedicated bodies like German-Chinese Legal Science Institute or European Academy of Law and ICT.

Further advantages for law students in Göttingen derive from the wide variety of specialized institutes and other specialization clusters, which ensure that numerous legal subjects can be studied from multiple perspectives and in all their aspects. For example, the Institute of Business Law lets the students of IP and IT law benefit from the combined expertise of Professor Körber, a well-known expert on telecommunication law, competition law and law of search engines; Professor Spindler, the author of popular commentaries and monographs on e-commerce, electronic media, open source and other topics; Professor Wiebe, renowned for his works on ICT law, unfair competition, copyright and data protection; as well as other specialists in these and related areas. Professors Körber, Spindler and Wiebe are also involved in numerous legal policy development activities in Germany, Europe and beyond. These professors were actively engaged in establishing the LIPIT Program and currently they make up its Academic Board.

In addition to lectures and seminars by well-known experts in their fields, students can take advantage of various conferences, workshops, and study trips organized or co-organized by the Faculty or individual professors. For example, students can participate in the yearly International Research Forum on Law and ICT/IP, Göttingen IT Law Forum, and the Summer School of European IP and ICT Law.

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The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is a thriving center of intellectual excellence that encompasses 14 academic departments and 80 degree programs. Read more
The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is a thriving center of intellectual excellence that encompasses 14 academic departments and 80 degree programs. Its more than 2,500 students are engaged in a wide variety of challenging courses and hands-on learning experiences that extend across all areas of the humanities and sciences – from the great philosophers and classic literature to the world economy and environmental sustainability.

At the core of each department are faculty members who have garnered national acclaim for their best-selling books, ground-breaking research and creative endeavors. Together, students and their professors explore globally significant subjects and work towards the goal of improving every aspect of the way in which human beings live. To learn more about a specific area of study, click on the left-hand navigation bar for a full listing of academic departments.

The department

In the Department of Criminal Justice, undergraduate and graduate programs are designed to meet the constant demand for law enforcement and criminal justice professionals. Our programs also provide an excellent pathway toward the study of law.

Our core curriculum thoroughly explores the theory and practice of the criminal justice system. But you will customize your study through elective courses that focus on a particular area of interest. Our full-time faculty is an internationally renowned group of academic professionals, and our adjunct professors are working criminal justice professionals, including attorneys, judges and law enforcement officials.

The LIU Post Department of Criminal Justice was one of the first on the East Coast to establish an internship program. All criminal justice majors intern in the field, and have access to an extraordinary network of criminal justice professionals, making it possible to be offered positions upon graduation.

Criminal Justice students may have the opportunity to spend a semester in Washington, D.C., participating in the Justice Semester at American University, or studying Forensic Psychology at George Washington University.

M.S. in Criminal Justice

The 36-credit Master of Science in Criminal Justice offers an in-depth, 21st century curriculum geared toward forensics, law and society, criminal behavior, cyber crime, terrorism and criminological theory. In addition to our core curriculum, electives are available but not limited to areas such as terrorism, law, high technology, forensics, security, and fraud. The program prepares students for modern-day careers in criminal justice, including cyberspace crime detection, law enforcement management systems and homeland security.

Courses are taught by a distinguished faculty that includes published authors, researchers and widely-consulted authorities on the American and world criminal justice systems. Adjunct faculty members are working professionals in the field and include attorneys, judges and law enforcements officials. Our professors will engage and inspire you to exceed your expectations.

Alumni of our program are employed in a wide variety of professional positions: law enforcement officers, federal agents, security officers, prosecutors, corrections counselors, judges, attorneys, private security professionals, homeland security agents, forensic technologists, crime lab technicians, emergency managers, FBI agents and social service representatives.

Forensic Psychology Semester: George Washington University, Washington, D.C.

The Department of Criminal Justice is proud to announce an articulation agreement with George Washington University concerning Forensic Psychology. Eligible criminal justice graduate students may take forensic psychology courses in Washington, D.C. for a semester. Completed credits will be applied towards the student’s plan of study. To find out more about the George Washington University Program contact the Department of Criminal Justice.

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With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students. Read more
With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students.

This LLM course covers the concepts and enforcement of international criminal law, It focuses on international crimes that fall under the jurisdiction of international criminal courts and tribunals (genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes and aggression). The core principles, law, and institutions of international criminal law are contextualised against international law and human rights, and international humanitarian law.

You'll study the following subset categories of International Law:International Criminal Law, International Human Rights Law and Humanitarian Law by exploring the contours of the duty to prosecute those who commit international crimes. And, focus on the application of domestic and international law to the question of jurisdiction over international criminal activities, including universal jurisdiction of national courts.

The course explores the procedural aspects of international cooperation in criminal matters, with particular attention to extradition and problems associated with obtaining evidence from abroad.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/international-criminal-law-procedure-llm

Modules

- International criminal law
- International criminal procedure and practice
- International law and human rights
- Research methods
- Dissertation

Plus two options from:
- International humanitarian law
- International human rights and development
- Terrorism
- Case management
- Advocacy
- Migration and development

Study modes

Full-time:
- 14 months; taught October-June; dissertation July-October
- Six modules plus a dissertation to be completed July-October

Part-time:
- 26 months: taught stage October-June year one and year two; dissertation July-October or July to January in year 2)
- Three modules a year for two years; plus a dissertation completed July-January, or, July-October. You can alternatively opt for the accelerated part-time learning mode (Saturday classes).

Employability

New international criminal law:
This programme is particularly relevant if you're looking for careers in the new international criminal law institutions such as the International Criminal Court or in agencies with rapidly increasing criminal justice competencies such as the UN or the EU.

You'll acquire in-depth knowledge of international criminal law and procedure, international human rights law and international humanitarian law. You'll have the necessary knowledge and skills to practice international criminal law before international tribunals or national courts.

This LLM will appeal to you if you're interested in the increasing trend in international human rights law to criminalize and prosecute mass human rights atrocities, both in domestic courts and international tribunals, like the International Criminal Court.

Non-governmental organisations

Other graduates may embark on careers in non-governmental organisations, such as Amnesty International or Human Rights Watch, or in the area of international legal practice. The LLM is also highly relevant for law graduates and criminal law practitioners both from the UK and abroad. Moreover it is particularly relevant for graduates from Commonwealth Common Law jurisdictions, wishing to study international criminal law and practice while developing their legal and professional knowledge and skills in the field of international litigation.

The LLM aims to produce reflective practitioners, capable of using their professional experience in combination with theoretical insights to contribute to public debate on international criminal justice policy and practice.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

A number of Visiting Professors and Lecturers will teach on the course. All are leading practitioners with a national reputation in the fields of international criminal law and human rights.

Recent guest lecturers:
- Ko Aung, Burma Human Rights Campaigner;
- Joel Bennathan, QC, Barrister;
- Sir Geoffrey Bindman, Solicitor;
- Imran Khan, Solicitor;
- Roger Smith, Director of Justice.

Teaching and learning

- Assessment
Content, knowledge and understanding is assessed through coursework, or coursework, presentations and on-line assessments.

Assessment methods reflect the development of legal skills within particular modules, for example the advocacy presentation within the Advocacy Module and the Case study within the Case Management Module. Oral assessments assess your ability to effectively and critically research, evaluate, write and present a coherent legal analysis of a particular issue drawing upon relevant law reform proposals, assessing conflicting interpretations of the International Criminal Law and proposing new hypotheses relevant to the topic being assessed.

- Coursework
Coursework can take many forms (based on the practical or theoretical content of the module) including essays and reports. Typically coursework pieces will be 6,000 words in length. Students will explore a topic covered in depth, providing a critical, practical, insight into the topic analysed.

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The LLM in Intellectual Property Law programme allows students to study introductory and advanced intellectual property (IP) and technology law and to scrutinise the policies affecting intellectual property and technology law under the guidance of leading scholars in the field. Read more
The LLM in Intellectual Property Law programme allows students to study introductory and advanced intellectual property (IP) and technology law and to scrutinise the policies affecting intellectual property and technology law under the guidance of leading scholars in the field. Students will be able to study a wide range of topics from the protection of inventions, products, trade marks, creative works and designs to the global policy surrounding the law.


Modules:


To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Intellectual Property Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.

◦ QLLM025 E-Commerce Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM076 Media Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM095 Intellectual Property and the Creative Industries (45 credits)
◦ QLLM145 Intellectual Property in Business (45 credits)
◦ QLLM162 Intellectual Property Taxation (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM178 Competition Law, Intellectual Property and Innovation (45 credits)
◦ QLLM308 Civil Enforcement of Intellectual Property (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM309 Criminal Enforcement of Intellectual Property (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM328 Digital Intellectual Property Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM329 Informational Technology Transactions (sem 2)
◦ QLLM330 Comparative Copyright Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM331 International Copyright: International Treaties and Cross-Border Litigation (sem 1)
◦ QLLM332 Comparative Law of Patents and Trade Secrets (sem 1)
◦ QLLM333 International Law of Patents and Related Rights (sem 2)
◦ QLLM334 Licensing Intellectual Property (sem 1)
◦ QLLM335 Intellectual Property and Fashion: Art and Design (sem 1)
◦ QLLM336 Intellectual Property and Fashion: Business and Law (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM337 Design and Intellectual Property: EU and US
◦ QLLM338 International and Comparative Law of Unfair Competition (sem 1)
◦ QLLM339 The Law of Registered Trade Marks (sem 2)
◦ QLLM340 Global Intellectual Property: Fundamental Principles (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM341 Global Intellectual Property: Technology and Policy (sem 2)
◦ QLLM342 Interactive Entertainment and Intellectual Property Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM343 Interactive Entertainment Law: Contracts and Regulation (sem 2)
◦ QLLM344 The Law of Film (sem 1)
◦ QLLM345 The Business of Film (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM346 EU Copyright Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM347 The Law of Geographical Indications (GIs) (sem 2)
◦ QLLM348 Music Industry Contracts (sem 2)
◦ QLLM349 Transnational Mooting (sem 1)
◦ QLLM389 Copyright and Trademark in China (sem 1)
◦ QLLM390 Patent and Design in China (sem 2)
◦ QLLM400 United States Energy Law, Regulation and Policy (sem 1)

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The LLM in Competition Law programme offers you the opportunity to study the application of competition law in relation to different business phenomena, ranging from anti-competitive agreements and abusive dominance to mergers. Read more
The LLM in Competition Law programme offers you the opportunity to study the application of competition law in relation to different business phenomena, ranging from anti-competitive agreements and abusive dominance to mergers. Competition law is an exciting and important area of law, particularly internationally and across the EU. You will also have an opportunity to explore the interface between competition law and related areas such as intellectual property rights and trade.

The Interdisciplinary Centre for Competition Law and Policy (ICC)

The Interdisciplinary Centre for Competition Law and Policy (ICC) at Queen Mary conducts research in competition law and policy and offers training to judges, lawyers, business people and enforcement officials in the field of competition law. The ICC runs an annual event 'Crowell & Moring conference: Trends and Developments in Global Competition Law'.

ICC Global Antitrust Review

The Global Antitrust Review is an online refereed student journal that aims to encourage and promote scholarship among young competition law scholars.

Taught modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the same field of law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM available modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated below.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.


◦ QLLM044 International and Comparative Competition Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM060 International Merger Control (45 credits)
◦ QLLM094 UK Competition Law (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM124 European Union Competition Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM178 Competition Law, Intellectual Property and Innovation (45 credits)
◦ QLLM305 Cartels, Collusion and Competition Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM306 Competition enforcement: From investigation to sanctions (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM307 Economics of Competition Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM317 Competition and the State: EU State Aid Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM318 Competition and the State: Regulation of public services in the EU (Sem 2)

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Forensic information technology (FIT) is the scientific use or application of information technology (IT) in the generation and presentation of digital evidence to be used in courts, legal or other formal proceedings. Read more

Why take this course?

Forensic information technology (FIT) is the scientific use or application of information technology (IT) in the generation and presentation of digital evidence to be used in courts, legal or other formal proceedings.

This course will enable you to develop your understanding and application of security issues and cybercrime for the purpose of forensic computing and investigation.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Learn how to investigate hacking, fraud and deception using a range of digital forensic tools
Practise identifying intruders' trails and suspected inappropriate use of internet applications in order to compile scientific evidence to prosecute
Manage a real-life computer engineering project using appropriate techniques for writing and reasoning about security policies

What opportunities might it lead to?

Many police investigations or civil disputes involve investigation of computer systems, mobile phones or other information devices, and there are an increasing number of UK companies that undertake investigations as consultants. You can expect to find career opportunities in such companies as well as in law enforcement and other services.

Accredited by BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT for the purposes of fully meeting the further learning academic requirement for registration as a Chartered IT Professional (CITP). This course also partially meets the academic requirement for registration, either as a Chartered Scientist (CSci) or (on behalf of the Engineering Council) as a Chartered Engineer (CEng)*.

*On condition that the Master's Engineering Project is successfully completed.

Module Details

You will study four key topics which will collaboratively develop your knowledge and ability to carry out forensic IT investigations as well as an introduction on how to build protected specification software for data and other web applications. You will also get to build your own test system as part of your final project.

Here are the units you will study:

Computer Forensic Investigation and Cryptography: This unit covers the practical aspects of conducting a forensic investigation of digital evidence. In order for the students to develop a critical understanding of computer forensics, a holistic approach of the forensics investigation process is adopted, with a full investigation ‘life cycle’ from seizure of evidence through to giving evidence in court as an expert witness. We look at a range of tools, operating systems and devices.

Computer Security: The unit provides an introduction to computer security concepts and their practical application, in both closed and interconnected networks. Students are expected to both understand and be able to critically evaluate different approaches to securing complex computer systems.

Cybercrime Security and Risk Management: This unit provides opportunities for participants to develop skills and knowledge in the understanding of corporate cyber threats. Drawing upon a range of practical examples, students will examine how rapid technological development and expansion in access to the internet has impacted upon crime (e.g. how anonymity and unfounded trust encourage deception), mapping out the terrain of information technology, and identifying the emerging areas of cyber crime. Areas explored will include the crossing of established boundaries into spaces over which control has already been established such as cyber-intrusion and cyber-theft, but also 'new cyber crimes' in the form of virtual trespass, Denial of Service attacks, and the development of opportunities for offending in the context of social networking websites.

Master's Project: You will undertake either an engineering unit or a study project, during the summer period. The project offers students the opportunity to apply the taught material in the solution of a real-world problem directly related to their course. The engineering project usually involves building a piece of software to solve a problem. An example of the sort of thing you might do would be building a tool to address a specific forensics requirement. The study project usually involves undertaking a study of an IT domain relevant to forensics. To prepare for this the project includes a number of preparatory sessions, which contribute to part of your final mark.

Specialist optional units include:

Systems, Security and Data Analysis: The first part of the unit provides an overview of computer organisation, operating systems and network design, with a strong focus on security considerations and aspects relevant to computer and digital forensics. The early part of the unit will provide an introduction to relevant issues in system architecture and file system organisation. Threats to computer systems will be considered. The first half of the unit is concluded with studying in some depth current technologies for securing real computer networks. The second part of the unit deals with the important topic of data analytics.

Advanced Programming Skills for the Web: This unit draws together a number of system development skills, focusing on how they can be applied to the development specifically of web applications. Topics covered include web programming, connecting databases to web applications, software tools, testing and security.

Programme Assessment

You will be taught through a combination of practical exercises, simulations, lectures, guest lectures and formative assessments, and will be expected to use a wide range of on and offline learning tools.

You will encounter a range of assessment styles depending on the content and nature of the unit topic. This can include written assignments, presentations as well as group and individual lab-based assessments. However, the most significant assessment element is the final dissertation, which reports and reflects on your final project.

Student Destinations

On completing this course, you will be equipped to seek employment in the following areas: IT auditing, information security, independent investigation, Computer Emergency Response Teams (CERT) and law enforcement agencies. Some of our previous graduates have been successful in finding employment within high-tech crime units, commercial investigation and national security bodies, while others go on to further research study at PhD level.

This course will also appeal to already practising professionals in related areas such as law enforcement, system administration, corporate security, IS auditing or security analysis and management for the commercial sector.

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Are you seeking to enter the criminal justice or community justice sectors? Want to work with drug action teams or in the voluntary and charitable sector?. Read more
Are you seeking to enter the criminal justice or community justice sectors? Want to work with drug action teams or in the voluntary and charitable sector?

The MA Criminology and Criminal Justice at Northumbria University is a dynamic course that offers a flexible mode of study. You will be encouraged to develop a critical understanding of the key themes, issues and political debates concerning crime, crime control and criminal and social justice in the UK and globally.

Learn from an exciting, vibrant and dynamic team of scholars who are high quality teachers and internationally renowned experts within their subject. All of the Criminology staff team have doctorates or extensive professional experience in the Criminology/criminal justice sector.

Equipped with excellent practical, communication, and transferable skills you will be well placed for a range of roles including drug action teams, law enforcement, research, community safety, local authority, voluntary and charitable sectors.

This course has several different available start dates and study options - for more information, please view the relevant web-page:
January full time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/criminology-and-criminal-justice-dtfscj6/

September part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/criminology-and-criminal-justice-dtpscz6/

January part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/criminology-and-criminal-justice-dtpscj6/

Learn From The Best

You will learn from a vibrant and dynamic team of scholars who will provide you with an outstanding learning experience, support and engagement in a research rich environment.

The academic team includes 16 criminology-specific academics with extensive research and engagement with the criminal justice system who bring their real-life experience to their teaching.

Nearly all criminology staff have received funding from leading research institutions and organisations such as Economic and Social Research Council, and they often work in partnership with state and third sector organisations such as Youth Offending Teams and homelessness charities.

They play leading roles in professional associations such as the British Society of Criminology and the Academy of the Social Sciences and serve on the editorial boards of leading disciplinary journals.

The department also has excellent international links within Europe, America and Australia where members of the staff team have been Visiting Fellows and Professors.

Teaching And Assessment

You will learn about research methods and their relevance to the global study of criminology, giving you the relevant skills to conduct your own research and engage with contemporary debates. These debates will be covered in the areas of global penal policy, international policing and security, and social exclusion.

All modules are compulsory, but assessment topics and dissertation allow you to concentrate on your own areas of interest as you develop your knowledge of theory, methods and practical topics.

Your learning combines formal input and practical exercises and discussion, allowing you to develop your ideas through interaction with academic staff and your peers.

Your dissertation is an independent and innovative piece of work, which is designed to demonstrate your skills in researching, collecting evidence, and organising that evidence. Working independently, with the support of a tutor, you’ll find your own sources and evaluate their helpfulness to your study topic.

Module Overview
CR7001 - Research Methods for Global Criminology (Core, 30 Credits)
CR7002 - Comparative Penal Policy (Core, 30 Credits)
CR7003 - International Crime, Policing and Security (Core, 30 Credits)
CR7004 - Social Exclusion and Victimisation in a Global Context (Core, 30 Credits)
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
SO7001 - Advanced Study Skills (Core, 0 Credits)
SO7002 - Social Sciences Postgraduate Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)

Learning Environment

We want to make sure that you can conduct your studies to the best of your abilities, so we’ll always do our best to ensure that you know exactly what is expected of you.

The academic team will help you develop the skills required to plan, manage and review your learning, and support you if you have any issues. A central principle of this system is to help you develop a well-honed ability to work independently upon graduation.

You will be given a dedicated dissertation supervisor with relevant subject expertise and you’ll also have a guidance tutor who will provide support for your personal and academic development.

As you progress, the links between taught elements and your own independent learning will be explained at regular intervals, giving you every opportunity to achieve your full potential.

Research-Rich Learning

According to the UK’s most recent research excellence framework, the criminologists on this course are producing research outputs of international quality within world-leading peer reviewed journals such as Criminology, British Journal of Criminology, Theoretical Criminology, Criminology and Criminal Justice, Policing and Society, Justice Quarterly, the Journal of Criminal Justice, and the Howard Journal of Criminal Justice.

Research is embedded throughout your course at all stages. You will be introduced to research methods to equip you with all the relevant skills you’ll need throughout your studies and beyond.

The Advanced Study Skills module introduces higher level reading, writing and research skills to help support you through the course. Whatever your previous background this module will provide you with important skills to succeed with your studies and to boost subsequent career prospects.

Give Your Career An Edge

The MA Criminology and Criminal Justice focuses on embedding skills to prepare you for a career in a crime related area or for further doctoral study.

You will write traditional essays and develop skills sought by employers through real-world assessments including debate logs, a critical literature review, a portfolio, a research bid and a dissertation.

The department has close links with a range of relevant agencies, including the Prison Service, law enforcement agencies and the voluntary sector, and these close networks will further enhance your learning experience throughout the course.

You will also have access to tailored career guidance in 1-to-1 and CV skills sessions with the Northumbria Careers team.

Your Future

On graduating, you will have developed advanced written and oral communication skills and the ability to apply Criminological concepts to a wide range of practical issues.

You will be able to demonstrate research skills which are valuable in many professions and show that you are someone who can apply independent critical thinking and judgement.

Previous students are enjoying successful careers in the criminal justice and community justice sectors, drug action teams, law enforcement agencies, voluntary and charitable sectors, crime analysis, research, local government, community safety, youth justice and the prison system. You also have the opportunity to continue your academic studies at PhD level.

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Forensic art encompasses a wide range of subjects, notably facial anthropology and identification, such as two and three-dimensional facial reconstruction, craniofacial superimposition, post-mortem depiction, composite art and age progression. Read more
Forensic art encompasses a wide range of subjects, notably facial anthropology and identification, such as two and three-dimensional facial reconstruction, craniofacial superimposition, post-mortem depiction, composite art and age progression.

This highly innovative one-year taught Masters course will encompass all these fields, employing highly specialised tutors from scientific backgrounds alongside experienced forensic art supervisors.

Why study Forensic Art at Dundee?

Forensic Art is the presentation of visual information in relation to legal procedures. A forensic artist may aid in the identification or location of victims of crime, missing persons or human remains, and may facilitate the identification, apprehension or conviction of criminals.

Forensic artists require technical and conceptual art skills alongside comprehensive medical and anatomical knowledge. The course provides training and expertise at the cutting-edge of the forensic art profession

What's so good about studying Forensic Art at Dundee?

You will benefit from the facilities of a well-established art college, whilst appreciating the newly-refurbished laboratories, a dedicated library and access to human material in a modern medical science environment.

The award-winning staff in the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID) are amongst the most experienced in the UK in the fields of human identification, forensic anthropology, craniofacial identification and the study of the human body. The core remit of the Centre is the study of anatomy and staff deliver high quality anatomy teaching at all levels, via whole body dissection which allows students to develop a sound knowledge of the human body.

The Centre was awarded a prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher Education in November 2013. Presented in recognition of 'world class excellence', the Queen’s Anniversary Prizes are among the most highly-regarded awards for the UK’s universities and colleges.

Teaching & Assessment

Teaching methods include traditional and online lectures, practical workshops in the studio and dissecting room and small group discussions. These encourage debate around theoretical research-based solutions to current practical problems.

The MSc will be taught full-time over one year (September to August).

How you will be taught

The course is delivered using traditional methods including lectures, practical studio sessions and small group discussions with an encouragement into debate and theoretical solutions to current problems.

What you will study

This highly innovative one-year taught MSc will encompass these fields, employing highly specialised tutors from scientific backgrounds alongside experienced forensic artists.

Semester 1 (60 credits)

In semester 1 the focus is on the study of anatomy through dissection, prosection study, illustration and facial sculpture and applying this to life art practice. Students will also be introduced to research methods and digital media.

Anatomy 1 - Head and Neck (15 credits)

Anatomy 2 - Post Cranial (15 credits)

Life Art (10 credits)

Digital Media Practice (10 credits)

Research Methods (10 credits)

Semester 1 may be also taken as a stand-alone PGCert entitled ‘Anatomy for Artists’.


Semester 2 (60 credits)

Forensic Facial Imaging, Analysis and Comparison (25 credits)

Forensic Art (25 credits)

Medical-Legal Ethics (10 credits)

On successful completion of Semesters 1 and 2 there is an exit award of a Postgraduate Diploma in Forensic Art and Facial Identification.

Semester 3 (60 credits) - dissertation and exhibition resulting from a self-directed project undertaken either at the university or as a placement.

How you will be assessed

A variety of assessment methods are employed, including anatomy spot-tests; oral and visual presentations; portfolio assessment of 2D/3D image acquisition and of artwork; written coursework and examination, such as forensic case reports.

Careers

This programme aims to provide professional vocational training to underpin your first degree, so that you can enter employment at the leading edge of your discipline. Career opportunities in forensic art are varied and will depend on individual background and interests.

In forensic art, potential careers exist within the police force and overseas law enforcement. Possible careers include:

Police art & design departments producing law enforcement documents, image enhancement, CCTV surveillance, image collection, staff posters and presentations.
SOCO/CSIs in UK or overseas law enforcement agencies
Facial composite practitioner and witness interview expert in police force
Archaeological artist working with museums, institutes and exhibitions
Facial identification services
Medico-legal artwork
Freelance art applications
Special effects and the media/film world
Academia – teaching or research
PhD research

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This popular and high-quality GCHQ-accredited Masters degree delivers modern enterprise Cyber Security, coupled with Digital Forensics for investigation and incident response. Read more
This popular and high-quality GCHQ-accredited Masters degree delivers modern enterprise Cyber Security, coupled with Digital Forensics for investigation and incident response.

Computer security is one of the key challenges in contemporary computing. You will gain critical knowledge within the cyber security and digital forensic domains, combining academic principles and industrial practice. The course is informed by current research in security and digital forensics, and is underpinned by our experience with external partners in law enforcement, financial institutions, and other knowledge transfer activities. Course specialisms include network security, penetration testing, incident response, malware analysis, cryptography, audit and compliance, and host and mobile digital forensics.

The specialisation you gain in the taught modules is further developed through an extensive research-based MSc dissertation project, leading towards a mastery of a subject area and enhancing your particular specialism.

See the website http://www.napier.ac.uk/en/Courses/MSc-Advanced-Security-and-Digital-Forensics-Postgraduate-FullTime

What you’ll learn

This course focuses on the areas of securing computer, network and communications systems, incident response, and the forensic investigation of digital devices and networks. Computer security is a growth industry, and is vital in modern computing environments. You will gain foundation knowledge in all the key areas of computing cyber security, both defensive and offensive, as well as post incident response. The digital forensic aspects of the course include network and computer forensics, allowing you to develop the knowledge required to conduct computer-related investigations across networks, systems, and other digital devices. Cyber security and digital forensics are becoming significant computing disciplines, with an acknowledged skill shortage coupled with growing employment opportunities.

Our industry informed course combines thorough coverage of academic theory aligned with extensive hands-on practical activities, supported by online and blended materials with virtualised lab environments that complement our on-campus specialist facilities.

The School of Computing has developed close ties with industry, law enforcement, and the public sector, through partnerships with organisations such as Cisco Systems, Guidance Software, Dell Secure Works, NCA, NCC, Police Scotland, and many others. The course benefits from this by including many guest lecturers by industry experts. Through the dedicated cyber security and forensic research group extensive cutting edge research is also carried out in key domains by an ever growing cohort of Phd students. The programme also has an affiliation with The Cyber Academy here at Edinburgh Napier, which integrates formally with a range of international initiatives including into a European Centre of Excellence, along with the EU-funded DFET project, which is building a world class virtualised infrastructure for Cyber Security teaching and training, with strong links into law enforcement industry and academia across the World.

The MSc is also one of a very small number of courses certified by GCHQ, recognising UK universities which are excellent in Cyber Security.

Modules

• Host-Based Forensics
• Network Security
• Security Audit and Compliance
• e-Security
• Incident Response and Malware Analysis
• Computer Penetration Testing
• Dissertation

Study modules mentioned above are indicative only. Some changes may occur between now and the time that you study.

Careers

The continued growth in the current requirement for cyber security and digital forensics professionals means there are a wide range of careers which can be followed after graduating from the course, such as security consultant/analyst, penetration tester, network security analyst, forensic investigator, audit/compliance consultant, security certification engineer, incident response analyst, cisco security engineer/architect, sys admin, network engineer.

The programme develops a range of key skills currently needed in industry, covering areas such as network security, penetration testing, security monitoring, incident response, malware analysis, operating systems, network and computer forensics, virtualisation and malware analysis. Materials from many professional courses are integrated into the curriculum, towards helping students prepare for sought after professional certification such as Cisco Security Certifications, CISSP, and CREST.

How to apply

http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/how-to-apply

SAAS Funding

Nothing should get in the way of furthering your education. Student Awards Agency Scotland (SAAS) awards funding for postgraduate courses, and could provide the help you need to continue your studies. Find out more: http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/saas-funded-courses

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