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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Laser Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Laser Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc by Research Laser Physics enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Laser Physics programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

You will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as World-leading or Internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

The two main research groups within the Department of Physics currently focus on the following areas of research:

Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group

Fundamental Atomic Physics
Condensed Matter and Material Physics
Analytical Laser Spectroscopy
Particle Physics Theory Group

String theory, quantum gravity and the AdS/CFT correspondence
Lattice gauge theories, QCD
Supersymmetric field theory, perturbative gauge theory
Field Theory in curved spacetime
Physics beyond the standard model

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a student of the Laser Physics programme in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of
positronium
CW and pulsed laser systems
Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
Raman microscope
CPU parallel cluster
Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

AMQP Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

PPT Group

The Particle Physics Theory Group has fourteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.

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The course explores the versatile field of optical technologies which supports many aspects of modern society. Optical technologies are expected to be a key enabling technology of the 21st century. Read more

Why this course?

The course explores the versatile field of optical technologies which supports many aspects of modern society. Optical technologies are expected to be a key enabling technology of the 21st century.

The course is based on the strong record of optical technologies across research divisions in the department of physics and the collaborating institutions:
- Optics Division (Physics)
- Plasma Division (Physics)
- Nanoscience Division (Physics)
- Institute of Photonics
- Centre for Biophotonics
- Department of Electronic & Electrical Engineering

You can choose classes relevant to your career interests from a wide range of topics including:
- photonics and photonic materials
- nanosciences
- optics at the physics-life sciences interface
- laser-based plasma physics
- quantum optics and quantum information technology

You’ll put the knowledge gained in the taught components to use in a cutting-edge research project.

The course gives you the opportunity of exploring and mastering a large range of optical technologies. It enables you to put devices in the context of an optical system and/or application.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/opticaltechnologies/

Who’s the course suitable for?

It’s suitable for those with a science or engineering background wanting to gain a vocational degree or to obtain a solid foundation for an optics-related PhD programme.

It’s also appropriate for those who’ve worked in industry and want to consolidate their future career by further academic studies.

You’ll study

The course consists of two semesters of taught classes followed by a three- month research project.

Facilities

This course is run by the Department of Physics. The department’s facilities include:
- well-equipped optical labs for semiconductor photonics, semiconductor spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime analysis.
- the Ultrafast Chemical Physics lab with state-of-the-art femtosecond laser systems for multi-dimensional IR spectroscopy
- cutting edge high power laser research with SCAPA, the highest power laser in a UK university
- a scanning electron microscopy suite for analysis of hard and soft matter
- access to top-of-the-range high performance computer facilities
- industry standard cleanroom in the Institute of Photonics

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.

To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form. To ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

Our teaching is based on lectures, tutorials, workshops, laboratory experiments, and research projects.

Assessment

The assessment includes written examinations, coursework, presentations and a talk, oral examination and report presenting and defending the research project.

Careers

The course gives you a thorough basis for a successful job in the photonics, optical and life sciences industries. It provides the basis to excel in more interesting and challenging posts.
The course can also be an entry route into an optics-related PhD programme.
Over the years, many of Strathclyde’s optics and photonics graduates have found successful employment at the large variety of local laser and optics companies as well as with national and international corporations.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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Offered in collaboration with Heriot-Watt University. This programme is aimed at graduates in physics or electrical engineering who seek postgraduate education in photonics to enhance their opportunities in industry/ commerce or in PhD research in photonics. Read more

MSc in Photonics and Optoelectronic Devices

• Offered in collaboration with Heriot-Watt University.

• This programme is aimed at graduates in physics or electrical engineering who seek postgraduate education in photonics to enhance their opportunities in industry/ commerce or in PhD research in photonics.

• The programme is tailored to balance fundamental understanding with industrial relevance.

• You gain an understanding of the fundamental properties of optoelectronic materials and devices with vocational training in modern optics, laser physics and semiconductor physics. You also gain practical experience in the operation of a wide range of laser devices and optoelectronic technologies.

• You develop an appreciation of the widespread practical applications of coherent light sources in communications, material processing and testing, optical processing, medical treatments and diagnostics, and environmental monitoring.

• The industrial project placement occupies 12-14 weeks from late May to August and is assessed in September after the submission of a dissertation.

• The admissions process will be run by the University of St Andrews in 2016 and by Heriot-Watt University in 2017.

Features

* In the UK Research Excellence Framework 2014, the quality of research undertaken by PHYESTA, the joint research School of Physics & Astronomy between the Universities of St Andrews and Edinburgh, was ranked third in the UK and top in Scotland.

* The School has around 40 academic staff, around 70 postdoctoral researchers, including 7 SUPA, EPSRC, STFC and Royal Society Research Fellows, around 80 research students and around 20 students on taught postgraduate courses.

* The MSc course in Photonics and Optoelectronic Devices is offered in collaboration with Heriot-Watt University, allowing students access to the expertise at both sites.

* St Andrews has recently opened £3.7 million of specialist research labs in photonic microfabrication and in high resolution condensed matter physics.

* We are a member of the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance (SUPA), whose Graduate School provides a comprehensive range of graduate level courses in physics and astronomy.

Postgraduate community

The postgraduate community in the School of Physics & Astronomy includes typically ten students in our MSc class, two to ten engineering doctorate students taking taught modules, plus around 80 PhD research students. Students on the MSc course come from all over the world, with a mix of students from the UK, EU and overseas.

You are taught by internationally-leading research experts, and the relatively small size of the School means that there can be real interaction between students and staff. Lecture classes are relatively small, ranging from about 30 students down to groups of just a few. The teaching staff are proud to have the reputation of being accessible to students, and enjoy explaining the excitement of physics and its applications to their students. Well-equipped teaching laboratories allow you to explore the science of photonics in “research mode”, and interact directly with academic staff and the School’s early-career researchers.

Teaching methods

• Teaching comprises lectures, tutorials, and laboratory work.
• The teaching laboratory offers the photonics students a wide choice of experiments.
• Work for lecture modules is assessed largely through examinations whereas the laboratory work is assessed in a continuous manner. Lecture courses are examined at the end of each semester.
• MSc students select their project topic part way through the course. This is assessed by the submission of a dissertation and an oral exam.
• You are also invited to attend relevant research seminars and departmental colloquia given by departmental research staff, specialists from other universities and specialists from industry.

Careers

The MSc programme aims to produce graduates with appropriate knowledge, skills and attitudes to go on to be successful in the photonics area, be it in industrial/commercial positions, or undertaking PhD study in universities.

Typically half the class will start PhD or EngD programmes after graduation, while the other half will take up industrial and commercial positions. Commercial destinations of graduates from a recent year-group include laser development, sales and marketing with consumer/office optoelectronics, product support of optical metrology equipment, theoretical modelling of photonic structures, university teaching, internship with a national laser lab, and semiconductor optoelectronics research.

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This course will train physicists and engineers in the area of photonics, which is a key enabling technology, underpinning many areas of industry. Read more

Why this course?

This course will train physicists and engineers in the area of photonics, which is a key enabling technology, underpinning many areas of industry.

You'll have the opportunity to undertake a three-month research or development project based with one of our industrial partners such as M Squared Lasers.

We have a long tradition of cutting-edge photonics research, which supports our courses. Much of this work has resulted in significant industrial impact through our spin-out companies and academic-industrial collaborations.

You'll also have the opportunity to develop your entrepreneurial skills by taking courses delivered by the Hunter Centre for Entrepreneurship.

You’ll study

The course is made up of two semesters of taught classes, followed by a three-month research project based with one of our industrial partners. The majority of your classes are delivered by the Department of Physics and cover the following:
-research and grant writing skills, which are valuable in both academic and commercial settings
-project training, including entrepreneurial and innovation skills training and a literature survey preparing for the project in the company
-topics in photonics, covering laser physics, laser optics and non-linear optics
-optical design, where you will learn about advanced geometrical optics and apply this knowledge to the design of optical systems, through the use of modern optical design software
-photonic materials and devices, focusing on semiconductor materials physics and micro/nano-structures
-advanced photonic devices and applications, covering quantum well structures, waveguides and photonic crystals

These classes are complemented by two classes delivered by the Department of Electronic & Electrical Engineering, which look at:
-system engineering and electronic control which forms a key part of modern optical systems
-photonic systems, where fibre optic communications systems and principles of photonic networks are discussed

Work placement

You'll be based with one of our industrial partners for a three-month project placement. This is your opportunity to experience how research and development operate within a commercial environment. It'll also give you a chance to form strong links with industry contacts.

The project is put forward by the company and supervised by both industrial and academic staff. Training on relevant skills and background will be received before and during the project.

Facilities:
Scotland has a world-leading position in optics and photonics industry.Your project will be carried out mainly in the excellent facilities of our Scottish industry partners. Projects elsewhere in the UK and with international companies may also be possible.

Advanced research facilities are also available in:
-the Department of Physics here at Strathclyde
-the Institute of Photonics
-the Fraunhofer Centre for Applied Photonics

Our research is strongly supported in equipment and infrastructure. This includes a newly opened 3-storey wing in the John Anderson Building as part of a £13M investment programme in Physics. Furthermore, the IoP and FCAP have recently relocated into the University's Technology & Innovation Centre (TIC) which at £90 million TIC is Strathclyde’s single-biggest investment in research and technology collaboration capacity. This new centre will accelerate the way in which researchers in academia and industry collaborate and innovate together in a new specifically designed state-of-the-art building in the heart of Glasgow.

Guest lectures

You'll attend the seminar series of the Institute of Photonics and Fraunhofer Centre of Applied Photonics with distinguished guest speakers giving a first-hand overview of the rapid development in applied photonics research.

Learning & teaching

In semesters one and two, the course involves:
-lectures
-tutorials
-various assignments including a literature review
-workshops where you'll gain presentation experience

The courses include compulsory and elective classes from the Department of Electronic & Electrical Engineering.
Over the summer, you'll undertake a three-month project based on practical laboratory work in a partner company. You'll be supervised by the industrial partner and supported by an academic supervisor.

Assessment

Assessment methods are different for each class and include:
-written examinations
-marked homework consisting of problems and/or essay assignments
-presentations

Your practical project is assessed on a combination of a written report, an oral presentation, and a viva in which you're questioned on the project.

How can I fund my course?

Financial support for Scottish and EU students may be available on a case-by-case basis which will be supported by the industrial partners. Selection will be based on an excellent academic record and/or industrial experience and the promise of a successful career in Industrial Photonics.

Please indicate that you apply for such a scholarship in the "Funding" section of the application form. You'll also need to provide a CV and a statement explaining your interests and motivation with your application. This will inform the decision on a possible scholarship.

For more information, just get in touch with the Department of Physics.

Available scholarships:
We currently have a scholarship available for this course.

You must be able to demonstrate academic excellence based on your previous study along with the promise of a successful career in Industrial Photonics. Relevant previous industrial experience will be considered.

Deadline:
The first round of applications closes on 20th May 2016, and a second one will close on the 30th June 2016.

How to apply:
Apply for this scholarship via our scholarship search: https://www.strath.ac.uk/studywithus/scholarships/sciencescholarships/physicsscholarships/physicsindustrialphotonicsscholarships/

Careers

A degree in industrial photonics can set you up to work in a range of jobs in physics and positions in other industries.

Typically, it can lead you to photonic technologies in industrial corporate research and development units, production engineering and applied academic laboratories.

Work experience is key:
Employers want to know you can do the job so work experience is key.

This course has a strong focus on the relationship between academia and industry. It's a great opportunity to enhance your skills and provides a direct transition from university to the work place.

We have an excellent record of graduate employment in the Scottish, national and international optics and photonics industries.

Doctorate study:
If you're interested in practical work with impact but are also interested in a further academic qualification, you can move on to study an EngD or a CASE PhD studentship. These can lead to a doctorate within industry or in close collaboration with industry.

Job roles:
Our Physics graduates from photonics related courses have found employment in a number of different roles including:

-Medical Physicist
-Optical engineer
-Laser engineer
-Optical and laser production engineer
-Research and production engineer
-Senior Engineer
-Systems Engineer
-Software Engineer
-Spacecraft Project Manager
-Defence Scientist
-Oscar winner

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The photonics research groups in the physics departments of Heriot-Watt and St. Andrews Universities are internationally renowned, and have many links with industrial and university groups around the world. Read more

Overview

The photonics research groups in the physics departments of Heriot-Watt and St. Andrews Universities are internationally renowned, and have many links with industrial and university groups around the world. Major activities are based around optoelectronics, laser development, semiconductor physics, materials technology, ultra-fast phenomena, modern optics, and instrumentation. This expertise is brought to the teaching of our one-year taught MSc course (See http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-photonics-and-optoelectronic-devices/ ).

Previously called Optoelectronic and Laser Devices, this MSc course has been updated and enhanced, recognising the explosive growth of the UK and global photonics industry, fostered by the world-wide expansion in the exploitation of optical in telecommunications.

Students spend one semester at each university, and then undertake a three-month research project, normally in a UK company. Companies participating in recent years include Bookham Technologies, BAE Systems, Edinburgh Sensors, Cambridge Display Technology, Defence Science and Technology Laboratory, Indigo Photonics, Intense Photonics, Kamelian, Nortel, Renishaw, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Thales, Sharp and QinetiQ.

Find more information here http://www.phy.hw.ac.uk/

Scholarships available

We have a number of fully funded Scottish Funding Council (SFC) scholarships available for students resident in Scotland applying for Photonics and Optoelectronic Devices. Find out more about this scholarship and how to apply http://www.hw.ac.uk/student-life/scholarships/postgraduate-funded-places.htm .

Programme content

Students receive postgraduate training in modern optics and semiconductor physics tailored to the needs of the optoelectronics industries. Graduates gain an understanding of the fundamental properties of optoelectronic materials and optical fibres, and experience of the technology and operation of a wide range of laser semiconductor devices appropriate to the telecommunications, information technology, sensing, and manufacturing industries.

English language requirements

If your first language is not English, or your first degree was not taught in English, we’ll need to see evidence of your English language ability. The minimum requirement for English language is IELTS 6.5 or equivalent. We offer a range of English language courses (See http://www.hw.ac.uk/study/english.htm ) to help you meet the English language requirement prior to starting your masters programme:
- 14 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with no more than one skill at 4.5);
- 10 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with minimum of 5.0 in all skills);
- 6 weeks English (for IELTS 5.5 with minimum of 5.5 in reading & writing and minimum of 5.0 in speaking & listening)

Find information on Fees and Scholarships here http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-photonics-and-optoelectronic-devices/

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While the rate of deterioration and disappearance of heritage sites has accelerated due to acceleration of human progress, major technological breakthroughs have occurred to enable digital preservation, i.e. Read more
While the rate of deterioration and disappearance of heritage sites has accelerated due to acceleration of human progress, major technological breakthroughs have occurred to enable digital preservation, i.e. 3D digital capture has been developed allowing high definition, high accuracy, and high productivity associated with digital documentation. This technology has been adopted worldwide and over 3,000 international service providers are available to deploy this technology to facilitate the preservation of heritage sites. In addition, major innovations in digital image processing, 3D modelling software, broadband access, and computer hardware capabilities have allowed worldwide public access to voluminous data and information systems including 3D visualisation.

The

MSc in Visualisation (International Heritage)

is a specialist pathway in the realm of 3D visualisation at DDS. This course aims to develop the knowledge and skill sets required to deliver and conduct digital preservation of world heritage sites and to create a unique opportunity to combine architecture and heritage with state of the art digital technologies, including 3D laser scanning, digital reconstruction of historic sites and artefacts, interaction and visualisation using virtual reality facilities. It allows an ideal opportunity for documentation, maintenance, and preservation of significant cultural sites and physical heritage assets, and to reconstruct them in a real-time 3D environment for use in tourism, art, education, entertainment and science.

This pathway will enable students to understand the process of creating original 3D datasets of cultural objects and sites, to reconstruct and present immersive visualisation with interactive narratives and provide a novel approach to foster multi-disciplinary study in computer science, history, geography, culture study, archaeology, architecture, the build environment, art and design and tourist management.

The programme aims to develop the knowledge and skill sets required to deliver and conduct digital preservation of world heritage sites and to create a unique opportunity to combine architecture and heritage with state of the art digital technologies, including 3D laser scanning, digital reconstruction of historic sties and artefacts, interaction and visualisation using virtual reality facilities. It allows an ideal opportunity for documentation, maintenance and preservation of significant cultural sites and physical heritage assets, and the ability to reconstruct them in a real-time 3D environment for use in tourism, art, education, entertainment and science.

The International Heritage pathway emerged as a result of successful strategic research collaborations between the DDS and a number of partners in cultural heritage. DDS has several long-term partnerships with industry and governmental organisations and a world-leading portfolio of work. DDS and Historic Scotland have formed the Centre for Digital Documentation and Visualisation (CDDV) which specialises in the precise documentation and 3D representation of heritage objects, architecture and environments using state of the art, high resolution laser scanning technology and 3D visualisation software. The CDDV promotes and celebrates Scotland’s cultural heritage at home and abroad and enhance Scotland’s reputation for developing world class and innovative research and development. It is delivering the digital documentation of the five Scottish UNESCO World Heritage Sites and five International Heritage Sites in a five-year project known as the Scottish Ten.

The MSc in Visualisation (International Heritage) provides a high level taught programme to those emerging from a wide range of disciplines. This places graduates in a leading global competitive position to advance in research, academia, governmental and commercial organisations, gaining a greater understanding of techniques that may assist in digital heritage practices.

Although just one intake per year in September, students can attend this programme on a part-time basis.
A number of Scottish Funding Council Fee Waivers are available for this programme.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Cold Atoms and Quantum Optics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Cold Atoms and Quantum Optics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc by Research Cold Atoms and Quantum Optics enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Cold Atoms and Quantum Optics programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

As a student of the Cold Atoms and Quantum Optics programme you will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as World-leading or Internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a postgraduate Cold Atoms and Quantum Optics student in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of
positronium
CW and pulsed laser systems
Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
Raman microscope
CPU parallel cluster
Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

AMQP Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

PPT Group

The Particle Physics Theory Group has fourteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Nanotechnology (Physics) at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Nanotechnology (Physics) at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc by Research Nanotechnology (Physics) enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Nanotechnology (Physics) programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

For MSc by Research in Nanotechnology (Physics) programme you will be guided by internationally leading researchers through an extended one-year individual research project. There is no taught element. The Nanotechnology (Physics) programme has a recommended initial research training module (Science Skills & Research Methods), but otherwise has no taught element and is most suitable for you if you have an existing background in geography or cognate discipline and are looking to pursue a wholly research-based programme of study.

As a student of the MSc by Research in Nanotechnology (Physics) you will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as World-leading or Internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a student of the MSc by Research in Nanotechnology (Physics) in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of
positronium
CW and pulsed laser systems
Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
Raman microscope
CPU parallel cluster
Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

This MSc by Research in Nanotechnology comes under the Nano-physics and the life sciences research area at Swansea. The fundamental understanding of the electronic, structural, chemical and optical properties of materials on the nano-scale is essential for advances in nanotechnology, in particular the development of new devices via the incorporation of novel materials. Advances in experimental physics underpin these developments via characterisation and quantification of quantum phenomena which dominate at these length scales.

The Nanotechnology research concentrates on two main areas: determining properties of materials (e.g., graphene) on the nano-scale using scanning probe based techniques; the development of imaging and laser based spectroscopic techniques to study biological samples (e.g., imaging of cellular components and bacteria).

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Lattice Gauge Theory at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Lattice Gauge Theory at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc by Research Lattice Gauge Theory enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Lattice Gauge Theory programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

You will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as World-leading or Internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a student of Lattice Gauge Theory programme in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of
positronium
CW and pulsed laser systems
Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
Raman microscope
CPU parallel cluster
Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

AMQP Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

PPT Group

The Particle Physics Theory Group has fourteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Quantum Fields and String at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Quantum Fields and String at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc by Research Quantum Fields and String enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Quantum Fields & String programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

As a student of the MSc by Research in Quantum Fields and String you will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as world-leading or internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a student of the Quantum Fields and String programme in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of
positronium
CW and pulsed laser systems
Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
Raman microscope
CPU parallel cluster
Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

AMQP Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

PPT Group

The Particle Physics Theory Group has fourteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.

Read less
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Theoretical Particle Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Theoretical Particle Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc by Research Theoretical Particle Physics enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Theoretical Particle Physics programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

As a student of Theoretical Particle Physics programme you will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as world-leading or internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a postgraduate student in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of
positronium
CW and pulsed laser systems
Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
Raman microscope
CPU parallel cluster
Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

AMQP Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

PPT Group

The Particle Physics Theory Group has fourteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.

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This is a vocational course in applied physics for anyone with a background in the physical sciences or engineering. You can choose classes relevant to your career interests from a wide range of topics including. Read more

Why this course?

This is a vocational course in applied physics for anyone with a background in the physical sciences or engineering.

You can choose classes relevant to your career interests from a wide range of topics including:
- high-power microwave technology
- laser-based particle acceleration and enabled applications
- physics and the life sciences
- materials and solid state physics
- photonics
- quantum optics and quantum information technology

You‘ll put the knowledge gained in the taught classes to use on a research project. You can design the project to fit in with your interests and career plans.

The course gives you the opportunity to explore and master a wide range of applied physics skills. It teaches you transferable, problem-solving and numeracy skills that are widely sought after across the commercial sector.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/appliedphysics/

You’ll study

You’ll have two semesters of taught classes made up of compulsory and optional modules. This is followed by a three-month research project.

Facilities

This course is run by our Department of Physics. The department’s facilities include:
- cutting-edge high-power laser and particle acceleration research with SCAPA, enabling generation of radiation from the terahertz to - the X-ray region, and biomedical applications
- the Ultrafast Chemical Physics lab with state-of-the-art femtosecond laser systems for multi-dimensional IR spectroscopy
- a scanning electron microscopy suite for analysis of hard and soft matter
- access to top-of-the-range high-performance and parallel computer facilities
- state-of-the-art high-power microwave research facility in the Technology & Innovation Centre
- advanced quantum optics and quantum information labs
- several labs researching optical spectroscopy and sensing

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at the University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options

To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form. To ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

Our teaching is based on lectures, tutorials, workshops, laboratory experiments and research projects.

Assessment

The final assessment will be based on your performance in examinations, coursework, a research project and, if required, in an oral exam.

What kind of jobs do Strathclyde Physics graduates get?

To answer this question we contacted some of our Physics graduates from all courses to find out what jobs they have. They are working across the world in a number of different roles including:
- Medical Physicist
- Senior Engineer
- Professor
- Systems Engineer
- Treasury Analyst
- Patent Attorney
- Software Engineer
- Teacher
- Spacecraft Project Manager
- Defence Scientist
- Procurement Manager
- Oscar winner

- Success story: Iain Neil
Iain Neil graduated from Strathclyde in Applied Physics in 1977 and is an optical consultant, specialising in the design of zoom lenses for the film industry. He has received a record 12 Scientific and Technical Academy Awards, the most for any living person.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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The optoelectronics market is expected to grow significantly in coming years. This specialist optoelectronics Masters course will give you access to optoelectronics expertise, so you can take advantage of new opportunities in this field. Read more
The optoelectronics market is expected to grow significantly in coming years. This specialist optoelectronics Masters course will give you access to optoelectronics expertise, so you can take advantage of new opportunities in this field.

Optoelectronics includes electronic devices that source, detect and control light. On this course you will benefit from high-level vocational training in lasers, LED lighting and semiconductors, tailored to the needs of the optoelectronics and optical communications industries.

As part of your studies, you will also benefit from the latest research within the field. You will be able to attend relevant research seminars and departmental seminars that are held regularly throughout the year. These events reflect the most up-to-date thinking from academics and specialists from industry.

The teaching team, many of whom have published research in optoelectronics, lead the University’s Wireless and Optoelectronics Research and Innovation Centre This informs our teaching, so you will benefit from cutting-edge Course Content that embodies the latest research.

Routes of study:
The course is available to study via two routes:
- MSc Optoelectronics (with internship)
- MSc Optoelectronics (without internship)

Please note: *Internships are optional and available to full-time students only. Internship places are limited. Students have the opportunity to work in a participating UK company or within a Research Centre at the University. You can also opt to study the course without an internship which will reduce your course length.

What you will study

You will study the following modules:
- Physics in Modern Optics
- Optoelectronics Devices for Telecommunications
- Optoelectronics Devices for Life Science & Measurement
- Applied Digital Signal Processing
- Embedded System Design
- Product Innovation and Entrepreneurship
- Six month Internship
- Masters Major Individual Project

Learning and teaching methods

The optoelectronics course offers an intensive but flexible learning pattern, with two start points each year – February and September. There are three major blocks during the 18 months’ study (full-time), which includes 12 months of teaching and a possible six months of internship*. Throughout your studies you will complete a 15-week final research project.

You will be taught through lectures, tutorials and workshops involving hands-on systems modeling and simulations using state-of-the-art hardware and software facilities (Zemax, Lightools etc). Students will also engage in supervised research supported by full access to world-class online and library facilities.

You are also expected to regularly attend relevant research seminars and departmental colloquia, which reflect the up-to-date research interests of the Wireless and Optoelectronics Research and Innovation Centre (WORIC).

The optoelectronics course is available to study via two main routes, you can opt to add further value to your studies by undertaking an internship or simply focus on building your academic knowledge through a on-campus study as detailed below:

- MSc Optoelectronics (with internship):
Delivery: Full-time only | Start dates: September and February

If you choose to undertake an internship, your course will be delivered in four major blocks that offer an intensive but flexible learning pattern. Six taught modules are completed during two teaching blocks featuring 12 contact hours per week. This is followed by 6 month period of internship, after which the student returns to undertake a 16-week major research project. Please note: Course length may vary dependent on your chosen start date.

- MSc Optoelectronics (without internship):
Delivery: Full-time and Part-time | Start dates: September and February

The study pathway available without internship is available full-time and part-time. The full-time route is delivered in three major blocks. Six taught modules are completed during two teaching blocks featuring 12 contact hours per week followed by a 16-week major research project. The full-time course duration is about 12 months, if you study part-time then you will complete the course in three years. Part-time study involves completing three modules in each of the first two years and a major research project in the final year. The use of block-mode delivery in this way allows flexible entry and exit, and also enables practising engineers to attend a single module as a short course.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

Many industries need specialists in optoelectronics systems design. Careers are available in industrial and technology sectors such as automotives, computers, consumer electronics, communications, industrial optical sensing equipment and medical laser equipment.

The major project gives you a great opportunity to deepen your knowledge and hone your skills in a specialist topic informed by your planned career, and the period of internship gives you an industrial experience that can set you apart from others immediately upon graduation.

Internship

Internships are only available to students studying full-time: Following successful completion of six taught modules, you will be competitively selected to join participating UK companies or University Research Centres on a six-month period of unpaid work placement before returning to undertake your major research project. All students who have an offer for the MSc Optoelectronics (with internship) are guaranteed an internship either in industry or in a University Research Centre.

There are 25 internship places available. Students who wish to undertake an internship must apply for the MSc Optoelectronics (with internship). It is anticipated that there will be significant demand for this programme and applicants are advised to apply as soon as possible to avoid disappointment. Applications will be considered on a first come first served basis and the numbers of students offered a place on the programme with internship will be capped.

If the course is already full and we are unable to offer you a place on the Masters course with internship, we may be able to consider you for the standard MSc Optoelectronics (without internship) which is a shorter programme.

Assessment methods

Each of the six taught modules is typically assessed through 50% coursework and 50% closed-book class test. The major project is assessed through presentation to a panel of examiners, viva and written report. Work for lecture modules is assessed largely through examinations whereas the laboratory work is assessed in a continuous manner. Lecture courses are examined at the end of each teaching block.

Facilities

There are two optoelectronics and two RF laboratories equipped with £1million worth of experimental equipments and modeling facilities. These state-of-the-art facilities are home to:

The Innova® Sabre® MotoFreD™ ion laser
Newfocus TLM-8700 fast sweep tunable laser source
Agilent 8164B Lightwave Measurement System
RENISHAW ML-10 Measurement Systems
Beam profilers: Thorlabs BC106-VIS – CCD Camera Beam Profiler, Thorlabs BP109-IR – Beam Profiler
Scanning Fabry-Perot Spectrum Analyzer. e.g. Thorlabs SA200-5B, Coherence 0464H08
Anritsu MS9710B Optical Spectrum Analyzer
Ocean Optics spectrometers. e.g. HR4000 and USB4000
Edwards E306A Coating System Thermal Vacuum Evaporator
SCS G3-8 Spin Coater
ZEPTO laboratory plasma cleaner ZEPTO
FUJIKURA FSM-40S ARC FUSION SPLICER
National Instruments FPGA and Digitizer
Signal generator: TG210 2MhZ function Generator
Oscilloscopes: HP infinium Oscilloscope, HM507 Combiscope
Anechoic Chamber suitable for frequencies above 1 GHz.
Various measurement systems for 2, 10, 20, 40, & 60 GHz links
VubiQ 60 GHz development kits
Three 60 GHz Backhaul links (Sub10 Systems)
Antenna radiation patterns measurement system
Two equipped vans for outdoor measurements
Programmable or Reconfigurable Platform (DSPs, FPGAs, GPPs)
The modeling facilities include high performance computing facilities (e.g. a 24-core cluster) equipped with various optoelectronic and EM modeling packages such as FDTD solutions, Zemax, FEKO, and VPI Photonics suites. We also in-house novel RF Ray-tracing and Physical Optics EM planning tools developed by members of WORIC.

Teaching

The academic staff teaching on the MSc Optoelectronics are the same people who lead and work in the WORIC. This international centre has a significant track record of innovation in lasers, sensors, nanophotonics, wireless communications, telecommunications, and optical communications and aims to provide industry with access to cutting edge innovative ideas and knowledge. WORIC has won many grants from EPSRC, TSB, EADS, as well as A4B is keen to solve real industrial problems with innovation that provides enormous market.

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Refractive surgery is an ever-expanding area within the field of ophthalmology that encompasses laser and non-laser vision correction. Read more
Refractive surgery is an ever-expanding area within the field of ophthalmology that encompasses laser and non-laser vision correction. Such surgery has traditionally been performed by surgeons in large private clinics, but in recent years has become accepted as part of mainstream ophthalmic care. Laser eye surgery is now the most frequently performed eye operation in Australia.

Upon completion of the Master of Medicine (Cataract and Refractive Surgery) at Sydney Medical School you will be equipped with knowledge of cataract and refractive surgery theory and practice. The course is primarily online with a two-week placement in an accredited refractive surgical centre and time spent in the wet lab at Sydney Eye Hospital. Jointly offered with the University of Auckland, New Zealand, the course is the first of its kind in the world.

Your lecturers include internationally recognised corneal and refractive surgeons.

To ask a question about this course, visit http://sydney.edu.au/internationaloffice/

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The course gives you the opportunity to explore and master theoretical, computational and experimental physics skills with wide application. Read more

Why this course?

The course gives you the opportunity to explore and master theoretical, computational and experimental physics skills with wide application.

Our four divisions – Nanoscience, Optics, Plasmas and the Institute of Photonics – all contribute research-based teaching expertise to the course. You can choose taught elements relevant to your career interests from a wide range of topics, including:
- theoretical & computational physics
- quantum optics and quantum information
- complexity science
- physics and the life sciences
- solid-state physics
- plasma physics

The knowledge you gain in the taught components is then put to use in a cutting-edge research project, which can be theoretical, computational or experimental.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/advancedphysics/

You’ll study

You’ll have two semesters of taught classes made up of compulsory and optional modules. This is followed by a three-month research project.

- Facilities
This course is run by the Department of Physics. The department’s facilities include:
- cutting-edge high-power laser research with SCAPA, researching the future of particle accelerators via laser-based acceleration
- the Ultrafast Chemical Physics lab with state-of-the-art femtosecond laser systems for multi-dimensional IR spectroscopy
- access to the top-of-the-range high performance and parallel computer facilities of ARCHIE-WeSt
- a scanning electron microscopy suite for analysis of hard and soft matter
- new high-power microwave research facility in the Technology & Innovation Centre
- advanced quantum optics and quantum information labs

English language

IELTS 6.0 is required for all non-English speakers.

Learning & teaching

Our teaching is based on lectures, tutorials, workshops, laboratory experiments, and research projects.

Assessment

The final assessment will be based on your performance in examinations, coursework, a research project and, if required, in an oral examination.

Careers

A Masters degree in physics prepares you for a wide and versatile range of careers in science and engineering as well as all areas of management, financial services, etc. Many graduates proceed to a PhD.

Strathclyde physics graduates are working across the world in a number of different roles including:
- Medical Physicist
- Senior Engineer
- Professor
- Systems Engineer
- Treasury Analyst
- Patent Attorneys
- Software Engineer
- Teacher
- Spacecraft Project Manager
- Defence Scientist
- Procurement Manager
- Oscar winner

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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