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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Laser Physics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Laser Physics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MSc by Research Laser Physics enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Laser Physics programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

You will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as World-leading or Internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

The two main research groups within the Department of Physics currently focus on the following areas of research:

Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group

Fundamental Atomic Physics

Condensed Matter and Material Physics

Analytical Laser Spectroscopy

Particle Physics Theory Group

String theory, quantum gravity and the AdS/CFT correspondence

Lattice gauge theories, QCD

Supersymmetric field theory, perturbative gauge theory

Field Theory in curved spacetime

Physics beyond the standard model

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a student of the Laser Physics programme in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of

positronium

CW and pulsed laser systems

Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes

Raman microscope

CPU parallel cluster

Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

AMQP Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

PPT Group

The Particle Physics Theory Group has fourteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.



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Why this course?. The course explores the versatile field of optical technologies which supports many aspects of modern society. Optical technologies are expected to be a key enabling technology of the 21st century. Read more

Why this course?

The course explores the versatile field of optical technologies which supports many aspects of modern society. Optical technologies are expected to be a key enabling technology of the 21st century.

The course is based on the strong record of optical technologies across research divisions in the department of physics and the collaborating institutions:

You can choose classes relevant to your career interests from a wide range of topics including:

  • photonics and photonic materials
  • nanosciences
  • optics at the physics-life sciences interface
  • laser-based plasma physics
  • quantum optics and quantum information technology

You’ll put the knowledge gained in the taught components to use in a cutting-edge research project.

The course gives you the opportunity of exploring and mastering a large range of optical technologies. It enables you to put devices in the context of an optical system and/or application.

Who’s the course suitable for?

It’s suitable for those with a science or engineering background wanting to gain a vocational degree or to obtain a solid foundation for an optics-related PhD programme.

It’s also appropriate for those who’ve worked in industry and want to consolidate their future career by further academic studies.

You’ll study

The course consists of two semesters of taught classes followed by a three- month research project.

Facilities

This course is run by the Department of Physics. The department’s facilities include:

  • well-equipped optical labs for semiconductor photonics, semiconductor spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime analysis.
  • the Ultrafast Chemical Physics lab with state-of-the-art femtosecond laser systems for multi-dimensional IR spectroscopy
  • cutting edge high power laser research with SCAPA, the highest power laser in a UK university
  • a scanning electron microscopy suite for analysis of hard and soft matter
  • access to top-of-the-range high-performance computer facilities
  • industry standard cleanroom in the Institute of Photonics

Learning & teaching

Our teaching is based on lectures, tutorials, workshops, laboratory experiments, and research projects.

Assessment

The assessment includes written examinations, coursework, presentations and a talk, oral examination and report presenting and defending the research project.

Careers

The course gives you a thorough basis for a successful job in the photonics, optical and life sciences industries. It provides the basis to excel in more interesting and challenging posts.

The course can also be an entry route into an optics-related PhD programme.

Over the years, many of Strathclyde’s optics and photonics graduates have found successful employment at the large variety of local laser and optics companies as well as with national and international corporations.



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Why this course?. This is a vocational course in applied physics for anyone with a background in the physical sciences or engineering. Read more

Why this course?

This is a vocational course in applied physics for anyone with a background in the physical sciences or engineering.

You can choose classes relevant to your career interests from a wide range of topics including:

  • high-power microwave technology
  • laser-based particle acceleration and enabled applications
  • physics and the life sciences
  • materials and solid state physics
  • photonics
  • quantum optics and quantum information technology

On the programme you'll acquire:

  • in-depth knowledge of current and emerging theories, techniques and practices within the field of physics and the life sciences and the ability to apply these theories in a professional setting
  • problem-solving and high numeracy skills that are widely sought-after across the commercial sector skills required to use high-power microwave technology in an industrial environment
  • professional abilities in applying laser-based particle acceleration and enabled applications
  • in-depth knowledge of materials and solid state physics, photonics & quantum optics and quantum information technology

You‘ll put the knowledge gained in the taught classes to use on a research project. You can design the project to fit in with your interests and career plans.

The course gives you the opportunity to explore and master a wide range of applied physics skills. It teaches you transferable, problem-solving and numeracy skills that are widely sought after across the commercial sector.

You’ll study

You’ll have two semesters of taught classes made up of compulsory and optional modules. This is followed by a three-month research project.

Facilities

This course is run by our Department of Physics. The department’s facilities include:

  • cutting-edge high-power laser and particle acceleration research with SCAPA, enabling generation of radiation from the terahertz to the X-ray region, and biomedical applications
  • the Ultrafast Chemical Physics lab with state-of-the-art femtosecond laser systems for multi-dimensional IR spectroscopy
  • a scanning electron microscopy suite for analysis of hard and soft matter
  • access to top-of-the-range high-performance and parallel computer facilities
  • state-of-the-art high-power microwave research facility in the Technology & Innovation Centre
  • advanced quantum optics and quantum information labs
  • several labs researching optical spectroscopy and sensing

Learning & teaching

Our teaching is based on lectures, tutorials, workshops, laboratory experiments and research projects.

Assessment

The final assessment will be based on your performance in examinations, coursework, a research project and, if required, in an oral exam.

Careers

What kind of jobs do Strathclyde Physics graduates get?

To answer this question we contacted some of our Physics graduates from all courses to find out what jobs they have. They are working across the world in a number of different roles including:

  • Medical Physicist
  • Senior Engineer
  • Professor
  • Systems Engineer
  • Treasury Analyst
  • Patent Attorney
  • Software Engineer
  • Teacher
  • Spacecraft Project Manager
  • Defence Scientist
  • Procurement Manager
  • Oscar winner

Success story: Iain Neil

Iain Neil graduated from Strathclyde in Applied Physics in 1977 and is an optical consultant, specialising in the design of zoom lenses for the film industry. He has received a record 12 Scientific and Technical Academy Awards, the most for any living person.



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Why this course?. This course will train highly qualified physicists and engineers in the area of photonics, which is a key enabling technology, underpinning many areas of industry. Read more

Why this course?

This course will train highly qualified physicists and engineers in the area of photonics, which is a key enabling technology, underpinning many areas of industry.

You'll have the opportunity to undertake a three-month research or development project based with one of our industrial partners such as M Squared Lasers.

We have a long tradition of cutting-edge photonics research, which supports our courses. Much of this work has resulted in significant industrial impact through our spin-out companies and academic-industrial collaborations.

You'll also have the opportunity to develop your entrepreneurial skills by taking courses delivered by the Hunter Centre for Entrepreneurship.

You’ll study

The course is made up of two semesters of taught classes, followed by a three-month research project based with one of our industrial partners. The majority of your classes are delivered by the Department of Physics and cover the following:

  • research and grant writing skills, which are valuable in both academic and commercial settings
  • project training, including entrepreneurial and innovation skills training and a literature survey preparing for the project in the company
  • topics in photonics, covering laser physics, laser optics and non-linear optics
  • optical design, where you will learn about advanced geometrical optics and apply this knowledge to the design of optical systems, through the use of modern optical design software
  • photonic materials and devices, focusing on semiconductor materials physics and micro/nano-structures
  • advanced photonic devices and applications, covering quantum well structures, waveguides and photonic crystals

These classes are complemented by two classes delivered by the Department of Electronic & Electrical Engineering, which look at:

  • system engineering and electronic control which forms a key part of modern optical systems
  • photonic systems, where fibre optic communications systems and principles of photonic networks are discussed

Work placement

You'll be based with one of our industrial partners for a three-month project placement. This is your opportunity to experience how research and development operate within a commercial environment. It'll also give you a chance to form strong links with industry contacts.

The project is put forward by the company and supervised by both industrial and academic staff. Training on relevant skills and background will be received before and during the project.

Facilities

Scotland has a world-leading position in optics and photonics industry.Your project will be carried out mainly in the excellent facilities of our Scottish industry partners. Projects elsewhere in the UK and with international companies may also be possible.

Advanced research facilities are also available in:

Our research is strongly supported in equipment and infrastructure. This includes a newly opened 3-storey wing in the John Anderson Building as part of a £13M investment programme in Physics. Furthermore, the IoP and FCAP have recently relocated into the University's Technology & Innovation Centre (TIC) which at £90 million TIC is Strathclyde’s single-biggest investment in research and technology collaboration capacity. This new centre will accelerate the way in which researchers in academia and industry collaborate and innovate together in a new specifically designed state-of-the-art building in the heart of Glasgow.

Learning & teaching

In semesters one and two, the course involves:

  • lectures
  • tutorials
  • various assignments including a literature review
  • workshops where you'll gain presentation experience

The courses include compulsory and elective classes from the Department of Electronic & Electrical Engineering.

Over the summer, you'll undertake a three-month project based on practical laboratory work in a partner company. You'll be supervised by the industrial partner and supported by an academic supervisor.

Assessment

Assessment methods are different for each class and include:

  • written examinations
  • marked homework consisting of problems and/or essay assignments
  • presentations 

Your practical project is assessed on a combination of a written report, an oral presentation, and a viva in which you're questioned on the project.

Careers

A degree in industrial photonics can set you up to work in a range of jobs in physics and positions in other industries.

Typically, it can lead you to photonic technologies in industrial corporate research and development units, production engineering and applied academic laboratories.

Work experience is key

Employers want to know you can do the job so work experience is key.

This course has a strong focus on the relationship between academia and industry. It's a great opportunity to enhance your skills and provides a direct transition from university to the work place.

We have an excellent record of graduate employment in the Scottish, national and international optics and photonics industries.

Doctorate study

If you're interested in practical work with impact but are also interested in a further academic qualification, you can move on to study an EngD or a CASE PhD studentship. These can lead to a doctorate within industry or in close collaboration with industry.

Job roles

Our Physics graduates from photonics related courses have found employment in a number of different roles including:

  • Medical Physicist
  • Optical engineer
  • Laser engineer
  • Optical and laser production engineer
  • Research and production engineer
  • Senior Engineer
  • Systems Engineer
  • Software Engineer
  • Spacecraft Project Manager
  • Defence Scientist
  • Oscar winner


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The photonics research groups in the physics departments of Heriot-Watt and St. Andrews Universities are internationally renowned, and have many links with industrial and university groups around the world. Read more

Overview

The photonics research groups in the physics departments of Heriot-Watt and St. Andrews Universities are internationally renowned, and have many links with industrial and university groups around the world. Major activities are based around optoelectronics, laser development, semiconductor physics, materials technology, ultra-fast phenomena, modern optics, and instrumentation. This expertise is brought to the teaching of our one-year taught MSc course (See http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-photonics-and-optoelectronic-devices/ ).

Previously called Optoelectronic and Laser Devices, this MSc course has been updated and enhanced, recognising the explosive growth of the UK and global photonics industry, fostered by the world-wide expansion in the exploitation of optical in telecommunications.

Students spend one semester at each university, and then undertake a three-month research project, normally in a UK company. Companies participating in recent years include Bookham Technologies, BAE Systems, Edinburgh Sensors, Cambridge Display Technology, Defence Science and Technology Laboratory, Indigo Photonics, Intense Photonics, Kamelian, Nortel, Renishaw, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Thales, Sharp and QinetiQ.

Find more information here http://www.phy.hw.ac.uk/

Scholarships available

We have a number of fully funded Scottish Funding Council (SFC) scholarships available for students resident in Scotland applying for Photonics and Optoelectronic Devices. Find out more about this scholarship and how to apply http://www.hw.ac.uk/student-life/scholarships/postgraduate-funded-places.htm .

Programme content

Students receive postgraduate training in modern optics and semiconductor physics tailored to the needs of the optoelectronics industries. Graduates gain an understanding of the fundamental properties of optoelectronic materials and optical fibres, and experience of the technology and operation of a wide range of laser semiconductor devices appropriate to the telecommunications, information technology, sensing, and manufacturing industries.

English language requirements

If your first language is not English, or your first degree was not taught in English, we’ll need to see evidence of your English language ability. The minimum requirement for English language is IELTS 6.5 or equivalent. We offer a range of English language courses (See http://www.hw.ac.uk/study/english.htm ) to help you meet the English language requirement prior to starting your masters programme:
- 14 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with no more than one skill at 4.5);
- 10 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with minimum of 5.0 in all skills);
- 6 weeks English (for IELTS 5.5 with minimum of 5.5 in reading & writing and minimum of 5.0 in speaking & listening)

Find information on Fees and Scholarships here http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-photonics-and-optoelectronic-devices/

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Cold Atoms and Quantum Optics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Cold Atoms and Quantum Optics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MSc by Research Cold Atoms and Quantum Optics enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Cold Atoms and Quantum Optics programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

As a student of the Cold Atoms and Quantum Optics programme you will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as World-leading or Internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a postgraduate Cold Atoms and Quantum Optics student in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of

positronium

CW and pulsed laser systems

Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes

Raman microscope

CPU parallel cluster

Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

AMQP Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

PPT Group

The Particle Physics Theory Group has fourteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Nanotechnology (Physics)  at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Nanotechnology (Physics)  at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MSc by Research Nanotechnology (Physics) enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Nanotechnology (Physics) programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

For MSc by Research in Nanotechnology (Physics) programme you will be guided by internationally leading researchers through an extended one-year individual research project. There is no taught element. The Nanotechnology (Physics) programme has a recommended initial research training module (Science Skills & Research Methods), but otherwise has no taught element and is most suitable for you if you have an existing background in geography or cognate discipline and are looking to pursue a wholly research-based programme of study.

As a student of the MSc by Research in Nanotechnology (Physics) you will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as World-leading or Internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a student of the MSc by Research in Nanotechnology (Physics) in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of

positronium

CW and pulsed laser systems

Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes

Raman microscope

CPU parallel cluster

Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

This MSc by Research in Nanotechnology comes under the Nano-physics and the life sciences research area at Swansea. The fundamental understanding of the electronic, structural, chemical and optical properties of materials on the nano-scale is essential for advances in nanotechnology, in particular the development of new devices via the incorporation of novel materials. Advances in experimental physics underpin these developments via characterisation and quantification of quantum phenomena which dominate at these length scales.

The Nanotechnology research concentrates on two main areas: determining properties of materials (e.g., graphene) on the nano-scale using scanning probe based techniques; the development of imaging and laser based spectroscopic techniques to study biological samples (e.g., imaging of cellular components and bacteria).



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Lattice Gauge Theory at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Lattice Gauge Theory at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MSc by Research Lattice Gauge Theory enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Lattice Gauge Theory programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

You will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as World-leading or Internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a student of Lattice Gauge Theory programme in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of

positronium

CW and pulsed laser systems

Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes

Raman microscope

CPU parallel cluster

Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

AMQP Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

PPT Group

The Particle Physics Theory Group has fourteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Quantum Fields & String at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Quantum Fields & String at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MSc by Research Quantum Fields and String enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Quantum Fields & String programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

As a student of the MSc by Research in Quantum Fields and String you will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as world-leading or internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a student of the Quantum Fields and String programme in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of

positronium

CW and pulsed laser systems

Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes

Raman microscope

CPU parallel cluster

Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

AMQP Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

PPT Group

The Particle Physics Theory Group has fourteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Theoretical Particle Physics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Theoretical Particle Physics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MSc by Research Theoretical Particle Physics enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Theoretical Particle Physics programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

As a student of Theoretical Particle Physics programme you will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as world-leading or internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a postgraduate student in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of

positronium

CW and pulsed laser systems

Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes

Raman microscope

CPU parallel cluster

Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

AMQP Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

PPT Group

The Particle Physics Theory Group has fourteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.



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Why this course?. The course gives you the opportunity to explore and master theoretical, computational and experimental physics skills with wide application. Read more

Why this course?

The course gives you the opportunity to explore and master theoretical, computational and experimental physics skills with wide application.

Our four divisions – Nanoscience, Optics, Plasmas and the Institute of Photonics – all contribute research-based teaching expertise to the course. You can choose taught elements relevant to your career interests from a wide range of topics, including:

  • theoretical & computational physics
  • quantum optics and quantum information
  • complexity science
  • physics and the life sciences
  • solid-state physics
  • plasma physics

The knowledge you gain in the taught components is then put to use in a cutting-edge research project, which can be theoretical, computational or experimental.

You’ll study

You’ll have two semesters of taught classes made up of compulsory and optional modules. This is followed by a three-month research project. 

Facilities

This course is run by the Department of Physics. The department’s facilities include:

  • cutting-edge high-power laser research with SCAPA, researching the future of particle accelerators via laser-based acceleration
  • the Ultrafast Chemical Physics lab with state-of-the-art femtosecond laser systems for multi-dimensional IR spectroscopy
  • access to the top-of-the-range high performance and parallel computer facilities of ARCHIE-WeSt
  • a scanning electron microscopy suite for analysis of hard and soft matter
  • new high-power microwave research facility in the Technology & Innovation Centre
  • advanced quantum optics and quantum information labs

Learning & teaching

Our teaching is based on lectures, tutorials, workshops, laboratory experiments, and research projects.

Assessment

The final assessment will be based on your performance in examinations, coursework, a research project and, if required, in an oral examination.

Careers

A Masters degree in physics prepares you for a wide and versatile range of careers in science and engineering as well as all areas of management, financial services, etc. Many graduates proceed to a PhD.

Strathclyde physics graduates are working across the world in a number of different roles including:

  • Medical Physicist
  • Senior Engineer
  • Professor
  • Systems Engineer
  • Treasury Analyst
  • Patent Attorneys
  • Software Engineer
  • Teacher
  • Spacecraft Project Manager
  • Defence Scientist
  • Procurement Manager
  • Oscar winner


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This exciting and innovative, part-time aesthetic medicine programme, presents the best available clinical evidence in non-surgical cosmetic interventions (NSCI), and combines it with clinical skills developed through experience and practice. Read more
This exciting and innovative, part-time aesthetic medicine programme, presents the best available clinical evidence in non-surgical cosmetic interventions (NSCI), and combines it with clinical skills developed through experience and practice. This approach offers existing and aspiring aesthetic medicine practitioners an evidence-based programme of study in a growth specialism, that fully meets the qualification requirements recommended by Health Education England (Nov 2015).

One unique aspect of the UCLan aesthetic medicine programme is that not only do students learn about the latest research, products and technologies from leading clinicians, scientists and academics, but they also treat patients in a clinical facility, under the expert guidance and supervision of our clinical tutors. This unique evidence-based aesthetic medicine programme will prepare you to work safely and independently in an increasingly competitive sector, and one that will be more tightly regulated in the future.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

The three-year, part-time programme is delivered via blending learning, with a combination of face-to-face tutor led sessions, clinical hands-on sessions and self-directed learning, using the UCLan virtual learning platform (Blackboard).

You will be expected to attend up to 20 study/assessment days per academic year. Face-to-face and clinical sessions will be split between the excellent teaching facilities at the UCLan Preston Campus, and a CQC registered cosmetic aesthetic clinic (Discover Laser) in Burnley, Lancashire.

An emphasis on small-group teaching and training, gives you maximum contact with tutors and clinicians, with the benefit of academic support and clinical supervision at all stages of the programme.

The clinical hands-on sessions undertaken in the first and second year of study, prepare you to become a highly effective aesthetic medicine practitioner, and will develop the critical thinking skills required to undertake the third year dissertation.

COURSE TOPICS

-Anatomy
-Ageing processes
-Patient assessment
-Treatment planning
-Communication technologies
-Consent and medico legal issues
-Cross infection control
-Medical Emergencies
-Record Keeping
-Clinical Photography
-Instrumentation
-Toxins and fillers
-Advanced techniques
-Clinical training in NSFA (Supervised)
-Psychology
-Pathology and Pharmacology
-Managements of the medically compromised patient
-Ethics
-New developments including peels; lasers; mesotherapy; complete facial aesthetics; recognising the role of surgical facial aesthetics

FURTHER INFORMATION

Our UCLan healthcare professionals spend a significant part of their studies in the clinical setting, assessing patients in order to plan and deliver a range of safe and appropriate aesthetic medicine treatments. In a typical clinical session, students will inject botulinum toxins and dermal fillers, use laser and light based therapies, ‘recondition’ skin by chemical or physical rejuvenation. Advanced clinical sessions include interventions such as: thread lifts, carboxytherapy, platelet rich plasma, and skin resurfacing using laser and energy-based devices.

One element of the hands-on training that our UCLan students find critically important for their professional and personal development is the feedback and support provided by our clinical tutors. This evidence-based approach to aesthetic medicine builds the knowledge, confidence and competence we expect of our students.

Being an academic MSc programme, clinical knowledge and skills are developed and assessed throughout each year of study by a variety of formal examinations including; clinical OSCEs, case studies, oral presentations, reflective learning journals and portfolios.

An increasing number of healthcare professionals (HCPs) are now delivering aesthetic medicine interventions that treat a range of presenting conditions such as; photo damaged skin, vascular and pigmented lesions, lines and deep wrinkles, lax skin and facial volume loss.

Work in the early part of the course will comprise plenary lectures and practical sessions in our state-of-the-art phantom head facility working on simulated similar systems. As you move through the course you will progress to working on live patients under close supervision within UCLan Dental Clinic. Here skills will be developed and assessed through Direct Observations of Procedural Skills (DOPS). The academic underpinning that supports this discipline will be developed though plenary lectures, directed reading and case-based discussions, which you and others in the group will be expected to prepare and lead. Group sizes are generally small (typically 12 per cohort) leading to an informal and supportive learning environment where you can ensure that your own learning needs are being met.

We must of course have assessments and examinations - these are designed to develop and test your core knowledge and skills at regular intervals throughout the programme. Assessments focus on your higher levels skills of diagnosis and planning, rather than simply remembering facts. Typical assessments would include analysis of given clinical cases OSCEs, portfolios and essays.

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Our MPhil/PhD research degree programme offers you. Wide variety of research interests. The Institute of Science and the Environment has a strong mix of academics with a high degree of professional and personal experience, enabling you to get the most out of your programme. Read more
Our MPhil/PhD research degree programme offers you:

Wide variety of research interests
The Institute of Science and the Environment has a strong mix of academics with a high degree of professional and personal experience, enabling you to get the most out of your programme. Our staff have expertise in river science, glacial geomorphology, environmental geology, GIS and remote sensing.

Excellent supervision
Benefit from a professional and challenging relationship with your supervisory team, drawn from experienced academics working at the forefront of their disciplines.

Resources
Access to the University of Worcester’s virtual resources and its state of the art library facilities. The Physical Geography team at Worcester have an excellent range of resources available to support your learning and your research project, including; field equipment including a Teledyne StreamPro Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP), a 2D Flow Tracker, six Valeport Electromagnetic current meters, three portable YSI multi-parameter water quality probes, an ISCO automatic liquid sampler, Solinst water level and water temperature data loggers, Tinytag water temperature data loggers and tipping bucket logging rain gauges. Two hydrological monitoring sites on local streams (Leigh Brook and Bow Brook) continuously monitor water level and various water quality parameters (pH, temperature, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, turbidity) with data logged every 15 minutes and accessible online via telemetry in real-time. Each site also has an ISCO automatic liquid sampler The field equipment and hydrological monitoring sites are managed and maintained by a specialist Physical Geography technician and field equipment can booked out through him.

Survey equipment includes a Draganflyer X6 Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) with three staff licensed with the Civil Aviation Authority to fly it in the UK, mapping and survey grade GPS, a Leica Terrestrial Laser Scanner, total stations, quickset levels and laser distance measurers.

The Institute of Science and the Environment has a fully-equipped GIS, Mapping and Visualization Suite, which provides access to high-end computers, industry-standard GIS (ArcGIS) and statistical analysis software (e.g. Primer-E, Matlab, SPSS) and other mapping and remote sensing software (e.g. ENVI and Photoscan Pro (Agisoft LLC)). This facility is run by GIS technicians, who provide advice and training to students and the suite also has its own A3 colour laser printer and A3 scanner for staff and student use. The Institute also has digital camcorders, cameras and microphones which students can use for data capture. A further six science and geography technicians offer support with field and laboratory based work.

Recent successful projects have included Dr Caroline Wallis who evaluated the Spatial Configuration and Temporal Dynamics of Hydraulic Patches in Three UK Lowland Rivers (2014), Dr Martin Wilkes who examined The Hydrodynamics of River Ecosystems: Towards an Objective and Ecologically Relevant Classification of Mesohabitat (2014), and Dr Amy Woodget who quantified Physical River Habitat Parameters Using Hyperspatial Resolution UAS Imagery and SfM-photogrammetry (2015). Some of our current research students are exploring The influence of physical habitat heterogeneity on macroinvertebrate community response to fine sediment deposition in river ecosystems (George Bunting).

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The 30 credit MS program in applied physics offers graduate courses in physics in collaboration with the New Jersey Institute of Technology. Read more

The 30 credit MS program in applied physics offers graduate courses in physics in collaboration with the New Jersey Institute of Technology. The program is designed to meet the demands of modern industry for young researchers with a basic knowledge of quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics and electrodynamics that they can apply it to problems in laser spectroscopy, photonics, magnetic resonance and surface physics.

Learning goals and assessment

Learning Goal 1 for Students: Master the fundamental knowledge of the field.

Assessment of student achievement of Goal 1:

  • Performance on homework, examinations and class participation in courses
  • Comprehensive qualifying examination to assess basic knowledge in physics
  • Essay on a current topic in the field or a research thesis evaluated by faculty
  • Placement in a career or a continuation of graduate study that requires ability in applied physics.

Role of the program in helping students to achieve Goal 1:

  • Assure that students are being prepared in a coherent and academically rigorous fashion
  • Effective monitoring of student progress
  • Evaluations of teaching effectiveness of instructors in graduate courses
  • If effectiveness is below expectations, work with instructors to improve
  • Periodic review of curriculum offerings and assessment tools

Learning Goal 2 for Students: Engage in and conduct original research (for Master’s degrees with thesis)

Assessment of graduate student achievement of Goal 2:

  • Assessment of quality of Master’s thesis
  • Public defense of thesis
  • Critical reading of thesis by a committee of graduate faculty members
  • Submission and acceptance of conference papers and of peer reviewed articles based on the thesis
  • Achievement of students as evidenced by professional placement, selection for conference presentations, peer-reviewed publications, and the awarding of individual grants

Role of graduate program in helping students achieve Goal 2:

  • Provide an early introduction to research methods and opportunities for research
  • Provide opportunities and support to present research and receive feedback

Learning Goal 3 for Students: Prepare professionals working in applied physics

Assessment of graduate student achievement of Goal 3:

  • Evaluations of teaching effectiveness of graduate student instructors
  • Collection of placement and awards data

Role of the program in helping students achieve Goal 3:

  • Host professional development and career exploration activities
  • Acquaint students with non-academic career opportunities

The leadership of the Graduate Program of the Department of Applied Physics will regularly review the structure and content of the program and feedback received from assessments, surveys and students. These reviews are used to improve the program to achieve the goal of providing the best possible education for students.

Programs and Facilities

Students in the graduate program in applied physics have access to many resources, including far-infrared free electron laser, laser spectroscopy laboratory, surface science laboratory, biosensor laboratory, and a Microelectronics Research Center with class 10 clean room facility for CMOS technology and micromachining research. Other available technology includes molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) for III-V optoelectronic materials and device research, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and physical vapor deposition (PVD) materials synthesis, ultrafast optical and optoelectronic phenomena, ultrathin film and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), Electronic Imaging Center, rapid thermal annealing, infrared optoelectronic device laboratory, and various materials- and device-characterization facilities.

Interdisciplinary applied physics research is carried out in collaboration with electrical engineering, chemistry, biological sciences, and geological sciences faculty members, as well as with the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ). There also is extensive cooperative research with the National Solar Observatory, Bell Laboratories, the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, and other industrial and federal research laboratories.



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In cooperation with the Aachen Dental Laser Center (AALZ) the RWTH International Academy offers the postgraduate programme "Master of Science in Lasers in Dentistry". Read more

In cooperation with the Aachen Dental Laser Center (AALZ) the RWTH International Academy offers the postgraduate programme "Master of Science in Lasers in Dentistry". The course offers dentists the opportunity to become highly qualified specialists in the area of laser therapy.

This programme is recognised and accredited in Germany and the European Union, as well all countries that are signatories of the "Washington Accord".

The two-year, executive master programme "Lasers in Dentistry" comprises ten individual, self-contained modules. The programme goal is specialisation of dental practitioners to experts in laser therapy.

This postgraduate, executive education course combines lectures, skill training sessions, live OPs, tutorials and practical workshops. Additionally, the study course is rounded off with extensive literature research, homework and laboratory work, patient treatment and documentation as well as practical experiments.

Under the intensive supervision of post-doctorate employees, participants are introduced to successful and correct practical applications of lasers.

This qualification innovatively links the disciplines of life-science, medicine and natural sciences. Research and teaching meet the highest quality standards and are provided in close interdisciplinary cooperation between dentistry and physics.



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