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The SOAS MA in Ancient Near Eastern Languages offers an intensive programme of text-reading and language-learning for those who already have a good knowledge of the Akkadian language - usually at least two years' experience. Read more
The SOAS MA in Ancient Near Eastern Languages offers an intensive programme of text-reading and language-learning for those who already have a good knowledge of the Akkadian language - usually at least two years' experience. The degree is intended to widen the student's experience in the vast legacy of written documentation in Akkadian and other languages from ancient Mesopotamia and Anatolia. The programme is tailor-made to serve as an intermediate level between SOAS's three-year BA in Ancient Near Eastern Studies (or an equivalent qualification) and postgraduate Assyriological research at the level of MPhil and PhD. It can, of course, be taken for its own sake.
Email:

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/maanel/

Structure

The degree comprises three taught courses chosen from the MA list and a dissertation on an agreed subject. The courses that are avaliable at SOAS in Akkadian, Sumerian and Hittite are in the list below.

Instead of one of these SOAS courses candidates may, if qualified, take one of the following topics from MA programmes run by University College London:

- Hebrew and other North-West Semitic languages (MA in Hebrew and Jewish Studies)
- Ancient history, currently Change and Continuity in the Ancient Near East (MA in Ancient History, 91AHG003)
- Archaeology (MA in Archaeology of the Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East)

Not all the courses listed are available every year. Entry to courses run by University College is subject to the approval of the academic department in question (the Department of Hebrew and Jewish Studies, the Department of History, and the Institute of Archaeology).

Courses avaliable at SOAS
- Mesopotamian Languages and Literature A: the third millennium - 15PNMC021 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
- Mesopotamian Languages and Literature B: the second millenium BC - 15PNMC022 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
- Mesopotamian Languages and Literature C: the first millenium bc - 15PNMC023 (1 Unit) - Full Year
- Sumerian Language - 15PNMC024 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
- Christians and Muslims in Syriac Texts - 15PSRC175 (1 Unit) - Full Year
- Hittite Language - 15PNMC025 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017

MA Ancient Near Eastern Languages- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 24kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/maanel/file80794.pdf

Teaching & Learning

- Course Information
Courses are listed under the menu item Programme Structure on the left-hand side of this page. Each course is taught two or three hours weekly in small classes of usually one to five students. Courses in language and literature comprise the reading, translation and discussion of set texts. Thorough preparation is essential.

- Dissertation
The dissertation will be on a topic agreed with the student's teachers and will extend to about 10,000 words. It may take the form of an extended essay on an approved topic or an edition with introduction and commentary of a previously unedited text or group of texts. The deadline for submission is 15 September in the year of examination.

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Today, there are around 6-7,000 languages spoken in the world and it is widely agreed that at least half of those are under threat of extinction within 50 to 100 years. Read more
Today, there are around 6-7,000 languages spoken in the world and it is widely agreed that at least half of those are under threat of extinction within 50 to 100 years. Language documentation is a new sub-discipline within linguistics that has emerged as a response to the growing crisis of language endangerment. It emphasises data collection methodologies, in two ways: first, in encouraging researchers to collect and record a wide range of linguistic phenomena in genuine communicative situations; and secondly, in its use of high quality sound and video recording to make sure that the results are the best possible record of the language.

The MA programme in Language Documentation and Description is intended for students who wish to specialise in the documentation and description of languages, with a focus on minority and endangered languages. This specialist MA is characterised by an integrated core of subject offerings that are oriented around issues in language documentation and description, plus a series of options in linguistics, applied linguistics, and language studies.

The programme is formulated with two main pathways:

MA Language Documentation and Description [Language Support and Revitalisation] provides an introductory overview of the study of language as well as courses geared at enabling students to support endangered and minority language communities in a number of ways. This pathway is open to students with or without a background in linguistics.

MA Language Documentation and Description [Field Linguistics] provides students with a sound knowledge of state-of-the-art methods and technology for language documentation and description with an emphasis on endangered and minority languages. This pathway is open to students who already hold an undergraduate major in linguistics/applied linguistics, or an MA in linguistics.

This course is part of the Endangered Languages Academic Programme (ELAP), which specifically aims to advance the documentation and description of endangered languages. ELAP also runs seminars, workshops, and intensive courses on the documentation of endangered languages. The programme is funded by the Lisbet Rausing Charitable Fund, and forms part of the Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (http://www.hrelp.org/).

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/malangdocdesc/

Structure

The MA Language Documentation and Description (LDD) consists of three components: core courses, option courses and dissertation research. This degree programme is formulated with two different pathways; one specialising in Language Support and Revitalisation and the other specialising in Field Linguistics.

Regardless of the pathway they chose, all students take the equivalent of 2 full units as core courses, and the equivalent of 1 full unit as option courses and submit a Masters dissertation at the end of the year. The MA may be taken part-time, over two or three years, and there is a possibility for transferring between the two pathways for part-time students.

- MA Language Documentation and Description [Language Support and Revitalisation]

This pathway is open for full-time study to students with or without a BA in linguistics and provides an introductory overview of the study of language as well as courses geared at enabling students to support endangered and minority language communities in a number of ways. For part-time options and details please see the MA Handbook.

- MA Language Documentation and Description [Field Linguistics]

This pathway is open to students with a BA in Linguistics and equivalent and provides students with a sound knowledge of state-of-the-art methods and technology for language documentation and description with an emphasis on endangered and minority languages. For part-time options and details please see the MA handbook.

- Optional Courses

Any course/s to the value of 1 unit from the list of running Linguistics PG courses.

Programme Specification

MA Language Documentation and Description - Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 29kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/malangdocdesc/file80773.pdf

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Department of Linguistics

The department is a centre for linguistic study in an unparalleled range of languages, many of which we are documenting for the first time. They include languages of Africa, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, Central Asia, Australia, the Pacific, and Siberia. The department has close academic ties to the rest of our faculty, the Departments of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, as well as the Language Centre.

The research interests of members of staff cover a wide range of theoretical and applied aspects of linguistics, including syntax, phonology, semantics, information structure, sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, linguistic typology, language documentation and description, language contact and multilingualism, language support and revitalisation, language archiving, lexicography, language pedagogy, translation studies, and the studies of individual languages and language families.

View Degree Programmes - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MA programme in Translation Theory and Practice (Asian and African Languages) combines training of practical translation skills with teaching of translation theories. Read more
The MA programme in Translation Theory and Practice (Asian and African Languages) combines training of practical translation skills with teaching of translation theories. It is unique in terms of the range of Asian/African language specializations and in collaborative teaching with University College London (SLAIS) and Imperial College. The aim of the programme is to enhance students' methodological and practical skills in translation, preparing them for the professional market as (freelance) translators or other language professionals, while providing an intellectual perspective on the discipline of translation studies, which could be the foundation for further MPhil/PhD research. Students have access to a wealth of resources for the study and practice of translation available in the SOAS Library and nearby institutions such as the University of London Library, the UCL Library, the British Library, as well as the BBC World Service and many others.

Languages:
Drawing on the expertise of highly qualified teachers and researchers at SOAS, the programme offers a range of languages to work with, including

Arabic
Chinese,
Japanese
Korean
Persian
Swahili

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/mathepratrans/

Structure

The programme may be taken over 12 months full-time, 24 months two-year part time, or 36 months three-year part time. The MA consists of taught courses and a dissertation. The assessment of most of the taught courses includes a written examination paper or papers, taken in June. The dissertation, of 10,000 words, is due by 15 September of the year in which it is taken.

The marking guidelines for MA Theory and Practice of Translation Studies dissertations are different to those for other programmes. Please refer to this PDF document. Marking Criteria for MA Translation Dissertations (pdf; 66kb) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/mathepratrans/file71240.pdf)

Programme Specification

MA Theory and Practice of Translation (Asian and African Languages) - Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 30kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/mathepratrans/file80775.pdf

Learning Outcomes

Students who successfully complete the Programme will:

- have competence in the practice of translation
- be familiar with the major theories of translation
- have some understanding of translation research and methods

Employment

Our graduates find employment both in the United Kingdom and around the world. They will work with:

- Translation agencies
- Multinational companies
- International organizations
- Education institutions

They can also pursue further MPhil/PhD research in translation studies at SOAS or other academic institutions.

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) is offered by specialists in the field of Applied Linguistics.

Key Features of TESOL

Swansea University has one of the longest established Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) training and education centres in the UK and is internationally known for excellence in vocabulary research. Currently staff expertise exists in corpus linguistics, computer assisted language learning and stylistics. Internationally recruited staff offer a wide range of relevant experience and contacts across countries and continents as well as different levels of kinds of education. The MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) is intended for those who have already begun to develop an informed interest or have some previous training or relevant experience in the field.

El Gazette ranked the Department of English Language and Applied Linguistics at Swansea, top for world class research in English Language.

Students enrolled on the Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) programme will benefit from the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught Master's study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) has two parts: a taught component and either a dissertation or practical teaching of English language classes.

TESOL students following the practical route will be supported, observed and assessed teaching English. They are also required to produce a portfolio of teaching and testing materials. This route would be indicated on the final MA certificate.

TESOL Programme Aims

- The MA TESOL is a one-year full time, campus-based programme designed to give (prospective) teachers of English as a foreign/second language a thorough understanding of current theories, trends, and cutting edge applied linguistics research relevant for language teaching.

- The Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) programme also aims to stimulate reflection on students’ own teaching practices.

- TESOL students are assessed through a range of assessments, including essays, data analysis projects, group projects, and in-class
exams.

- TESOL students with some experience in language teaching and/or some formal background in linguistics are likely to benefit most from the programme.

Modules

Modules on the Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) programme typically include:

• Vocabulary: Teaching and Learning
• Describing English
• Discourse Analysis for ELT
• Communicative Language Teaching
• Second Language Acquisition
• Young Language Learners
• Research Methods for ELT
• Language Testing and Assessment

Who should Apply to the TESOL Programme?

- Prospective students interested in teaching English as a foreign or second language.

- Prospective students who have experience of teaching English as a second or foreign language, or who have some previous training or relevant work experience in the field.

- Prospective students who wish to gain academic training in applied linguistics, in preparation for advanced academic degrees (e.g., MPhil, PhD) in applied linguistics or related disciplines.

Career Opportunities

Graduates from the MA Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) at Swansea can expect to pursue careers in ESL and EFL teaching, teacher training, material development, international education, publishing, and in a wide range of international settings requiring in-depth understanding of language learning, teaching, and research.

Student Quote

“Studying abroad has always been one of my dreams. My friends have always told me that the period studying as a student is the most enjoyable time in life. I didn't really believe it till I started my MA course at the Swansea University. The course in Teaching English As a Foreign Language (TEFL, now TESOL) helped me to deepen my knowledge in that field. All of the lecturers I had a chance to meet were really helpful, motivating and friendly. They were professional and possessed a great knowledge of what they teach. The modules offered include theory as well as practice. The facilities provided by the University, such as computer rooms and the library were great as well and well equipped. I really regret that the time I spent in Swansea is now over. It was a great experience for me and gave me a chance to meet and make friends with many people from all over the world.”

Anna Marie Poczta, Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL), MA

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The Languages PGCE explores languages teaching and learning by combining theory and practice in innovative, inspiring and effective ways. Read more
The Languages PGCE explores languages teaching and learning by combining theory and practice in innovative, inspiring and effective ways. This helps students develop a critical awareness and strong classroom skills to enable them to become a principled professional and educational thinker.

Degree information

This programme enables students to engage critically with a number of approaches and issues relating to languages education, such as the teaching of grammar, the incorporation of literature into lessons, target language use and the monitoring and assessment of pupils' learning. It incorporates a range of approaches to effective, inclusive learning, and develops a student’s professionalism and critical awareness to a high level. Wherever possible, we provide opportunities for trainees to gain experience at Key Stage 5 (post-16 age range).

Students undertake two level 7 (Master’s-level) modules of 30 credits each, totaling 60 credits. These can be carried forward onto full Master’s programmes at the IOE.

The Secondary PGCE consists of three core modules: two Master’s-level (level 7) modules, which are assessed through written assignments, and the Professional Practice module, which is assessed by the observation of practical teaching in placement schools.

Completion of the Professional Practice module and the two level 7 (Master’s level) modules (60 credits) will result in the award of a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE). Completion of the Professional Practice module and one or two level 6 (undergraduate/Bachelor’s level) modules, will lead to the Professional Graduate Certificate of Education (PgCE).

Four pathways are available: European languages, European language with EAL (English as an Additional Language) enhancement, Mandarin Chinese with a European Language, and Mandarin Chinese with EAL enhancement. There are no optional modules for this programme.

Core modules
-Languages in a Wider Context (30 Master's-level credits)
-Learning, Teaching and Assessing Languages (30 Master's-level credits)
-Professional Practice

Placement
You will spend most of your time (120 days) in schools, working with subject specialist mentors who support you through your two school placements. We are fortunate to have a good choice of schools with whom we work, with many outstanding mentors and strong Languages departments.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered via keynote lectures, subject lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials and directed study days at the IOE, as well as time spent in placements. Assessment is by practical teaching, assignments and portfolio tasks.

Students will also record their progress in a Career Entry and Development Profile statement. This will form part of an ongoing portfolio charting the student's continuing professional development.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are working as languages teachers and heads of department in schools, while others have jobs using the skills they have developed on the programme. Graduates in this area can also be found working as senior leaders in schools.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Secondary School French Teacher, Unspecified Academy
-French and Spanish Teacher, Unspecified Secondary School
-Mandarin Teacher, Unspecified Academy
-Head of German, Unspecified School
-Spanish Teacher, Unspecified College

Employability
A PGCE from the IOE carries considerable currency in schools which, alongside the quality of training you receive, puts you in a strong position in the employment market. Last year, all those students who sought employment in a school were successful. We expect 100% success rate in gaining a post in a school by the end of the year.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Languages PGCE programme is informed by research and places a strong emphasis on cultural knowledge, use of literature in the languages classroom, pupils' use of target language and broader aspects of language learning including issues related to bilingual learners and English as an additional language.

The IOE has well-established partnerships with cultural and educational institutions across London, as well as European and Chinese universities and teacher training institutions. Our partnership with over 200 secondary schools and colleges in Greater London and beyond enables our students to become skilled and confident teachers in their chosen subject specialism.

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This degree provides a coherent combination of courses in South Asian languages and their associated literatures and cultures; it leads to an advanced level of understanding of one aspect of South Asian civilization, together with a broader appreciation of the linguistic and literary culture of the subcontinent. Read more
This degree provides a coherent combination of courses in South Asian languages and their associated literatures and cultures; it leads to an advanced level of understanding of one aspect of South Asian civilization, together with a broader appreciation of the linguistic and literary culture of the subcontinent. The ‘Directed Readings’ courses, available in several modern languages, have a flexible curriculum which allows them to accommodate the interests of individual students or groups of students. The MA will provide, inter alia, an appropriate training for students wishing to proceed to postgraduate research in South Asian studies; its focus on South Asian language, culture and literature distinguishes it from the interdisciplinary perspective of the MA in South Asian Area Studies on the one hand and the MA in Comparative Literature on the other.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/southasia/programmes/malangcultsa/

Structure

Students take three taught courses, one of which is considered a major, and complete a 10,000 word dissertation related to the major.

Candidates who wish to take a language at other than introductory level will be assessed at the start of the term to determine the most appropriate level of study.

Part-time students (two years) will take two courses in the first year (normally their Minors) and the Major and dissertation in the second year; part-time students (three years) take one course per year, and their dissertation in the third year.

- Choosing the Courses
Applicants are asked to specify their preferred major subject and to give an alternative, as not all courses are available every year and practical considerations such as timetabling may limit choices.

Once enrolled, students have two weeks to finalise their choice of subjects, during which time they may sample different subjects through attending lectures etc.

Programme Specification

MA Languages and Cultures of South Asia- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 29kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/southasia/programmes/malangcultsa/file80816.pdf

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Develop as a highly qualified, effective and confident teacher of modern foreign languages, studying with a specialist to gain the knowledge and skills to use a variety of different approaches to teaching your specialist subject; and achieve Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). Read more
Develop as a highly qualified, effective and confident teacher of modern foreign languages, studying with a specialist to gain the knowledge and skills to use a variety of different approaches to teaching your specialist subject; and achieve Qualified Teacher Status (QTS).

Intermediate qualifications available:

• Professional Graduate Certificate in Education

This course is accredited by the National College for Teaching and Leadership (a department of the Department for Education) to deliver Initial Teacher Training

For the PGCE Modern Foreign Languages course, we accept applications from graduates who can offer a combination of the following languages: French, German, Italian and Spanish. French will be included in the combination as either your first or second language offered, even if you are a native speaker of other languages.

Any applicant with little experience of French can be supported in developing this language in preparation for entry on the course.

Course detail

• Study on a course designed to enable you to join a challenging and rewarding profession – becoming an imaginative and inspiring teacher who draws on broad subject specific knowledge and secure understanding of teaching and learning theories - with the knowledge and skills to lead learning and initiate change in educational settings
• Explore your understanding of teaching and learning secondary modern languages, as you apply your subject knowledge and expertise to planning teaching and managing the language classroom; honing your skills of critical self-evaluation and improvement
• Develop your creativity and team-working skills, preparing you to influence and lead in educational settings and enhancing your own sense of independence
• Gain confidence in analysing the evidence of your own practical experience during placements in schools, informing your future actions as you evaluate the impact of applying theory to your teaching practice
• Benefit from a qualification that gives you recommendation for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS), enabling you to gain employment in a school, with opportunities for continuous development through further study at MA/MSc, MPhil, PhD and EdD levels.

Modules

• The Professional Teacher
• The Reflective Teacher*
• The Research Informed Teacher*
• The Subject Specialist (Secondary Modern Languages)

*denotes units that can be assessed at Masters level

Format

Teaching modern foreign languages in secondary schools can be a very rewarding endeavour; on the one hand it provides an exciting and challenging opportunity for linguists to put their enthusiasm in, and knowledge of their subject(s) to good use and at the same time provide invaluable educational opportunities for young people to enable them to broaden their horizons to other people and cultures and communicate with them.

The Secondary PGCE in Modern Languages aims to develop the necessary skills to teach modern languages effectively and make learning experiences for young people enjoyable and varied.

It also seeks to foster a professional attitude amongst trainee teachers as well as a critical awareness of key issues of policy and practice underpinned by relevant evidence.

Assessment

The Teachers’ Standards 2012 provide the framework by which your progress in your teaching is judged. These are supplemented with descriptors which support you in understanding the qualities, which define the level at which you meet the standards.

Your assignments and documentary evidence are managed through a webfolio, bringing together your experiences and activities into a coherent structure. It will help you engage in critical self-evaluation of your practice, enabling you to identify areas of strength and areas for future development.

Careers

Local and national demand for University of Bedfordshire graduate teachers is high. Annual destinations surveys show that 90% of graduate teachers will have secured full-time teaching posts to begin in the year of graduation, with a further 9% working in part-time teaching positions.

The course is framed by a commitment to help you to develop the characteristics of a University of Bedfordshire graduate teacher. You will be challenged to explore theories of teaching and learning and to examine the implications of such theories for your own development.

On completion of the course you will have the appropriate attitude, knowledge, skills and understanding to meet the needs of the children’s and schools’ workforce agenda and to lead learning and initiate change in educational settings.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Modern Languages at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Modern Languages at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

Modern Languages at Swansea encompasses Arabic, French, German and Hispanic Studies with research strengths in written culture from the medieval period to the present day, including contemporary European cinema. We also have language expertise in Italian and Mandarin Chinese, but, depending on your choice of topic, advanced knowledge of a language is not an entry requirement. Some comparative projects in both literature and film can be researched in English translation.

The MA by Research in Modern Languages is ideal for those who want:

an MA qualification in niche areas where taught programmes are not offered;
the experience of a research degree without committing to a PhD at the outset.

Research proposals are invited on any topic in Modern Languages for which staff can provide supervision. It is advisable to email a member of academic staff in the appropriate area before applying (see staff web pages).

Key Features

An MA by Research in Modern Languages gives you the chance to pursue a project based around your own passions and interests, leading to a qualification which can open the door to an academic career or boost employment prospects outside academia (typically in the private sector, the Civil Service, or education).

It will give you the freedom to explore a topic of your choosing in Modern Languages and develop a methodology under the close supervision of two experienced academics but without attending regular classes as required in taught programmes.

You will be supervised closely by two experienced academics in your field. Typically, you will meet them fortnightly in the first term and at regular intervals thereafter. Meetings are logged and goals agreed each time.

All research students in Modern Languages are required to attend skills and training courses at College and Institutional level. They give presentations to other research students and staff at departmental seminars and the annual departmental postgraduate symposium in June and the College of Arts and Humanities conference in October. Advanced research students may have opportunities to teach undergraduate tutorials and seminars. You have a budget (currently £200 per year) to attend conferences outside Swansea.

MA by Research degrees typically last from one year (full-time study) to two years (part-time study). Some students choose to ‘upgrade’ at the end of their first academic year to an MPhil or PhD. This can be permitted on the recommendation of the two supervisors. If they do upgrade their year on the MA counts towards the MPhil or PhD.

Research Expertise

Our expertise in Modern Languages ranges from the French medieval lyric and Enlightenment drama, women's writing and feminism; travel; the conflicted memories of World War Two; film and literature about the Baader-Meinhof Group; and the works of the Nobel Laureates, Elias Canetti, Jean Cocteau, Günter Grass, Mario Vargas Llosa, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and Herta Müller. Our dynamic research environment which has won attention and funding from outside bodies such as the Coleg Cymraeg Cenedlaethol, the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), the Modern Humanities Research Association, the Wellcome Trust and the EU.

We support the following research centres all of which also house postgraduate research students:

Contemporary German Culture (http://www.swansea.ac.uk/riah/researchgroups/ccgc);
Gender in Culture and Society (GENCAS, http://www.swansea.ac.uk/gencas);
The Comparative Study of the Americas (CECSAM, http://www.swansea.ac.uk/riah/researchgroups/cecsam);
Medieval and Early Modern Research (MEMO, http://www.swansea.ac.uk/riah/researchgroups/memo).
For further information on research specialisms and supervisory interests of our staff visit: http://www/swansea.ac.uk/artsandhumanities/about-us/.

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This course enables well-qualified candidates to pursue postgraduate work in any area of modern languages in which the School is able to offer specialist supervision. Read more
This course enables well-qualified candidates to pursue postgraduate work in any area of modern languages in which the School is able to offer specialist supervision.

The School of Modern Languages and Cultures has an outstanding research record. Over 85% of the School's research was rated of international quality in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise.

The MA in Modern Languages by Research draws upon the extraordinarily wide range of research expertise in these four language departments of the School. It is aimed specifically at students who wish to pursue a particular research topic across two languages and cultures. The programme is devised to suit either those candidates who intend to continue with their studies at PhD level, or those who want to study an MA for its own interest.

Entry requirements

Candidates would normally be expected to hold a single or joint honours degree at 2:1 level or above (or its international equivalent). Those whose first language is not English must achieve an overall score on the British Council IELTS test of at least 7.0 with no less than 6.0 in each element, or a TOEFL score of 600 (250 for computer based tests) with a TWE of at least 4.5, or a TOEFL iBT
score of 100 (with no less than 19 in any element). Test results should be no more than two years old.

Course structure

The programme can be pursued one year full-time or two years part-time. Students undertake a programme of directed study comprising a course in research methodology and presentation,
and courses of guided reading in agreed fields of study under the supervision of members of staff in the two language departments.

Assessment

Assessment is by submission of a 30,000-word dissertation deriving from the directed reading.
Information about staff research interests and publications can be found at http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/modern-languages

Research training

The training component covers all essential aspects of research methodology and presentation. We also ensure that all research students receive appropriate generic and subject-specific skills
training throughout their period of study.

Careers

Many MA graduates in Modern Languages at Nottingham have gone on to further study for a PhD, both at Nottingham and elsewhere, and several are now in full-time lecturing posts in the UK and overseas. Others work in a wide range of careers.

Funding

The School of Modern Languages and Cultures awards a number of Studentships (fees and maintenance at home/EU rates), fee-waivers and smaller bursaries for postgraduate study at Nottingham. All studentships and bursaries are competitive and are awarded on academic merit.
To be eligible to apply for an award, you must have been offered and have accepted a place to undertake a programme of study/research on one of the degrees within the School of Modern Languages and Cultures.

If you are applying from overseas you should consult the funding database via the International Office webpage for details of any specific schemes for which you may be eligible to apply at http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/international.

Both full-time and part-time students may apply. If you wish to study part-time you may apply to the University of Nottingham for a Revis Grant, which, if awarded, covers approximately a third of the cost of tuition fees http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/student-support/revis.htm.

Applications

Candidates are encouraged to apply online at https://pgapps.nottingham.ac.uk

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Why do languages change? Why does your mobile device suggest funny completions for words you are typing? How did it happen that Finnish is spoken mostly… Read more
Why do languages change? Why does your mobile device suggest funny completions for words you are typing? How did it happen that Finnish is spoken mostly in Finland, but its linguistic relatives are scattered over a larger area? How can you study a language that does not have a standard orthography? Why can you sometimes tell where other people come from just by their accent? Why do some people stick to their dialect, but others give it up when they move to the city? Should you try to support language diversity? Can we save languages that are spoken by a very small number of people? How can computer-synthesised speech be made to sound more human? Why do some languages seem so much more difficult to learn - are they inherently more complex?

This Master's programme will provide you with an understanding of the nature and diversity of human language and with the theoretical tools for working with language material. If you are interested in languages but are unable to decide which of them you want to study, this Master's programme offers several fields of specialisation. One of them might be just perfect for you.

During your studies, you will:
-Gain an in-depth understanding of the basic structure of language, its subsystems (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics) and their mutual relationships.
-Learn the fundamentals of linguistic analysis and language description.
-Familiarize yourself with linguistic concepts, theories, descriptive models and the associated research methods.
-Learn how language is related to cognition, speech and interaction as well as to social structures, culture and society.
-Learn to use various methods and technical tools in order to manage and analyze language data.
-Gain a good understanding of linguistic variation and diversity: what is common to the world's languages and how they differ, how language changes through time, how languages influence one another, how individuals cope with multilingual situations and how communities speaking endangered languages can be supported.

After completing your studies, you will be able to work independently in various fields that require multidisciplinary expertise in linguistic sciences. You will have the theoretical knowledge and skills that are required for postgraduate studies in the doctoral programme in language studies.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

Linguistic Diversity in the Digital Age is an integrated international programme that offers you a comprehensive view of all subfields of the science of language. As a student in the programme you will be able to choose among four specialist options: (1) General Linguistics, (2) Phonetics, (3) Language Technology, and (4) Diversity Linguistics.

General Linguistics
Gives you comprehensive in-depth training in a wide range of theoretical and methodological approaches to language structure and language in use. Special emphasis is put on language typology in a global perspective as well as the documentation and description of endangered and previously undocumented and under-documented forms of speech.

Phonetics
Introduces you to the tools for working with the articulatory, acoustic and perceptional aspects of human speech from a multidisciplinary perspective. At the more advanced level, you will become acquainted with the methods of experimental phonetics.

Language Technology
Combines linguistics with digital technology in an interdisciplinary approach with close links to computer science. The focus areas include natural language processing (NLP) for morphologically rich languages, cross-lingual NLP and language technology in the humanities.

Diversity Linguistics
Encompasses all aspects of linguistic diversity in time and space, including historical linguistics as well as the extralinguistic context of languages: ethnicities, cultures and environ­ments. The areal foci in Diversity Linguistics are Eurasia and Africa.

These four specialist options interact at all levels. There is a study module common to all students in the programme regardless of the specialist option they choose. The integration of these four perspectives into one programme is unique - no similar programme exists anywhere else.

In the context of “Humanities”, the programme has the closest relationship to natural sciences, and many subfields of the programme involve methods directly linked to laboratory sciences, including digital technology and neurosciences.

The teaching in the programme includes lectures and seminars, practical exercise sessions, reading circles, fieldwork excursions, as well as work practice (internship). The broad spectrum of teaching methods guarantees optimal support for your learning processes.

Programme Structure

The scope of the Master of Arts degree is 120 credits. The degree contains the following studies:
-Studies common to all students in the programme (30 credits)
-Advanced studies in the specialist option (at least 60 credits)
-Other studies (up to 30 credits)

The target duration of full-time studies leading to an MA degree is two years.

All students in the programme take the same courses during the autumn semester of the first year.

Then you will focus on your specialist option (general linguistics, phonetics, language technology, or diversity linguistics). This block of studies consists of courses (at least 30 credits) and of the final project, which is your Master's thesis (30 credits).

Additionally, you choose other studies: modules offered either by the other specialist options within this Master's programme or by other programmes within the University of Helsinki. The size of such optional study modules is typically 15, 25 or 30 credits. Courses offered by other universities can also be included here.

The studies in your own specialist option as well as the other studies may also include an internationalization period (e.g. student exchange) and work practice or other working life oriented study units. Working life and career development perspectives are integrated in many courses in the programme.

You will complete your studies systematically. At the beginning of your Master’s studies, you will prepare your first personal study plan (PSP). In this, you will receive support especially from the staff of the Master's programme. Guidance is also given at the Faculty level.

Career Prospects

After graduation, students of the programme find employment in a wide variety of positions, in which special knowledge of language is required.

One path prepares you for a research career, and many graduates work as researchers in Finland and abroad. You can also work in the political, diplomatic, and educational sectors, as well as research administration. Further potential employers are found in the publishing industry, media and journalism, public relations and communications of business and public administration, as well as NGOs.

If you choose a technological orientation, you may work in language technology firms or more generally in the IT sector. Big international companies are in constant need of experts in speech and language technology. Additionally, there is a vibrant field of domestic companies, some established ones and many promising start-ups. Some students have founded their own companies and become entrepreneurs.

Note that it is not possible to graduate as a (subject) teacher in the LingDA Master's programme.

In honour of the University of Helsinki's 375th anniversary, the Faculty of Arts presented 375 humanists during year 2015. Get to know the humanists! http://375humanistia.helsinki.fi/

Internationalization

Linguistics is by definition an international field. Language capacity is a feature common to all human beings, and the objective of linguistics as a science is to study both the universal background of language as a phenomenon and the global diversity of languages as expressions of social and cultural heritage.

In the LingDA programme, internationalization is present in several forms and at several levels:
-The programme functions in English and accepts international students from all countries.
-The programme recruits students representing a variety of linguistic and cultural backgrounds.
-The students are encouraged to study and master many languages from both the practical and the theoretical points of view.
-The students are encouraged early on to get engaged in documentational and typological field work among speakers of little documented languages in various parts of the world.
-The students are encouraged to use the opportunities of international exchange that the university offers.

The programme has a high international profile and all teachers have wide international contact networks. At the university of Helsinki, linguistics was internationalized as early as the 19th century. Finland is a country where, in particular, ethnolinguistics and field linguistics were developed and practised much earlier than in most other European countries. Some of the regions where Finnish ethnolinguists have been active include North and Central Eurasia, the Near and Middle East, East Asia, South Asia, and Africa. This tradition of field-work-oriented linguistics is today carried on by the HALS (Helsinki Area and Linguistic Studies) research community. At the same time, the more recent fields of linguistics, including phonetics, language technology, and typology, have developed their own international profiles.

Research Focus

The MA programme Diversity Linguistics in the Digital Age combines several research fields in which the University of Helsinki has long been a global leader. Language research in Helsinki has always maintained its strong commitment to a better understanding of cultural areas and their history. Situated in an ideal place for the study of language history and contact linguistics of various Eurasian language families, the study of Uralic languages has a long tradition in Helsinki. Our interest in the culturally and historically informed study of language reaches well beyond that, though, spanning Asia, Europe and Africa.

Our language research is empirically driven and informed by linguistic typology. The question of linguistic complexity, its significance for language and cultural history, and its intersection with ecological models is a hallmark of the Helsinki School of Linguistics. We explore new horizons in area and language studies by combining cutting edge research in linguistic typology with field work based descriptive linguistics and linguistic anthropology.

A unique asset at the University of Helsinki is the presence of various language technology initiatives at the forefront of the digital humanities. The study of morphologically complex languages plays a great role here, and special attention is paid to lesser researched languages.

Each of the four study lines of our MA programme thus corresponds to a University of Helsinki focus area. Our language-related research is typically multidisciplinary and involves more than one linguistic specialty. This is also a crucial feature in our MA programme. Students receive theoretical, thematic and methodological training for research or other professional careers that require problem-solving skills in order to maintain linguistic diversity and to support people’s linguistic well-being.

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Train to teach modern languages to 11 to 16-year-olds, and kick-start a fulfilling career as a secondary school teacher on this National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL)-accrdited course. Read more
Train to teach modern languages to 11 to 16-year-olds, and kick-start a fulfilling career as a secondary school teacher on this National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL)-accrdited course. You’ll learn the principles of effective modern languages teaching and how to develop pupils’ love of a foreign language, and we also offer a French Subject Knowledge Enhancement (SKE) if you need to widen your language skills. Your school placements reinforce what you learn by given you hands-on practical experience in the classroom. Trainees on our PGCE Secondary courses achieve high results, with 95% receiving an Ofsted good or outstanding grade by the end of the course and 96% going on to obtain employment, often with one of their placement schools.

More about this course

This NCTL-accredited PGCE Secondary Modern Languages course leads to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) and prepares you to teach 11 to 16-year-olds. You may also have the opportunity to work in A level environments.

You’ll focus on the principles of teaching modern languages including French, Spanish and German, and will develop school pupils’ skills in speaking, reading, listening and writing these languages.

If you only speak either German or Spanish, we offer a 12-week Subject Knowledge Enhancement (SKE) course in French. This will enable you to teach French to pupils up to Key Stage 3. The SKE is fully funded and bursaries are available to eligible applicants.

At the University you’ll explore teaching methodology, pupil assessment and the fundamentals of how children learn. The PGCE course will also broaden your understanding of teaching in multicultural urban environments through your two placements in London, where you’ll learn how to help pupils develop their foreign language skills.

Great emphasis is placed on sharing feedback with other trainees. You’ll complete a weekly reflection and contribute to discussions online to develop your understanding of the role of a secondary teacher. This commitment to high standards has lead to positive reviews from Ofsted:

"Headteachers comment favourably on the trainees’ high standards of personal and professional conduct and on their willingness to follow school policies and procedures. Trainees speak very positively about the quality of training, particularly the links between theory and practice."
Ofsted 2015.

Your assessment will consist of four elements:
-School placement A
-School placement B, where your teaching ability will be assessed in relation to the standard for Qualified Teacher Status
-A Professional Practice Portfolio, which is compiled throughout the year, detailing personal experiences and reflections on your development as a teacher, largely in relation to your practical teaching experience
-The Educational Research Assignment, which allows you to explore an educational issue

There are no examinations.

Modular structure

This is a year-long course.

Module 1, Curriculum Studies, includes:
-The theoretical underpinning of the practice you'll take into the classroom
-Access to the pedagogical knowledge and understanding required to effectively plan and teach well-structured lessons in the Secondary curriculum
-Sessions on Modern Languages
-Training to assess school pupils’ progress in each of these curriculum areas

Module 2, Professionalism and Inclusive Practice (PIP), includes:
-Support for the wider professional development of each student teacher
-Discussion of the role of children’s rights and how this underpins effective learning relationships
-Understanding of different aspects of inclusive education
-Introduction to the whole school and wider children’s workforce
-Teamwork and collaborative discussion across different subject areas

Work placement:
-120 days in a London placement learning to teach with a mentor in secondary schools

In both university and classroom contexts, your self-directed study is extremely important in order to support your development of purposeful educational enquiry, preparing effective teaching resources and ensuring up-to-date subject knowledge.

What our students say

“London Met was very proactive in providing support and guidance for my new teaching post. The team educated me on everything necessary to prepare me for my forthcoming role; they are highly skilled professionals who were able to support me through my interview process as well as answer any queries regarding the teaching industry. With regards to course content, I felt everything covered during lectures and the professional studies sessions was relevant to my development and future prospects as a teacher.” Jatinder Chohan, London Met trainee and Year 5 teacher at Rosedale Hewens Academy, Harlington.

“I really enjoyed my course at London Metropolitan University. There was a lot to learn, but the support and guidance from my tutor and mentors was excellent throughout and by the end of the course I really felt prepared to take on my first mainstream teaching assignment. The tutors and lecturers helped me set the right goals for my development as a teacher as well as giving me the tools to succeed. I had two great school placements arranged by the University and I feel these were key to building my confidence. I was really happy to be offered a job by one of these schools – my PGCE year couldn’t have ended better.” Maira Rodrigues, London Met trainee and Year 4 teacher at Lloyd Williamson Primary School, Kensington.

After the course

This intensive PGCE leads to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS), which enables you to teach modern languages to 11 to 16-year-olds. Our trainees have gone on to secure school secondary teacher roles at schools including Ark Academy, Ralph Allen School, Bushey Academy and more.

Funding

Funding is available for many postgraduate courses leading to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). Depending on your teaching subject and degree classification, you may be eligible for a bursary or scholarship of up to £30,000 through the teacher training bursary.

PGCE School Direct

The School Direct school placements work around the training calendar for the student teacher with the PGCE offered at the university. This means we can only offer places in Early Years / Primary and in Secondary teaching Maths, Modern Languages and Science with a specialism in Biology, Chemistry or Physics.

You will attend the training workshops at the university with other regular PGCE students and carry out placements of 120 days in a school or consortium of schools with a School Direct allocation. This time could be divided between two schools with some flexibility.

London Met has School Direct partnership with nearly 100 schools. This large body of schools have joined with us to build a cross-capital alliance, providing diverse contexts in which to train the new generation of London teachers.

Most of our trainees follow a programme modelled on the traditional PGCE, with time spent under tutor supervision at London Metropolitan University and the school placement divided between two partner schools.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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Train to teach Modern Languages to 11 to 16-year-olds with London Metropolitan University and begin your fulfilling career in secondary schools. Read more
Train to teach Modern Languages to 11 to 16-year-olds with London Metropolitan University and begin your fulfilling career in secondary schools. You’ll learn the principles of effective Modern Languages teaching and how to develop school childrens’ love of the foreign word. Your placements at our partnership schools will back up what you have learnt with hands-on practical experience. Attendees of our National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL) accredited PGCE Secondary courses attain high results, with 95% achieving an Ofsted good or outstanding grade by the end of the course and 96% going on to obtain employment, often with their placement schools.

More about this course

This NCTL accredited PGCE Secondary Modern Languages course leads to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) and prepares you to teach 11 to 16-year-olds (Key Stages 3 and 4) in a secondary school environment. It also gives you the opportunity to teach the 16-18 age range.

The modern languages included are French, Spanish and German, and you will be developing pupils’ skills in speaking, reading, listening and writing the language they choose to learn.

If you only speak German or Spanish, we offer a 12-week Subject Knowledge Enhancement (SKE) in French, enabling you to teach French up to Key Stage 3. The SKE is fully funded and bursaries are available to eligible applicants.

At the University, you’ll study teaching methodology, pupil assessment and how children learn. There will also be collaborative and school-based projects with other trainees.

Based in London, this PGCE course will broaden your understanding of teaching in multicultural urban environments. Through your two school placements, you’ll learn how to help 11-16-year-olds develop their foreign languages effectively and fluently.

This commitment to high standards has led to positive reviews from Ofsted:

"Headteachers are particularly complimentary about the fact that the trainees and Newly Qualified Teachers are well prepared to meet the specific challenges of teaching pupils in the London environment."
Ofsted 2015

Your assessment will consist of four elements:
-School placement A
-School placement B, where your teaching ability will be assessed in relation to the standard for Qualified Teacher Status
-A Professional Practice Portfolio which is compiled throughout the year, detailing personal experiences and reflections on your development as a teacher, largely in relation to your practical teaching experience
-The Educational Research Assignment which allows you to explore an educational issue

There are no examinations.

You'll share feedback with your peers and colleagues on the placement, completing weekly reflections and contributing to online discussions in order to further develop your understanding of the secondary teacher role.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Curriculum Studies (core, 30 credits)
-Professionalism and Inclusive Practice (core, 30 credits)
-School Experience to Progress Point 2 (core, 15 credits)
-School Experience to Progress Point 5 (core, 45 credits)

What our students say

"I personally believe that London Met is an excellent PGCE course provider and the Modern Languages course prepares students very well for a teaching career in this subject. What I appreciated the most was the tutors and the relationships they were able to build with the students. The PGCE year can be a stressful one and it is very important for student teachers to feel supported. The tutors at London Met do this. They teach that in order to be a good teacher you have to encourage pupils and they do it with their student teachers as well. Excellent!" Former PGCE Secondary Modern Languages trainee

After the course

This intensive PGCE leads to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS), which enables you to teach Modern Languages to 11 to 16-year-olds. Our trainees have gone on to secure secondary teacher roles at schools including Ark Academy, Ralph Allen School, Bushey Academy and more.

Funding

Funding is available for many postgraduate courses leading to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). Depending on your teachng subject and degree classification, you may be eligible for a bursary or scholarship of up to £30,000 through the teacher training bursary.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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School Direct (Tuition Fee) is a route into teaching at both primary and secondary levels. Trainees join other student teachers on the established Languages PGCE programme at the UCL Institute of Education (IOE), whilst undertaking their teaching experience at their host school or alliance. Read more
School Direct (Tuition Fee) is a route into teaching at both primary and secondary levels. Trainees join other student teachers on the established Languages PGCE programme at the UCL Institute of Education (IOE), whilst undertaking their teaching experience at their host school or alliance.

Degree information

This programme enables students to engage critically with a number of approaches and issues relating to languages education, such as the teaching of grammar, the incorporation of literature into lessons, target language use and the monitoring and assessment of pupils' learning. It incorporates a range of approaches to effective, inclusive learning, and develops a student’s professionalism and critical awareness to a high level. Wherever possible, we provide opportunities for trainees to gain experience at Key Stage 5 (post-16 age range).

Students undertake two Master’s-level (level 7) modules of 30 credits each, totaling 60 credits. These can be carried forward onto full Master’s programmes at the IOE.

The Secondary PGCE consists of three core modules: two Master’s-level modules, which are assessed through written assignments, and the Professional Practice module, which is assessed by the observation of practical teaching in placement schools.

Completion of the Professional Practice module and the two level 7 (Master’s level) modules (60 credits) will result in the award of a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE). Completion of the Professional Practice module and one or two level 6 (undergraduate/Bachelor’s level) modules, will lead to the Professional Graduate Certificate of Education (PgCE).

Four pathways are available: European languages, European language with EAL (English as an Additional Language) enhancement, Mandarin Chinese with a European Language, and Mandarin Chinese with EAL enhancement. There are no optional modules for this programme.

EAL is primarily intended for those students who can offer only one language.

Core modules
-Learning, Teaching and Assessing Languages (30 Master's-level credits)
-Languages in a Wider Context (30 Master's-level credits)
-Professional Practice

Placement
You will spend most of your time (120 days) in schools, working with subject specialist mentors who support you through your school placements.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered via keynote lectures, subject lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials and directed study days at the IOE, as well as time spent in placement at the host school or alliance. Assessment is by the observation of practical teaching, assignments and a portfolio (which links into continuing professional development in the induction year).

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are working as languages teachers and heads of department in schools, while others have jobs using the skills they have developed on the programme. Graduates in this area can also be found working as senior leaders in schools.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-French and Spanish Teacher, Unspecified Secondary School
-Spanish Teacher, Unspecified Secondary School
-French and Spanish Teacher, Unspecified Academy

Employability
A PGCE from the IOE carries considerable currency in schools, which alongside the quality of training you receive, puts you in a strong position in the employment market. Last year, all those students who sought employment in a school were successful. We expect 100% success rate in gaining a post in a school by the end of the year.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Languages PGCE programme places a strong emphasis on cultural knowledge, use of literature in the languages classroom, pupils' use of target language and broader aspects of language learning. This includes issues related to bilingual learners and English as an additional language and other areas such as information and communications technology and digital, video and multimedia production.

The IOE has well-established partnerships with cultural and educational institutions across London, as well as European and Chinese universities and teacher training institutions. Our partnership with over 200 secondary schools and colleges in Greater London and beyond enables each of our students to become a skilled and confident teacher in their chosen subject specialism.

The PGCE is informed by research, including research carried out by PGCE tutors into target language use, the teaching of literature and the storyline approach. The programme includes a number of innovative projects, such as the British Film Institute Film Project and our own Literature Project, which supports the development of materials for classroom practice.

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A single degree program incorporates a variety of options and tracks. There are three options. the French Option, the Spanish Option, and the Romance languages Option (which combines languages). Read more
A single degree program incorporates a variety of options and tracks:
There are three options: the French Option, the Spanish Option, and the Romance languages Option (which combines languages). All three options have thesis and nonthesis tracks. The French and Spanish options also allow for an applied linguistics track (thesis or nonthesis). Regardless of the option or track, all new graduate teaching assistants must enroll for the Practicum in Applied Linguistics (either FR 512 or SP 502).

Nonthesis track of the master of arts in Romance languages (Plan II). The nonthesis track for the French, Spanish, and Romance languages options incorporates 30 hours of coursework (or 36 hours of coursework for the applied linguistics version). Included in all nonthesis tracks of the master of arts in Romance languages is a core of five courses in the five areas listed below (approximately 50 percent of the major). Twenty-one hours of the coursework must be language specific.

1. Teaching Practicum/Topics in Linguistics
2. Proseminar: Research Methodology/Critical Theory
3. Topics in Culture and Civilization
4. Graduate Seminar
5. Special Topics/Directed Readings

All nonthesis tracks require success on comprehensive exams before granting of the degree.
Thesis track of the master of arts in Romance languages (Plan I). A description of the typical configuration for the various thesis tracks of the master of arts in Romance languages follows.

* Spanish Option, standard version with thesis (Plan I). Curriculum requirements: 24 hours of coursework and a thesis. The curriculum centers on Peninsular and Spanish-American literature. Requirements include success on comprehensive written and oral examinations before granting of the degree. The written examination is based on the coursework. The oral examination is based on the coursework and on a pre-established reading list.

* Spanish Option, applied linguistics track with thesis (Plan I). Curriculum requirements: 30 hours of coursework and a thesis. In addition to the thesis, the applied linguistics track involves three components: language, linguistics, and applied linguistics. The language component consists of 15 hours of course credit in Spanish language, literature, and culture (a minimum of 6 hours must be in Peninsular literature and 6 hours in Spanish-American literature). The linguistics component is comprised of a 3-hour descriptive linguistics course (SP 556). The applied linguistics component consists of 12 hours of coursework in second language acquisition and pedagogy (SP 502, EN 613, and two of the following: SP 581, EN 610, EN 612, CIE 577, or other approved courses; for descriptions of courses bearing the EN prefix, see the Department of English section of this catalog; for a description of CIE 577, see "Curriculum and Instruction Course Descriptions" in the College of Education section). Requirements include success on comprehensive written and oral examinations before granting of the degree. All examinations are based on the coursework.

* Romance Languages Option, with thesis (Plan I). Curriculum requirements: 24-30 hours of coursework and a thesis. The curriculum requires study of French and Spanish, one as the major and one as the minor. The major includes a minimum of 18 hours. The minor includes a minimum of 12 hours. More than the minimum is recommended for both the major and the minor. Graduate courses in Italian studies are also available (see the RL prefix in course listings below). Requirements include success on comprehensive written and oral examinations before granting of the degree. All exams are based on the coursework.

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This course enables well-qualified candidates to pursue postgraduate work in any area of modern languages in which the School is able to offer specialist supervision. Read more
This course enables well-qualified candidates to pursue postgraduate work in any area of modern languages in which the School is able to offer specialist supervision.

The School of Modern Languages and Cultures has an outstanding research record. Over 85% of the School's research was rated of international quality in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise.

The MA in Modern Languages by Research draws upon the extraordinarily wide range of research expertise in these four language departments of the School. Information about staff research interests and publications can be found at http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/modern-languages. This MA programme is aimed specifically at students who wish to pursue a particular research topic across two languages and cultures. The programme is devised to suit either those candidates who intend to continue with their studies at PhD level, or those who want to study an MA for its own interest.

Entry requirements

Candidates would normally be expected to hold a single or joint honours degree at 2:1 level or above (or its international equivalent). Those whose first language is not English must achieve an overall score on the British Council IELTS test of at least 7.0 with no less than 6.0 in each element, or a TOEFL score of 600 (250 for computer based tests) with a TWE of at least 4.5, or a TOEFL iBT score of 100 (with no less than 19 in any element). Test results should be no more than two years old.

Course structure

The programme can be pursued one year full-time or two years part-time. Students undertake a programme of directed study comprising a course in research methodology and presentation, and courses of guided reading in agreed fields of study under the supervision of members of staff in the two language departments.

Assessment

Assessment is by submission of a 30,000-word dissertation deriving from the directed reading.

Research training

The training component covers all essential aspects of research methodology and presentation. We also ensure that all research students receive appropriate generic and subject-specific skills
training throughout their period of study.

Careers

Many MA graduates in Modern Languages at Nottingham have gone on to further study for a PhD, both at Nottingham and elsewhere, and several are now in full-time lecturing posts in the UK and overseas. Others work in a wide range of careers.

Funding

The School of Modern Languages and Cultures awards a number of Studentships (fees and maintenance at home/EU rates), fee-waivers and smaller bursaries for postgraduate study at Nottingham. All studentships and bursaries are competitive and are awarded on academic merit.
To be eligible to apply for an award, you must have been offered and have accepted a place to undertake a programme of study/research on one of the degrees within the School of Modern Languages and Cultures.

If you are applying from overseas you should consult the funding database via the International Office webpage for details of any specific schemes for which you may be eligible to apply at http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/international.

Both full-time and part-time students may apply. If you wish to study part-time you may apply to the University of Nottingham for a Revis Grant, which, if awarded, covers approximately a third of the cost of tuition fees http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/student-support/revis.htm.

Applications

Candidates are encouraged to apply online at https://pgapps.nottingham.ac.uk

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