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Masters Degrees (Language Policy)

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Combine a solid theoretical basis in Language for Specific Purposes, Second Language Acquisition and Language Testing with challenging opportunities to design language courses and practise your coaching skills. Read more

Combine a solid theoretical basis in Language for Specific Purposes, Second Language Acquisition and Language Testing with challenging opportunities to design language courses and practise your coaching skills.

There’s an increasing demand for language and communication trainers and coaches: business people, pilots, politicians, hospital porters, teachers, hotel staff, academics, cab drivers, athletes, doctors, office workers, tour guides, lawyers, catering staff, nurses, practically everybody needs to use English in their jobs. The Master’s specialisation in Language and Communication Coaching offers you a thorough academic grounding to pursue a career as a language and communication coach who can quickly and effectively meet the training needs of a wide variety of clients.

The specialisation offers a unique and rigorous programme combining a solid theoretical basis in Language for Specific Purposes, Second Language Acquisition and Language Testing with challenging opportunities to design language courses and practise your training and coaching skills. You’ll also get some practical, hands-on training and coaching experience in the form of peer teaching and an internship at a language institute.

Why study Language and Communication Coaching at Radboud University?

  • The specialisation includes an English for Specific Purposes module, which prepares students for a career as a language and communication coach who can quickly and effectively meet the needs of a wide variety of target groups such as business people, pilots, politicians, hospital porters, doctors etc.
  • You’ll receive a combination of academic grounding and practical training.
  • You’ll be part of a truly international classroom with students from all over the world. This will not only provide you with an interesting social and cultural experience. It’ll also allow theoretical and practical insights into the linguistic issues you’ll be studying, as you consider how these apply to the various languages and language learners represented in your class.
  • The specialisation addresses both the linguistic and cultural aspects of present-day communication all over the world.
  • Although the role of English as a lingua franca has meant that research in this field is mostly focused on English, it is equally applicable to the design of courses in other languages.
  • The Linguistics programme is connected to the research carried out at the Centre for Language Studies (CLS). This institution has a reputation in the Netherlands and far beyond for top quality and ground-breaking research. Students at Nijmegen can also benefit from the wealth of other research done on campus by, for example, the world-renowned Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics.

World-leading research

Linguistics research at Radboud University was recently rated number 1 in the world wide university ranking. The Center for World University Rankings (CWUR) publishes annual rankings of the best universities world wide. Withing the subject field of Linguistics, our research topped the list. Research and education are closely intertwined in Nijmegen: in lectures and through research internships and assignments, students become familiar with the latest developments in linguistics research.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/linguistics/language

Admission requirements for international students

1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Linguistics or related area

In order to get admission to this Master's you’ll need a completed Bachelor’s degree in Linguistics. Students with a Bachelor’s degree in specific language, like German, Dutch and such, or with a Bachelor’s degree in Communication and Information Sciences can also apply, provided they took at least 60 ECTS worth of courses in the field of linguistics.

2. Proficiency in English

In order to take part in this programme, you need to have fluency in both written and spoken English. Non-native speakers of English* without a Dutch Bachelor's degree or VWO diploma need one of the following:

  • A TOEFL score of >600 (paper based) or >100 (internet based)
  • An IELTS score of >7.0
  • Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with a mark of C or higher
  • A Bachelor’s degree in English Language and Culture from a research university.

Career prospects

Graduates of the Language and Communication Coaching Master’s will be able to deliver a wide range of language and communication services: language teaching, text consultancy, in-service training, development of course and test materials, language policy and communication advice.

Graduates could work as:

  • Self-employed trainers and coaches
  • Language and communication coaches with language institutes, communication offices, teacher training programmes
  • Advisors to education consultancies
  • Developers of language tests
  • Policy staff members for international offices
  • Refresher course developers for English teachers (all levels)
  • Developers of (digital) learning tools and (online) curricula
  • Editors, copy writers, journalists or text coaches
  • Managers or heads of department in language institutes, translation agencies, etc.
  • Project researchers (for instance into language acquisition processes, educational efficiency, learning methods, specific components of language learning processes (pronunciation, etc.)
  • Language specialists or consultants working in business or for the government

Teacher in the Netherlands

Want to become an English teacher in secondary or further education? After completing your Master's you can get your ‘eerstegraads bevoegdheid’ to become a teacher in the Netherlands (leraar Engels). With this degree, you can teach the higher grades of secondary school in the Netherlands (HAVO and VWO). The combination of the specialisation in Language and Communication Coaching and the ‘eerstegraads bevoegdheid’ will make you a particularly attractive candidate for Universities of Applied Science (HBO).

This one-year-postgraduate programme (Lerarenopleiding Taal- en Cultuurwetenschappen) is offered in Dutch by the Radboud Docenten Academie.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/linguistics/language

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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This one-year Master's programme focuses on foreign language teaching. It offers theoretical insights to help assess language-teaching methods and applied linguistics research. Read more
This one-year Master's programme focuses on foreign language teaching. It offers theoretical insights to help assess language-teaching methods and applied linguistics research. You will study the process of learning and the use of second languages. The programme allows you to focus your research on your language of choice, for instance Dutch as a second language, but also French, German, Swedish, Chinese, or any other language.
You will approach second language acquisition from many different angles, including psychology, social interaction and language teaching. You will be introduced to the field of linguistics, language acquisition and language teaching theory.
The program focuses especially on Dynamic System Theory, which explains how cultural differences become bodily differences. You will learn about the social, cultural and political processes that play a role in using a language or that may cause the use of a second language to decline. You will explore didactic applications of recent research and theoretical developments, and learn about computer assisted language learning.

Why in Groningen?

The MA Applied Linguistics at the University of Groningen is a unique programme focussing on the processes involved in second language learning, as well as teaching theories. The programme encompasses various fields of study, as learning and using a second language may be approached from many different angles. Students will explore and discuss the factors that relate to second language development, including cognition, psychology, social interaction, language teaching, and culture.

In addition to theoretical and teaching paradigms, students will also take classes in the research practices and methodology essential for conducting applied linguistics studies and research. These classes will act as the foundation from which students will be able to conduct their own applied linguistics research in the form of the MA thesis in Semester 2.The MA Applied Linguistics is a truly international programme, welcoming students from all over the world. The classes are taught entirely in English, and students are encouraged to use their own language experiences as the basis for their individual linguistic enquiries and research.Our degree programme is small, which means that students benefit from small, intimate classes and close collaborative relationships with the other students as well as instructors.

Job perspectives

After completing this programme, you can pursue a career in research, or set up language teaching projects. You are also equipped to take positions on the European level that deal with issues of language policy.

Job examples

- Linguist (L2)
- language research
- language education
- language policy
- language testing
- curriculum development
- publishing

Research in Applied Linguistics focuses on the process of learning and using a second language. It covers various fields of study because learning and using a second language can be approached from many different angles, including cognition, psychology, social interaction, language teaching and culture.

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- professionals with a strong interest and need in gaining a thorough academic foundation in, and understanding of, current developments in the area of global economic governance. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

- professionals with a strong interest and need in gaining a thorough academic foundation in, and understanding of, current developments in the area of global economic governance.

- graduate students from other disciplinary backgrounds wishing to further their understanding of global economic policy issues and debates through systematic academic study.

- economics graduate students wishing to specialize in global economic policy and governance.

Prior knowledge of economics is not a requirement.

The MSc Global Economic Governance and Policy is the most recent addition to the Department of Economics’ portfolio of masters programme. The programme builds on the department’s unique combination of expertise – in policy analysis, regional economics and critical theoretical perspectives – to provide students with an in-depth understanding of core policy debates in the area of global economic governance. Specifically, the programme focuses on:

- global economic governance: It offers in-depth specialisation in this area of wider global governance.

- economic policy: It provides high-level training in the understanding and critical evaluation of economic policy issues, design and solutions, their foundation in the evolution of economic theory and methods, as well as critical discussion of the application of policy design to real-world problems, such as issues of implementation and monitoring.

- regional specificities within the global economy: It provides a differentiated analysis of problems of global economic governance from a range of regional perspectives, in advanced as well as developing country regions.

The programme is taught through two dedicated core courses (Global Economic Governance I: Global Economic Policy Debates and Analysis and Global Economic Governance II: Institutional and Governance Debates on Economic Development and Growth). In addition, students can choose from a wide range of optional courses and will write a 10.000 word dissertation.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/economics/programmes/msc-global-economic-governance-and-policy/

Structure

The MSc in Global Economic Governance and Policy is a new masters programme designed for professionals and postgraduate students, with or without a prior background in economics, who wish to gain a focused and in-depth understanding of contemporary economic governance and policy debates.

The MSc is taught through two dedicated core courses. The first, Global Economic Governance 1 deals with issues of Global Economic Policy. This covers international trade and investment relationships between countries, trade and industrial policies, global capital markets, the international monetary and financial system, multinationals, global production networks and labour in the global economy. The second core paper, Global Economic Governance 2 deals with issues of institutions and governance. This includes issues of governance reforms for developing countries, the theory of institutional economics informing these debates, the policy and theoretical debates around property rights reforms, anti-corruption, industrial policy, rents and rent seeking, democratization and related governance issues. In addition, students will choose one, two or three optional courses, depending on the weight of the courses (see the list below), from across a range of SOAS departments plus a 10,000 word dissertation.

Students can, but do not have to, choose a course structure that, in addition to the programme’s focus on policy analysis and training, provides research method training.

- Optional Courses

MSc GEGP students can choose either one (1 unit) course or two (0.5 unit) courses or three (0.33 unit courses) to make up a total of 1 unit from the following list of courses by department. The availability of open option courses in other FL&SS departments from the below list is conditional on the approval of individual course convenors as well as the usual restrictions with regard to pre-requisites, timetable compatibilities and availability of individual courses in any one academic year. Students should note that some courses are capped in terms of student numbers, and that students from home departments will be given priority in case the relevant caps are reached. All law courses are open only for students with an LLB or who take the Law pre-sessional course offered by the School of Law at SOAS.

- Economics Department

MSc GEGP students will be eligible to take any of the post-graduate courses offered in the Economics Department, pending permission by the course convenors on the basis of the students’ prior academic qualifications in economics. Economics options with CATS 22.5 (0.5 unit) modules will be made available subject to approval.

Programme Specification

MSc Global Economic Governance and Policy programme specification (pdf; 392kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/economics/programmes/msc-global-economic-governance-and-policy/file97019.pdf

Materials

- SOAS Library
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.
Access to other London Universities will be provided, where relevant to specific courses.

Teaching & Learning

Courses are taught in lectures and tutorial groups. Degrees are awarded on the basis of assessed coursework, examinations and the dissertation. Courses are generally assessed on the basis of a final examination (70%) and an essay or project-based coursework (30%). MSc degrees are taught over a period of twelve months of full-time study within a structured programme. In the case of part-time study, the degrees will be taught over two or three years.

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge

- Students will learn about core policy debates on global economic governance.
- Students will study the current institutional and organisational architecture of global economic policy-making and governance.
- Students will have an opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of differing economic theories and methods, and of how these relate to economic policy debates and designs in the area of global economic governance.
- Students will study regionally specific economic policy challenges in the context of the evolution of the global economy, and will have an opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of different regional perspectives on global economic governance.
- Students will be trained in the understanding and use of economic policy tools and design, as well as issues of policy implementation and monitoring.
- Students taking the research pathway of the MSc GEGP will acquire sound knowledge of statistical research techniques and economic research methods.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:

- Students will learn to develop intellectual initiative and to analyse, evaluate and reflect critically on current research in the area of global economic governance.
- Students will acquire the ability to discriminate between competing economic theories and methods underlying the design of global economic policies, and to critically appraise the policy implications of these differing approaches.
- Students will learn to apply theoretical, empirical and technical knowledge about core features of current global economic governance to practical policy analysis through coursework and the dissertation.
- Students will have an opportunity to translate a complex understanding of issues in global economic governance into reform proposals, and to learn how to present these in an articulate, informed and coherent manner.

Subject-based practical skills:

- Students will learn how to gather, organise and employ data, information and evidence for economic policy analysis and design in the area of global economic governance.
- Students will gain the ability to critically assess economic policy tools and to design economic policy proposals in a case study context.
- Students will learn how to identify core problems in economic policy design, implementation and monitoring
- Students will acquire the ability to marshal arguments lucidly, coherently and concisely to present core analyses and policy messages or suggestions in clear language (written and verbal).
- Students taking the research pathway of the MSc GEGP will learn how to apply one or more research methods systematically to a chosen topic or project.

Transferable skills:

- Students will be able to analyse, evaluate and reflect critically on information received.
- Students will learn how to present ideas coherently and concisely, in writing and orally, extracting key elements from complex information.
- Students will be given the opportunity to engage with independent research on well defined tasks or topics.
- Students will learn how to identify policy problems and design solutions, selecting and applying competing theories and methods appropriately.
- Students will gain an understanding of how to gather, organise and deploy data and evidence to form a balanced judgement and to develop and support critical argument and policy recommendations. S
- Students will have an opportunity to present written and oral materials clearly and effectively and to engage constructively with feedback.

Employment

The MSc Global Economic Governance and Policy is a new programme, starting in 2016/17.

Students enrolling in this programme will return to or pursue careers in a wide range of positions in public, private and non-governmental project management and policy advice, for which a thorough understanding of on-going issues in global economic governance is essential.

This includes, for example, government officials from developing and advanced countries whose remit requires a wider understanding of global economic governance issues; employees of international organisations whose remits are not primarily concerned with economic policy-making, but increasingly require a thorough understanding of global economic governance issue to co-ordinate their approaches with those of other national and international organizations; private sector managers and consultants requiring a systematic understanding of current economic crises and imbalances in the world economy as well as regulatory approaches to this; employees of NGOs working in areas affected by current global economic crises and imbalances and policy responses to these; graduate students wishing to build a career in any of the above, and economics graduates with a special interest in global economic policy debates and design.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Today, there are around 6-7,000 languages spoken in the world and it is widely agreed that at least half of those are under threat of extinction within 50 to 100 years. Read more
Today, there are around 6-7,000 languages spoken in the world and it is widely agreed that at least half of those are under threat of extinction within 50 to 100 years. Language documentation is a new sub-discipline within linguistics that has emerged as a response to the growing crisis of language endangerment. It emphasises data collection methodologies, in two ways: first, in encouraging researchers to collect and record a wide range of linguistic phenomena in genuine communicative situations; and secondly, in its use of high quality sound and video recording to make sure that the results are the best possible record of the language.

The MA programme in Language Documentation and Description is intended for students who wish to specialise in the documentation and description of languages, with a focus on minority and endangered languages. This specialist MA is characterised by an integrated core of subject offerings that are oriented around issues in language documentation and description, plus a series of options in linguistics, applied linguistics, and language studies.

The programme is formulated with two main pathways:

MA Language Documentation and Description [Language Support and Revitalisation] provides an introductory overview of the study of language as well as courses geared at enabling students to support endangered and minority language communities in a number of ways. This pathway is open to students with or without a background in linguistics.

MA Language Documentation and Description [Field Linguistics] provides students with a sound knowledge of state-of-the-art methods and technology for language documentation and description with an emphasis on endangered and minority languages. This pathway is open to students who already hold an undergraduate major in linguistics/applied linguistics, or an MA in linguistics.

This course is part of the Endangered Languages Academic Programme (ELAP), which specifically aims to advance the documentation and description of endangered languages. ELAP also runs seminars, workshops, and intensive courses on the documentation of endangered languages. The programme is funded by the Lisbet Rausing Charitable Fund, and forms part of the Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (http://www.hrelp.org/).

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/malangdocdesc/

Structure

The MA Language Documentation and Description (LDD) consists of three components: core courses, option courses and dissertation research. This degree programme is formulated with two different pathways; one specialising in Language Support and Revitalisation and the other specialising in Field Linguistics.

Regardless of the pathway they chose, all students take the equivalent of 2 full units as core courses, and the equivalent of 1 full unit as option courses and submit a Masters dissertation at the end of the year. The MA may be taken part-time, over two or three years, and there is a possibility for transferring between the two pathways for part-time students.

- MA Language Documentation and Description [Language Support and Revitalisation]

This pathway is open for full-time study to students with or without a BA in linguistics and provides an introductory overview of the study of language as well as courses geared at enabling students to support endangered and minority language communities in a number of ways. For part-time options and details please see the MA Handbook.

- MA Language Documentation and Description [Field Linguistics]

This pathway is open to students with a BA in Linguistics and equivalent and provides students with a sound knowledge of state-of-the-art methods and technology for language documentation and description with an emphasis on endangered and minority languages. For part-time options and details please see the MA handbook.

- Optional Courses

Any course/s to the value of 1 unit from the list of running Linguistics PG courses.

Programme Specification

MA Language Documentation and Description - Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 29kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/malangdocdesc/file80773.pdf

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Department of Linguistics

The department is a centre for linguistic study in an unparalleled range of languages, many of which we are documenting for the first time. They include languages of Africa, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, Central Asia, Australia, the Pacific, and Siberia. The department has close academic ties to the rest of our faculty, the Departments of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, as well as the Language Centre.

The research interests of members of staff cover a wide range of theoretical and applied aspects of linguistics, including syntax, phonology, semantics, information structure, sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, linguistic typology, language documentation and description, language contact and multilingualism, language support and revitalisation, language archiving, lexicography, language pedagogy, translation studies, and the studies of individual languages and language families.

View Degree Programmes - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The programme is run on a modular basis to suit students with little or no training in linguistics who. - Wish to acquire a more profound knowledge of the discipline or take the degree as a conversion course before proceeding to a research degree. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme is run on a modular basis to suit students with little or no training in linguistics who:

- Wish to acquire a more profound knowledge of the discipline or take the degree as a conversion course before proceeding to a research degree.

- Are looking to gain a working knowledge of an Asian, Middle Eastern or African language.

This two-year programme is meant for students who wish to combine rigorous training in the discipline of linguistics, with the intensive study of one or more African or Asian languages. At the end of the programme students will be able to embark on professional careers in language-related fields with emphasis on the region in which the language chosen for the programme is spoken. They will also be able to undertake further study, e.g. for a research degree in linguistics.

The programme is built on the MA Linguistics and includes all parts of this programme (4 units). It may be combined with Intensive Language (Japanese), Intensive Language (Korean) and Intensive Language (Arabic). Relevant departments deliver 4 units of language study, which may include a summer abroad in a country where the language is spoken. Please click on the links to view their webpages for further information.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/ma-lingandlang/

Structure

The MA Linguistics and Intensive Language consists of three components: core courses, optional courses and dissertation research.

Students take seven full units of taught courses and write a 10,000 word dissertation on the topic of their choice in linguistics in consultation with the supervisor. Three units are taken in the Linguistics department, and four units are taken in other SOAS departments and involve the practical study of a language at any level. Students also attend the weekly Research Training Seminar in Year 1.

Programme Specification

MA Linguistics and Intensive Language - Programme Specifications 2015/16 (pdf; 334kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/ma-lingandlang/file91061.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Programme Aims:

- To provide students with knowledge of the discipline of linguistics and research methodology in the study of language, both from a theoretical and practical viewpoint

- To provide students with sufficient transferable skills to enable them to function in other professional environments related to language

- To provide either a further qualification in linguistics or a preparation for research (MPhil/PhD) study. By the end of the course students are able to pursue further research or training, at either PhD or professional level

- To provide the opportunity of studying one or more Asian, Middle Eastern and African languages. By the end of the course students are able to have an intermediate-level command of at least one language

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge

1. Acquiring a solid foundation in the ‘core’ areas of theoretical linguistics, syntax, phonology and semantics

2. Familiarity with the basic concepts and assumptions of different theoretical frameworks in the discipline, and the ability to critically question and evaluate these assumptions

3. Familiarity with the relevant conventions and methodology applicable to working with both raw linguistic data and linguistic descriptions

4. Opportunity to specialise in the area of interest

5. The student will have the opportunity to gain knowledge (or further knowledge) of one or more Asian, Middle Eastern or African languages

Intellectual (thinking) skills:
Having completed the programme, students should have:

1. The ability to formulate appropriate linguistic problems, propose and evaluate analyses and present evidence (for and/or against) these analyses

2. Knowledge of how to assess data and evidence critically from the literature and original sources, how to formulate analyses and arguments within the system of concepts and assumptions in the discipline, how to solve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations

Subject-based practical skills:
Having completed the programme, students should be able to:

1. Practise research techniques in specialised research libraries and through consultant work

2. Retrieve and select information from a variety of linguistic sources such as specialised papers and reference grammars

3. Have strong practical language skills which will help them in any context where the language is used and which will also be of benefit if they need to learn another language in the future

Transferable skills:
Having completed the programme, students should be able to:

1. Locate materials and use research sources (library holdings, ‘raw’ language data, periodicals, internet)

2. Structure and communicate ideas effectively in writing

3. Question, understand and evaluate competing proposals

Employment

Many linguistics graduates continue their studies and go to do a PhD, either at SOAS or elsewhere. Others work in the domains of education, translation, information and media technology, journalism, publishing, consultancy for law and medicine, product-naming companies, as well as governmental organisations concerned with language planning, language policy and foreign affairs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This three module course is designed to help you provide an effective and supportive learning environment for children who are learning in a second language classroom. Read more
This three module course is designed to help you provide an effective and supportive learning environment for children who are learning in a second language classroom.

It offers you the opportunity to gain the knowledge and skills to make informed decisions both about the learning and development of a child with English as an Additional Language and best practice pedagogy and policies to support them.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/pgcert-education-teaching-english-as-an-additional-language/

Why choose this course?

- It has a strong focus on applied classroom practice

- You will be taught by an experienced team of colleagues delivering the suite of TESOL courses at The School of Education.

This course in detail

There are three modules, outlined as follows:

- English as an additional language
You will focus on children in English-speaking schools, whose first language is not English (the EAL child). The module aims to draw on current practice, research, case studies, websites and professional networks, enabling you to:
- analyse the development of children in second languages settings

- identify theories of bilingualism, trans-languaging and dynamic language

- appreciate the links between first and second language, identity and self-esteem: the emotional experiences of the EAL child

- evaluate teacher, teacher assistant, parent, and whole school responses to the EAL child

- theorise practice and pedagogy: what beliefs, theories and attitudes to language and the EAL learner underpin teacher choices?

- evaluate and critically compare policies connected with the teaching, learning and integration of the EAL child into the mainstream school

- evaluate, adapt and create resources and materials for their fit with the needs of the EAL child.

- Language acquisition
You will deal with theoretical and practical approaches to language acquisition and focus on second language acquisition, with priority given to approaches of special relevance to language learning and education. Key themes that you will cover throughout the session include: linguistic variation, codeswitching, sociopolitics and language policy, and language teacher training.

- Investigative practice
You will have the opportunity to apply knowledge and skills from the core modules to a specific work-based setting involving EAL children, and to reflect on how these work in practice to enhance the child's learning experience.

Please note: as our courses are reviewed regularly the list of modules you choose from may vary from that shown here.

Teaching and learning

The course will be offered through a range of methods, including:
- face to face workshops, 5.00pm - 7.30pm on Wednesday evenings

- follow-up sessions, with readings, online discussion forum, shared assignment tasks and online tutorials

- work-based investigation within your own working context.

Attendance pattern

The course will be offered through a range of methods, including face to face workshops, 5.00 - 7.30pm on Wednesday evenings.

How this course helps you develop

The PGCertificate aims to develop reflective practitioners at master's level.

Careers

Your learning on the course may lead to better prospects for career advancement and students may change role / direction as a function of developing new understandings and skills from their work on the course.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

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Conceived in the context of world-systemic transformation, this MA will give you the analytical tools to understand contemporary developments and world(s) through an encounter with post-colonial theory and international political economic issues. Read more

Conceived in the context of world-systemic transformation, this MA will give you the analytical tools to understand contemporary developments and world(s) through an encounter with post-colonial theory and international political economic issues.

We're witnessing today a tectonic shift in global geopolitics. The emergence of China, Brazil and India as global players, the development of global governance, the financial crisis, climate change – are all symptoms.

On this Masters you’ll grasp concepts like race, diaspora, hybridity, difference, grassroots development, HDI, multitude, immanence, and human rights.

These concepts are used to analyse practical, policy and activist issues arising from globalisation: global civil society, the role of international organisations (the IMF, WTO, UN and World Bank and global NGOs), intellectual property rights, social capital, financialisation, global governance and deep democracy.

You'll deal with issues like terrorism, microfinance, indigenous people, gender and sexuality, multiculturalism and environmental justice.

The MA is ideal for anyone pursuing careers in policy research, NGOs, advocacy, charities, international organisations, cultural and political activism, global media, art and curating, as well as for further academic work leading to a PhD.

Practical placement

The Masters includes a supervised and assessed practical placement. This may be with NGOs in India or Africa, arts and conservation organisations in China, indigenous activists in Latin America, London-based global NGOs, diasporic communities, think-tanks, environmental organisations, publishers or financial/microfinance organisations.

Leading theorists and visiting lecturers

You'll be taught by leading theorists and visiting lecturers drawn from a wide circle of activists, artists, film-makers, lawyers, economists, journalists and policy-makers.

Modules & structure

Core modules

Recommended option modules

You take option modules to the value of 30 credits. Modules can be chosen from across Goldsmiths departments and centres. Option modules are subject to availability and approval by the module lecturer/convenor.

We offer a wide range of option modules each year. Below are some examples of modules that are currently running. For a full list, please contact the Department of Media and Communications.

Other option modules, by department

You may prefer to look through the full range of optional modules available across Goldsmiths departments.

Please note that not all the modules listed below may be open to you - your final selection will depend upon spaces available and timetable compatibility.

Assessment

Essays and/or practical projects; dissertation.

Skills

The programme provides advanced training for labour market-relevant skills in transnational analysis of sovereignty, democracy, governmentality, financialisation, intellectual property rights, and the role of non-governmental organisations.

Careers

Suitable careers and areas of work for graduates of the programme include:

  • the academic sphere
  • government and non-government sectors
  • arts and art administration
  • publishing
  • journalism
  • media
  • the culture industry in general

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths.



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Welfare states everywhere face enormous challenges from population ageing, changes in family life and work-patterns, migration and the economic crisis. Read more

Welfare states everywhere face enormous challenges from population ageing, changes in family life and work-patterns, migration and the economic crisis. In a globalised and interdependent world, these issues can only be understood from an international perspective which accounts for these common pressures and processes, but which also recognises and engages with the diversity of national traditions and institutions for delivering welfare.

The International Social Policy programme takes a policy analytic approach to provide you with an advanced understanding of current debates, theories and concepts relevant to international social policy. You learn about the common features of social policy arrangements internationally and the variety and differences that characterise welfare across the countries and regions of the world. Drawing on the research-based expertise available at SSPSSR which relates to countries ranging from China, South Korea and Singapore in South East Asia to the UK, Germany and Sweden in Western Europe, you are equipped to understand how national and global forces interact to shape trajectories of welfare system development.

The programme enables you to apply theories and methods of social policy in exploring enduring cross cutting themes in social policy, including the prioritisation of equality and capabilities, as well as to drill down to how and why policy unfolds in key welfare fields. You develop policy analytic skills in relation to such areas as health, migration, pensions, education, social care, and children & family related policy. You acquire expertise in the use of primary and secondary data collection in areas pertaining to all these aspects of social policy, and are thus equipped to think critically about the development of social welfare systems in a global age across the full range of national contexts and policy situations.

Course structure

We place considerable emphasis on structured, interactive seminars with a high degree of student participation. You also join the staff/graduate seminars which allow MA and research students to become involved in a professional research culture.

The programme gives you a clear and confident grasp of social policy in developed and developing countries. You gain an advanced understanding of the relevant debates, theories and concepts of international issues alongside skills in research design and data collection.

Modules

You take compulsory modules alongside optional modules of your choice. Modules may include:

  • Design of social research
  • Key issues in comparative social policy
  • Comparative social policy
  • Organised civil society and the third sector
  • The family, parenting culture and parenting policy
  • Governing science, technology and society in the 21st Century
  • Foundations of sociology
  • Politics and sociology of the environment
  • Sociology of health, illness and medicine
  • Quantitative data analysis
  • Terrorism and modern society

https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/118/international-social-policy#structure

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

  • provide you with an advanced understanding of current debates, theories and concepts relevant to international social policy
  • impart country-specific as well as cross-national empirical and theoretical knowledge of current challenges and processes of transformation of welfare systems
  • enable you to apply theories and methods of social policy in exploring specific policy fields such as health, migration, pensions, education, social care, poverty and social exclusion, urban development, and family policy
  • develop your skills in research design and data collection in areas pertaining to social policy
  • familiarise you with using primary and secondary data to develop cutting-edge research in the field of international social policy.

Careers

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we place considerable emphasis on you gaining specialist knowledge in your chosen subject alongside core transferable skills. We ensure that you develop the skills and competences that employers are looking for including: research and analysis; policy development and interpretation; independent thought; writing and presentation, as well as time management and leadership skills. You also become fully involved in the professional research culture of the School. A postgraduate degree in the area of social and public policy is a particularly flexible and valuable qualification that can lead to many exciting opportunities and professions.

Our graduates obtain a range of transferable skills and report high levels of being in employment or further study within six months of graduation across all of our degree programmes.

Over 98% of Kent's postgraduate students who graduated in 2016 were in work or further study within six months. Recent graduates from our School have pursued careers in academia, journalism, local and central government, charities and NGOs.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at the University of Kent

We offer inspirational teaching and supervision alongside first-class library and IT facilities. You also benefit from our high-impact research in all subjects. Whatever you are looking to study, Kent provides a dynamic and challenging environment for your postgraduate studies.

  • Kent was awarded gold, the highest rating, in the UK Government’s Teaching Excellence Framework
  • Kent is ranked 21st in the Times Higher Education (THE) ‘Table of Tables’ 2017
  • Kent is ranked 25th in the Complete University Guide 2018
  • Kent is ranked 22nd in the Guardian University Guide 2018
  • 42% of our academics are from overseas and we have students representing 158 nationalities
  • In the most recent research rankings, 97% of research at Kent was found to be of international quality (REF 2014)
  • Kent is ranked 17th in the UK* for research intensity and research output (REF 2014)
  • Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why-kent/

* of 122 universities, not including specialist institutions



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The Master of Governance and Public Policy (MGPP) degree aims to impart knowledge, skills, and analytic capability about the rational application of methods, practical tools and techniques in public governance including the formulation, implementation, and evaluation of public policy in the dynamic and complex era of globalization. Read more
The Master of Governance and Public Policy (MGPP) degree aims to impart knowledge, skills, and analytic capability about the rational application of methods, practical tools and techniques in public governance including the formulation, implementation, and evaluation of public policy in the dynamic and complex era of globalization. The Program combines relevant contemporary theories, professional skills, practical knowledge, high level research skills and critical thinking to approach the questions of governance and policy management in the new millennium. The MGPP equips students with cutting-edge skills to undertake open, accountable, responsive, and inclusive leadership to address the administrative, ethical, financial, organizational, and political challenges in delivering superior governmental services and making effectual decisions. For more details on this program, click here: http://www.chss.uaeu.ac.ae/en/mgpp/index.shtml

Program Objectives

‌•To prepare professionals and public policy leaders to discuss, analyze, and evaluate public policies.
‌•To appreciate the complex and cross-sectorial nature of public policy, public policy challenges, and public policy solutions.
‌•To implement skills necessary to address important criteria of transparency, accountability, responsive, effectiveness, efficiency, and inclusive in all policy processes.
‌•To develop leadership skills necessary to lead national and local institutions and perform administrative, financial, organizational, and political activities.
‌•To exercise ethical and moral standards in public policy processes and leadership behaviors.
‌•To equip students with various analytical tools to effectively diagnose and proffer solutions to complex public policy issues .

Program Learning Outcomes

‌•Upon successful completion of this program, students will be able to:
‌•Comprehend selected theories and methods in public governance, policy analysis, market-government relations, macro and micro economics, public budgeting, leadership, and research in the analysis and formulation of public policy.
‌•Conduct governance and public policy research using appropriate research methods, ethics procedures, and statistical analysis
‌•Apply qualitative and quantitative skills in the formulation of public policy independently and in teams.
‌•Use different tools and techniques in policy analysis, stakeholder management, successful policy implementation, effective program evaluation, and financial management
Communicate descriptive and analytical knowledge effectively in written and oral format to various audiences.
‌•Demonstrate preparedness for continued reflective practice and lifelong learning in public policy and governance.
‌•Degree Requirements
‌•Required Credit Hours : minimum 36 hours
‌•Governance and Public Policy

Required Courses (24.00 hours)
‌•Economics for Policy Analysis
‌•Financial Management and Public Budgeting
‌•Public Policy Analysis Theory & Practice
‌•New Public Man & Governments
‌•Research Methods for Political Analysis
‌•Government, Leadership, & Pubic Management
‌•Public Policy Design and Tools
‌•Seminar in Government & Public Policy in the UAE

Elective Courses (6.00 hours)
‌•Globalization, International Agencies & Public Policy
‌•Environmental Policy & Sustainable Development Management
‌•Implementation, Evaluation & Monitoring of Strategic Issues
‌•Comparative Political Institutions
‌•Thesis

Required Course (6.00 hours)
•Master Degree Thesis

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A Masters in Global Englishes unlocks the mysteries behind the English language and enables you to both teach and study it to a higher level. Read more

A Masters in Global Englishes unlocks the mysteries behind the English language and enables you to both teach and study it to a higher level. This programme will address key issues in Global Englishes including; English as a Lingua Franca, World Englishes, the role of English in education globally, English language policy and practice, intercultural communication and intercultural pragmatics. The programme will be taught by members of staff from the world leading research Centre for Global Englishes.

Introducing your degree

Study an MA in Global Englishes at the University of Southampton and gain an insight into the immense impact that the English language has had on a global scale. It is a fundamental component of business transactions and diplomatic dealings throughout the world. Studying this MA degree will present the importance of English as a world language and the influence it has had on other cultures and the varieties of Englishes that are spoken internationally. Study the pragmatics of English in global contexts and Guided by leading experts in this field, this masters degree can help move you towards a career in teaching, politics or publishing.

Overview

It has been estimated (conservatively) that there over 2 billion speakers of English as a second language or lingua franca worldwide today. This gives rise to questions about what is ‘correct’ English, who ‘owns’ English and how it should be used and taught.

The programme provides students with the opportunity to explore and understand the way in which English is used and taught on a global scale and what this means for our understanding of English and language and communication more generally. This programme will address key issues in Global Englishes including:

  • English as a Lingua Franca
  • World Englishes
  • the role of English in education globally
  • English language policy and practice
  • intercultural communication and intercultural pragmatics

The programme will be taught by members of staff from the world leading research Centre for Global Englishes.

View the programme specification document for this course

Career Opportunities

Career destinations for students on this programme will be as researchers of Global Englishes, applied linguistics teachers, English language teachers in state and private institutions internationally, or in Education Ministries or the publishing industry.



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This unique Master's of Public Administration degree provides professionals working in international development with the practical tools and skills to collaborate on policy that responds to the need for balanced growth, social wellbeing and environmental protection in developing countries. Read more

This unique Master's of Public Administration degree provides professionals working in international development with the practical tools and skills to collaborate on policy that responds to the need for balanced growth, social wellbeing and environmental protection in developing countries.

About this degree

Students are taught the conceptual frameworks, policy analysis tools and analytical methods to creatively develop innovative sustainable policy for developing countries. Students also study how development and innovation policies are implemented, evaluated and revised in policy cycles. A focus on leadership and the development of professional skills is emphasised throughout.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (105 credits), one optional module (15 credits), an elective module (15 credits), and a major group project module (45 credits).

Core modules

Students undertake three core modules with students from sister MPA programmes, and a specialist module focusing on their degree topic.

  • Introduction to Science, Technology, Engineering and Public Policy
  • Analytical Methods for Policy
  • Development, Technology and Innovation Policy
  • Evidence, Institutions and Power

Optional modules

Students must select one compulsory option from the following STEaPP modules

  • Science, Technology and Engineering Advice in Practice
  • Risk Assessment and Governance
  • Communicating Science for Policy
  • Negotiation, Mediation and Diplomacy

Students will then also select one further 15-credit graduate module which is relevant to their degree of study. This module can be selected from any UCL department.

MPA Group Policy Project

In the group project, students work with an external client on a relevant policy challenge. With the support of STEaPP academic staff, the multidiscipinary student groups work together to produce an analysis that meets their clients' needs. The Group Project is usually around 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme combines innovative classroom teaching methods with unique scenario-based learning, enabling students to dynamically engage with real-world policy challenges. Scenarios are designed to help students consolidate knowledge and develop essential practical skills and their understanding of principles. During the programme, students acquire a comprehensive range of relevant skills.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Development, Technology and Innovation Policy MPA

Careers

Graduates with Development, Technology and Innovation Policy MPA degrees will typically work in government agencies, corporate regulatory affairs departments or within advocacy groups doing legislative, regulatory or policy analysis. The career path for this type of profession begins as research or policy assistant, moves through policy or research analyst, then to technical consultant or project director or other senior professional roles. Ambitious candidates can work towards top-level positions such as assistant secretary or executive director.

Employability

Through the MPA programme, students will:

  • gain a greater awareness of current issues and developments in innovation, development, science, technology and engineering
  • develop a greater awareness of the knowledge systems underpinning successful policy-making processes
  • learn how to communicate with scientists and engineers, policymakers and industry experts
  • develop the skills to mobilise development, technology and innovation policy, and science and engineering knowledge and expertise, to address the societal challenges they care about.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Developing countries face rapid technological change, increased global interdependencies, and problems such as climate change. This practical programme offers experiential learning for skills needed in innovative development policy-making.

Students undertake a week-long scenario activity on the policy-making process where they engage with external experts and UCL academics. Students go on to undertake a nine-month major project for a real-world client involved in development initiatives. Example policy problems include water or energy infrastructure, food, or telecoms.

Students will gain the opportunity to network with UCL STEaPP's broad range of international partners, expert staff and a diverse range of academics and professionals from across the department's MPA and doctoral programmes.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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This Master's of Public Administration prepares the next generation of climate and energy leaders and decision makers to tackle complex challenges, from mitigating climate change to developing sustainable and renewable energy. Read more

This Master's of Public Administration prepares the next generation of climate and energy leaders and decision makers to tackle complex challenges, from mitigating climate change to developing sustainable and renewable energy. Graduates gain the tools, practical skills and knowledge to leverage technology and innovate climate and energy policy and gain insights from practising experts.

About this degree

Students are taught the conceptual frameworks, policy analysis tools and analytical methods to develop energy and climate policies. Students also study how energy and climate policies are implemented, evaluated and revised in policy cycles. A focus on leadership and the development of professional skills is emphasised throughout. 

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (105 credits), one optional module (15 credits), an elective module (15 credits), and a major group project module (45 credits) of around 12,000 words.

Core modules

Students undertake three core modules with students from sister MPA programmes, and a specialist module focusing on their degree topic.

  • Introduction to Science, Technology, Engineering and Public Policy
  • Analytical Methods for Policy
  • Energy, Technology and Climate Policy
  • Evidence, Institutions and Power

Optional modules

Students select one optional STEaPP module from the following:

  • Science, Technology and Engineering Advice in Practice
  • Risk Assessment and Governance
  • Communicating Science for Policy
  • Negotiation, Mediation and Diplomacy

Students will then also select one further 15-credit graduate module which is relevant to their degree of study. This module can be selected from any UCL department.

MPA Group Policy Project

In the group project, students work with an external client on a relevant policy challenge. With the support of STEaPP academic staff, the multidiscipinary student groups work together to produce an analysis that meets their clients' needs.

Teaching and learning

The programme combines innovative classroom teaching methods with unique scenario-based learning, enabling students to dynamically engage with real-world policy challenges. Scenarios are designed to help students consolidate knowledge and develop essential practical skills and their understanding of principles. During the programme, students acquire a comprehensive range of relevant skills.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Energy, Technology and Climate Policy MPA

Careers

Graduates of this Master's of Public Administration acquire skills to work in a range of sectors involved in analysis and/or policy-making concerning energy and climate change. Career destinations might include national and local government; international agencies such as the World Bank, United Nations and other global organisations; technology companies focused on sustainable energy; government offices of energy, innovation or development; environment agencies; consultancies and think tanks.

Employability

Throughout the MPA programme, students will:

  • gain a greater awareness of current issues and developments in energy and climate policy and technology
  • develop an understanding of the knowledge systems underpinning successful policy-making processes
  • learn how to communicate with scientists and engineers, policymakers and technology experts
  • develop the skills to mobilise public policy, and science and engineering knowledge and expertise, to address societal challenges relating to energy and climate policy.

Why study this degree at UCL?

A rapidly changing energy landscape and the impacts of climate change are providing opportunities for policy strategy and leadership in almost every country and industry sector. This practical programme offers experiential learning for skills needed in energy and climate policy-making.

Students undertake a week-long scenario activity on the policy-making process where they engage with external experts and UCL academics. Students go on to undertake a nine-month major project for a real-world client. Example policy problems include renewable energy sources, carbon capture and storage, or emerging energy technologies.

Students will gain the opportunity to network with UCL STEaPP's broad range of international partners, expert staff and a diverse range of academics and professionals from across the department's MPA and doctoral programmes.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Our MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) is a 12-month full-time taught MA programme designed for students who plan to teach English as a second/foreign language in the UK or internationally or to do research on the teaching, learning or assessment of English as a second/foreign language. Read more
Our MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) is a 12-month full-time taught MA programme designed for students who plan to teach English as a second/foreign language in the UK or internationally or to do research on the teaching, learning or assessment of English as a second/foreign language.

The programme is designed primarily for people with little or no prior experience of English language teaching, but who have a relevant first degree (English Language/ Linguistics or Education with a substantial English component) and who intend to be an English teacher or researcher.

The MA TESOL is an academic programme of study and not a teacher training course. Therefore, it provides a foundation in Applied Linguistics, Approaches to English Teaching and Research Methods on which later training in practical teaching can build. Theories of language acquisition and language teaching are explored, with the emphasis on how such theories may be practically applied; however, there is no teaching practicum as part of this programme.

The programme aims to:
-Provide an introduction to current issues and key trends in language learning and teaching in a global context
-Develop students' knowledge of Applied Linguistics and approaches to language teaching that will facilitate better teaching practice
-Provide basic research skills that students will need in order to (1) be able to engage critically with the language teaching and learning literature they read, and (2) carry out their own research project
-Help provide the knowledge and skills for those who want to conduct doctoral research in TESOL, Applied Linguistics or related areas

Content

Term 1
-TESOL Methods (20 credits)
-Research Methods in Language Learning and Teaching (20 credits)

One option module from a list of about 10 options (20 credits). These may include:
-Bilingualism
-Citizenship Education
-Cross-linguistic influences in second language acquisition
-Discourse analysis & language teaching
-Education and social justice
-Evaluating ESOL classroom practice
-Intercultural communication in education
-Learning and Teaching Second Language Reading
-Motivation in education
-Teaching and assessing speaking skills
-Teaching and assessing writing skills
-Teaching and learning in schools
-Teaching World English
-Topics in second language acquisition

Term 2
-English Linguistics (20 credits)

One option module from a list of about 10 options (20 credits). These may include:
-Approaches to English language teaching
-Contemporary issues in teaching
-Cross-cultural perspectives on language and discourse
-Developmental psycholinguistics
-Learning and teaching grammar in a second language
-The practice of English language teaching
-Pragmatics: language, meaning and communication
-Psychology of language and language learning
-Qualitative and quantitative data analysis
-Teaching and learning citizenship and global education
-Teaching English for academic purposes
-Testing and assessment in English language teaching

Term 3
-Planning and Communicating Research (20 credits). These classes are spread over Terms 2 and 3

The third term and the summer is devoted to writing a dissertation based on a small-scale research study (60 credits), to be submitted by early September.

Teaching

The MA in TESOL programme is proud of its international standing and attracts high quality students and experienced academics from the UK and around the globe. With this experience, we are ideally suited for supporting our home and international students alike.

Learning is maximised through the use of a variety of teaching approaches which are student-centred and research informed, including lectures, small group seminars, tutorials, and through the use of our online virtual learning environment. The Education Department also has a vibrant guest speaker programme and students are encouraged to attend and participate in lectures and presentations from many key researchers in the field of Language Education and TESOL. Students are also able to take advantage of additional English language lessons and study skills workshops should they need them.

Students are assigned a personal supervisor who they will have on-going contact with throughout the duration of the course through face-to-face meetings and through email contact. The supervisor provides academic and pastoral support throughout the course. The Department of Education is highly regarded within the university for its teaching and supervision and has won many awards at university level to reflect this.

Careers

Our graduates find employment in a wide range of sectors within education, but also in journalism, information management, human resources and other careers.

Many become English language teachers all around the world, in private language schools, state schools, universities and other organisations requiring English language instruction.

Others find employment opportunities in areas of course and syllabus design, and materials writing in large and small scale publishing houses.

Our postgraduate courses can be used to complement teacher training/development programmes and voluntary or paid roles which focus on the more practical elements of teaching. However, other than our PGCE, our courses are not teacher training programmes in themselves.

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The MA in Multilingualism, Linguistics and Education is an applied linguistics programme with an emphasis on diversity, both linguistic and cultural diversity, which also provides a solid understanding of the theoretical and practical issues that arise in multilingual and intercultural educational settings. Read more

The MA in Multilingualism, Linguistics and Education is an applied linguistics programme with an emphasis on diversity, both linguistic and cultural diversity, which also provides a solid understanding of the theoretical and practical issues that arise in multilingual and intercultural educational settings.

This programme is a unique combination of applied linguistics and educational studies. It draws on expertise from two departments, the Department of English and Comparative Literature and the Department of Educational Studies, to offer students a wide-ranging interdisciplinary programme. It will add value to your professional life, whether as a manager, teacher or researcher, or in other careers related to language and education.

This programme is targeted at students working or planning to work in education in diverse contexts, and those interested in professional roles related to intercultural and multilingual communication.

It will be of particular interest to students who wish to gain experience in language teaching, either as an additional or second foreign language (for example in multilingual classrooms, in bilingual education settings internationally, or English as a foreign language/English as a Lingua Franca) and aim to achieve a wider theoretical knowledge base. Some of the topics explored include:

  • English in a multilingual world
  • Multilingualism, code-switching and translanguaging
  • English as a Lingua Franca
  • Intercultural communication
  • English language teaching
  • Teaching languages from a multilingual perspective
  • Race, ethnicity and cultural diversity in education

Study in Brazil

There are three places available for students on this programme to spend a minimum of two months at our partner institution the Federal University of Bahia (Salvador, Brazil). Students can apply for this opportunity through Goldsmiths once they have enrolled on the MA.

Successful students will not have to pay additional tuition fees, and will receive a grant for living expenses while in Salvador provided by Erasmus+ and the UK National Agency. Students will be able to conduct their research projects as well as take a range of modules at the host institution.

Modules & structure

You learn how the English language and other languages are structured and used in a range of cultural settings, and how to support the literacy and learning development of students from multilingual backgrounds.

The course offers critical engagement with theory, policy and practice, and students benefit from intellectual debates in the disciplines of both education and linguistics.

Modules are taught by the Department of English and Comparative Literature (ECL) and the Department of Educational Studies (ES). You complete two compulsory modules, two option modules and a 15,000-word dissertation.

Core modules

In addition to the two core modules, you must choose two option modules.

One of the following modules from the Department of English and Comparative Literature:

And one of the following modules from the Department of Educational Studies:

For the dissertation we encourage hands-on research based on the uses of written and spoken language in a variety of institutional and informal contexts.

Where possible, we'll help you access multilingual settings relevant to you research. This will give unique insight into the practices of British classrooms and different linguistic communities.

You're also encouraged to draw on your own experience or unique cultural and linguistic background.

We run an additional MA study skills module in which we cover topics such as: using electronic resources; British academic essay writing & referencing at MA level; planning a dissertation.

Assessment

Coursework; essays; examinations; dissertation.

Skills

You will acquire a wide-ranging understanding of educational and linguistic policy and research, especially with respect to multilingual settings. You will also develop your critical thinking, communication and research skills.

Careers

Teaching (especially language teaching or teaching in multilingual environments), administration and/or management of educational and language policy, publishing, the civil service, the media.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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Want to further your career in language teaching? Learn the latest linguistics theories and apply them to your classroom practice. Read more

Want to further your career in language teaching? Learn the latest linguistics theories and apply them to your classroom practice. Gain critical and analytical skills that will boost your career prospects. Choose to study by distance learning or in Cambridge, a city famous for language teaching.

Overview

If you’re involved with any aspect of foreign language teaching, this course will further your theoretical understanding of language learning and give you a chance to develop your teaching skills.

You’ll gain a firm grounding in the current theories and methodologies of foreign language teaching and learning, and second language acquisition, and have the chance to apply these to your own classroom practice and curriculum development.

You’ll learn the basics of conducting research, and improve the critical and analytical skills in demand from employers. Our modules will also allow you to investigate other issues of language, like migration or identity.

Outside of the course, you’ll have the chance to attend, and take part in, our research seminars and conferences, like the Identities in Language conference, or the British Association for Applied Linguistics conference 2016.

Course duration: 13 months full-time, 2 years part-time (September starts); 18 months full-time, 28 months part-time (January starts)

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applied-linguistics-and-tesol

Careers

Our past students enjoy careers in many language-learning and teaching-related professions, such as teaching English and other languages (in the UK and abroad), and developing courses, tests, materials or language policy.

Modules

Core modules:

Second Language Acquistion

Discourse in Society

Research Methods in Applied Linguistics

Major Project

Optional modules:

Materials and Course Design

Classroom Theory and Practice

Impacts of Migration

Language, Identity and Policy

Assessment

You’ll show your understanding of theoretical issues and their practical application through a combination of portfolios, classroom observation tasks and critical essays. After completing your final module, you’ll also research and prepare a 15,000-word dissertation.

Where you'll study

You can take this course on our Cambridge campus or by distance learning. On campus, all teaching takes place in the evening, making it easier for you to take up paid work during the day. With its many language schools, Cambridge is the perfect place for you to gain invaluable experience in language teaching.

Our distance learning course is provided entirely online and asynchronous, allowing you to study flexibly wherever you are.



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