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The programme is organised by the Centre of Language Studies. Within this research institute, language and communication specialists from Radboud University and the University of Tilburg work closely together. Read more

The programme is organised by the Centre of Language Studies. Within this research institute, language and communication specialists from Radboud University and the University of Tilburg work closely together. You will also be able to follow a number of lectures in Tilburg. Our programme is known to be challenging, but it also offers students a very large degree of choice.

Real language in real-life situations

Whenever we use language we are involved in communicating. How does this work and why is there miscommunication? How does language fit together and how do we learn to understand each other's language? This is the central theme of this unique programme. It is unique because language and communication are treated as a single unit with each field complementing the other. The programme is also special because it focuses strongly on empirical research. You will be studying real language in real-life situations and you will use your observation skills to develop possible theories. Later, you will test these theories against everyday reality. In this way you will discover the richness of both language and communication.

Challenging research environment

As a Master’s student in Language and Communication you will find yourself in a challenging research environment. The university has experts in topics such as language variation and language diversity, language technology, sign language, intercultural communication, persuasive communication, optimal communication and the ways in which language can be processed. These specialists work closely with colleagues in the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics (MPI) and the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (FI BCB). As a result, Nijmegen can provide you with an exceptional opportunity to explore new avenues of knowledge and the chance to work alongside specialists who are leaders in their field internationally.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/language

Why study Language and Communication (Research) at Radboud University?

  • Radboud University offers this programme jointly with Tilburg University, so that our students can learn from and work alongside a large number of specialists. Our universities have experts in language variation and language diversity, language technology, sign language, intercultural communication, persuasive communication, optimal communication, multimodal messages and social media.
  • The programme is designed so that you can develop a unique professional profile by specialising in an area that meets your interests and research ambitions.
  • You’ll gain substantial hands-on research experience during two lab rotations, while you’ll also develop various research skills (incl. academic writing and grant proposal writing); the programme also challenges you to think about the valorisation process.
  • You’ll participate in group-oriented education and be part of a selected group of highly motivated national and international students.
  • The Radboud campus in Nijmegen offers you a challenging research environment in which you could work together with specialists from four leading research institutes connected to this field: Centre for Language Studies, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Baby Research Centre, and Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour
  • Radboud University has excellent facilities for doing research, including the University Library with the largest collection in the field of linguistics in the Netherlands, and experimental labs and computer facilities with state-of-the-art equipment

General requirements:

  1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Communication Studies, in Linguistics, in a modern language or a related area with excellent grades. Your Bachelor's thesis or a dedicated research proposal will also need to demonstrate that you’re sufficiently talented for scientific research.
  2. Proficiency in English. Non-native speakers of English* need one of the following:
  • A TOEFL score of >600 (paper based) or >100 (internet based)
  • A IELTS score of >7.0
  • Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with a mark of C or higher

3. Strong motivation

You have to be able to demonstrate your motivation for and affinity with international academic research. A selection committee will evaluate the motivation of each applicant separately.

Career prospects

The primary goal of the programme is academic training, which makes it ideal for those wishing to embark on a research career, for example by taking a PhD. But it also caters for the growing demand from the public and private sectors for people with academic insight and research skills. Many graduates will join research groups in the public and private sector. These may address a wide range of topics such as advanced Internet and enhancing professional communication in an international context.

Our approach to this field

Whenever we use language we are involved in communication with others - to persuade, to inform and to exchange ideas. How does this work and why is there miscommunication? How does language fit together in spoken language and non-verbal cues such as eye-contact or facial expression and how do we learn to understand each other's language? This is the central theme of this unique programme.

It is unique because language and communication are treated as a single unit with each field complementing the other. The programme is also special because it focuses strongly on empirical research. We invite you to discover exciting new areas of research, where language and communication are illuminated by developments in information and communication technology. You will be studying real language in real-life situations and you will use your observations to develop possible theories. Later, you will test these theories against everyday reality. In this way you will discover the richness of both language and communication.

Our research in this field

As a Master’s student in Language and Communication you will find yourself in a challenging research environment. The university has experts in language variation and language diversity, language technology, sign language, intercultural communication, persuasive communication, optimal communication and the ways in which language can be processed. These specialists work closely with colleagues in the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics (MPI) and the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (FI BCB). As a result, Nijmegen can provide you with an exceptional opportunity to explore new avenues of knowledge and the chance to work alongside specialists who are leaders in their field internationally.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/language



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Combine a solid theoretical basis in Language for Specific Purposes, Second Language Acquisition and Language Testing with challenging opportunities to design language courses and practise your coaching skills. Read more

Combine a solid theoretical basis in Language for Specific Purposes, Second Language Acquisition and Language Testing with challenging opportunities to design language courses and practise your coaching skills.

There’s an increasing demand for language and communication trainers and coaches: business people, pilots, politicians, hospital porters, teachers, hotel staff, academics, cab drivers, athletes, doctors, office workers, tour guides, lawyers, catering staff, nurses, practically everybody needs to use English in their jobs. The Master’s specialisation in Language and Communication Coaching offers you a thorough academic grounding to pursue a career as a language and communication coach who can quickly and effectively meet the training needs of a wide variety of clients.

The specialisation offers a unique and rigorous programme combining a solid theoretical basis in Language for Specific Purposes, Second Language Acquisition and Language Testing with challenging opportunities to design language courses and practise your training and coaching skills. You’ll also get some practical, hands-on training and coaching experience in the form of peer teaching and an internship at a language institute.

Why study Language and Communication Coaching at Radboud University?

  • The specialisation includes an English for Specific Purposes module, which prepares students for a career as a language and communication coach who can quickly and effectively meet the needs of a wide variety of target groups such as business people, pilots, politicians, hospital porters, doctors etc.
  • You’ll receive a combination of academic grounding and practical training.
  • You’ll be part of a truly international classroom with students from all over the world. This will not only provide you with an interesting social and cultural experience. It’ll also allow theoretical and practical insights into the linguistic issues you’ll be studying, as you consider how these apply to the various languages and language learners represented in your class.
  • The specialisation addresses both the linguistic and cultural aspects of present-day communication all over the world.
  • Although the role of English as a lingua franca has meant that research in this field is mostly focused on English, it is equally applicable to the design of courses in other languages.
  • The Linguistics programme is connected to the research carried out at the Centre for Language Studies (CLS). This institution has a reputation in the Netherlands and far beyond for top quality and ground-breaking research. Students at Nijmegen can also benefit from the wealth of other research done on campus by, for example, the world-renowned Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics.

World-leading research

Linguistics research at Radboud University was recently rated number 1 in the world wide university ranking. The Center for World University Rankings (CWUR) publishes annual rankings of the best universities world wide. Withing the subject field of Linguistics, our research topped the list. Research and education are closely intertwined in Nijmegen: in lectures and through research internships and assignments, students become familiar with the latest developments in linguistics research.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/linguistics/language

Admission requirements for international students

1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Linguistics or related area

In order to get admission to this Master's you’ll need a completed Bachelor’s degree in Linguistics. Students with a Bachelor’s degree in specific language, like German, Dutch and such, or with a Bachelor’s degree in Communication and Information Sciences can also apply, provided they took at least 60 ECTS worth of courses in the field of linguistics.

2. Proficiency in English

In order to take part in this programme, you need to have fluency in both written and spoken English. Non-native speakers of English* without a Dutch Bachelor's degree or VWO diploma need one of the following:

  • A TOEFL score of >600 (paper based) or >100 (internet based)
  • An IELTS score of >7.0
  • Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with a mark of C or higher
  • A Bachelor’s degree in English Language and Culture from a research university.

Career prospects

Graduates of the Language and Communication Coaching Master’s will be able to deliver a wide range of language and communication services: language teaching, text consultancy, in-service training, development of course and test materials, language policy and communication advice.

Graduates could work as:

  • Self-employed trainers and coaches
  • Language and communication coaches with language institutes, communication offices, teacher training programmes
  • Advisors to education consultancies
  • Developers of language tests
  • Policy staff members for international offices
  • Refresher course developers for English teachers (all levels)
  • Developers of (digital) learning tools and (online) curricula
  • Editors, copy writers, journalists or text coaches
  • Managers or heads of department in language institutes, translation agencies, etc.
  • Project researchers (for instance into language acquisition processes, educational efficiency, learning methods, specific components of language learning processes (pronunciation, etc.)
  • Language specialists or consultants working in business or for the government

Teacher in the Netherlands

Want to become an English teacher in secondary or further education? After completing your Master's you can get your ‘eerstegraads bevoegdheid’ to become a teacher in the Netherlands (leraar Engels). With this degree, you can teach the higher grades of secondary school in the Netherlands (HAVO and VWO). The combination of the specialisation in Language and Communication Coaching and the ‘eerstegraads bevoegdheid’ will make you a particularly attractive candidate for Universities of Applied Science (HBO).

This one-year-postgraduate programme (Lerarenopleiding Taal- en Cultuurwetenschappen) is offered in Dutch by the Radboud Docenten Academie.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/linguistics/language

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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Today, there are around 6-7,000 languages spoken in the world and it is widely agreed that at least half of those are under threat of extinction within 50 to 100 years. Read more
Today, there are around 6-7,000 languages spoken in the world and it is widely agreed that at least half of those are under threat of extinction within 50 to 100 years. Language documentation is a new sub-discipline within linguistics that has emerged as a response to the growing crisis of language endangerment. It emphasises data collection methodologies, in two ways: first, in encouraging researchers to collect and record a wide range of linguistic phenomena in genuine communicative situations; and secondly, in its use of high quality sound and video recording to make sure that the results are the best possible record of the language.

The MA programme in Language Documentation and Description is intended for students who wish to specialise in the documentation and description of languages, with a focus on minority and endangered languages. This specialist MA is characterised by an integrated core of subject offerings that are oriented around issues in language documentation and description, plus a series of options in linguistics, applied linguistics, and language studies.

The programme is formulated with two main pathways:

MA Language Documentation and Description [Language Support and Revitalisation] provides an introductory overview of the study of language as well as courses geared at enabling students to support endangered and minority language communities in a number of ways. This pathway is open to students with or without a background in linguistics.

MA Language Documentation and Description [Field Linguistics] provides students with a sound knowledge of state-of-the-art methods and technology for language documentation and description with an emphasis on endangered and minority languages. This pathway is open to students who already hold an undergraduate major in linguistics/applied linguistics, or an MA in linguistics.

This course is part of the Endangered Languages Academic Programme (ELAP), which specifically aims to advance the documentation and description of endangered languages. ELAP also runs seminars, workshops, and intensive courses on the documentation of endangered languages. The programme is funded by the Lisbet Rausing Charitable Fund, and forms part of the Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project (http://www.hrelp.org/).

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/malangdocdesc/

Structure

The MA Language Documentation and Description (LDD) consists of three components: core courses, option courses and dissertation research. This degree programme is formulated with two different pathways; one specialising in Language Support and Revitalisation and the other specialising in Field Linguistics.

Regardless of the pathway they chose, all students take the equivalent of 2 full units as core courses, and the equivalent of 1 full unit as option courses and submit a Masters dissertation at the end of the year. The MA may be taken part-time, over two or three years, and there is a possibility for transferring between the two pathways for part-time students.

- MA Language Documentation and Description [Language Support and Revitalisation]

This pathway is open for full-time study to students with or without a BA in linguistics and provides an introductory overview of the study of language as well as courses geared at enabling students to support endangered and minority language communities in a number of ways. For part-time options and details please see the MA Handbook.

- MA Language Documentation and Description [Field Linguistics]

This pathway is open to students with a BA in Linguistics and equivalent and provides students with a sound knowledge of state-of-the-art methods and technology for language documentation and description with an emphasis on endangered and minority languages. For part-time options and details please see the MA handbook.

- Optional Courses

Any course/s to the value of 1 unit from the list of running Linguistics PG courses.

Programme Specification

MA Language Documentation and Description - Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 29kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/malangdocdesc/file80773.pdf

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Department of Linguistics

The department is a centre for linguistic study in an unparalleled range of languages, many of which we are documenting for the first time. They include languages of Africa, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, Central Asia, Australia, the Pacific, and Siberia. The department has close academic ties to the rest of our faculty, the Departments of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, as well as the Language Centre.

The research interests of members of staff cover a wide range of theoretical and applied aspects of linguistics, including syntax, phonology, semantics, information structure, sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, linguistic typology, language documentation and description, language contact and multilingualism, language support and revitalisation, language archiving, lexicography, language pedagogy, translation studies, and the studies of individual languages and language families.

View Degree Programmes - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The combined specialisation in language development provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter-related aspects of human spoken communication. Read more
The combined specialisation in language development provides a thorough multidisciplinary introduction to modern knowledge and current research in the inter-related aspects of human spoken communication. It prepares students from different backgrounds for work in the rapidly developing fields of language development research, and their technological applications.

Degree information

Students take a core set of modules building a foundation to study current issues and research in the language sciences, specialising in language development. In selecting the modules for their specialisation, students will be able to take full advantage of the breadth of expertise in language research in the UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two mandatory modules (45 credits), three specialisation modules (45 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research project (60 credits).

Mandatory modules
-Introduction to the Brain and Imaging the Brain
-Research Methods: Principles, Skills and Applications
-Students select three specialisation modules from those below:
-Developmental Language Disorders and Cognitive Neuroscience
-Developmental Disorders of Language, Learning and Cognition
-Development of Speech Perception and Production
-Language Acquisition
-Introduction to Children's Language Development
-Semantic and Pragmatic Development

Optional modules - students select two modules from all those offered within UCL Psychology and Language Sciences, subject to availability and agreement with the Programme Director. A list of possible options is listed below:
-Neuroscience of Language
-Deafness - Cognition and language
-Speech Processing
-Conversation Analysis
-Second Language Speech Learning
-Phonetic Theory
-Foundations of Linguistics
-Issues in Pragmatics
-Current Issues in Syntax
-Stuttering

Not all modules will run every year, some modules may require a minimum number of registered students.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project in an area of Language Science which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, small-group teaching and a virtual learning environment. Some modules also involve workshops or practical classes. Student performance is assessed through coursework, examinations and the research project.

Careers

The majority of students who graduate from Language Sciences MSc programmes go on tho further study or research. Recent graduates have gone on to PhD study in UCL, and in other UK and overseas institutions. Others have gone to work in related industries (for example in speech technology industries, cochlear implants manufacturers) or in education. The skills that the MSc develops - independent research, presentation skills, and statistics - are transferable skills that are very highly sought after outside academia.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Speech and Language Therapist, Kanton Aaargau, Switzerland
-PhD Biomedical Science- Speech and Hearing, Harvard University
-Speech and Language Therapist, West London Mental Health NHS Trust
-Speech and Language Therapist, Whitting Health Foundation Trust
-PGCE Early Years Teaching, Canterbury Christ Church University

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Division of UCL Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language. Staff and students benefit from cutting-edge resources including extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, and cognition.

Opportunities for students to work with world-renowned researchers exist in all areas of investigation. The division offers a supportive environment including numerous specialist seminars, workshops, and guest lectures.

The Language Sciences MSc provides the opportunity for in-depth study of one or more areas of the language sciences. The programme is an 'umbrella degree', with a number of specialisation strands that follow a common structure.

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Conduct an in-depth study of the grammar of English. Learn about dialectal and social variation, language change and the pragmatics of language use, and study varieties of English used around the world. Read more
Conduct an in-depth study of the grammar of English. Learn about dialectal and social variation, language change and the pragmatics of language use, and study varieties of English used around the world.

If you wish to focus specifically on the linguistics of the English language then our MA English Language and Linguistics should interest you. “Grammar” is the body of knowledge that enables a speaker to produce and understand the language(s) they speak. We study that knowledge, taking a practical approach to our research through analysis of English corpora, recordings and texts.

Our course allows you to cover a wide range of topics related to English, including:
-Dialectal and social variation
-Conversation analysis
-Language change
-Language rights
-Pragmatics

You also have the choice of optional topics including American languages, language and gender, multilingualism and language disorders.

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’, placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and among the top 150 departments on the planet (QS World University Rankings 2016).

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

Our expert staff

Our staff maintain excellent student-staff ratios with capped language-specific seminars.

In theoretical linguistics, Doug Arnold, Bob Borsley, Louisa Sadler, and Mike Jones work on the structure of sentences, focusing on English and other languages; Andrew Spencer investigates how complex words are created; and Nancy Kula and Wyn Johnson work on sound structure.

In sociolinguistics, Peter Patrick, Rebecca Clift, Enam Al Wer and Vineeta Chand all work on different aspects of how language varies, and investigate which factors cause such variation. Peter is also involved in language rights, and offers expert opinions in asylum cases where language is used to determine origin.

In applied linguistics, Florence Myles, Monika Schmid, Sophia Skoufaki, Karen Roehr-Brackin, Adela Gánem-Gutiérrez, and Roger Hawkins focus on the learning of second and further languages, whilst Julian Good, Christina Gkonou and Tracey Costley focus on issues to do with the classroom teaching of English as a foreign language.

In psycholinguistics, Sonja Eisenbeiss, Claire delle Luche and Fang Liu use experimental techniques to understand how children learn language, how adults process language, and what happens when language ability is impaired by brain disorders.

Specialist facilities

-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
-Our ‘Visual World’ Experimental Lab records response times and eye movements when individuals are presented with pictures and videos
-Our Eye-Tracking Lab monitors eye movement of individuals performing tasks
-Our Psycholinguistics Lab measures how long it takes individuals to react to words, texts and sounds
-Our Linguistics Lab has specialist equipment to analyse sound
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

Our course can lead to careers in areas such as academic research, publishing, journalism, administration, public service and teaching. You develop key employability skills including research design, data analysis, thinking analytically, report writing and public speaking.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Our graduates are successful in a wide variety of career paths. They leave Essex with a unique set of skills and experience that are in demand by employers.

Example structure

-MA Dissertation
-Advanced Phonology
-English Syntax 1
-Varieties of English
-English Syntax 2
-Variation in English II
-First Language Acquisition (optional)
-Phonological Development (optional)
-Second Language Acquisition and Linguistics Theory (optional)
-American Languages (optional)
-Sentence Processing (optional)
-Language Rights (optional)
-Semantics (optional)
-Language Learning (optional)
-Individual Differences in L2 Learning (optional)
-Syntactic Theory I (optional)
-Variationist Sociolinguistic Theory (optional)
-Experimental Design and Analysis (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods 1: Data Collection (optional)
-Research Methods I (optional)
-Syntactic Theory II (optional)
-Sociocultural Linguistics (optional)
-The Role of Age in Bilingual Development (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods: Data Coding and Analysis (optional)
-Research Methods II (optional)
-Graduate Research Assignment (optional)
-Language Attrition (optional)
-Language in Context: From Pragmatics to Conversation Analysis (optional)
-Intercultural Communication: communicating across languages and cultures (optional)

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There is an increasing demand for teachers of English worldwide, and the sector is no longer dominated by native English speaking teachers. Read more
There is an increasing demand for teachers of English worldwide, and the sector is no longer dominated by native English speaking teachers. The MA in Applied Linguistics for English Language Teaching programme is aimed at students with little or no teaching experience, who want to improve their understanding of linguistics as applied to English Language teaching.

This programme will enable you to join the English language teaching community around the world in higher education, in private language schools and colleges, and, with an appropriate teaching qualification (dependent upon the regulations of the country in which you wish to teach), you may also be able teach in state schools.

On this MA programme, you will learn the basic methods and theories of language teaching and language learning, which will provide a base from which you can then specialise in a number of areas according to your interests: optional modules allow you to specialise in curriculum design and materials evaluation, to focus on educational technologies and software, to explore the teaching of English in professional and academic contexts, or, for those with a non-language undergraduate degree, to work on some of the fundamentals of English language, grammar and vocabulary.

- You will be encouraged to reflect on language learning strategies, in a real context, by becoming a learner yourself: as part of the programme, you are required to learn a foreign language for one semester.
- You will be provided with opportunities to observe experienced English language teachers teaching in real classroom situations, and to reflect on best practice.
- You will receive a thorough grounding in the theoretical aspects of language teaching and learning.
- You will have opportunities to apply these theories by micro-teaching in a peer based environment.

Why study your MA with us?

Queen Mary consistently ranks highly in the National Student Survey. In 2011, our undergraduate language courses were ranked in the top ten across the country for overall student satisfaction. In addition:

You will have many opportunities to participate in extra-curricular events both in the College and in London; this includes a series of guest lectures from English Language Teaching professionals, the Language Centre Reading Group, and participation in BALEAP (the Global forum for professionals involved in English for Academic Purposes).

- You will obtain a University of London degree from a prestigious Russell Group institution, recognised internationally as a guarantee of quality.
- All your lecturers in this programme are also practitioner teachers and therefore you will benefit from the most up-to-date expertise in English language teaching.
- You will profit from London's international English-speaking environment to perfect your own language skills and to interact with students and staff in an exciting multicultural environment.

Facilities

Multimedia Language Resource Centre

You will have access to the Language Learning Centre, which has three computerised multimedia language learning laboratories. Each is equipped with Televic AVIDA net Tenjin systems, satellite TV at every workstation and Smart board interactive whiteboards. The Centre also has two mini labs equipped with similar systems, which are ideal for small group tutorial work and intensive practice. This hi-tech teaching facility is here to support you in your language teaching and learning and also provides a multimedia self access centre where you can pursue your own learning goals.

Students have free access to the superb collections of the University of London Library at Senate House. The many other specialist libraries of the institution, such as the libraries of the British Film Institute, the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes or the social sciences library at the LSE, provide additional breadth. The vast resources of the British Library are close at hand, while London's cultural resources facilitate research in our specialist fields.

Graduate students can also attend interdisciplinary training workshops offered throughout the year by the Faculty, on such topics as writing journal articles, research ethics, preparing for an academic career, enterprise skills, and knowledge transfer.

Core modules

Approaches and Methods in English Language Teaching
Second Language Acquisition
MA Dissertation

Optional modules

Curriculum Design and Materials Evaluation
Description of Language
Technology in Language Education: Theory and Practice
Teaching English in Professional and Academic Settings (TEPAS)

Students choose two optional modules and may also be offered a number of carefully chosen MA Linguistics options.

Career prospects

Students who graduate with this degree will be able to join the community of English language teachers around the world in higher education, in private language schools and colleges, and, with an appropriate teaching qualification (dependent upon the regulations of the country in which you wish to teach), you may also be able teach in state schools. In addition to teaching, students will also be able to develop more specialist careers in syllabus design, education technology, and consultancy.

This degree also prepares students to continue to doctoral study if they so wish.

Continuing onto further research

Upon completing this programme, graduates can choose to pursue a wide variety of research in the broad areas of:

- Second language acquisition
- English Language Teaching
- Second language teaching methodology
- Teaching English for special purposes (academic, business, law, aviation, etc)
- Curriculum design
- Syllabus development and planning
- Educational technology

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This programme is offered in partnership with the Institute of International Education in London. Students are given an academically rigorous programme that explores linguistics issues relating to the Japanese language. Read more
This programme is offered in partnership with the Institute of International Education in London. Students are given an academically rigorous programme that explores linguistics issues relating to the Japanese language. It also analyses research in applied linguistics, particularly research activities and themes that impinge on the language learning environment, such as second language acquisition, language testing, communicative language learning and classroom-based research.

The programme also explores the interface between research in language learning and the practical learning environment, with an emphasis on the teaching of Japanese, and evaluates the role and future of information technology within a resource-based language-learning framework.

The aims of the programme are:

- To explore linguistics issues in the Japanese language

- To analyse the research in applied linguistics, in particular the research activities and themes that impinge on the language learning environment such as second language acquisition, language testing, communicative language learning and classroom-based research

- To explore the interface between research in language learning and the practical learning environment with an emphasis on the teaching of Japanese

- To evaluate the role and future of information technology within source-based language learning framework

- To develop an awareness of non-traditional (i.e. non-classroom teaching) methods of language learning.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/lang/lljap

Language

With special emphasis on building communication skills and developing cultural awareness, our programmes will enable you to become more effective in your chosen career.

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Japanese Teaching Methodology (15 credits)
Japanese Language & Analysis (15 credits)
Key Issues in Second Language Teaching (30 credits)
Reseach Methods in Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
Second Language Acquisition (30 credits) (30 credits)
Research Project (MAMLL/LL&JLT)(60 credits) (60 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:

- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

Students will be assessed through essays and a dissertation.

Career options

Graduates may consider a role as a language teacher in schools, colleges or universities.

Careers and employability

FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE, COMPUTING & HUMANITIES
Our programmes develop the essential skills of communication, self-discipline, independent research and teamwork - all qualities increasingly valued by employers in many fields. A wide range of career opportunities are open to our graduates, ranging from education, publishing and advertising to public administration, speech therapy and IT. We ensure there is a good balance between theory and practice in all our programmes, developing academic and intellectual skills in tandem with practical application.

We work with employers to ensure our degrees provide students with the skills and knowledge they need in the world of work.

Students from the majority of our programmes have the opportunity to undertake work placements in business or the wider community, as a part of their degree. These range from full-year placements to practical course options to work experience opportunities. Students receive advice and mentoring from successful professionals, and to plan their futures from an informed and supported position giving them the best chance of success in the world of work.

Staff will work with students to help find suitable opportunities that will develop the students understanding of their subject and help increase their overall skills and experience, as well as develop an insight into a possible future career. We have good relationships with a wide range of employers but are always keen to help students find new placements that reflect their goals and ambitions. Our network of national and international employers supports the three-way relationship between the student, the employer and the faculty.

The university also provides many opportunities for students to gain work experience and enhance career prospects. The Employability and Careers Service (ECS) offers a range of options, including JobShop, mentoring, volunteering and the student ambassador scheme.

Find out about the teaching and learning outcomes here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/?a=643759

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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The Division of Language and Communication Science in City’s School of Health has an established reputation for teaching and research excellence. Read more
The Division of Language and Communication Science in City’s School of Health has an established reputation for teaching and research excellence. Join the MSc Speech and Language Therapy course and join a profession that makes a real difference to people’s lives.

Students starting PG Dip courses in September 2017 will receive a NHS Tuition Fee Bursary to cover the full tuition fees for the duration of their course.

Who is it for?

Our graduate-entry courses allow graduates with a first degree from disciplines other than healthcare to gain a pre-registration health qualification in two years as opposed to the usual three to four - providing a fast-track route into health.

The MSc in Speech and Language Therapy is designed for students who are committed to a career in speech and language therapy. You will need to have:
-Good listening and communication skills
-Good problem-solving skills
-Good organisational skills
-An ability to learn a range of academic subjects and to apply your learning to clinical practice
-An enthusiasm for working with children and adults and as part of a team.

Objectives

The MSc Speech and Language Therapy course leads to work in a challenging and varied field - you could be working with autistic children, people who stammer or adults who have lost their speech following a stroke.

City's MSc Speech and Language Therapy has an excellent reputation and is based within the largest, teaching, research and clinical division in the UK for language and communication science.

The programme is taught by expert staff who are leaders in the field of speech and language therapy. The innovative and research-informed curriculum is supported by a busy in-house speech and language therapy clinic led by specialist staff and is considered as one of the leading educational environments in the world.

At City we have close links with speech and language therapy services throughout London, with many practitioners from these services acting as clinical tutors on our courses.

Placements

The MSc Speech and Language Therapy course provides many opportunities for clinical practice, including attendance at health centres, schools, departmental clinics, special educational settings and hospitals throughout the London area.

Academic facilities

Speech and language therapy students have access to specialist labs and equipment such as ultrasound and laryngographs to help them understand speech production and audiological equipment when learning about hearing and deafness.

The Roberta Williams Speech and Language Therapy Centre, opened in January 2016, is our specialist speech and language therapy clinic. The Centre contains state-of-the-art equipment to enable staff within the Division of Language and Communication Science to deliver cutting edge research and services to patients.

Moodle is an enhanced Virtual Learning Environment which provides students with access to online course materials, resources, interactive activities, assessment and communication tools and is a key element of our blended learning approach, combining face-to-face teaching with online activity.

Teaching and learning

The MSc in Speech and Language Therapy is a very intensive programme which requires full time study by attending lectures, small-group problem-solving sessions, practical classes and tutorials. You will also have access to the most up-to-date equipment in the Speech Acoustics Laboratory and innovative online learning materials. On clinical placements you will benefit from the supervision of a qualified therapist.

Modules are assessed through a diverse range of assignments and examinations. Your clinical progress will also be monitored by supervising clinicians.

Modules

During the MSc Speech and Language Therapy course you will learn about the foundations of speech and language, about how children learn to talk and about disorders that affect communication. A number of subjects equip you for the analysis of speech, language and hearing difficulties, such as phonetics, linguistics and audiology. You will also develop research skills and the ability to apply evidence based practice. You will undertake weekly and block clinical placements in both years of the course.

Modules
-Articulatory Phonetics, Phonology and Speech Development
-Bio-medical Sciences
-Life Span Psychology and Research Methods
-Speech Disorders, Dysfluency and Augmentative and Alternative
-Dysphagia, Voice, Motor Speech Disorders, Dementia
-Language Sciences: Linguistics and Language Development
-Professional Studies A
-Evidence Based Practice and Data Analysis
-Acoustic Phonetics, Audiology and Deafness
-Acquired and Developmental Language Disorders
-Autism Spectrum Disorder, Learning Disability, Child Mental Health, Cerebral Palsy, Cleft Palate
-Professional Studies B
-Research Project

When you have successfully completed 13 modules totalling 240 credits you will qualify for an MSc Speech and Language Therapy.

Career prospects

On successfully completing the MSc Speech and Language Therapy you are eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC), and practise as a speech and language therapist in the NHS and other settings.

A career in speech and language therapy offers opportunities to work with clients of all ages in settings such as:
-Health centres
-Hospitals
-Schools
-Charities
-Universities
-You can also work abroad and in the private sector.

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This specialisation in Sign Language and Deaf Studies is unique amongst existing Master’s degrees in including components in the psychology and linguistics and neuroscience of deafness and sign language, taught by staff at the Deafness Cognition and Language Research Centre. Read more
This specialisation in Sign Language and Deaf Studies is unique amongst existing Master’s degrees in including components in the psychology and linguistics and neuroscience of deafness and sign language, taught by staff at the Deafness Cognition and Language Research Centre. Students also have the opportunity to study introductory British Sign Language.

Degree information

Students take a set of core modules and then specialise in linguistics, psychology of language, and/or interpreting. In selecting the modules for specialisation, students are able to take full advantage of the breadth of expertise in language research in the UCL Division of Psychology & Language Sciences.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two mandatory modules (45 credits), three specialisation modules (45 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a research project (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) consisting of two mandatory modules (45 credits), four core modules (60 credits), and one optional module (15 credits) is also offered. A Postgraduate Certificate of four mandatory modules (60 credits) is also offered.

Core modules
-Introduction to the Brain and Imaging
-Research Methods: Principles, Skills and Applications

Specialisation modules - students take four specialisation modules, students who already hold BSL CACDP Level 1 or equivalent choose three specialisation modules and two optional modules:
-Introduction to British Sign Language
-Deafness: Cognition and Language
-Linguistics of Sign Languages
-Introduction to Deafhood

Optional modules - students then select one optional module from all those offered within the Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, subject to availability and agreement with the Programme Director (students who already hold BSL level one or equivalent select two). Recommendations include:
-Foundations of Linguistics
-Historical and Social Context of Interpreting
-Interaction and Language Management of Interpreting
-Introduction to Children’s Language Development
-Multimodal Communication and Cognition
-Sociolinguistics

Not all modules will run every year, some modules may require a minimum number of registered students.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project in an area of Language Science which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, small-group teaching and a virtual learning environment. Some modules also involve workshops or practical classes. Student performance is assessed through coursework, examinations and the research dissertation.

Careers

The majority of students who graduate from Language Sciences MSc programmes go on to further study or research. Recent graduates have gone on to PhD study in UCL, and other UK and overseas institutions. Others have gone to work in related industries, for example in speech technology industries, cochlear implants manufacturers, and in education. The skills that the MSc develops - independent research, presentation skills, and statistics - are transferable and very highly sought outside of academia.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The division undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language. Staff and students benefit from cutting-edge resources including extensive laboratories for research in speech and language, perception, and cognition.

Opportunities for students to work with world-renowned researchers exist in all areas of investigation. The division offers a supportive environment including numerous specialist seminars, workshops, and guest lectures.

The Language Sciences MSc provides the opportunity for in-depth study of one or more areas of the Language Sciences. The programme is an 'umbrella degree', with a number of specialisation strands that follow a common structure.

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This programme is designed for both graduates with teaching experience and practising language teachers and trainers who wish to build a career in modern languages and English as a foreign language. Read more
This programme is designed for both graduates with teaching experience and practising language teachers and trainers who wish to build a career in modern languages and English as a foreign language. It enables students to make an effective contribution to language learning in their organisation through research, development and the application of newly acquired knowledge, and enhance career prospects in further and higher education.

Students are introduced to a wide range of research in applied languages, in particular those research activities and themes that affect the language-learning environment, including second language acquisition and communicative language teaching.

Students also explore research in language learning in relation to the practical learning environment. They acquire the skills to write and use computer-aided language learning tools and conduct a research project in language learning and language teaching.

The aims of the programme are:

- To analyse theory and research in applied languages, particularly the research activities and theoretical frameworks that impinge on language learning and language teaching and testing

- To explore the interface between research in language learning and the practical learning environment

- To evaluate the role and future of information technology with a resource-based language-learning framework

- To develop an awareness of non-traditional (i.e. non-classroom-based) methods of language learning

- To provide the research skills and knowledge of research methods in language learning to enable the student to conduct their own project.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/lang/lang

Language

With special emphasis on building communication skills and developing cultural awareness, our programmes will enable you to become more effective in your chosen career.

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Key Issues in Second Language Teaching (30 credits)
Reseach Methods in Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
The Use of Information Communication Technology (ICT) in Second Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
Second Language Acquisition (30 credits) (30 credits)
Research Project (MAMLL/LL&JLT)(60 credits) (60 credits)

Part time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Key Issues in Second Language Teaching (30 credits)
Second Language Acquisition (30 credits) (30 credits)

- Year 2:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Reseach Methods in Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
The Use of Information Communication Technology (ICT) in Second Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
Research Project (MAMLL/LL&JLT)(60 credits) (60 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

Students are assessed through essays and a dissertation.

Career options

Graduates can become teachers of languages in schools, colleges or universities, or manage a department of languages.

Careers and employability

FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE, COMPUTING & HUMANITIES
Our programmes develop the essential skills of communication, self-discipline, independent research and teamwork - all qualities increasingly valued by employers in many fields. A wide range of career opportunities are open to our graduates, ranging from education, publishing and advertising to public administration, speech therapy and IT. We ensure there is a good balance between theory and practice in all our programmes, developing academic and intellectual skills in tandem with practical application.

We work with employers to ensure our degrees provide students with the skills and knowledge they need in the world of work.

Students from the majority of our programmes have the opportunity to undertake work placements in business or the wider community, as a part of their degree. These range from full-year placements to practical course options to work experience opportunities. Students receive advice and mentoring from successful professionals, and to plan their futures from an informed and supported position giving them the best chance of success in the world of work.

Staff will work with students to help find suitable opportunities that will develop the students understanding of their subject and help increase their overall skills and experience, as well as develop an insight into a possible future career. We have good relationships with a wide range of employers but are always keen to help students find new placements that reflect their goals and ambitions. Our network of national and international employers supports the three-way relationship between the student, the employer and the faculty.

The university also provides many opportunities for students to gain work experience and enhance career prospects. The Employability and Careers Service (ECS) offers a range of options, including JobShop, mentoring, volunteering and the student ambassador scheme.

Find out about the teaching and learning outcomes here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/?a=643756

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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The MA Language & Linguistics programme is designed for those who have previously studied Language and Linguistics at undergraduate level and who wish to develop their study of the subject to Masters level, but without the applied/professional focus offered by other programmes in the Taught Postgraduate Linguistics suite (TESOL, Clinical Linguistics, Translation, Japanese Language Teaching). Read more
The MA Language & Linguistics programme is designed for those who have previously studied Language and Linguistics at undergraduate level and who wish to develop their study of the subject to Masters level, but without the applied/professional focus offered by other programmes in the Taught Postgraduate Linguistics suite (TESOL, Clinical Linguistics, Translation, Japanese Language Teaching).

On the programme, you will have opportunities to develop an advanced understanding of concepts, information and theory relevant to the field of contemporary linguistics and language study. You will develop an advanced understanding of techniques and processes applicable to your own research or advanced scholarship. You will also complete a dissertation on a topic related to a subject which is of interest to you.

You will be taught by our team of Language and Linguistics experts and become part of our expanding Languages and Linguistics community.

Course detail

The academic study of language and linguistics focuses on analysing language in contexts of use and investigating its applications and implications. Teaching on the programme draws on the expertise of specialist staff who are considered major contributors to research and the development of subject knowledge in their fields. The Department of Languages and Linguistics has particular research strengths in the following areas which are reflected in the content of the programme: language, identity and power; language learning and teaching; language variation and change; language meaning and cognition. You can choose three optional modules from a range which reflects these areas of expertise. This flexibility enables you to cover a range of areas within language and linguistics, or to specialise in a particular strand.

The MA also provides the research training and subject knowledge to enable you to continue your studies to doctoral level (at YSJ and in other institutions).

Our MA in Language & Linguistics draws from state-of-the-art teaching approaches derived from TESOL research and practice, an area of expertise at York St John University. This MA would be attractive to those who have previously studied Language and Linguistics at undergraduate level and who wish to develop their study of the subject to Master’s level, but without the applied/professional focus offered by other programmes in the Taught Postgraduate Linguistics suite (TESOL, Clinical Linguistics, Translation, Japanese Language Teaching).

Format

The programme is designed to be studied either full-time over 12 months or part-time over a maximum of five years. If you are unable to complete the full Masters degree or are interested in certain modules, you may work for the intermediate awards of Postgraduate Certificate in Language & Linguistics or Diploma in Language & Linguistics.

Modules

• Research in Language & Linguistics (30 credits/Compulsory)
• Themes in Language & Linguistics (30 credits/Option)
• Second Language Acquisition (30 credits/Option)
• Language & Society (30 credits/Option)
• Acquired Communication Disorders (30 credits/Option)
• Developmental Communication Disorders (30 credits/Option
• Language & Interaction (30 credits/Option)
• Accents & Dialects (30 credits/Option)
• Attitudes to Language (30 credits/Option)
• Psycholinguistics (30 credits/Option)
• Language & Literacy (30 credits/Option
• World Englishes (30 credits/Option)
• Language & Identities (30 credits/Option)
• Analysing Media Texts (30 credits/Option)
• Dissertation (60 credits/Compulsory

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please see the following link:
https://www.yorksj.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

Other sources of funding

Information on alternative sources of funding can be found here:
https://www.yorksj.ac.uk/student-services/money/funding-my-course/postgraduate-/postgraduate-funding-/

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The Department of Education, in collaboration with the Centre for English Language Teaching, offers a one-year (12-month) taught full-time MA in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (MAALLT). Read more
The Department of Education, in collaboration with the Centre for English Language Teaching, offers a one-year (12-month) taught full-time MA in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (MAALLT). Applicants' first degree should be in a related subject, such as language, linguistics or education.

To be eligible for this MA, you must have the equivalent of at least one year's teaching experience by the time the course starts; this can involve any language, any age of learner and any stages of learning. This teaching experience is normally after you have obtained your first degree. Teacher training internships, casual private tutoring and holiday camps are not normally sufficient.
You must indicate clearly on the main application form that you have this experience, giving all of the following information:
-The start date and finish date of your teaching experience,
If you will be teaching until the MA starts, please write 'on going until MA starts'
-The type of establishment you have taught in (e.g. primary, secondary, university, private language school, etc.)
-Whether you were full or part time. If part time, tell us how much you taught per week.

You will also need to provide formal evidence of your teaching experience, for example a professional reference.

If by the time the MA at York begins, you will not have the equivalent of at least one year's full time experience, please consider applying for the MA in TESOL instead.

Aims

The aim of the programme is to provide a broad-based Masters in language education informed by theoretical and practical concerns. The programme does not offer a language teaching qualification; it does offer advanced inquiry into the processes of language learning, with specific reference to second language learning. Applications are welcome from both home and international students.

Applicants are strongly advised to ensure that they submit applications no later than 1 September if they wish to begin a course of study beginning in the same year. No guarantee can be offered that applications received after this date will be processed for a September start date.

Overseas applicants are also advised to check how long it is likely to take for their visa to be processed and to allow sufficient time in order that they are able to begin their programme of study on time.

Programme Content

Term 1
-Language for education (20 credits)
-Research methods in language learning and teaching (20 credits)

One option module (20 credits). The options available are likely to include:
-Bilingualism
-Citizenship education
-Cross-linguistic influences in second language acquisition
-Discourse analysis & language teaching
-Education and social justice
-Evaluating ESOL Classroom Practice
-Intercultural communication in education
-Learning and Teaching Second Language Reading
-Motivation in Education
-Teaching and assessing speaking skills
-Teaching and assessing writing skills
-Teaching and learning in schools
-Teaching World English
-Topics in second language acquisition

Term 2
-Teaching and learning language (20 credits)

One option module (20 credits). The options available are likely to include:
-Approaches to English language teaching
-Contemporary issues in teaching
-Cross-cultural perspectives on language and discourse
-Developmental psycholinguistics
-Gender, Sexuality and Education
-Higher Education in the 21st Century
-Learning and teaching grammar in a second language
-Pragmatics: language, meaning and communication
-Psychology of language and language learning
-Qualitative and quantitative data analysis
-Teaching and learning citizenship and global education
-Teaching English for academic purposes
-Testing and assessment in English language teaching

Term 3
-Planning and Communicating Research (20 credits.) These classes are spread over Terms 2 and 3

The third term and the summer is devoted to writing a dissertation (60 credits) based on a small-scale research study to be submitted by early September.

Careers

Our graduates find employment in a wide range of sectors within education, but also in journalism, information management, human resources and other careers.

Many become language teachers all around the world, in private language schools, state schools and universities.

Others find employment opportunities in areas of course and syllabus design, and materials writing in large and small scale publishing houses.

Our postgraduate courses can be used to complement teacher training/development programmes and voluntary or paid roles which focus on the more practical elements of teaching. However, other than our PGCE, our courses are not teacher training programmes in themselves.

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Applied linguistics addresses real-life language problems through insights gained from current linguistic theory, psychology and education. Read more
Applied linguistics addresses real-life language problems through insights gained from current linguistic theory, psychology and education.

Our MA is designed for people who want to know more about how foreign or second languages (particularly English) are learned, and how different kinds of classroom practice might affect proficiency. You explore different approaches to understanding language and language acquisition, and the methods that can be used to investigate language learning and teaching. You select a mixture of modules on language learning and its application to classroom practices.

You can choose areas of special study from a wide range of options, including:
-Teaching speaking and listening skills to language learners
-Psychological factors in second language learning
-Computer-assisted language-learning
-Literature and language-learning
-Age and bilingual development

You'll also be part of our Centre for Research in Language Development throughout the Lifespan (LaDeLi), a unique research centre specialising in all aspects of language learning and development.

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’, placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and among the top 150 departments on the planet (QS World University Rankings 2016).

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

This course is also available on a part-time basis.

Our expert staff

Our staff maintain excellent student-staff ratios with capped language-specific seminars.

In applied linguistics, Florence Myles, Monika Schmid, Sophia Skoufaki, Karen Roehr-Brackin, Adela Gánem-Gutiérrez, and Roger Hawkins focus on the learning of second and further languages, whilst Julian Good, Christina Gkonou and Tracey Costley focus on issues to do with the classroom teaching of English as a foreign language.

Specialist facilities

-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
-Our ‘Visual World’ Experimental Lab records response times and eye movements when individuals are presented with pictures and videos
-Our Eye-Tracking Lab monitors eye movement of individuals performing tasks
-Our Psycholinguistics Lab measures how long it takes individuals to react to words, texts and sounds
-Our Linguistics Lab has specialist equipment to analyse sound
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

Our course can lead to careers in areas such as academic research, publishing, journalism, administration, public service and teaching. You develop key employability skills including research design, data analysis, thinking analytically, report writing and public speaking.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Our graduates are successful in a wide variety of career paths. They leave Essex with a unique set of skills and experience that are in demand by employers.

Example structure

Postgraduate study is the chance to take your education to the next level. The combination of compulsory and optional modules means our courses help you develop extensive knowledge in your chosen discipline, whilst providing plenty of freedom to pursue your own interests. Our research-led teaching is continually evolving to address the latest challenges and breakthroughs in the field, therefore to ensure your course is as relevant and up-to-date as possible your core module structure may be subject to change.

MA Applied Linguistics
-MA Dissertation
-Assignment Writing and Dissertation Preparation
-Language Learning
-Research Methods I
-Research Methods II
-Advanced Phonology (optional)
-First Language Acquisition (optional)
-Phonological Development (optional)
-Second Language Vocabulary: Learning, Teaching and Use (optional)
-Topics in the Psychology of Language Learning and Teaching (optional)
-Second Language Acquisition and Linguistics Theory (optional)
-American Languages (optional)
-Varieties of English (optional)
-Sentence Processing (optional)
-Language Rights (optional)
-Semantics (optional)
-Literature and Language Teaching (optional)
-English Syntax 1 (optional)
-Description of Language for TEFL/ELT and Applied Linguistics (optional)
-Individual Differences in L2 Learning (optional)
-Syntactic Theory I (optional)
-Variationist Sociolinguistic Theory (optional)
-Experimental Design and Analysis (optional)
-Materials Design and Evaluation (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods 1: Data Collection (optional)
-English Syntax 2 (optional)
-Syntactic Theory II (optional)
-Teaching, Listening and Speaking (optional)
-Sociocultural Linguistics (optional)
-The Role of Age in Bilingual Development (optional)
-Variation in English II (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods: Data Coding and Analysis (optional)
-Graduate Research Assignment (optional)
-Language Attrition (optional)
-Teaching Practice I (optional)
-Approaches, Methods and Teacher Development for TEFL/TESOL (optional)
-Language in Context: From Pragmatics to Conversation Analysis (optional)
-Teaching Reading and Writing in TEFL/TESOL (optional)
-Intercultural Communication: communicating across languages and cultures (optional)

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This unique programme bridges the gap between linguistic theory and language teaching practice to enable you to develop a career in language teaching or research. Read more

This unique programme bridges the gap between linguistic theory and language teaching practice to enable you to develop a career in language teaching or research.

Whether you’re already a teacher or you plan to become one, this degree offers you a deeper understanding of how language is structured, used and interpreted and how this can inform language teaching. Core modules will introduce you to key topics in linguistics such as syntax, phonetics and phonology, as well as teaching methodologies and how they are applied. You’ll also improve your knowledge of research methods in language sciences.

To enhance your knowledge, you’ll choose from optional modules to suit your career plans or interests, on topics such as language acquisition or sociolinguistics. With support from expert tutors within the Language at Leeds research network, you’ll gain valuable skills and a sound knowledge base to prepare you for further research or to inform your teaching practice.

Specialist resources

Leeds is a fantastic place to study linguistics and phonetics. Our tutors and research students are active members of the wider Language at Leeds network which brings together researchers from across the University. You’ll be able to enhance your learning with an array of research events throughout the year.

Postgraduates also have access to our extensive facilities, including the Human Communications Suite complete with a recording studio and lab space for psycholinguistics experiments. You can make use of our phonetics lab and the Language Zone, a state-of-the-art space where you can use a range of language-based teaching materials whenever you want.

This is an academic programme which approaches English language teaching from the perspective of linguistics, and it is therefore not intended for those who are seeking vocational teacher training or classroom experience.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

Core modules in your first semester will give you a good grounding in key topics and approaches in linguistics, introducing you to syntax, phonetics, phonology and language acquisition. You’ll also develop the skills you need to study linguistics effectively.

In the following semester you’ll build on this foundation, improving your linguistic research skills while learning about language teaching methodologies and practices. You’ll also choose from optional modules to focus on topics that interest you, such as pragmatics and language development.

Throughout this programme you’ll develop sophisticated research and analytical skills, as well as a wealth of subject knowledge and teaching techniques. You’ll demonstrate this in your dissertation, where you’ll independently research a topic of your choice and submit the finished product by the end of the programme in September.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation (Linguistics and Phonetics) 30 credits
  • Foundations of Phonetics and Phonology 15 credits
  • Foundations of Syntax 15 credits
  • Approaches to Linguistics and Language Acquisition 30 credits
  • Methodology in Language Teaching 15 credits
  • Language Teaching in Practice 15 credits
  • Academic Skills in Linguistics 15 credits
  • Research Methods in Linguistics 15 credits

Optional modules

  • Pragmatics 30 credits
  • Second Language Acquisition 30 credits
  • Topics in Phonetics and Phonology 15 credits
  • Topics in Syntax 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Linguistics and English Language Teaching MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Linguistics and English Language Teaching MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use diverse teaching and learning methods to help you benefit from our tutors’ expertise. They include seminars, lectures, online learning, tutorials and practicals. Independent study is also a vital element of the course. You’re also encouraged to sit in on classes in modules that you’re not taking, which gives you a great opportunity to gain a broad base of knowledge in linguistics and phonetics.

Assessment

Depending on the modules you choose, assessment methods will vary. However, they usually include coursework , essays and practicals, while core linguistics modules also include exams.

Career opportunities

This programme will equip you with a deeper understanding of human communication and how language is taught and learned. It will also give you high-level research and analysis skills that are valued in all kinds of industries and organisations.

Graduates have pursued a wide range of careers in fields such as language teaching, preparing language teaching materials, lexicography, editing work, the media, marketing and journalism. Many others have pursued PhD level study in fields such as applied linguistics and education.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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Our MA Linguistic Studies is our broadest postgraduate degree, offering you the widest choice of options. You expand your knowledge of language through studying everything from syntax, to computer-assisted language-learning, to language and gender, to language disorders, to multilingualism. Read more
Our MA Linguistic Studies is our broadest postgraduate degree, offering you the widest choice of options. You expand your knowledge of language through studying everything from syntax, to computer-assisted language-learning, to language and gender, to language disorders, to multilingualism.

You build a programme best-suited to your individual needs. This course is ideal if you need to study on a part-time basis and wish to fit your course choices in with your existing commitments, as you can also study on an accumulation basis over a period of up to five years.

The optional modules you choose come from a broad list including:
-Theoretical and descriptive phonology
-Sociolinguistics
-Pragmatics
-Semantics
-Syntax

You also gain a basic familiarity with some common research methodologies and paradigms used in linguistics. You will write a dissertation on a topic of your choice. This takes place between April and September.

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014), placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and ranked among the top 150 departments on the planet according to the QS World [University] Rankings [2016] for linguistics.

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

Our expert staff

Our staff maintain excellent student-staff ratios with capped language-specific seminars.

In theoretical linguistics, Doug Arnold, Bob Borsley, Louisa Sadler, and Mike Jones work on the structure of sentences, focusing on English and other languages; Andrew Spencer investigates how complex words are created; and Nancy Kula and Wyn Johnson work on sound structure.

In sociolinguistics, Peter Patrick, Rebecca Clift, Enam Al Wer and Vineeta Chand all work on different aspects of how language varies, and investigate which factors cause such variation. Peter is also involved in language rights, and offers expert opinions in asylum cases where language is used to determine origin.

In applied linguistics, Florence Myles, Monika Schmid, Sophia Skoufaki, Karen Roehr-Brackin, Adela Gánem-Gutiérrez, and Roger Hawkins focus on the learning of second and further languages, whilst Julian Good, Christina Gkonou and Tracey Costley focus on issues to do with the classroom teaching of English as a foreign language.

In psycholinguistics, Sonja Eisenbeiss, Claire delle Luche and Fang Liu use experimental techniques to understand how children learn language, how adults process language, and what happens when language ability is impaired by brain disorders.

Specialist facilities

-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
-Our ‘Visual World’ Experimental Lab records response times and eye movements when individuals are presented with pictures and videos
-Our Eye-Tracking Lab monitors eye movement of individuals performing tasks
-Our Psycholinguistics Lab measures how long it takes individuals to react to words, texts and sounds
-Our Linguistics Lab has specialist equipment to analyse sound
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

Our course can lead to careers in areas such as academic research, publishing, journalism, administration, public service and teaching. You develop key employability skills including research design, data analysis, thinking analytically, report writing and public speaking.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Example structure

-Assignment Writing and Dissertation Preparation
-MA Dissertation
-Advanced Phonology (optional)
-First Language Acquisition (optional)
-Phonological Development (optional)
-Second Language Vocabulary: Learning, Teaching and Use (optional)
-Topics in the Psychology of Language Learning and Teaching (optional)
-Second Language Acquisition and Linguistics Theory (optional)
-American Languages (optional)
-Varieties of English (optional)
-Sociocultural Linguistics (optional)
-Sentence Processing (optional)
-Language Rights (optional)
-Semantics (optional)
-Literature and Language Teaching (optional)
-Language Learning (optional)
-English Syntax 1 (optional)
-Description of Language for TEFL/ELT and Applied Linguistics (optional)
-Syntactic Theory I (optional)
-Variationist Sociolinguistic Theory (optional)
-Experimental Design and Analysis (optional)
-Materials Design and Evaluation (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods 1: Data Collection (optional)
-Research Methods I (optional)
-English Syntax 2 (optional)
-Syntactic Theory II (optional)
-Teaching, Listening and Speaking (optional)
-The Role of Age in Bilingual Development (optional)
-Variation in English II (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods: Data Coding and Analysis (optional)
-Research Methods II (optional)
-Graduate Research Assignment (optional)
-Language Attrition (optional)
-Teaching Practice I (optional)
-Approaches, Methods and Teacher Development for TEFL/TESOL (optional)
-Language in Context: From Pragmatics to Conversation Analysis (optional)
-Teaching Reading and Writing in TEFL/TESOL (optional)
-Intercultural Communication: communicating across languages and cultures (optional)

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