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Masters Degrees (Landscape History)

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The English landscape has been described as 'the richest historical record we possess' and this MA programme focuses both on the skills of 'reading the landscape' and also the practical and theoretical issues involved in the study of the countryside. Read more
The English landscape has been described as 'the richest historical record we possess' and this MA programme focuses both on the skills of 'reading the landscape' and also the practical and theoretical issues involved in the study of the countryside.

The key theme of the course is the relationship between human beings and the natural environment from prehistory to the present day. The importance of landscape history is not something that is confined to the academic seminar room, however, as an understanding of the historic environment has relevance to the heritage industry, conservation agencies, local government and archaeological management.

The MA offers an intensive and practical preparation for those wishing to undertake further post-graduate study in landscape history, but also for those who wish to enter a profession for which knowledge of the historic environment is desirable.

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Students will learn how to acquire knowledge from a range of sources including history, horticulture, architecture, garden archaeology and other subjects, to develop an appreciation of the study of garden history as a cultural discipline. Read more
Students will learn how to acquire knowledge from a range of sources including history, horticulture, architecture, garden archaeology and other subjects, to develop an appreciation of the study of garden history as a cultural discipline.

Students will be able to appreciate the differences in garden-making over time and in different countries, from the 16th century to the present day in Britain, Europe and America. Emphasis will be on design and management, ownership, and the culture from which these examples have evolved.

This degree will provide an academically rigorous environment in which students will learn a range of academic research and writing skills. Teaching will be undertaken at the Institute of Historical Research (http://www.history.ac.uk/), with a strong emphasis on tutor/student interaction in class. There will be practical sessions at museums and libraries, as well as visits to gardens in London. There will also be an optional field trip to Italy in the spring.

Structure

The course will be run on a full-time basis over one year. Teaching will take place on Thursdays from 10:00 to 17:00 and will be divided between two terms. The third term will be dedicated to dissertation preparation and writing. Please get in touch if you would like to see the full timetable.

Students must complete core module 1, core module 2 (selecting three options from the six provided), and core module 3 - a 15,000 word dissertation in order to be awarded the full MA.

However, there are a range of options available for flexible study:

Those wishing to pursue this course on a part-time basis can complete Modules 1 and 2 (the taught elements of the course) in their first year and Module 3, the dissertation, in their second year
Module 1 can be undertaken as a standalone unit leading to a PGCert, the credit for which can be banked should the student wish to complete the MA at a later date (within a prescribed time frame) Please enquire for further details.
Module 1: Researching Garden History (60 credits)

The first term will showcase the huge variety of resources available to study garden and landscape history from archaeology, architecture, cartography, horticulture, manuscripts, paintings and other works of art, from the sixteenth century to the present day.

Sessions include:

Early maps of gardens (British library)
Garden Archaeology (Hampton Court)
Gardens and Architecture referencing Drawings Collection at the RIBA and V&A
The Italian Renaissance and English Gardens
The eighteenth century garden + visit to Chiswick House
Gardening and Photographic images
Assessment

A 5,000 word report on the history of a garden chosen by the student and an accompanying presentation.

Module 2: Culture and Politics of Gardens (60 credits)

This module consists of six optional units of which students must choose three.

These sessions aim to:

Develop students’ knowledge and understanding of gardens and landscapes in different countries
Develop students’ critical analysis and judgement
Demonstrate the importance of context and the relationship of garden and landscape history to other disciplines such as literature, social history, film and visual media and the history of ideas
The module will look at Historiography, theory, the connection between culture and politics in landscape making and the expansion of the skills of term one across regional boundaries.

For instance, the influence in Britain of the Italian Renaissance’s new ideas on garden making, including architecture, sculpture and hydraulic engineering; iconography in gardens and landscapes; formality in garden-making as an indicator of the power of the owner, from the sixteenth century onwards, as in France; different aspects of the ‘natural’ garden from the eighteenth century onwards; conflict between the ‘natural’ and the formal in the nineteenth century between William Robinson and Reginald Blomfield in Britain; gender and garden making; and shifting boundaries between architect, landscape architect and plantsman relating to the status of those designing gardens and landscapes in the 21st century.

Students will choose one unit from each group:

Students will choose one unit from each group:

Group A
French gardens of the seventeenth century
The evolution of the English garden in the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries

Group B
The eighteenth-century garden
The American garden

Group C
The Suburban Garden in England between the wars
Twentieth- and twenty-first-century gardens

Please note: Optional units are subject to change. Please consider this a guide only.

Assessment

Two 5,000 word assessed essays on two of the three options taken, and an assessed student presentation on the outline of the intended dissertation.

Module 3: Dissertation (60 credits), 15,000 words

Mode of study

12 months full-time or 24 months part-time.

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The Postgraduate Certificate in Landscape Design is the first stage of the Landscape Institute accredited two year 'conversion' route for applicants interested in becoming a professional Landscape Architect. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Landscape Design is the first stage of the Landscape Institute accredited two year 'conversion' route for applicants interested in becoming a professional Landscape Architect. On successful completion of the PG Certificate Landscape Design students join the MA Landscape Architecture programme. Together the two programmes form an exciting and intensive 2-year postgraduate route of studies for future Landscape Architects.

Across the programme candidates are involved in a rigorous curriculum, including advanced skills and knowledge in: design, history, theory, professional practice, technology, ecology, sustainability, horticulture, drawing and digital representation.

Candidates have strong design ambitions with backgrounds in disciplines related to design, society and the environment. These may include graduates from architecture, design, art, geography, sociology and ecology. Applicants may be changing career or further specialising their career in the profession of Landscape Architecture. The Postgraduate Certificate in Landscape Design programme provides a comprehensive introduction to Landscape Architecture and a basis for entry to the MA Landscape Architecture programme. Details of international events, open lectures and student events can be found on: http://thelandscape.org/.

The Department is based in a new state of the art building designed by the award winning architects Heneghan Peng; it is equipped with fourteen rooftop landscapes, cutting edge digital workshops, extensive design studios, a world-class library and two gallery spaces.

Our building is located in the heart of Greenwich, the newest addition to a suite of magnificent buildings that occupy the UNESCO World Heritage site and the location of the Greenwich Prime Meridian.

The aims of the programme are:

- To introduce students to the technical and design aspects of landscape architecture practice

- To provide students who already have a suitable degree, to develop the technical design skills necessary for entry to the MA Landscape Architecture programme

- To form part of the set of programmes accredited by the Landscape Institute.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/arc/landes

Architecture and Landscape

We need tools to help us create a built environment that is responsive rather than obstructive to its users and to the world around it. At Greenwich we encourage both students and staff to embrace the interconnectedness of design, construction and building management, of landscape architecture and graphic design, and to constantly look at new ways of exploring these areas.

All architecture programmes focus on the urgent necessity to change our living habits in order to design and build a sustainable urban environment.

The construction management programmes are designed to provide students with a high level of understanding of the design, function, construction and statutory requirements for buildings of all classes, and to prepare them for more advanced employment within the construction industry.

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Design & Communication 1 (15 credits)
Ecology and Conservation (15 credits)
Landscape Basic Design (15 credits)
Design with Nature (15 credits)
Planting Design (15 credits)
Hard and Soft Materials (30 credits)
Site Design (15 credits)
Landscape Digital Design (10) (10 credits)

Part time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Design & Communication 1 (15 credits)
Ecology and Conservation (15 credits)
Design with Nature (15 credits)
Planting Design (15 credits)
Hard and Soft Materials (30 credits)
Landscape Digital Design (10) (10 credits)

- Year 2:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Landscape Basic Design (15 credits)
Site Design (15 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Assessment

Students are assessed through design portfolio, essays, seminars and dissertation.

Professional recognition

The Postgraduate Certificate in Landscape Design programme is part of a Landscape Institute accredited route to becoming a fully qualified Landscape Architect.

Career options

Opportunities are available in Landscape Architecture, Landcape Planning and Urban Design. Recent graduates have successfully gained employment in the public and private sectors in the UK and worldwide. Many have continued to design and work on leading landscape projects such as the London Olympic Park, Gardens by the Bay in Singapore and the Eden Project.

Find out about the teaching and learning outcomes here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0017/644021/Certificate-in-Landscape-Design.pdf

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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The profession of landscape architecture is concerned with the quality of land use, the aesthetic and history of landform and the complex integration of social, cultural, ecological and economic systems in the built environment. Read more

Overview

The profession of landscape architecture is concerned with the quality of land use, the aesthetic and history of landform and the complex integration of social, cultural, ecological and economic systems in the built environment. It involves the analysis of environmental, cultural, historical and legal factors as well as the exploration of human needs and expression. Landscape architecture approaches elements of change and their physical and phenomenal relationships through the implementation of landscape and garden designs, landscape plans, and landscape management strategies. The profession addresses a broad range of landscapes in urban, suburban, rural and ‘wilderness’ settings. The scale of such projects varies from expressive detailed design at a site scale to master planning at community and campus scales to landscape analysis and planning at regional scales.

The interdisciplinary nature of Landscape Architecture is a rich and diverse subject drawing on the traditions of both arts and sciences. The postgraduate Landscape Architecture course and the undergraduate Landscape and Garden Design Course are accredited (candidate status) by the Landscape Institute (LI).

Accreditation

The postgraduate Landscape Architecture course is accredited (candidate status) by the Landscape Institute (LI) and the International Federation of Landscape Architects (Europe).

Core modules in Year One

Semester One: Theories of Landscape, Landscape Ecology, Advanced Design Studio (Urban Territory Project), Research Methods in Landscape Architecture and Design, Research Colloquium.

Semester Two: Theory and History of Landscape and Garden Design, Professional Practice, Advanced Design Studio II, Options (e.g. Landscape and Environmental Assessment, Landscape Resource Management, Special topics (specific project/research interest area) and Dissertation or Design Research Project.

Work Experience

Landscape Architecture Programme internships are made available through project, research and industrial resources internal and external to the College. Visits and study tours are an important part of the course curriculum in conjunction with other design courses at Writtle University College.

Careers

Graduates have many employment possibilities with local authorities, technical and planning offices, government advisory, private sector landscape, environmental and urban design consultancies and private practice as Landscape Architects within the UK and internationally.

All Writtle University College degrees are awarded by the University of Essex.

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The Master of Landscape Architecture (MLA) is designed for graduates who wish to become professional landscape architects. The programme is accredited by the Landscape Institute, offering a 2-year 'graduate entry' route for candidates from diverse backgrounds, professions and educations. Read more
The Master of Landscape Architecture (MLA) is designed for graduates who wish to become professional landscape architects. The programme is accredited by the Landscape Institute, offering a 2-year 'graduate entry' route for candidates from diverse backgrounds, professions and educations.

The MLA programme has a focus on design excellence, with landscape architecture projects exploring issues of cities, society and the environment. Students develop skills and knowledge in: design, history, theory, professional practice, technology, ecology, sustainability, horticulture, drawing and digital representation. Through your studies, you will engage fully with the digital and workshop facilities of the new Stockwell Street building in Greenwich. You will also have the opportunity to be involved with the 14 green roofs at Stockwell Street and the resources of the adjacent Royal Park in Greenwich. Examples of student work can be found on our blog, http://www.thelandscape.org/.

Applicants include graduates from architecture, design, art, geography, sociology, ecology and many other disciplines. The programme attracts many applicants who are changing career or further focusing their career in the profession of Landscape Architecture.

The aims of the programme are:

- To introduce to and advance students through the design, technical, professional, and theoretical skills of Landscape Architecture practice

- To encourage an environment of innovation and creativity in the development of exceptional landscape architecture projects

- To establish social, ecological and design processes as a fundamental aspect of landscape architecture

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/arc/lan-arc-mla

Architecture and Landscape

We need tools to help us create a built environment that is responsive rather than obstructive to its users and to the world around it. At Greenwich we encourage both students and staff to embrace the interconnectedness of design, construction and building management, of landscape architecture and graphic design, and to constantly look at new ways of exploring these areas.

All architecture programmes focus on the urgent necessity to change our living habits in order to design and build a sustainable urban environment.

The construction management programmes are designed to provide students with a high level of understanding of the design, function, construction and statutory requirements for buildings of all classes, and to prepare them for more advanced employment within the construction industry.

What you'll study

- Year 1:

Landscape design 1: Experimentation and communication
Landscape design 2: Ecologies, exploration and proposition
Architecture and landscape practice 2
Landscape design technology 3
Contemporary theories of landscape

- Year 2:

Advanced landscape design
Landscape representation and technique
Professional and technical practice
Design research methodologies
Landscape and urbanism theory
Masters project

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Assessment

Assessments include a design portfolio, technical reports, professional reports, theory essays, and a thesis.

Specialist equipment/facilities

Facilities include design studios, a model workshop, digital workshops and green roofs.

Professional recognition

The Master of Landscape Architecture (MLA) programme is part of a Landscape Institute accredited route to becoming a fully-qualified Chartered Landscape Architect.

Career options

London is home to many leading international landscape architecture firms. Recent graduates from the University of Greenwich have successfully gained employment in the public and private sectors in London, the UK and worldwide. Many have designed and worked on extraordinary landscape projects such as the London Olympic Park, Gardens by the Bay in Singapore and the Eden Project. Other graduates, such as Marti Franch, have established international award winning design studios.

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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This programme aims at providing a multidisciplinary background for architects, with a special focus on environmental sustainability and landscape design. Read more

Mission and Goals

This programme aims at providing a multidisciplinary background for architects, with a special focus on environmental sustainability and landscape design. The concept of sustainability is associated with a high quality transformation of landscape, from the macro-scale of urban planning, to the micro-scale of technical details, how the varied scales connect and interrelate with each other. This method is oriented to a physical, social and technical approach, passing over a close specialized theme vision. The international program involves also workshops, study trips, and summer schools.

The programme is taught in english.

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/sustainable-architecture-and-landscape-design/

Career Opportunities

The programme trains architects with an expertise in sustainable architecture and landscape design, to follow a career in the private and public sector as covered by EU directives in: architecture, urban planning, urban design, and landscape architecture.

Presentation

See http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/uploads/media/Architecture-Piacenza.pdf
The MSc Degree programme in Sustainable Architecture and Landscape Design offers the student the tools to become an Architect with a sound competence on theories, methods and applications of Architecture and of Landscape Design, highly skilled in the issues of contemporary territories: regeneration of productive landscapes; sustainable transformation of the architectural, urban and rural landscapes; transformation of the built environment and re-use of the existent soil; design of open spaces and infrastructures; protection of the territory; valorisation of the ecological and cultural resources; design strategies for new forms of sustainable inhabiting.
To this aim, this Degree Programme offers a complex view on the environment, dealing with all the landscape forms: from urban, to agricultural and to suburban areas, in line with the European Landscape Convention (2000) which “applies to the entire territory of
the Parties and covers natural, rural, urban and peri-urban areas”. More specifically, the landscape is seen as “represented”, “constructed” and “productive” landscape, with a specific attention to the aspects of sustainability (from a physical, economic and social point of view). The programme is taught in English.

Subjects

Theories of architecture, city and landscape; Steel, timber and reinforced concrete structures; History of architecture and landscape in the contemporary age; Urban and landscape Regeneration studio (environmental technology, landscape as heritage, general ecology); Architectural design studio 1 (sustainable architecture, technical environmental systems, multi-criteria analysis and project appraisal); Urban and environmental design studio (design of public spaces and infrastructures, agronomy and food sciences, sociology of the environment); Architectural design studio 2 (advanced architectural design, topography and cartography, landscape urbanism and land planning); Landscape design studio (advanced landscape design, physical geography and geo-morphology, techniques and tools for environmental design); Landscape representation and aesthetics.

Optional courses
- Italian territories and landscape tradition
- Open source architecture
- Arboriculture and agrobiotechnologies
- Architecture and creativity: cultural industries
- Special topics in landscape (workshop)
- Special topics in architecture(workshop)

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/sustainable-architecture-and-landscape-design/

For contact information see here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/sustainable-architecture-and-landscape-design/

Find out how to apply here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/how-to-apply/

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The profession of landscape architecture is concerned with the quality of land use, the aesthetic and history of landform and the complex integration of social, cultural, ecological and economic systems in the built environment. Read more

Overview

The profession of landscape architecture is concerned with the quality of land use, the aesthetic and history of landform and the complex integration of social, cultural, ecological and economic systems in the built environment. It involves the analysis of environmental, cultural, historical and legal factors as well as the exploration of human needs and expression.

Landscape architecture approaches elements of change and their physical and phenomenal relationships through the implementation of landscape and garden designs, landscape plans, and landscape management strategies. The profession addresses a broad range of landscapes in urban, suburban, rural and ‘wilderness’ settings. The scale of such projects varies from expressive detailed design at a site scale to master planning at community and campus scales to landscape analysis and planning at regional scales.

The interdisciplinary nature of Landscape Architecture is a rich and diverse subject drawing on the traditions of both arts and sciences.

If you would like to find out more about our postgraduate courses please see here: http://www.writtle.ac.uk/Postgraduate-Courses

Accredited

The postgraduate Landscape Architecture course is accredited (candidate status) by the Landscape Institute (LI) and the International Federation for Landscape Architects (Europe).

Core Modules in Year One

Semester One:
* Theories of Landscape
* Landscape Ecology
* Advanced Design Studio (Urban Territory Project)
* (Option) Research Methods in Landscape Architecture and Design
* Research Colloquium

Semester Two:
* Theory and History of Landscape and Garden Design
* Professional Practice
* Advanced Design Studio II and Options (e.g. Landscape and Environmental Assessment, Landscape Resource Management, Special topics (specific project/research interest area)

Work Experience

Landscape Architecture Programme internships are made available through project, research and industrial resources internal and external to the College. Visits and study tours are an important part of the course curriculum in conjunction with other design courses at Writtle University College.

Careers

Graduates have many employment possibilities with local authorities, technical and planning offices, government advisory, private sector landscape, environmental and urban design consultancies and private practice as Landscape Architects within the UK and internationally.

All Writtle College degrees are awarded by the University of Essex.

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September, January and May. Masters degree / Postgraduate Diploma / Postgraduate Certificate / Single-module study. Read more

Course start date

September, January and May

About the course

Masters degree / Postgraduate Diploma / Postgraduate Certificate / Single-module study

Seeking to deepen your understanding of Scotland’s history and heritage in the global context from the comfort of your home? This course will equip you with the skills you need, and offers access to cutting edge, innovative research in Scottish historical studies. Delivered in an interactive online environment, this course is designed to provide students who cannot attend a fulltime postgraduate degree course in Scottish History with an opportunity to develop research skills and an understanding of the major topics and historiography of Scottish History.

Why study Scottish History at Dundee?

This course builds upon the current expertise within the History programme at Dundee to provide an integrated programme of study including research skills, a critical understanding of the principal theories and concepts of Scottish History and historiography, and the chance through independent research to make a contribution to the development of Scottish history.

The central aim of this course is to examine the many different interpretations of Scottish history and you will be encouraged to think critically about the various ways in which historians have viewed the development of Scotland over the past five centuries and to consider some of the ways in which Scottish history has been portrayed in a popular context.

You will learn about:

- Debates and Issues in Scottish History from the sixteenth century to the present
- How to use the main sources available to historians of Scotland
- The Union of 1603 and the Covenanters
- The Scottish Reformation: Politics and Society
- The Union of 1707
- Jacobite rising
- Scottish Identity and Culture
- The ‘Highland Question’: Clearance and Improvement
- Health and welfare in the Highlands
- The Industrial Revolution
- Landscape and Environment
- Scotland and Empire
- Tourism and Leisure

Who should study this course?

This course is aimed at:

- Anyone with a good undergraduate degree wishing to gain a deeper appreciation and understanding of Scottish History. The University can consider applications from people with experience, but no first degree
- Graduates in History or related disciplines wishing to gain additional knowledge and skills to further their employment prospects
- History graduates considering PhD research

Individual modules can be taken as non-accredited modules for interest or personal development.

How you will be taught

The programme is delivered through online distance learning. You study from home and can be based anywhere in the world. You will have a tutor who is an expert in their field and will work through the modules with other students so you won’t feel isolated. Module authors and tutors include Dr Alan MacDonald, Professor Graeme Morton and Dr Patricia Whatley.

Modules run for 15 weeks, and pathways can take between 1 and 5 years. We suggest that students account for 15 hours per week of work for each module undertaken. Most of the student cohort will be studying part-time alongside employment and other commitments.

What you will study

There is one core module, worth 20 credits:

- Debates and Issues in Scottish History: Sources, Interpretations and Arguments

You will take 100 credits of optional modules from the following:

- Scottish National Identities since 1807
- Scottish Tourism, 1780-1930
- Health, Politics and Society in the Scottish Highlands, 1840-1945
- Scotland in the Age of Mary Queen of Scots
- War, Empire and Society: Scotland c 1870-1922
- Scotland: Land and People
- The Union of 1707

You can also take 40 credits worth of modules from the Centre for Archive and Information Studies

- Public History
- Scots Palaeography and Diplomatic
- Skills and Sources for Family and Local History in Scotland

Students can choose to graduate at 60 credits with a PG Cert, at 120 credits with a PG Dip or complete the Research Proposal and Dissertation module for the Masters. All modules are available in a standalone basis.

How you will be assessed

Coursework (100%) consisting of, per module:

- 55% Essay (4,000 words)
- 30% Assessed Tasks (2 short essays of c. 1000 words each)
- 15% Module Journal (c. 500 words every 2 weeks)

Tutors will provide regular support and feedback from the assessed tasks and module journal as the module progresses.

To complete the MLitt, students are also required to write an 18,000 word dissertation.

Careers

Students who take this course will gain a solid foundation from which they can proceed to doctoral research.

However, due to the non-vocational nature of a History degree many students also enter jobs unrelated to their course of study. For these students this course provides them with an opportunity to further develop their written presentation skills, as well as the ability to work independently and plan independent research and study.

For those wishing to use their studies more directly, for example in heritage, museum or archivist work, the job market is competitive, and the MLitt will provide students with a chance to further their knowledge and understanding of History and to demonstrate advanced research skills necessary for work in archives or heritage.

Learn more about careers related to the Humanities on our Careers Service website.

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Durham's MA in Modern History is a broad-ranging Master's programme which seeks to equip students with historical research techniques and approaches, advanced skills in critical analysis and independent study, as well as strong and effective communication skills. Read more
Durham's MA in Modern History is a broad-ranging Master's programme which seeks to equip students with historical research techniques and approaches, advanced skills in critical analysis and independent study, as well as strong and effective communication skills. The MA programme is designed to enable students with different career ambitions to succeed in their chosen area, and it caters for students of different backgrounds, previous training, and areas of specialisation. The breadth of research interests of the modern historians at Durham allows the department to offer supervision in topics about modern history from the nineteenth century through to contemporary history. The programme seeks to enable students to build an awareness of the contemporary boundaries of modern scholarship, to master advanced understanding of historical concepts and methods, and ultimately to make their own contributions to the field.

Durham's History Department is an international centre for the study of the Modern period, and is situated in the historic setting of the World Heritage Site, which includes Durham Cathedral, Durham Castle, and the surrounding area. Students of modern history at Durham benefit from the rich archival and manuscript resources in the collections of the University (at Palace Green Library - especially the Sudan Archive - and Ushaw College) and in the Cathedral Library, while the wider regional resources for study of the period are also highly significant: the landscape of industrial revolution and of post-industrial response, of globalisation and regional identity. Modern History at Durham is comprehensive and international in its reach, with specialists in the cultural and political history, visual culture and media studies, sports history, regional and international histories. Area specialisms include the British Isles, Continental Europe, Africa, North America, China and the Steppe regions.

Course Structure

The MA in Modern History is a one-year full-time programme (or two-years part-time). All students are allocated a supervisor at the beginning of the first term, and s/he guides each student through the year. The programme is structured as follows:

Michaelmas Term (October-December)
-Archives and Sources (15 credits)
-Issues in Modern History (30 credits)
-*Skill module (30 credits) - taken over Michaelmas and Epiphany Terms
Students may choose to take a skills module: these are mainly medieval/ancient languages (e.g. Old English, Old Norse, Latin, Greek), modern languages for reading (e.g. Academic French, Academic German), or research skills (e.g. palaeography). Students who take a skills module write a 60-credit dissertation instead of a 90-credit dissertation.

Epiphany Term (January-March)
-Critical Practice (15 credits)
-Option module (30 credits)
Option modules allow students the opportunity to learn about a particular topic or issue in modern history in depth, and to consider different historical approaches to this topic over a full term's study. In previous years, options for modern history included: The Wealth of Nations; Race in Modern America; 'Tribe' and Nation in Africa since 1800; Interpretations of Terror and Genocide in Modern Europe; Tradition, Change and Political Culture in Modern Britain; Gender, Nationalism and Modernity in East Asia; History, Knowledge and Visual Culture (a full list of MA option modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/). Option modules are taught in weekly two-hour seminars for a full term's study.

Easter Term (April-June), and the summer vacation (until early September)
-Dissertation (90 credits, or 60 credits if taking a *Skill module)

The formal requirements and structure of the programme can be found at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=9200&title=Modern+History&code=V1K707&type=MA&year=2016#essentials a full list of optional modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/

The MA can be taken part-time, over two years. In the first year the module combination consists of Archives and Sources, Critical Practice, Issues and in addition a Skills module OR Optional module. In the second year your work will consist of either a 90 credit, 20,000 word dissertation (if you took an Optional module in the first year) OR a 60 credit, 15,000 word dissertation, AND an Optional module (if you took a Skills module in the first year).

Additional courses can be taken on an audit-basis (not for credit), and can include language modules as well as optional modules. You will need to ask and receive the permission of the module leader before auditing a class. If the class is outside the department you will also need to inform the Director of Taught Postgraduates.

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered primarily through small group seminar teaching with some larger classes, and lecture-style sessions. Termly division of contact hours between terms depends on student choice. Issues in Modern History has 16 contact hours, all classroom-based; this module is team-taught and exposes students to a wide variety of staff support and expertise. Archives and Sources has 8 contact hours, split between lectures, classes and seminars. Skills modules are taught through seminars or classes and are usually more contact-hour-intensive. Optional modules are taught in seminars and provide a total of 16 contact hours. Critical Practice involves lectures, a drama workshop, and oral presentation to a group (at a 'mini-conference'). Dissertation supervision involves 8 hours of directed supervision, individually with a dedicated supervisor.

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Durham's MA in Social and Economic History at Durham provides training in research methods for historical topics in any aspect of social and economic history. Read more
Durham's MA in Social and Economic History at Durham provides training in research methods for historical topics in any aspect of social and economic history. The MA provides quantitative and qualitative research methods appropriate to a wide range of historical approaches. Accredited by the ESRC, this MA is part of our four year funding scheme offered by the North-East Doctoral Training Centre. Students can apply for 1+3 funding for this MA followed by a PhD in any aspect of social and economic history with expert supervision available within the Department – and with our partner institution in the NEDTC at Newcastle University. This includes African history, and aspects of governance, as well as traditional social and economic topics. For further information on funding see further below.

The MA programme is shared with the School of Applied Social Science and will help you to build an awareness of the contemporary boundaries of social and economic history and to master advanced understanding of the concepts and methods with which it may be interrogated. It seeks to equip you with a diverse portfolio of research techniques and approaches to enable you to undertake extended independent research in your dissertation, and to make your own contribution to the field. The skills provided by this MA are also transferrable to a wide range of careers.

Durham has a long tradition of economic and social history, on which this MA draws. The breadth of possible subjects for study mirrors the comprehensive and global nature of the department staff: from medieval Europe to modern-day Africa, and from north-east England to the global economy. Durham's History Department is situated in the historic setting of the World Heritage Site, which includes Durham Cathedral and Durham Castle. Students of social and economic history at Durham benefit from the rich archival and manuscript resources in the collections of the University (at Palace Green Library - especially the Sudan Archive - and Ushaw College) and in the Cathedral Library, while the wider regional resources for study of the period are also highly significant: the landscape of industrial revolution and of post-industrial response, of globalisation and regional identity.

Course Structure

The MA in Social and Economic History is a one-year full-time programme (or two-years part-time). All students are allocated a supervisor at the beginning of the first term, and s/he guides each student through the year.

Students take 30 credits of core modules from History: Archives and Sources (15 credits), and Critical Practice (15 credits); and 30 credits of core modules from the School of Applied Social Sciences: Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits) AND EITHER Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits) OR Fieldwork and Interpretation (15 credits). They write a 60-credit dissertation (15,000 words) supervised by a member of academic staff in the History Department. They also choose a 30-credit optional module in History; AND 30 credits of optional modules from Social Sciences: EITHER Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits) and Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits) OR Applied Stastics (30 credits).

The programme is structured as follows:
Michaelmas Term (October-December)
-Archives and Sources (15 credits)
-Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits)
-*Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits; OPTIONAL)
* Fieldwork and Interpretation (15 credits; OPTIONAL)
* Applied Statistics (30 credits; OPTIONAL; runs across Michaelmas and Epiphany Terms)

Epiphany Term (January-March)
-Critical Practice (15 credits)
-Option module (30 credits)
Option modules allow students the opportunity to learn about a particular topic or issue in medieval history in depth, and to consider different historical approaches to this topic over a full term's study. In previous years, options included: Power and Society in the Late Middle Ages; The Wealth of Nations; Race in Modern America; 'Tribe' and Nation in Africa since 1800; Tradition, Change and Political Culture in Modern Britain; Gender, Nationalism and Modernity in East Asia; History, Knowledge and Visual Culture (a full list of MA option modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/). Option modules are taught in weekly two-hour seminars for a full term's study.
-*Qualitative Research Methods (15 credits; OPTIONAL)
-*Quantitative Research Methods (15 credits; OPTIONAL)

Easter Term (April-June), and the summer vacation (until early September)
-Dissertation (60 credits)

The formal requirements and structure of the programme can be found at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=9202&title=Social+and+Economic+History+%28Research+Methods%29&code=V1KB07&type=MA&year=2016#coursecontent a full list of optional modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/

The MA can be taken part-time, over two years: please contact the Department if you are interested in exploring this option further.

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered primarily through small group seminar teaching with some larger classes, and lecture-style sessions. Termly division of contact hours between terms depends on student choice. Archives and Sources has 8 contact hours, split between lectures, classes and seminars. Skills modules are taught through seminars or classes and are usually more contact-hour-intensive. Optional modules are taught in seminars and provide a total of 16 contact hours. Critical Practice involves lectures, a drama workshop, and oral presentation to a group (at a 'mini-conference'). Dissertation supervision involves 8 hours of directed supervision, individually with a dedicated supervisor. Social science modules are taught through lectures, seminars, workshops, and practical classes.

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Exploring the past is exciting, thought-provoking and sometimes revelatory. Read more
Exploring the past is exciting, thought-provoking and sometimes revelatory. This postgraduate course in history will help you develop the skills needed to become a historian, with a taught foundation module in the first term that will acquaint you with the theory, tools, techniques and research skills of historical analysis. We will look at the varied primary sources through which we study the past, from laws and official reports to diaries, letters, memoirs, newspapers, oral testimony, paintings, cartoons, music, film, architecture, landscape, archaeological remains and the internet. We will consider how a secondary source differs from a primary one and the problems involved in interpreting a source and ascertaining its truthfulness and reliability.

Thereafter, the course offers 2 routes for you to choose between: the first route is research focused and will support you in producing a dissertation of 7000 words on the historical subject that most interests you; the taught route lets you select 1 module from any of the extensive range of option modules offered by the Department of History, Classics and Archaeology.

This programme is ideal for those who wish to pursue their passion for the past, those who want to experience postgraduate historical study without committing to a full Master’s degree, and those who are changing direction and moving to history from a different undergraduate subject.

Visit the website http://www.bbk.ac.uk/study/2016/postgraduate/programmes/GCGHISTO_C/

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/news/ref-results/), which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), History at Birkbeck was ranked 6th in the UK for the percentage of our research deemed world-leading or internationally excellent. 94% of our eligible staff submitted research and we achieved 100% for a research environment supporting world-leading and internationally excellent research.

Read about Birkbeck research that crosses disciplines and focuses on pressing questions within the social sciences and humanities (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/sshp/research).

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

- Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.

- This postgraduate course in history provides the opportunity to pursue your passion for history and undertake independent study and research in the time periods and subject areas that most interest you.

- If you have a degree in a subject other than history, but would like to study history at postgraduate level, this course is ideal for making the conversion between subjects.

- We are located 5 minutes' walk from the British Museum and the British Library, while the Museum of London is easily reachable. Other nearby specialist centres of research include the Institute of Archaeology, the Institute of Classical Studies and the Institute of Historical Research, all of which have internationally renowned library collections and run seminars that you can attend.

- Our Department of History, Classics and Archaeology (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/history/) is ranked in the top 20 nationally and is a world-renowned centre of original, influential research.

- Our academic staff are international authorities in their respective fields, delivering stimulating teaching.

- The department is home to thriving student societies and a number of affiliated research centres that actively run seminars, conferences and other events where some of the world's best scholars present their latest research.

- Find out more about why you should study with us (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/history/prospective-students/why-study-with-us).

- Birkbeck Library has an extensive history collection, including the major specialist journals, and access to online materials.

- Watch videos of our postgraduate students discussing their experience of studying at Birkbeck (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/mybirkbeck/get-ahead-stay-ahead/student-experience-videos).

Course structure

To gain the graduate certificate, you must successfully complete modules worth 60 credits.

You take the module Foundations of History: Sources and Debates (worth 30 credits), and then choose either the:
- Research route: work towards a dissertation of 7000 words (worth 30 credits), or the
- Taught route: take 1 undergraduate module from those on offer from the Department of History, Classics and Archaeology (worth 30 credits).

Module:
Foundations of History: Sources and Debates

Teaching and assessment

Teaching
This programme aims to encourage and support students in independent learning and original research. This will be facilitated through a mixture of seminars and one-to-one supervision supporting independent study.

Assessment
Assessment for Foundations of History: Sources and Debates consists of 1 essay of 2500-3000 words and either a second essay of 2500-3000 words or a literature review essay of 2500 words. Students on the research route submit a dissertation of 6000-7000 words.

Careers and employability

Graduates can pursue careers in research and archiving, education, the heritage industry, publication and the media, the charity sector, and journalism. Possible professions include historian, higher education lecturer, or archivist. This degree provides a range of transferable skills, which may be useful in becoming a journalist, heritage manager, politician’s assistant, academic librarian, or museum/gallery curator.

Find out more about these professions (http://www.prospects.ac.uk/options_with_your_subject.htm).

Find out more about the destinations of graduates in this subject (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/prospective/careers-and-employability/department-of-history-classics-and-archaeology).

We offer a comprehensive Careers and Employability Service to help you advance your career, while our in-house, professional recruitment consultancy, Birkbeck Talent, works with London’s top employers to help you gain work experience that fits in with your evening studies.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bbk.ac.uk/prospective/postgraduate/apply

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Explore human-environment interaction through the ages. This course offers a unique perspective on landscape archaeology, focusing on human ecology and the interactions of people with their environments. Read more
Explore human-environment interaction through the ages.

Why choose this course?

This course offers a unique perspective on landscape archaeology, focusing on human ecology and the interactions of people with their environments. It takes you beyond isolated archaeological sites, buildings or artefacts to explore their context in the wider landscape. You will investigate the varying lifeways of humans through the ages, and how people have interacted with the natural world since early prehistory.
-Study landscape archaeology from the perspective of human ecology – from early prehistory to the 19th century
-Explore topical issues ranging from human-environment interaction to rock art in the landscape
-Access the region’s rich natural resources for landscape study in the Yorkshire Moors, Dales and Wolds
-Learn from world-leading researchers in landscape archaeology
-Use the latest techniques to build key practical skills in surveying, GIS, geoarchaeology and aerial photography
-Receive careers and research advice from knowledgeable and experienced staff

What does the course cover?
The course explores the links between landscape theory and practice, and provides a broad foundation in the recognition, recording, interpretation and conservation of archaeological landscapes. The course comprises modules that assess the development of landscape archaeology and the range of approaches and methods employed in this increasingly important field of study. You will examine case studies from many different periods and areas around the world to understand different approaches to the study of landscape change.

Who is it for?
The MA in Prehistoric Landscape Archaeology is designed for students with an interest in how people have engaged with landscapes and the environment during the prehistoric and protohistoric periods. Students with a background in archaeology, physical geography, environmental science or history are particularly suited to this course.

What can it lead to?
This MA opens the door to a variety of archaeological and landscape heritage careers, as well as further research or PhD study.

Careers

Open the door to varied archaeological careers and research. The MA in Prehistoric Landscape Archaeology enables you to:
-Demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of research methods appropriate to Landscape Archaeology
-Understand and critically assess the sources of information pertinent to the study of Landscape Archaeology
-Understand the fundamental concepts, techniques and current debates relevant to Landscape Archaeology
-Gather and organise information and arguments in a critical and independent manner through writing essays under various conditions
-Undertake independent research on a topic within the field of Landscape Archaeology
-Develop presentation skills through the delivery of seminar papers on a range of diverse themes

The skills and knowledge gained on the course are applicable to wide range of archaeological and landscape conservation careers, as well as further study, research and academic careers.

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The Landscape Architecture Studies MA will educate you in the knowledge and values of landscape architecture and its interface with planning and architecture. Read more

Course overview

The Landscape Architecture Studies MA will educate you in the knowledge and values of landscape architecture and its interface with planning and architecture. You will develop a practical understanding of the theories, methods and techniques that are applied to landscape architecture, with much of what you learn applicable worldwide.

Through studying this course you will learn how to demonstrate systematic knowledge and understanding of landscape architecture and its interface with planning and architecture. This includes the design and planning of both urban and rural landscapes with the potential to study landscape projects in a range of country contexts.

We will work with you to expand on your ability to think critically about the design of place and space. You will develop advanced skills so that you can deal with complex aspects of landscape design and planning in a creative and innovative way.

You will develop an advanced knowledge and understanding of the way landscape has been conceptualised and theorised at different times and in different places, informed by relevant research findings and relevant practice. You will consider this historical context with changes in the environment and the impact this will have on landscape architecture in the future.

The studio based design projects offer an opportunity for you to refine your design skills. The practical skills you will develop include being able to creatively respond to complex architectural briefs and generating design proposals. You will be able to evaluate the materials, process and techniques that apply to landscape architectural projects and integrate these into your proposals.

On graduation you will be equipped for advanced practice in landscape-related disciplines. The Landscape Architecture Studies MA is ideal if you want to further your education, develop your career, or prepare for further specialised study. Through the course you will develop advanced transferrable skills in literacy, design and communication.

The course can also open up some career paths outside of landscape architecture, such as landscape conservation and garden design history.

Modules

For detailed module information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/landscape-architecture-studies-ma/#modules

How to Apply

For course application information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/landscape-architecture-studies-ma/#howtoapply

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This programme enables students to examine and research the rich subject area of Irish history from the earliest times to the present day, and to assess the major events which led to the emergence of modern Ireland. Read more

Overview

This programme enables students to examine and research the rich subject area of Irish history from the earliest times to the present day, and to assess the major events which led to the emergence of modern Ireland. Compulsory modules provide students with an in-depth knowledge of the sources and resources at their disposal to undertake a piece of detailed research, and foster their ability to assess and understand the major debates and controversies that have engaged historians in writing Irish history. In a range of specialist modules, students explore key issues and debates associated with the individual fields (social, political, military, historic houses and landed estates, local history, etc.).

See the website https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/history/our-courses/ma-irish-history-0

Minimum English language requirements: please visit Maynooth University International Office website (https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/international/study-maynooth/postgraduate ) for information about English language tests accepted and required scores. The requirements specified are applicable for both EU and non-EU applicants.

National University of Ireland Maynooth’s TOEFL code is 8850

Course Structure

- Course Structure (Content):
This programme comprises two parts: taught modules (a combination of compulsory and optional modules) [50 credits] and a minor research thesis [40 credits] [90 credits in total].

- Compulsory modules:
Compulsory taught modules focus on familiarising students with the resources and sources available for the study of Irish history and also with the major debates and controversies in areas such as Irish urban history, women’s history, Irish emigration and Diaspora.

Part-time students may take one module in Semester 1 of their first year and the other in Semester 1 of their second year. Compulsory modules will be delivered in the evening on alternate years to enable part-time students to take both modules over the two-year cycle of the programme.

All students must successfully complete compulsory modules amounting to a total of 25 credits.

- Optional modules:
Students choose from a suite of optional modules which include Historic Houses and the world of goods; The evolution of Irish landed estates; The Irish soldier; Victorian Ireland; The evolution of the urban landscape; Doing local history; Reading the Irish landscape. All optional modules are delivered in Semester 2 of each academic year.

A suite of optional modules on offer will be delivered in the evening on alternate years to enable Part-time students to take a selection over the two-year cycle of the programme.

Note: The range of optional modules available to Part-time students will depend upon the number of students who register for individual modules.

All students must successfully complete optional modules amounting to a total of 25 credits.

- Thesis preparation and thesis completion:
Thesis modules span both semesters.

Part-time students complete HY608 Thesis preparation during Semester 1 of Year 2 and HY609 Thesis completion during Semester 2 of Year 2. A total of 40 credits are awarded for thesis preparation and completion. Students submit their thesis by 1 July of Year 2.

Career Options

A Taught Masters Degree in Irish History provides a good basis for pursuing a career in education, journalism, civil service, research, arts administration, archives, library and information service, the diplomatic service, politics, law, public relations, public administration among other options.

Find out how to apply here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/history/our-courses/ma-irish-history-0#tabs-apply

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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Based in the Department of War Studies, the MA History of War examines the social, cultural and operational aspects of war from broad historiographical and interdisciplinary perspectives. Read more
Based in the Department of War Studies, the MA History of War examines the social, cultural and operational aspects of war from broad historiographical and interdisciplinary perspectives. With close links to the Department of History and the Institute of Contemporary British History, students can study most aspects of the history of armed conflict and society from the late medieval period to the present day.

Key benefits

- The Department of War Studies is internationally recognised as a global centre of excellence and is highly regarded by the British Academy, the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the Economic and Social Research council as a high calibre training institution.

- It is one of the only university departments in the world devoted exclusively to the study of war as a human phenomenon. A remarkable diversity of research interests, disciplinary approaches, opinion and background exists in the department among both staff and students, reflecting the variety and complexity of the issues raised by war and the study of war.

- Students are taught by the best; experts and pioneers in their fields who are often at the forefront of world events as they happen. Our stellar academic cohort bring not only a wealth of knowledge but also an extensive and continually growing network of links with other departments, think-tanks, organisations, policy-making bodies and institutions.

- Situated close to the seat of Government, the City, the Imperial War Museum, the National Maritime Museum, the Royal Courts of Justice and the Inns of Court students have unique opportunities to network with key high profile visitors, from academics to government ministers, ambassadors and generals.

- The MA programmes in the Department of War Studies are designed to enhance your analytical, conceptual, research and critical thinking skills which will increase your employability and aid professional career development.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/history-of-war-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Our programme challenges you to examine war from broad historiographical and interdisciplinary perspectives, taking as a given that the history of warfare cannot be isolated from the study of general history. It encompasses more than what usually falls into the category of military history to include war from the viewpoint of combatants, societies, economies and cultures across the landscape of modern history, and in the spirit of war studies draws on the literature and methodology of other academic disciplines where appropriate.

Our MA History of War aims to equip you with the knowledge, understanding and skills you require to progress to advanced research in the field. To that end, it has been created with a compulsory module focused on research and analytical skills, supported by a range of optional modules addressing individual aspects of the history of warfare over time and across a wide geographical and thematic range. Our programme prepares you for future doctoral research into the history of warfare and related fields. It can also be taken as a free-standing master's degree if you are interested in warfare in the past and the intellectual, methodological and practical skills essential to its study.

- Course purpose -
Our programme offers you the opportunity to engage critically with the methods, materials and debates inherent in the study of the history of warfare.

- Course format and assessment -

Most of the 20-credit modules will be assessed by one 4,000-word essay or two 2000-word essays. However, some 20-credit modules will be assessed on class participation and attendance, oral vivas or exams, or a combination of these.

Most 40-credit modules are assessed through a combination of essays (3,000-6,000 words), class participation and attendance, oral vivas and exams.

The dissertation module assessment will be on the research proposal (10%) and the dissertation (up to 15,000 words) (90%) for some programmes or solely on the dissertation for others.

Career prospects

Designed as a research preparation degree for those wishing to continue and to study for a PhD, it is also a valuable stand-alone degree. Students on MA programmes in the department have gone on to build careers in further academic research, NGOs, civil service, NATO, UN, media and publishing, finance and investment, teaching and the armed forces. For more information about career prospects and graduate destinations see: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/employability.aspx

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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