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Masters Degrees (Land Economy)

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This course combines taught elements and research methods training with a significant level of independent research. Students admitted to this course will be those who have a strong background in Land Economy related subjects and who may already have some research experience. Read more
This course combines taught elements and research methods training with a significant level of independent research. Students admitted to this course will be those who have a strong background in Land Economy related subjects and who may already have some research experience. They will normally be those aspiring to and who have good prospects of proceeding to the PhD prior to an academic career.

Candidates study two modules chosen from a list of options taught by the Department of Land Economy. They are also required to attend the Social Sciences Research Methods Centre (SSRMC) Training programme, which is compulsory, and to complete a 20,000 word dissertation, supervised by one of the academic staff within the department. The dissertation will review the literature and develop research hypotheses, and possibly involve some preliminary data collection and analysis. The SSRMC programme is described on their website. Candidates must take six SSRMC core modules and undertake a research methods essay as part of this programme. It is anticipated that the research training provided by the SSRMC plus the dissertation (20,000 words) and the choice of specialised modules from the other Land Economy MPhils will provide the necessary and sufficient background for commencing PhD research.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/lelempler

Course detail

MPhil courses offered by the Department of Land Economy share common aims. These are:

i) to enable students of a high calibre to pursue their education at an advanced applied level drawing on the primary disciplines of economics, planning and environmental policy, with additional specialisms in finance and law;

ii) to provide students with opportunities both to build on and develop material which they may have studied at undergraduate level as well as to broaden their knowledge base;

iii) to equip students with the necessary skills to pursue careers at a high level in a range of areas, including business and finance, civil service, public service, property professions, environmental agencies and organisations, national/international agencies and further study;

iv) to provide opportunities for education in a multidisciplinary environment so as to advance the understanding of cognate disciplines and their applications;

v) to provide opportunities for learning with colleagues from different social, economic and legal systems;

vi) to provide students with appropriate skills and experience to enable them to use information and resources critically and to equip them with the means to undertake their own research;

vii) to provide an educational environment with a strong research ethos that brings together students from a wide variety of backgrounds and fosters an international approach to common problems.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of the course, students will have acquired the following skills:

i) Intellectual skills: the ability to study steadily, assimilate issues and large amounts of literature swiftly, evaluate countervailing positions and to produce succinct arguments to tight deadlines and to engage with those with whom they disagree. Particular methodologies used include: data evaluation, case evaluation, legal analysis, textual analysis, the convergence o theory and empirical data and advanced critical evaluation.

ii) Practical skills: identification and use of bibliographic materials, via libraries and electronically; taking notes effectively, thorough IT skills.

iii) Transferable skills: the ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing; to work to deadlines and under pressure; to manage time; to set priorities; to formulate an argument; to work independently and with initiative; basic IT skills (email, data analysis and internet use); critical analysis; to present material in a seminar context; skills of analysis and interpretation; self-discipline, self-direction; and respect for other views. The ability to develop and present a major piece of written work.

iv) Research skills: the ability to locate, utilise and organise a wide range of materials independently, on paper and electronically. The ability to assess and evaluate such material, to develop and pursue a critique of existing material. The ability to develop, structure and sustain a line of argument. The establishment of relationships with researchers in related areas. The ethical use of research material.

v) Communication skills: the ability to marshal arguments and present them succinctly and lucidly. The ability to effectively criticise the views of others powerfully but fairly. The presentation of written material in a persuasive and coherent manner.

Format

Students are required to take two taught MPhil modules from the range offered within the Department and to complete taught modules offered by the Social Sciences Research Methods Centre.

Students will receive up to four hours of supervision for each taught module and additional supervision relating specifically to their dissertation.

Each MPhil module typically consists of 16 hours of lectures, students undertaking the MPhil in Land Economy, Research take two modules equating to 32 hours across the year. Taught components offered by the SSRMC vary in length, more details on contact time can be found on the SSRMC webpages.

Graduate student Supervisors provide formal feedback on progress via the Cambridge Graduate Student Reporting System (termly reports) and more informally through face to face meetings or by email.

Assessment

A dissertation of 20,000 words.

An essay of no more than 4000 words as assessment of research methods teaching. Students also take two optional modules which will be assessed by coursework. Assignments or practical assessments may be set for modules offered by the SSRMC.

Continuing

Approval of an application to continue to the PhD degree will depend on three criteria:

- Availability of a supervisor
- The approval by the Degree Committee of a research proposal
- The achievement of a minimum overall mark and minimum dissertation mark in the MPhil examination as prescribed by the Degree Committee in any offer of admission.

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This is a thesis-only MPhil and the Department will not admit students to it unless it can be satisfied that they have the necessary research skills, together with a clear vision of their topic and a good grasp of the appropriate methodology to explore it. Read more
This is a thesis-only MPhil and the Department will not admit students to it unless it can be satisfied that they have the necessary research skills, together with a clear vision of their topic and a good grasp of the appropriate methodology to explore it. Further details are given on our website.

MPhil courses offered by the Department of Land Economy share common aims. These are:

i) to enable students of a high calibre to pursue their education at an advanced applied level drawing on the primary disciplines of economics, planning and environmental policy, with additional specialisms in finance and law;

ii) to provide students with opportunities both to build on and develop material which they may have studied at undergraduate level as well as to broaden their knowledge base;

iii) to equip students with the necessary skills to pursue careers at a high level in a range of areas, including business and finance, civil service, public service, property professions, environmental agencies and organisations, national/international agencies and further study;

iv) to provide opportunities for education in a multidisciplinary environment so as to advance the understanding of cognate disciplines and their applications;

v) to provide opportunities for learning with colleagues from different social, economic and legal systems;

vi) to provide students with appropriate skills and experience to enable them to use information and resources critically and to equip them with the means to undertake their own research;

vii) to provide an educational environment with a strong research ethos that brings together students from a wide variety of backgrounds and fosters an international approach to common problems.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/lelemplec

Course detail

On completion of the course, students will have acquired the following skills:

i) Intellectual skills: the ability to study steadily, assimilate issues and large amounts of literature swiftly, evaluate countervailing positions and to produce succinct arguments to tight deadlines and to engage with those with whom they disagree. Particular methodologies used include: data evaluation, case evaluation, legal analysis, textual analysis, the convergence o theory and empirical data and advanced critical evaluation.

ii) Practical skills: identification and use of bibliographic materials, via libraries and electronically; taking notes effectively, thorough IT skills.

iii) Transferable skills: the ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing; to work to deadlines and under pressure; to manage time; to set priorities; to formulate an argument; to work independently and with initiative; basic IT skills (email, data analysis and internet use); critical analysis; to present material in a seminar context; skills of analysis and interpretation; self-discipline, self-direction; and respect for other views. The ability to develop and present a major piece of written work.

iv) Research skills: the ability to locate, utilise and organise a wide range of materials independently, on paper and electronically. The ability to assess and evaluate such material, to develop and pursue a critique of existing material. The ability to develop, structure and sustain a line of argument. The establishment of relationships with researchers in related areas. The ethical use of research material.

v) Communication skills: the ability to marshal arguments and present them succinctly and lucidly. The ability to effectively criticise the views of others powerfully but fairly. The presentation of written material in a persuasive and coherent manner.

Format

This is a research degree, students will be expected to attend Departmental Research Methods training sessions unless they can demonstrate that they have previous experience in this area.

Graduate student Supervisors provide formal feedback on progress via the Cambridge Graduate Student Reporting System (termly reports) and more informally through face to face meetings or by email.

Assessment

A thesis of 30,000 words

Continuing

- Approval of an application to continue to the PhD will depend on three criteria:
- Availability of a supervisor
- Approval by the Degree Committee of a research proposal
- Successful completion of the MPhil programme.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Your programme of study. This programme accepts graduates from any discipline to convert and become full RICS accredited in Land Economy and Rural Surveying. Read more

Your programme of study

This programme accepts graduates from any discipline to convert and become full RICS accredited in Land Economy and Rural Surveying.

Land Economy and Rural Surveying is very employable internationally, and it is an essential discipline in which you can contribute to the built environment covering anything from towns, cities, roads, transport systems and leisure venues. We are moving towards mega cities in which people will connect via technology to improve quality of life and infrastructure. This gives society a considerable challenge in terms of ensuring quality of life in the future where there will perhaps be more regulation. In order to give you the best start in the profession our programme is fully RICS accredited and it is the only programme of its type in Scotland. The discipline has been a strength at University of Aberdeen for many years now and our connections with industry are excellent over this time.

The programme gives you a very thorough knowledge of all areas associated with land economy and rural property management. This includes looking the wide range of environmental challenges, rural management such as forestry and game management, agriculture and planning and environmental law. These modules are disciplines in themselves and very useful for your career opportunities which could be wide ranging, adding real value to your programme.

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

Forestry and Game Management

Agricultural Principles and Practices

Planning, Land and Environmental Law

Semester 2

Valuation for Rural Surveyors

Rural Business Management

Rural Policy in Practice

Research Methods

Semester 3

Dissertation

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/degree-programmes/286/rural-surveying-and-rural-property-management/

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • The programme is fully RICS accredited which means you get and MLE and RiCS and professional status at graduation
  • You are given plenty of challenges in terms of the diversity of projects which require successful rural decision making
  • You gain valuable business skills which allow you to consider self employment options, consultancy and specialist status
  • If you want to convert this programme is available to graduates from any discipline

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • Full Time or Part Time
  • 12 Months or 27 Months
  • September start

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees:

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/tuition-fees-and-living-costs-287.php

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/finance-funding-1599.php

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/funding/

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

  • Your Accommodation
  • Campus Facilities
  • Aberdeen City
  • Student Support
  • Clubs and Societies

Find out more about living in Aberdeen:

https://abdn.ac.uk/study/student-life

Living costs

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/finance.php



Read less
Successful environmental policy depends on the ability of its makers to bring together scientific information, analytical thinking and an awareness of the legal, social and political realities of environmental regulation. Read more
Successful environmental policy depends on the ability of its makers to bring together scientific information, analytical thinking and an awareness of the legal, social and political realities of environmental regulation. This course has been designed to provide an intensive training in the relevant economic and legal concepts and techniques to equip you with the tools that will help you successfully design, implement and assess environmental policy in a variety of settings.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/lelempepl

Course detail

MPhil courses offered by the Department of Land Economy share common aims. These are:

i) to enable students of a high calibre to pursue their education at an advanced applied level drawing on the primary disciplines of economics, planning and environmental policy, with additional specialisms in finance and law;

ii) to provide students with opportunities both to build on and develop material which they may have studied at undergraduate level as well as to broaden their knowledge base;

iii) to equip students with the necessary skills to pursue careers at a high level in a range of areas, including business and finance, civil service, public service, property professions, environmental agencies and organisations, national/international agencies and further study;

iv) to provide opportunities for education in a multidisciplinary environment so as to advance the understanding of cognate disciplines and their applications;

v) to provide opportunities for learning with colleagues from different social, economic and legal systems;

vi) to provide students with appropriate skills and experience to enable them to use information and resources critically and to equip them with the means to undertake their own research;

vii) to provide an educational environment with a strong research ethos that brings together students from a wide variety of backgrounds and fosters an international approach to common problems.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of the course, students will have acquired the following skills:

i) Knowledge and understanding of the subject matter of the various components of their course.

ii) Intellectual skills: the ability to study steadily, assimilate issues and large amounts of literature swiftly, evaluate countervailing positions and to produce succinct arguments to tight deadlines and to engage with those with whom they disagree. Particular methodologies used include: data evaluation, case evaluation, legal analysis, textual analysis, the convergence of theory and empirical data and advanced critical evaluation.

iii) Practical skills: identification and use of bibliographic materials, via libraries and electronically; taking notes effectively, thorough IT skills.

iv) Transferable skills: the ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing; to work to deadlines and under pressure; to manage time; to set priorities; to formulate an argument; to work independently and with initiative; basic IT skills (email, data analysis and internet use); critical analysis; to present material in a seminar context; skills of analysis and interpretation; self-discipline, self-direction; and respect for other views. The ability to develop and present a major piece of written work.

v) Research skills: the ability to locate, utilise and organise a wide range of materials independently, on paper and electronically. The ability to assess and evaluate such material, to develop and pursue a critique of existing material. The ability to develop, structure and sustain a line of argument. The establishment of relationships with researchers in related areas. The ethical use of research material.

vi) Communication skills: the ability to marshal arguments and present them succinctly and lucidly. The ability to effectively criticise the views of others powerfully but fairly. The presentation of written material in a persuasive and coherent manner.

vii) Interpersonal skills: the ability to work with others in seminars and smaller groups towards common goals. The ability to share research data ethically. The ability to respect the views of others and to acknowledge deficiencies in one's own argument.

Format

Candidates study a total of eight modules, some of which are compulsory and complete a dissertation of not more than 12,000 words. Taught modules may be assessed by either written examination or coursework or by a combination of assessment formats.

The modules offered for this course are confirmed on an annual basis but may include:
- Quantitative research methods I
- Mixed research methods
- Fundamentals of environmental economics
- International environmental law I
- Environmental values
- Environmental policy assessment and evaluation
- International environmental law II
- Energy and climate change
- Rural environment: property, planning and policy
- Economic development and land use policies
- Climate change policy and land development

Plus optional modules from other taught MPhil courses offered by the Department of Land Economy.

Feedback and guidance is given to assist students in developing and drafting the dissertation research project. Feedback sessions are arranged by module leaders following examinations.

Assessment

A dissertation of between 10,000 to 12,000 words.

Assessment of subject modules varies and includes written examinations, individual and group project work. Some modules may be assessed in more than one format.

Assessment of subject modules varies, written examinations are used for some modules, these will normally be two-hour papers.

Continuing

Approval of an application to continue to the PhD degree will depend on three criteria:

1. Availability of a supervisor
2. The approval by the Degree Committee of a research proposal
3. The achievement of a minimum overall mark and minimum dissertation mark in the MPhil examination as prescribed by the Degree Committee in any offer of admission.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Read less
In the UK moves to devolve government and decision-making to the regional and local levels are generating an increased requirement for well-trained professionals who are capable of providing the knowledge and analytical skills required. Read more
In the UK moves to devolve government and decision-making to the regional and local levels are generating an increased requirement for well-trained professionals who are capable of providing the knowledge and analytical skills required. Across Europe increased economic and monetary union is emphasising the need for Member States to consider how those involved in urban and regional government can tackle the spatial disparities in economic growth and development that have been such an entrenched feature of the last 20 years.

In the Far East and North America a similar level of interest is being shown in how governments can best ensure more geographical balance in development. The design and implementation of spatial policies to manage the process of growth requires professionals with a multidisciplinary skill base and an international perspective on best practice.

This course is therefore designed to equip you with the analytical skills required to:

- Understand the factors that lead to variations in regional growth and development and to understand the consequences of regional imbalance
- Assess the scope for policy intervention to manage regional growth
- Design efficient and effective policies to manage growth at the regional level
- Understand how best to implement growth and regeneration policies
- Evaluate policy achievement and monitor and assess the effectiveness of policy initiatives.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/lelemppgr

Course detail

The course emphasises the importance of adopting a multidisciplinary approach both to understanding the nature of growth and regeneration problems as well as creating successful policy solutions.

MPhil courses offered by the Department of Land Economy share common aims. These are:

i) to enable students of a high calibre to pursue their education at an advanced applied level drawing on the primary disciplines of economics, planning and environmental policy, with additional specialisms in finance and law;

ii) to provide students with opportunities both to build on and develop material which they may have studied at undergraduate level as well as to broaden their knowledge base;

iii) to equip students with the necessary skills to pursue careers at a high level in a range of areas, including business and finance, civil service, public service, property professions, environmental agencies and organisations, national/international agencies and further study;

iv) to provide opportunities for education in a multidisciplinary environment so as to advance the understanding of cognate disciplines and their applications;

v) to provide opportunities for learning with colleagues from different social, economic and legal systems;

vi) to provide students with appropriate skills and experience to enable them to use information and resources critically and to equip them with the means to undertake their own research;

vii) to provide an educational environment with a strong research ethos that brings together students from a wide variety of backgrounds and fosters an international approach to common problems.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of the course, students will have acquired the following skills:

i) Knowledge and understanding of the subject matter of the various components of their course.

ii) Intellectual skills: the ability to study steadily, assimilate issues and large amounts of literature swiftly, evaluate countervailing positions and to produce succinct arguments to tight deadlines and to engage with those with whom they disagree. Particular methodologies used include: data evaluation, case evaluation, legal analysis, textual analysis, the convergence o theory and empirical data and advanced critical evaluation.

iii) Practical skills: identification and use of bibliographic materials, via libraries and electronically; taking notes effectively, thorough IT skills.

iv) Transferable skills: the ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing; to work to deadlines and under pressure; to manage time; to set priorities; to formulate an argument; to work independently and with initiative; basic IT skills (email, data analysis and internet use); critical analysis; to present material in a seminar context; skills of analysis and interpretation; self-discipline, self-direction; and respect for other views. The ability to develop and present a major piece of written work.

v) Research skills: the ability to locate, utilise and organise a wide range of materials independently, on paper and electronically. The ability to assess and evaluate such material, to develop and pursue a critique of existing material. The ability to develop, structure and sustain a line of argument. The establishment of relationships with researchers in related areas. The ethical use of research material.

vi) Communication skills: the ability to marshal arguments and present them succinctly and lucidly. The ability to effectively criticise the views of others powerfully but fairly. The presentation of written material in a persuasive and coherent manner.

vii) Interpersonal skills: the ability to work with others in seminars and smaller groups towards common goals. The ability to share research data ethically. The ability to respect the views of others and to acknowledge deficiencies in one's own argument.

Format

Candidates study a total of eight modules, some of which are compulsory, and submit a 12,000 word dissertation.

The modules offered for this course are confirmed on an annual basis but may include:
- Quantitative research methods I
- Mixed research methods
- Urban and environmental planning I
- Issues in public policy and regeneration and economic tools for spatial planning
- Urban and environmental planning II
- Real estate development

Plus optional modules from other taught MPhil courses offered by the Department of Land Economy.

Continuing

Continuation to the PhD degree Approval of an application to continue to the PhD degree will depend on three criteria:

1. Availability of a supervisor
2. The approval by the Degree Committee of a research proposal
3. The achievement of a minimum overall mark and minimum dissertation mark in the MPhil examination as prescribed by the Degree Committee in any offer of admission

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Read less
In a competitive international business environment, real estate professionals need a sophisticated understanding of finance, economics and law to succeed. Read more
In a competitive international business environment, real estate professionals need a sophisticated understanding of finance, economics and law to succeed. The MPhil in Real Estate Finance has been designed to provide rigorous training in the latest concepts from these three key areas as applied to international real estate markets.

The course is aimed at those who may already have some experience or interest in real estate markets, banking or investment and wish to upgrade their skills or for those who are looking to commence a career in this area. The programme offers an opportunity to study theoretical and practical finance, investment and law applied to global commercial real estate markets, while enjoying the cultural, social and recreational facilities of Cambridge. The course takes students from a wide variety of backgrounds: finance, geography, economics, law, biology, international business, mathematics. These students have in common a strong desire to work in property and investments coupled with strong academic skills.

Tuition in the programme is based around classroom lectures, case studies and field trips to ensure students can apply the theoretical concepts taught. The programme can also serve as an entry point into PhD training for those interested in pursuing research in real estate finance in greater depth.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/lelempref

Course detail

MPhil courses offered by the Department of Land Economy share common aims. These are:

i) to enable students of a high calibre to pursue their education at an advanced applied level drawing on the primary disciplines of economics, planning and environmental policy, with additional specialisms in finance and law;

ii) to provide students with opportunities both to build on and develop material which they may have studied at undergraduate level as well as to broaden their knowledge base;

iii) to equip students with the necessary skills to pursue careers at a high level in a range of areas, including business and finance, civil service, public service, property professions, environmental agencies and organisations, national/international agencies and further study;

iv) to provide opportunities for education in a multidisciplinary environment so as to advance the understanding of cognate disciplines and their applications;

v) to provide opportunities for learning with colleagues from different social, economic and legal systems;

vi) to provide students with appropriate skills and experience to enable them to use information and resources critically and to equip them with the means to undertake their own research;

vii) to provide an educational environment with a strong research ethos that brings together students from a wide variety of backgrounds and fosters an international approach to common problems.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of the course, students will have acquired the following skills:
i) Knowledge and understanding of the subject matter of the various components of their course.

ii) Intellectual skills: the ability to study steadily, assimilate issues and large amounts of literature swiftly, evaluate countervailing positions and to produce succinct arguments to tight deadlines and to engage with those with whom they disagree. Particular methodologies used include: data evaluation, case evaluation, legal analysis, textual analysis, the convergence o theory and empirical data and advanced critical evaluation.

iii) Practical skills: identification and use of bibliographic materials, via libraries and electronically; taking notes effectively, thorough IT skills.

iv) Transferable skills: the ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing; to work to deadlines and under pressure; to manage time; to set priorities; to formulate an argument; to work independently and with initiative; basic IT skills (email, data analysis and internet use); critical analysis; to present material in a seminar context; skills of analysis and interpretation; self-discipline, self-direction; and respect for other views. The ability to develop and present a major piece of written work.

v) Research skills: the ability to locate, utilise and organise a wide range of materials independently, on paper and electronically. The ability to assess and evaluate such material, to develop and pursue a critique of existing material. The ability to develop, structure and sustain a line of argument. The establishment of relationships with researchers in related areas. The ethical use of research material.

vi) Communication skills: the ability to marshal arguments and present them succinctly and lucidly. The ability to effectively criticise the views of others powerfully but fairly. The presentation of written material in a persuasive and coherent manner.

vii) Interpersonal skills: the ability to work with others in seminars and smaller groups towards common goals. The ability to share research data ethically. The ability to respect the views of others and to acknowledge deficiencies in one's own argument.

Format

Candidates study a total of eight modules, some of which are compulsory, and submit a 12,000 word dissertation.

The modules offered for this course are confirmed on an annual basis but may include:
- Quantitative research methods I
- Introduction to real estate finance
- Real estate securities, securitisation and investment
- Private real estate investment
- Real estate development
- Legal issues in land use and finance
- The macroeconomy and housing
- Real estate project modelling and decision methods
- Urban and environmental planning
- Spatial economics

Plus optional modules from other taught MPhil courses offered by the Department of Land Economy.

Continuing

Continuation to the PhD degree - Approval of an application to continue to the PhD degree will depend on three criteria:

1. Availability of a supervisor
2. The approval by the Degree Committee of a research proposal
3. The achievement of a minimum overall mark and minimum dissertation mark in the MPhil Examination as prescribed by the Degree Committee in any offer of admission

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Read less
The Real Estate Masters Programme is a Master of Studies (MSt) course offered by The Department of Land Economy drawing on the multi-disciplinary strength of the Department and the University. Read more
The Real Estate Masters Programme is a Master of Studies (MSt) course offered by The Department of Land Economy drawing on the multi-disciplinary strength of the Department and the University. It is aimed at experienced professionals and those identified as future leaders in the real estate industry and combines academic rigour with significant industry input.

The course aims to equip participants with a broader knowledge of all aspects of the real estate industry, insight into a range of long-term themes and strategic issues in the market as well as developing a range of research and other skills.

See the website http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/mst-real-estate

Who is the course designed for?

This is a two-year part-time Master's course designed for those who have several years of professional experience in real estate or associated business, have attained a leadership role, are identified as a potential leader or are seeking to take up a leadership role. The format permits students to continue with their professional career whilst studying. The course will enhance students’ technical skills and develop a range of other skills to enable them to be agents of change in the real estate industry and beyond.

Aims of the programme

- To enable students to build their knowledge across a range of disciplines around real estate including finance, investment, economics, environmental policy, planning and law.
- To enable students to build on previous study and work experience across real estate and related disciplines.
- To equip students to take leadership positions in the industry and develop their understanding of key skills in management, innovation, strategy, negotiation, partnering and risk management.
- To provide opportunities to learn from colleagues from different cultures, work backgrounds and with experience from different countries with different social, economic and legal systems.
- To provide students with the skills to manage information and resources effectively and to be able to manage their own research.
- To build a passion for research and strategic thinking.

The programme aims to ensure that students have a solid understanding of the end-to-end processes in real estate investment and finance whilst promoting innovation in real estate through highlighting some of the trends influencing the industry and the opportunities that this will bring. The course breadth is reflected in the topics it addresses, from looking at the high-level drivers of capital flows in real estate and changes in the urban environment, through to asset management of individual buildings and optimising their performance

Format

The course has a number of themes running through it that reflect some of the key trends shaping the industry:

- The interaction between the economy and real estate markets
- Globalisation and its influence on the market
- Risk management and mitigation
- The impact of technological change on real estate
- Sustainable buildings and cities

The programme is of a modular design and delivered through a combination of distance learning, with course materials, in various mediums, released through a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) and attendance at five intensive residential blocks in Cambridge (3 x 2 weeks and 2 x 1 week), over the two years.

The course is taught through a combination of:

- Taught sessions by academics and practitioners
- Individual work including: working through course materials on the VLE, course reading, preparation of written work (primarily between the residential sessions).
- Group work including: working through case studies, dialogue, debate and presentations throughout the taught modules.
- Supervisions and support from the Land Economy faculty, tutors and supervisors from within the university.

Residential sessions focus on taught sessions, practical applications, case studies and collaborative working, including presentation of project work and case studies, as well as individual supervisions. The residential sessions enable students to learn from one another as well as from the academic faculty staff and external speakers.

Support and facilitation for students is provided by team of faculty, tutors and supervisors from within the University.

Contact time

- Lectures: c.160 hours of lectures over the two-year course*
- Seminars and classes: 20 hours of managed discussions, debates and group exercises/workshops over the two-year course
- Practicals: 8 site and property visits over the two-year course, equating to c.40 hrs
- Supervision: up to 7 hours per year

* The number of hours may vary slightly as the course is constantly evolving in order to meet developments in the sector and in response to student and industry feedback. The lectures are intended to be interactive discussions with the lecturer.

Assessment

- Dissertation: 12,000 words maximum (including footnotes and appendices but excluding bibliography), to be completed during the second year of the course.
- Three short case study assessment exercises, each of 2,500 words maximum.
- Three essays, each of 3,000 words maximum.
- Full and active participation in all elements of the course is compulsory.

Students receive regular feedback throughout the course, formal and informal, individual and group, during face to face supervisions and through written exchanges with their supervisors and the Director of Studies.

First year tutors/supervisors complete an annual progress report at the end of Year 1. Dissertation supervisors provide termly reports in Year 2. Students are also given feedback on presentation of their projects and case studies during the residential sessions.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

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The course is structured around five core papers and a number of option papers, so that study pathways suited to a range of differing interests and needs can be explored. Read more
The course is structured around five core papers and a number of option papers, so that study pathways suited to a range of differing interests and needs can be explored. Each of the core papers (Development Economics; Institutions and Development; Sociology and Politics of Development; Globalisation, Business and Development: Cities and Development ) is taught by a member of Development Studies' academic staff. Some option papers are full papers and some are half papers. Students take four full papers (or their equivalent in half papers) concurrently. At least two papers must be core papers. One (full) option paper may be replaced by a 12,000 word dissertation. A number of option papers are shared with other MPhil Courses (Economic and Social History; Planning, Growth and Regeneration, Management, and Politics.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hsdvmpmdv

Course detail

The MPhil provides a framework within which students can construct a pathway suited to a wide range of differing interests and needs: those for whom the MPhil represents a one year preparation for a career in development policy can select a broad inter disciplinary set of subjects, while those who wish to continue their studies at the doctoral level can select a more specialised set of options concentrating on the analytical tools of their subject, and discover which university department or faculty is most suited to their research plan.

Format

The course is structured around five core papers and a number of option papers, so that study pathways suited to a range of differing interests and needs can be explored. Each of the core papers (Development Economics; Institutions and Development; Sociology and Politics of Development; Globalisation, Business and Development: Cities and Developmant ) is taught by a member of Development Studies' academic staff. Some option papers are full papers and some are half papers. Students take four full papers (or their equivalent in half papers) concurrently. At least two papers must be core papers. One (full) option paper may be replaced by a 12,000 word dissertation. A number of option papers are shared with other MPhil Courses (Economic and Social History; Planning, Growth and Regeneration, Management, and Politics.

The teaching for all papers, whether core or option, takes place over the first two of the three terms in the academic year (Michaelmas and Lent terms) and, in some cases, extends into the first four weeks of the third (Easter) term. Students who choose to write a dissertation must complete and submit their dissertations along with the rest of their course work before the written examinations begin in the third (Easter) term.

Assessment

One (full) option paper may be replaced by a 12,000 word dissertation on a subject of your choice.

Papers are examined either by assessed essays written and submitted during the course of the year, or by a take-home project, or by a formal written examination. At the discretion of the Examiners there may also be an oral examination.

All five core papers have a written examination. The examinations for these core papers are two-hours and for each paper you will be required to answer two questions out of a total of eight. At the discretion of the Examiners there may also be an oral examination.

Continuing

6 - 8 students annually continue to the PhD in Development Studies. For continuation on to the PhD candidates will have to achieve on average of 70 (high pass) in their overall mark in the MPhil course. They will also need an acceptable PhD proposal.

In recent years Development Studies students have been accepted as PhD students by the Faculties of Education, Social and Political Sciences, and History, by the Departments of Social Anthropology, Geography, and Land Economy, by POLIS , and by the Judge Business School.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Funding is available for two students from sub-Sahara Africa or from other developing countries. Funding will be allocated to those students to whom an offer to study the MPhil in Development Studies has been made and who have not secured other funding and scholarships.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The Master of Studies (MSt) in Sustainability Leadership is an interdisciplinary postgraduate degree that explores leadership responses to sustainability challenges and opportunities. Read more
The Master of Studies (MSt) in Sustainability Leadership is an interdisciplinary postgraduate degree that explores leadership responses to sustainability challenges and opportunities. This programme is accredited by the University of Cambridge and delivered by the University of Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL).

The MSt is offered in association with the Departments of Architecture, Engineering, Geography, Land Economy and the Judge Business School. Both academic excellence and leadership on sustainability are prioritised in the competitive selection process, and in the design and delivery of the programme.

See the website http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/mst-sustainability-leadership

Aims of the programme

- To develop leaders who have a wide awareness and deep understanding of the social, environmental, ethical and economic challenges facing the world, and equip them to respond more effectively in their executive roles.
- To expose leaders and future leaders to a range of best-practice cases of how business, government and civil society are responding to these challenges.
- To help leaders to make a compelling ‘business case’ for sustainability in their sector and/or institutional context, and understand how best to put sustainability policies into practice.
- To give leaders insights into the academic debate on sustainability, including some of the key scientific and technological issues, and equip them with research skills relevant to sustainability.

Format

The primary approaches to teaching and learning are:

- taught sessions by academics and practitioners, who are thought-leaders and/or case study illustrators
- group work, involving dialogue, debate and presentations throughout the taught modules, as well as a group research assignment
- individual work, involving research and written presentation of findings on selected topics
- support and facilitation by a CISL-led team of faculty, tutors and supervisors from within the University
- intensive and collaborative e-learning programmes, including e-modules, online webinars and content-based discussions to maximize knowledge sharing.

Contact time

- Lectures: 35 hours per year
- Seminars and classes: 50 hours per year
- Small group teaching: 26 hours per year
- Supervision: 7 hours per year

Assessment

- Dissertation: 15,000 words maximum (including footnotes, tables and graphs but excluding appendices and bibliography).
- An analysis paper of 3,000 words maximum
- A strategy paper of 3,000 words maximum
- A group project of 5,000-7,000 words

Some assignments and the dissertation require literature reviews. The dissertation also involves an oral presentation.

Students are given formal feedback on their assignment and informal feedback throughout their course, including during supervisions. First year tutors give an annual progress report at the end of year 1 and dissertation supervisors provide termly reports during year 2.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding

A limited number of small grants may be available from the alumni bursary fund to support eligible research activities.

Sources of government funding and financial support - including Professional and Career Development Loans: https://www.gov.uk/browse/education/student-finance

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East Asia is the foremost dynamic region in the world. This Master's specialization is organized around the achievements, opportunities and challenges facing East Asia. Read more
East Asia is the foremost dynamic region in the world. This Master's specialization is organized around the achievements, opportunities and challenges facing East Asia. Taught by international staff affiliated with the Centre for East Asian Studies Groningen this International Relations Master's programme focuses on the political economy and international relations of China, Japan and Korea.

The programme takes a multidisciplinary approach. Lectures and seminars are taught by experts in international relations, history, economy or law. You will gain knowledge on the top-three economies in East Asia and develop oral, writing and research skills to analyze developments from a local and global perspective. Work placement and study abroad are optional.

Why in Groningen?

- A unique International Relations Master's programme on the Political Economy of contemporary East Asia
- A multi-disciplinary approach towards developments in contemporary China, Japan and Korea
- Optional opportunities to study or gain hands-on experience in East Asia
- Private sector participation and guest speakers from East Asia
- Further opportunities to focus on Hong Kong, Taiwan or emerging countries such as Mongolia

Job perspectives

This degree has been designed for students who aspire to a career related to East Asia in international business, international cooperation, diplomacy, media and academia.

Job examples

- Business consultant
- Lobbyist
- Diplomat
- Policy advisor
- Researcher
- Manager

Research

Individual research topics of faculty members include: Economic Transition and Institutional Change in Asia, Political Economy of China, China and the World Economy, Land Tenure and Land Governance in China, Land Registration in China, International Trade Law and China, China-EU Relations, 19th Century Business Cycles in China, Religion in Modern China, Private International Law and China, Carbon Emission Trading and Competition Law in East Asia, Political Economies of Global Health in Asia, History of Japan, Foreign Policy of Japan, Japan-EU relations, Technology and Culture in Contemporary Japan, regionalization in Asia, Foreign and Security Policies of Korea, Visual Politics and North Korea, Foreign Policy of Mongolia.

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This Master of Science programme, taught entirely in English, aims at preparing high level professionals that can deal with a variety of problems common to all development and resource exploitation plans. Read more

Mission and Goals

This Master of Science programme, taught entirely in English, aims at preparing high level professionals that can deal with a variety of problems common to all development and resource exploitation plans. Their expertise will range from the knowledge of modelling of land and ecological systems, to acquisition and analysis of relevant data, geo-referencing and geo-processing, to pollution abatement technologies and reclamation plans. Students following this programme may either specialize in Geomatics or Environmental Engineering with particular emphasis on sustainable development and water resources.

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/environmental-and-geomatic-engineering/

Career Opportunities

In addition to the classic professional opportunities for Environmental and Land Planning Engineering, studying Geomatic Engineering in depth allows to work in national or local bodies involved in cartography, land registries and collection of land data or in the aerospace and ICT industries involved in the management of territorial databases. On the other side, graduates with a deeper knowledge in Environmental Engineering can also found opportunities in the field of international relations, large multinational corporations and in non-governmental organizations.

Presentation

See http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/uploads/media/Environmental_and_Geomatic_Engineering_02.pdf
This Master of Science programme, taught entirely in English, aims at preparing high level professionals that can deal with a variety of problems common to all development and resource exploitation plans. Their expertise will range from the knowledge of modeling of land and ecological systems, to acquisition and analysis of relevant data, geo-referencing and geo-processing, to pollution abatement technologies and reclamation plans. Students will increase their understanding of the functioning of ecosystems, learn how to assess the local and global environmental impacts of human activities, and apply advanced methods, techniques and models to identify, describe, quantify and develop integrated systems to support environmental decision-makers. The programme is organized around two main topics: Geomatics or Environmental Engineering, with particular emphasis on sustainable development and water resources. The first specialization aims at creating experts in surveying, monitoring, representing the land shape and processes in terms of information systems, while the second provides the future engineers with a clear understanding of sustainability issues and of their application in the current professional activities.

The programme is taught in English.

Subjects

- Mandatory courses:
Modeling and Simulation, Statistical Analysis of Environmental Data, Natural Resources Management, Environmental and Natural Resources Economy and Geographic Information Systems

Eligible courses:
1. Geomatics
Remote Sensing, Image Analysis, Satellite Navigation and Monitoring; Geophysical Prospecting;

2. Environmental Engineering
Hydraulic Engineering and River Basin Reclamation, Environmental Technology, Engineering and Cooperation for Global Development and Energy for sustainable Development.

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/environmental-and-geomatic-engineering/

For contact information see here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/environmental-and-geomatic-engineering/

Find out how to apply here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/how-to-apply/

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MPhil supervision covers a number of research topics supported by research active academic staff. Read more
MPhil supervision covers a number of research topics supported by research active academic staff. Our broad range of research areas relate to land use, natural resources and environmental change; rural planning, community governance and resilience; rural change, culture and wellbeing; and rural economy, enterprise and innovation.

Areas of research include:
-Impact and implications of ‘local-global’ processes and relationships for rural areas
-Characteristics and performance of rural businesses and households
-Rural governance
-Demographic ageing and social change
-Living with environmental change

Opportunities are available for postgraduate research in the following areas:

Land use, natural resources and environmental change

-Multifunctional land use and the evolving role of small farms
-Land use and food security
-The management and governance of natural resources
-Agri-environment policy
-Environmental valuation and choice modelling
-Access to land for outdoor recreation and leisure
-Protected areas management

Rural planning, community governance and resilience

-Relationship between rural development policy and communities in a changing political landscape
-Rural policies and the role of communities in policy development
-Neo-endogenous or networked rural development
-Rural housing and trends in counter-urbanisation
-Community asset management
-Rural partnerships and stakeholder relationships
-Community resilience

Rural change, culture and wellbeing

-Perceptions of rurality
-Rural social change
-The role of rural women
-The needs of a changing rural community
-Wellbeing and quality of life
-Rural social capital
-Social exclusion and rural poverty
-Changing perceptions of farming

Rural economy, enterprise and innovation

-Rural enterprise and its economic contribution
-Innovation and entrepreneurialism
-Networks and knowledge exchange
-The nature and needs of rural enterprise
-Technological adoption and innovation in agriculture
-Linkages between urban and rural economies
-Business collaboration and networking
-Expertise and knowledge exchange
-Social and community enterprise
-The green economy

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You will gain the higher level skills needed to understand the workings of the farm-based business, its success as well as aspects of lower performance and weakness.You will have an understanding of the supply chains in which the business operates and could operate and how to maximise the opportunity and in so doing develop the business further. Read more
You will gain the higher level skills needed to understand the workings of the farm-based business, its success as well as aspects of lower performance and weakness.You will have an understanding of the supply chains in which the business operates and could operate and how to maximise the opportunity and in so doing develop the business further. You will undertake practical application of a range of techniques to enable you to develop business management strategies within the evolving economic, social, legal and political framework that farm businesses operate in. Additionally, you will develop enhanced leadership and communication skills.

The course

Agriculture is the dominant user of rural land, accounting for about 70% of the UK land area. There is increasing demand to find diverse means of using rural resources to ensure the continued viability of the rural economy. There is therefore need to further develop the skills in farm management and develop new business opportunities, be that farm diversification, value added enterprises, on-farm but non-farm activities or other rural developments to ensure that the future of the rural economy will be secured. This programme therefore aims to enhance the capacity of farm managers and those working in closely associated industries to perform within shifting economic and policy environments.

The course will focus on effective use of agricultural resources and the opportunities this presents to the rural economy. The course will seek to enable individuals to develop leadership skills while becoming more creative, flexible and innovative entrepreneurs with a high level of transferable skills. It will support students to identify opportunities offered by the changing economy. Teaching will be contexualised presentations of theory with direct practical consideration, utilising a practical knowledge base of the rural environment. By combining this with a sound understanding of business development and policy it will enable participants to maximise on opportunities identified.

The course is designed for existing owner-managers, directors and managers of farm-based businesses, and those who aspire to this level of career development. We expect participants, whilst not necessarily formally educated to undergraduate level, will be well informed and committed to the subject area. This course will provide the necessary focus for growth-orientated businesses to develop.

How will it benefit me?

Your qualification, be it the MSc or the PgD/PgC will provide you with the skill, confidence and competence to enable you to manage growth-orientated businesses.

You will gain the higher level skills needed to really understand the workings of the farm-based business, its success as well as aspects of lower performance and weakness. You will have a clear understanding of the supply chains in which the business operates and could operate and how to maximise the opportunity and in so doing develop the business further. You will undertake practical application of a range of techniques to enable you to develop business management strategies within the evolving economic, social, legal and political framework that farm businesses operate in. Additionally, you will develop enhanced leadership and communication skills required for the management of successful rural business.

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There has never been a more urgent need to train scientists in the area of food security, equipped with skills in agronomy; plant pathology, plant disease and plant genetics; and knowledge of modern agricultural systems and agricultural policy. Read more

Food security: a global concern

There has never been a more urgent need to train scientists in the area of food security, equipped with skills in agronomy; plant pathology, plant disease and plant genetics; and knowledge of modern agricultural systems and agricultural policy. The Royal Society report Reaping the Benefits: science and the sustainable intensification of global agriculture published in October 2009, provided the clearest evidence of the challenge of ensuring global food security during the next 50 years. Crop yields need to rise significantly, but in a manner that requires much lower dependency on chemical intervention and fertilisers.

Meeting the challenge of sustainable agriculture

This programme was developed in collaboration with the agricultural industry, government agencies including Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) and The Food and Environment Research Agency (Fera), and farmers and food manufacturers, to provide a multi-disciplinary training in sustainable agriculture and global food security. Research-led teaching in molecular plant pathology, plant sciences and microbiology is strongly supplemented by Rothamsted Research, North Wyke expertise in grassland management, soil science and sustainable farming systems. Leading social scientists also provide valuable input in rural land use and the rural economy. The combination of expertise in both arable and pastureland systems ensures a truly rounded learning experience.

The curriculum takes account of the key skills shortages in the UK to train highly skilled individuals who can enter government agencies, agriculture and food industries and fulfil very valuable roles in scientific research, advice, evaluation, policy development and implementation tackling the challenges of food security. The programme provides opportunities to gain industrial and practical experiences including field trips.

Expert teaching

Teaching is enriched by expert contributions from a broad cross-section of the industry. Scientific staff from Fera provide specialist lectures as part of the Crop Security module, members of the Plant Health Inspectorate cover field aspects of plant pathology, and a LEAF1 farmer addresses agricultural systems and the realities of food production using integrated farm management. In addition, teaching staff from the University and BBSRC Rothamsted-North Wyke will draw on material and experiences from their academic research and scientific links with industry.

Industrial and practical experience

All students will have opportunities to gain industrial and practical experiences. Teaching visits will be made to the Plant Health Inspectorate in Cornwall to see quarantine management of Phytophthora, and to a local LEAF farm to review the challenges and approaches to food production in integrated farm management systems. You will gain specialised experience in practical science or policy making through a dissertation or project placement with external agencies. Defra and Fera, for example, are offering five dissertation and/or project placements annually.

Programme structure

The programme is made up of modules. The list of modules may include the following; Professional Skills; Research Project; Sustainable Land Use in Grassland Agriculture; Crop Security; Sustainable Livestock and Fisheries; Political Economy of Food and Agriculture and Research and Knowledge Transfer for Food Security and Sustainable Agriculture

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand. Please see the website for an up to date list (http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/biosciences/foodsecurity/#Programme-structure)

Addressing a skills shortage to tackle global food security

The MSc Food Security and Sustainable Agriculture curriculum has been designed in collaboration with the agricultural industry to tackle the skills shortage that exists in this vital interdisciplinary area. This programme will provide the highly skilled individuals required in government agencies, agriculture and food industries for critical roles in scientific research, advice, evaluation, policy development and implementation tackling the challenges of food security.

Global horizons

With food security and sustainable agriculture a global concern, opportunities for specialists in the areas of agronomy, plant pathology, plant disease and plant improvement will be worldwide. By combining expertise across the natural, social and political sciences, this programme provides valuable interdisciplinary knowledge and skills in both arable and pastureland systems. Graduates will be prepared to take on the global challenges of food security and sustainable agriculture, being able to adapt to farming systems across the world and identify cross-disciplinary solutions to local agricultural problems.

Learning enhanced by industry

The programme is enriched by expert contributions from a broad cross-section of the industry, with specialist lectures, teaching visits to observe the practical application of techniques, and industrial placement opportunities for project work or dissertations in practical science or policy making.

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This MSc offers a critical approach to 'people-centred' development, addressing the challenges for equitable citizenship in the context of social diversity and globalisation, particularly in urban contexts. Read more
This MSc offers a critical approach to 'people-centred' development, addressing the challenges for equitable citizenship in the context of social diversity and globalisation, particularly in urban contexts. Participants engage in a critical analysis of the theory and practice of social development alongside gaining the skills required to be a reflective social development practitioner.

Degree information

The programme objectives are to give participants a solid grounding in social analysis skills and perspectives, rooted in social theory around identity, inequality, and social change processes. Students learn how development interventions can best support the citizenship claims of diverse groups of women and men, and girls and boys living in the Global South, and consider the role of the social development practitioner in this endeavour.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (90 credits), either one or two optional modules (totalling 30 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma (full-time nine months) is offered, comprising three core modules (90 credits) and one or two optional modules (30 credits).

Core modules - all three of the following:
-Social Policy and Citizenship
-Social Diversity, Inequality, and Poverty
-Social Development in Practice

Optional modules - one or two optional modules, totalling 30 credits, usually including the following, among others:
-NGOs and Social Transformation
-Communication, Technologies and Social Power
-Gender in Policy and Planning
-Participatory Processes: Building for Development
-Disaster Risk Reduction in Cities
-Post Disaster Recovery: Policies, Practices and Alternatives
-Critical Urbanism Studio I and II
-Housing as Urbanism: Housing Policy and the Search for Scale
-Housing Policies: Practical Dimensions and Alternative Options
-Neo-Structuralism and the Developmental State
-Political Economy of Development: Land, Food and Agriculture
-Political Economy of Development: Industrialisation and Infrastructure
-Adapting Cities to Climate Change in the Global South
-Sustainable Infrastructure and Services in Development
-Urban Water and Sanitation, Planning and Politics
-Transport Equity and Urban Mobility
-Urban and Peri-Urban Agriculture: Knowledge Systems in the Global South
-The City and Its Relations: Context, Institutions and Actors in Urban Development Planning
-Managing the City Economy

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project related to the main themes of the programme, culminating in a dissertation report of 10,000 words (60 credits). Topics may be chosen to enhance career development or for their inherent interest.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practical classroom exercises, and fieldwork within the UK and abroad. Student performance is assessed through coursework, examinations, and a dissertation report as well as an assessment of practical work, including the international fieldwork group report.

Fieldwork
The programme incorporates group fieldwork in London and in a selected country of the Global South. The cost of flights, visas, necessary vaccinations, accommodation, and fieldwork-related travel and facilitations costs, are incorporated within the programme fees. Meals and other expenditure must be covered by the student.

Careers

Graduates of this Master's programme are likely to find employment as officers for local and international NGOs, as officers for international organisations, as officers in local or national government departments and as consultants. Some graduates pursue an academic career, either through doctoral studies or through teaching and research in a number of prestigious universities.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Head of Strategy Funding, Global Witness
-Researcher, Chinese Federation of Trade Unions
-Development Consultant, World Bank Group
-Corporate Responsibility Manager, Odebrecht
-Project Co-Ordinator, Thamani Youth of Kenya

Employability
Graduates of this programme are able to link theory to practice, critically reflect, and negotiate complex social relations as well as facilitate social processes in a context of diversity - all key transferable skills in the job market. Graduates have secured jobs in a variety of sectors and countries and built fulfilling careers in social development.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The programme introduces students to critical, analytical and practical skills that will be of use in their future careers, whether as academics, social development practitioners or advocates for the need to place the 'social' at the centre of development. Students have an opportunity to critically examine relevant bodies of knowledge, current debates and field experience in primarily urban contexts, and to consider the challenges of making development policy, planning and practice more socially responsive.

Students on this MSc benefit from the strong practical component, which includes fieldwork assignments in London and an international field trip to a city in the Global South. This trip provides the opportunity to develop practical skills, use tools for participatory action research, and reflect on the roles and responsibilities of social development practitioners.

The practice-based components of the programme also provide students with the opportunity to network with organisations and professionals working in the social development sector. In a complementary series of careers sessions, students can network with Development Planning Unit alumni and partners who are working in relevant fields.

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