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Masters Degrees (Laboratory Science)

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Programme Aims. Read more

Programme Aims

This award is offered within the Postgraduate Scheme in Health Technology, which aims to provide professionals in Medical Imaging, Radiotherapy, Medical Laboratory Science, Health Technology, as well as others interested in health technology, with an opportunity to develop advanced levels of knowledge and skills.

 A. Advancement in Knowledge and Skill

  • ​To develop specialists in their respective professional disciplines to enhance their career paths;
  • To broaden students' exposure to health science and technology to enable them to cope with the ever-changing demands of work; and
  • To provide a laboratory environment for testing problems encountered at work.

 Students develop intellectually, professionally and personally while advancing their knowledge and skills in Medical Laboratory Science. The specific aims of this award are:

  • ​To broaden and deepen students' knowledge and expertise in Medical Laboratory Science;
  • To introduce students to advances in selected areas of diagnostic laboratory techniques;
  • To develop in students an integrative and collaborative team approach to the investigation of common diseases;
  • To foster an understanding of the management concepts that are relevant to clinical laboratories; and
  • To develop students' skills in communication, critical analysis and problem solving.

B. Professional Development

  • ​To develop students' ability in critical analysis and evaluation in their professional practices;
  • To cultivate within healthcare professionals the qualities and attributes that are expected of them;
  • To acquire a higher level of awareness and reflection within the profession and the healthcare industry to improve the quality of healthcare services; and
  • To develop students' ability to assume a managerial level of practice.

C. Evidence-based Practice

  • ​To equip students with the necessary research skills to enable them to perform evidence-based practice in the delivery of healthcare service.

D. Personal Development

  • ​To provide channels for practising professionals to continuously develop themselves while at work; and
  • To allow graduates to develop themselves further after graduation.

Characteristics

Our laboratories are well-equipped to support students in their studies, research and dissertations. Our specialised equipment includes a flow cytometer, cell culture facilities; basic and advanced instruments for molecular biology research (including thermal cyclers, DNA sequencers, real-time PCR systems and an automatic mutation detection system), microplate systems for ELISA work, HPLC, FPLC, tissue processors, automatic cell analysers, a preparative ultracentrifuge and an automated biochemical analyser.

Recognition

This programme is accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science (UK), and graduates are eligible to apply for Membership of the Institute.

Programme structure

To be eligible for the MSc in Medical Laboratory Science (MScMLS), students are required to complete 30 credits:

  • 2 Compulsory Subjects (6 credits)
  • Dissertation (9 credits)
  • 3 Core Subjects (9 credits)
  • 2 Elective Subjects (6 credits)

Apart from the award of MScMLS, students can choose to graduate with the following specialism:

  • MSc in Medical Laboratory Science (Molecular Diagnostics)

 To be eligible for the specialism, students should complete 2 Compulsory Subjects (6 credits), a Dissertation (9 credits) related to the specialism, 4 Specialty Subjects (12 credits) and 1 Elective Subject (3 credits).

Compulsory Subjects

  • ​Integrated Medical Laboratory Science
  • Research Methods & Biostatistics

Core Subjects

  • Advanced Topics in Health Technology
  • Clinical Chemistry
  • Epidemiology
  • Haematology & Transfusion Science
  • Histopathology & Cytology
  • Immunology
  • Medical Microbiology
  • Clinical Applications of Molecular Diagnostics in Healthcare *
  • Molecular Technology in the Clinical Laboratory *
  • Workshops on Advanced Molecular Diagnostic Technology *

Elective Subjects

  • Bioinformatics in Health Sciences *
  • Professional Development in Infection Control Practice

* Specialty Subject



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The MSc in Medical Laboratory Science is equivalent to just over one year of full time study. It is designed for professional Medical Laboratory Scientists working full time so it is expected that all candidates will study part time and take three or four years to complete the degree. Read more

The MSc in Medical Laboratory Science is equivalent to just over one year of full time study. It is designed for professional Medical Laboratory Scientists working full time so it is expected that all candidates will study part time and take three or four years to complete the degree.

Careers

Suitable for Medical Laboratory Scientists interested in advancement within health-related areas.



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Our MSc Science Communication course is ideal if you are interested in science, technology, medicine, mathematics or engineering and want to work in the field of science communication. Read more

Our MSc Science Communication course is ideal if you are interested in science, technology, medicine, mathematics or engineering and want to work in the field of science communication.

You will develop the skills required to work in a range of sectors, including media, science policy, filmmaking, science outreach, public relations, museums and science centres, science festivals, and other public engagement fields.

Developed by the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine and Manchester Institute of Innovation Research , the course features masterclasses and project support from leading professionals in a wide range of sectors, together with experienced science communicators from across the University.

You will spend time building up practical communication skills, and thinking about the broad range of challenges that science communicators face. Does science communication matter for society? Whose interests are furthered by science news? What are the ethical issues in the communication of health research? When we talk about public engagement, what kind of public do we mean?

You will consider these and other questions through insights drawn from history, innovation and policy research, media studies, and the first-hand experience of long-serving communicators, and link these to practical skills.

Special features

Real world learning

We bring practitioners into the classroom and enable you to participate in the various forms of science communication that take place in Manchester to complement your academic learning with real life experiences.

Teaching and learning

You will learn through a mixture of lectures, small-group seminars, discussions and practical exercises. Activities will be included in the taught elements for both individual students and groups.

You will engage with primary and secondary academic literatures, professional literatures, and mass media products about science, technology and medicine.

You will also learn at special sites of science communication, such as museums, media institutions, and public events.

We encourage participation and volunteering to help you further your own interests alongside the taught curriculum. All students will meet regularly with a mentor from the Centre's PhD community, with a designated personal tutor from among the staff and, from Semester 2, a dissertation supervisor.

Applicants may informally request examples of study materials to help you test your ability to engage effectively with the course from the Course Director.

Coursework and assessment

All units are assessed by academic and practical tasks set in parallel. You should expect both written and spoken assessments that use a format appropriate to the relevant professional group or medium.

You may choose your own topic or medium for many of the assessments. Assessed work also includes a piece of original science communication research.

The final assessment is a project created under the supervision of a science communication professional (the mentored project).

Course unit details

The full-time version of the course runs for 12 months from September. There is also a part-time alternative, covering half the same classes each semester over two years. Part-time study involves a limited number of days' attendance per week and can be combined with part-time employment.

All students take three course units consisting of weekly lectures and discussion seminars:

  • Introduction to Science Communication (30 credits)
  • Communicating ideas in science, technology and medicine (15 credits)
  • Introduction to Contemporary Science and Medicine (15 credits)

All students also attend a series of intensive one-day schools on science communication practice and science policy, with sessions led by invited contributors including journalists, documentary filmmakers, museum professionals, policy analysts, outreach officers and other relevant experts. From these day schools, you will choose two of the following four areas to specialise in for assessed work (although you can sit in on all these units):

  • Science, media and journalism (15 credits)
  • Science museums, Science Centres and Public Events (15 credits)
  • Ideas and issues in science communication studies (15 credits) ¿ Science, government and policy (15 credits)

The course is completed by two more open-ended elements allowing you to specialise towards your preferred interests.

  • The science communication research project (30 credits) gives more scope for independent investigation and includes new research on a particular science communication topic.
  • The mentored project (60 credits), completed over the summer at the end of the course, involves working with support from a science communication professional on developing and analysing an activity close to professional practice.

Our course teaches the current trends in science communication, so details of our units may vary from year to year to stay up to date. This type of change is covered within the University's disclaimer , but if you are in doubt about a unit of interest, please contact us before accepting your offer of a place.

What our students say

Read about graduate Amie Peltzer's experience of the course on the Biology, Medicine and Health Student Blog .

Facilities

You will have use of a shared office in the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine, including networked computer terminals and storage space, and use of a dedicated subject library housed in the PhD office.

You will also be able to access a range of facilities throughout the University.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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Get a degree that's recognised worldwide and contribute to knowledge in your field. A Master of Science (MSc) will develop your technical, laboratory and academic writing skills to prepare you for a career in science. Read more

Get a degree that's recognised worldwide and contribute to knowledge in your field. A Master of Science (MSc) will develop your technical, laboratory and academic writing skills to prepare you for a career in science.

The MSc will take you between two and two and half years of full-time study or up to four years part time. In the first year of your MSc you'll take several courses related to your specialist subject area. Next, you'll carry out in-depth supervised research for 12–15 months and write a thesis. During your studies you might also author publications for peer-reviewed journals.

To do an MSc you'll need a Bachelor's degree in an appropriate field, with an average grade of B+ or higher in your subject area. You may also be able to qualify for entry if you have appropriate work or other experience.

Range of Master's programmes

Choose to complete this Master's programme or one of the specialist science Master's programmes. Most specialist programmes are 180 points and don't require a thesis.

If you have already done a BSc(Hons) you can apply to go directly into the 120-point MSc by thesis.

Available subjects

Workload

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.



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Get a degree that's recognised worldwide and contribute to knowledge in your field. A Master of Science (MSc) will develop your technical, laboratory and academic writing skills to prepare you for a career in science. Read more

Get a degree that's recognised worldwide and contribute to knowledge in your field. A Master of Science (MSc) will develop your technical, laboratory and academic writing skills to prepare you for a career in science.

The MSc by thesis will take you between 12 and 15 months to complete. You'll carry out in-depth supervised research and write a thesis. During your studies you might also author publications for peer-reviewed journals.

To do an MSc by thesis you'll need an Honours degree or postgraduate diploma in an appropriate field, with an average grade of B+ or higher in your subject area.

Available subjects

Workload

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.



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Expand your knowledge in all areas of forensic science, from gathering evidence at the crime scene itself, right through to the courtroom. Read more
Expand your knowledge in all areas of forensic science, from gathering evidence at the crime scene itself, right through to the courtroom. Develop your skills and knowledge on our accredited course, as you collect and analyse evidence, equipping you to become a confident and effective practitioner.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/forensic-science

In-keeping with its industry-focus our Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences accredited course is taught by experienced forensics practitioners. We’ll immerse you in a practical environment that closely emulates a real forensics laboratory. The analytical skills and expertise you gain apply equally well in the broader scientific and technological fields as they do in forensics.

Our course combines practical skills with high-level theoretical knowledge of the wide range of forensic techniques you need to apply at all stages of an investigation. Going further still, you’ll be trained to design and execute your own research project in a relevant area, which particularly interests you. This will include guidance on research methods, good practice, presentation and the application of your research.

Full-time - January start, 15 months. September start, 12 months.
Part-time - January start, 33 months. September start, 28 months.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/forensic-science

This course will provide you with:
• the opportunity to acquire Masters level capabilities, knowledge and skills in diverse areas of forensic science from the crime scene to the court
• training in the design and execution of science based research in an appropriate area of forensic science
• the opportunity to undertake a formal research programme in an appropriate area of forensic science

The intention is to immerse you in an environment that is as realistically close to that of a practising forensic science laboratory as is possible in an academic institution. The experience and background of Anglia Ruskin's staff, their intimate knowledge and working relationships with the industry and the availability or new or relatively new purpose-built laboratory facilities places this course in a strong position to deliver such an experience.

This course is suitable for candidates who wish to specialise in Forensic Science as a progression from their first degree in forensic science and for candidates coming into Forensic Science with a strong background in traditional analytical science. This course is accredited by The Forensic Science Society

On successful completion of this course you will be able to:
• demonstrate deep and systematic knowledge of several major areas of forensic science, including either chemical or biological criminalistics.
• apply theoretical and experimentally based empirical knowledge to the solution of problems in forensic science
demonstrate that you are cognisant with the best ethical practices, validation and accreditation procedures relevant to forensic science.
• demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the theory and practice of advanced analytical techniques, as used and applied in forensic science.
• devise, design, implement and, if necessary, modify a programme of basic research directly related to the solution of practical problems in the broad field of forensic science.
• assimilate the known knowledge and information concerning a particular problem/issue and erect testable and viable alternative hypotheses, from theoretical and empirical/experimental view points.
• demonstrate a level of conceptual understanding that will enable information from a wide range of sources and methodologies to be comprehensively and critically appraised.
• operate competently, safely and legally in a variety of complex, possibly unpredictable contexts and be able to apply appropriate standards of established good practice in such circumstances.
• demonstrate that you are able to exercise initiative in your work tasks, but yet be able to exercise your responsibility so as not to move beyond the scope of your expertise.
• search for and obtain information from a wide range of traditional, non-traditional and digital/electronic sources and be able to synthesis it into a coherent argument.
• present the results of your work in a number of forms (reports, papers, posters and all forms of oral presentation) at a level intelligible to the target audience (highly trained/specialised professional to informed lay-person).
• organise your own time and patterns of work to maximum effect and be able to work competently either autonomously or as part of groups and teams as required.

Careers

Our course is enhanced by our excellent working relationships with most of the major employers in the forensic science industry, including the police and fire services.

This focus on theory and good laboratory practice, analytical measurement and research and management skills, together with our industry contacts will make you an attractive candidate for employment. It’ll open up career opportunities in specialist forensic science laboratories in the chemical, biological, environmental, pharmaceutical and law enforcement industries.

You’re also in the perfect position to continue your academic career and move up to our Forensic Science PhD.

Core modules

Evidence Collection and Management
Mastering Forensic Evidence
Mastering Forensic Analysis
Specialist Topics
Research Methods
Research Project

Assessment

Your progress will be assessed using a variety of methods including laboratory reports, court reports (including witness statements), presentations, exams, essays and reports.

Facilities

Wide range of advanced microscopy instruments. SEM with EDS. Full range of organic analysis (GC, GC-MS, HPLC and ion chromatography). FT-IR and Raman spectrometers. Gene sequencing and other DNA analytical equipment. Comprehensive collection of specialist forensic equipment including GRIM, VSC and MSP. Dedicated crime scene facility with video equipment.

Your faculty

The Faculty of Science & Technology is one of the largest of five faculties at Anglia Ruskin University. Whether you choose to study with us full- or part-time, on campus or at a distance, there’s an option whatever your level – from a foundation degree, to a BSc, MSc, PhD or professional doctorate.

Whichever course you pick, you’ll gain the theory and practical skills needed to progress with confidence. Join us and you could find yourself learning in the very latest laboratories or on field trips or work placements with well-known and respected companies. You may even have the opportunity to study abroad.

Everything we do in the faculty has a singular purpose: to provide a world-class environment to create, share and advance knowledge in science and technology fields. This is key to all of our futures.

Specialist facilities

Our facilities include a wide range of advanced microscopy instruments – SEM with EDS, a full range of organic analysis (GC, HPLC and ion chromatography). FT-IR and Raman Spectrometers, gene sequencing and other DNA analytical equipment. A comprehensive collection of specialist forensic equipment includes GRIM, VSC and MSP and we also have a dedicated crime scene facility with video equipment.

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Why this course?. The MSc in Forensic Science is the UK’s longest established forensic science degree course, celebrating its . Read more

Why this course?

The MSc in Forensic Science is the UK’s longest established forensic science degree course, celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2016/2017.

You’ll join a global network of Strathclyde forensic science graduates in highly respected positions all over the world.

In addition to preparing you for life as a forensic scientist, you’ll also graduate with a wide range of practical skills, problem solving and investigative thinking relevant to a wide range of careers.

You'll study

  • crime scene investigation
  • legal procedures and the law
  • evidence interpretation and statistical evaluation
  • analysis of range of evidence types including footwear marks, trace evidence, and questioned documents

Following a general introduction to forensic science in semester 1, you can choose to specialise in either forensic biology or forensic chemistry. As a forensic biologist you’ll study a range of topics including:

  • body fluid analysis
  • blood pattern interpretation
  • DNA profiling
  • investigation of assaults and sexual offences

If you choose to specialise in forensic chemistry, you’ll develop expertise in:

  • analysis of fires and explosives
  • drugs of abuse
  • alcohol and toxicology

The focal point of the course is our major crime scene exercise, in which you are expected to investigate your own mock outdoor crime scene, collect and analyse the evidence, and present this in Glasgow Sheriff Court in conjunction with students training in Strathclyde Law School.

Project

In semester 3, MSc students undertake a three-month project, culminating in the production of a dissertation.

Students may be given the opportunity to complete their project in an operational forensic science provider either in the UK or overseas (subject to visa requirements). Alternatively, students may complete their project within the Centre for Forensic Science itself, under the supervision of our team of academics.

Examples of institutions that previous Strathclyde students have been placed in to undertake their project include: 

  • Scottish Police Authority, Forensic Services
  • Centre for Applied Science and Technology (CAST)
  • Forensic Explosives Laboratory, Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL)
  • LGC Forensics
  • Cellmark Forensic Services
  • Institute of Environmental Science and Research, Auckland, New Zealand
  • Institute of Forensic Research, Krakow, Poland
  • Centre of Forensic Sciences, Toronto, Canada

The MSc in Forensic Science runs for 12 months, commencing in September. 

Facilities

Teaching takes place in the Centre for Forensic Science. It’s a modern purpose-built laboratory for practical forensic training, equipped with state-of-the-art instrumentation for analysis of a wide range of evidence types. This includes a microscopy suite, DNA profiling laboratory, analytical chemistry laboratory, blood pattern analysis room, and a suite for setting up mock crime scenes.

Accreditation

The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences is a professional body with members in over 60 countries and is one of the oldest and largest forensic science associations in the world.

Our MSc in Forensic Science is accredited by the Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences, demonstrating our commitment to meeting their high educational standards for forensic science tuition.

Assessment

Assessment consists of written coursework, practical work assessments, oral presentations and formal written examinations. Practical work is continually assessed and counts towards the award of the degree. The project is assessed through the completion of a dissertation.

The award of MSc is based upon 180 credits.

Careers

Most forensic scientists in Scotland are employed by the Scottish Police Authority.

In the rest of the UK, forensic scientists are employed by individual police forces, private forensic science providers such as LGC Forensics and Cellmark Forensic Services, or government bodies such as the Centre for Applied Science and Technology (CAST) and the Defence Science Technology Laboratory (DSTL).

Outside of the UK, forensic scientists may be employed by police forces, government bodies or private companies.

Forensic scientists can specialise in specific areas such as crime scene examination, DNA analysis, drug analysis, and fire investigation.

Most of the work is laboratory-based but experienced forensic scientists may have to attend crime scenes and give evidence in court.

Where are they now?

Many of our graduates are in work or further study.**

Job titles include:

  • Analytical Chemist
  • Biology Casework Examiner
  • Deputy Laboratory Director
  • DNA Analyst
  • Forensic Case Worker Examiner
  • Forensic DNA Analyst
  • Forensic Scientist
  • Laboratory Analyst
  • Medical Laboratory Assistant Histopathology
  • Research & Development Chemist

Employers include:

  • Gen-Probe Life Sciences
  • HKSTC
  • Key Forensic Services Ltd
  • Lancaster Labs
  • LGC Forensics
  • Life Technologies
  • National Institute Of Criminalistics And Criminology
  • NHS
  • Seychelles Forensic Science Lab
  • University of Strathclyde

*information is intended only as a guide.

**Based on the results of the National Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey (2010/11 and 2011/12).



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Biomed Online is aimed at employees across the health sector who want to keep abreast of the latest developments in biomedical science, healthcare management and related subjects. Read more

Biomed Online is aimed at employees across the health sector who want to keep abreast of the latest developments in biomedical science, healthcare management and related subjects. The Biomed Online Learning programme is managed by a consortium of:

  • NHS Trusts
  • Pathology Joint Ventures
  • Public Health England, and the
  • University of Greenwich.

Courses are approved for continuing professional development (CPD) by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS), the leading body for those working in the field.

Degree structure

There are 16 structured online courses currently on offer, with more in the pipeline. Each has been specifically tailored to meet workplace needs and each is delivered online with full support from an experienced practitioner. Together they provide a flexible, practical way to learn, either for CPD or towards a Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert), Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) or Master's degree (MSc).

Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert)

Complete two 12 week online modules and gain either a PGCert Biomedical Science (Online) award, a PG Cert in Healthcare Quality Management or a PG Cert in Healthcare Management. Each course comprises two components:

  • Two face-to-face workshops held at the Greenwich Campus: 
  • Workshop 1: an introduction to e-learning, your tutor and your course 
  • Workshop 2: course consolidation.
  • Guided online study.

Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip)

Complete four 12 week online modules and gain either a PGDip Biomedical Science (Online) award, a PG Diploma in Healthcare Quality Management or a PG Diploma in Healthcare Management. You can take it further by applying for the MSc programme after completing four online courses and once you have your project idea established.

Master's degree (MSc)

Complete four online modules and complete a research project and gain an MSc Biomedical Science (Online) award. The MSc can be completed over six years and is validated by the University of Greenwich and accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science.

Project work

Your project will be an independent piece of work, laboratory based and audit focused. A significant aspect of the project will be critical evaluation and comparison with material published in journals or where appropriate, work done in other comparable hospitals.

The project will be relevant to your profession and potentially life changing. You will be supported all the way through from how to get started, structuring your project, write up and submission.

What you'll study

Year 1

Students are required to choose 60 credits from this list of options.

Year 2

Students are required to choose 60 credits from this list of options.

Year 3

Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Assessment

Students are assessed through:

  • Case study orientated reports
  • Production of posters
  • Presentations
  • Contributions to online discussions
  • Tests
  • Online assessments
  • Research project.

Careers

The programme is directed mainly towards those working in NHS / healthcare laboratories, with the intention of providing opportunities for professional advancement following registration and for continuing professional development.

Biomed Online Learning Programme is open to national and international students but due to the nature of the project, the MSc Programme is only open to students working in a hospital/laboratory setting in the UK.



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Programme Aims. Read more

Programme Aims

This award is offered within the Postgraduate Scheme in Health Technology, which aims to provide professionals in Medical Imaging, Radiotherapy, Medical Laboratory Science, Health Technology, as well as others interested in health technology, with an opportunity to develop advanced levels of knowledge and skills.

The award in Medical Imaging and Radiation Science (MIRS) is specially designed for professionals in medical imaging and radiotherapy and has the following aims.

A. Advancement in Knowledge and Skill

  • ​To provide professionals in Medical Imaging and Radiotherapy, as well as others interested in health technology, with the opportunity to develop advanced levels of knowledge and skills;
  • To develop specialists in their respective professional disciplines and enhance their career paths;
  • To broaden students' exposure to a wider field of health science and technology to enable them to cope with the ever-changing demands of work;
  • To provide a laboratory environment for testing problems encountered at work;
  • To equip students with an advanced knowledge base in a chosen area of specialisation in medical imaging or radiotherapy to enable them to meet the changing needs of their disciplines and contribute to the development of medical imaging or radiation oncology practice in Hong Kong; and
  • To develop critical and analytical abilities and skills in the areas of specialisation that are relevant to the professional discipline to improve professional competence.

B. Professional Development

  • ​To develop students' ability in critical analysis and evaluation in their professional practices;
  • To cultivate within healthcare professionals the qualities and attributes that are expected of them;
  • To acquire a higher level of awareness and reflection within the profession and the healthcare industry to improve the quality of healthcare services; and
  • To develop students' ability to assume a managerial level of practice.

C. Evidence-based Practice

  • ​To equip students with the necessary skill in research to enable them to perform evidence-based practice in the delivery of healthcare service and industry.

D. Personal Development

  • ​To provide channels through which practising professionals can continuously develop themselves while at work; and
  • To allow graduates to develop themselves further after graduation.

Characteristics

The Medical Imaging and Radiation Science award offers channels for specialisation and the broadening of knowledge for professionals in medical imaging and radiotherapy. It will appeal to students who are eager to become specialists or managers in their areas of practice. Clinical experience and practice in medical imaging and radiotherapy are integrated into the curriculum to encourage more reflective observation and active experimentation.

Programme Structure

To be eligible for the MSc in Medical Imaging and Radiation Science (MScMIRS), students are required to complete 30 credits:

  • 2 Compulsory Subjects (6 credits)
  • 3 Core Subjects (9 credits)
  • 5 Elective Subjects (15 credits)

Apart from the award of MScMIRS, students can choose to graduate with one of the following specialisms:

  • MSc in Medical Imaging and Radiation Science (Computed Tomography)
  • MSc in Medical Imaging and Radiation Science (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)
  • MSc in Medical Imaging and Radiation Science (Ultrasonography)

To be eligible for the specialism concerned, students should complete 2 Compulsory Subjects (6 credits), a Dissertation (9 credits) related to that specialism, a specialism-related Specialty Subject (3 credits), a Clinical Practicum (3 credits) and 3 Elective Subjects (9 credits).

 Compulsory Subjects

  • Research Methods & Biostatistics
  • ​Multiplanar Anatomy

Core Subjects

  • Advanced Radiotherapy Planning & Dosimetry
  • Advanced Radiation Protection
  • Advanced Technology & Clinical Application in Computed Tomography *
  • Advanced Technology & Clinical Application in Magnetic Resonance Imaging *
  • Advanced Technology & Clinical Application in Nuclear Medicine Imaging
  • Advanced Topics in Health Technology
  • Advanced Ultrasonography *
  • Clinical Practicum (CT/MRI/US)
  • Dissertation
  • Digital Imaging & PACS
  • Imaging Pathology

 * Specialty Subject

Elective Subjects

  • Bioinformatics in Health Sciences
  • Professional Development in Infection Control Practice


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The School of Life Science has developed an extremely active and successful undergraduate, Biomedical Science programme. We have embraced specialists working in local NHS Trusts to develop outstanding, collaborative relationships covering key diagnostic and clinical specialties. Read more

Overview

The School of Life Science has developed an extremely active and successful undergraduate, Biomedical Science programme. We have embraced specialists working in local NHS Trusts to develop outstanding, collaborative relationships covering key diagnostic and clinical specialties. Not only do students benefit from the inclusion of such specialist practitioners onto our teaching programmes, but could also be offered highly competitive research opportunities working within the hospital itself.

This MSc programme builds on this wealth of experience and best practice to enable well-qualified students to develop their scientific training and employability skills within a Biomedical context. The need for innovation and a multidisciplinary approach to Biomedical Science has never been more important. The teaching strategies embedded within this programme embrace these principles in its pursuit of Clinical Biochemistry, Medical Immunology and Haematology.

IBMS Accreditation

This programme is accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS) as the professional body of Biomedical Scientists within the United Kingdom. The IBMS aims to promote and develop the role of Biomedical Science within healthcare to deliver he best possible service for patient care and safety.

Accreditation is a process of peer review and recognition by the profession of the achievement of quality standards for delivering Masters level programmes.

Individuals awarded a Masters degree accredited by the Institute are eligible for the title of Chartered Scientist and the designation CSci if they meet the other eligibility criteria of corporate membership and active engagement in Continued Professional Development. A Masters level qualification is also one of the entry criteria for the Institute’s Higher Specialist Examination and award of the Higher Specialist Diploma, a pre-requisite for the membership grade of Fellowship and designation FIBMS.

The aim of IBMS accreditation is to ensure that, through a spirit of partnership between the Institute and the University, a good quality degree is achieved that prepares the student for employment in circumstances requiring sound judgement, critical thinking, personal responsibility and initiative in complex and unpredictable professional environments.

The Institute lists 10 advantages of IBMS accreditation:
1. Advances professional practice to benefit healthcare services and professions related to biomedical science.

2. Develops specific knowledge and competence that underpins biomedical science.

3. Provides expertise to support development of appropriate education and training.

4. Ensures curriculum content is both current and anticipatory of future change.

5. Facilitates peer recognition of education and best practice and the dissemination of information through education and employer networks.

6. Ensures qualification is fit for purpose.

7. Recognises the achievement of a benchmark standard of education.

8. The degree award provides access to professional body membership as a Chartered Scientist and for entry to the Higher Specialist Diploma examination.

9. Strengthens links between the professional body, education providers employers and students.

10. Provides eligibility for the Higher Education Institution (HEI) to become a member of HUCBMS (Heads of University Centres of Biomedical Science)

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/biomedicalbloodscience/

Course Aims

The main aim of the programme is to provide multidisciplinary, Masters Level postgraduate training in Biomedical Blood Science. This will involve building on existing, undergraduate knowledge in basic science and applying it to clinical, diagnostic and research applications relevant to Clinical Biochemistry, Medical Immunology and Haematology.

Intended learning outcomes of the programme reflect what successful students should know, understand or to be able to do by the end of the programme. Programme specific learning outcomes are provided in the Programme Specification available by request, but to summarise the overarching course, aims are as follows:

- To develop students’ knowledge and understanding of different theoretical perspectives, methodological approaches, research interests and practical applications within Blood Science

- To explore and explicitly critique the clinical, diagnostic and research implications within the fields of Clinical Biochemistry,

- Medical Immunology and Haematology, and to place this in the context of a clinical laboratory, fully considering the potential implications for patients, health workers and research alike

- To develop a critical awareness of Biomedical ethics and to fully integrate these issues into project management including grant application and business planning

- To support student autonomy and innovation by providing opportunities for students to demonstrate originality in developing or applying their own ideas

- To direct students to integrate a complex knowledge base in the scrutiny and accomplishment of professional problem-solving scenarios and project development

- To enable student acquirement of advanced laboratory practical competencies and high level analytical skills

- To promote and sustain communities of practice that allow students to share best practice, encourage a multidisciplinary approach to problem-solving and to develop extensive communication skills, particularly their ability to convey complex, underpinning knowledge alongside their personal conclusions and rationale to specialist and nonspecialist listeners

- To provide students with a wide range of learning activities and a diverse assessment strategy in order to fully develop their employability and academic skills, ensuring both professional and academic attainment

Course Content

This one year programme is structured so that all taught sessions are delivered in just two days of the working week. Full-time students are expected to engage in independent study for the remaining 3 days per week. Consolidating taught sessions in this way allows greater flexibility for part-time students who will be expected to attend one day a week for two academic years, reducing potential impact in terms of workforce planning for employers and direct contact for students with needs outside of their academic responsibilities.

Semester 1 will focus on two main areas, the first being Biomedical ethics, grant application and laboratory competencies. The second area focuses on the clinical and diagnostic implications of Blood Science for patients and health workers, with the major emphasis being on Clinical Biochemistry.

Semester 2 will also focus on two main themes; firstly, business planning methodological approaches, analytical reasoning and research. Secondly, the clinical and diagnostic implications of Blood Science for patients and health workers, with the major emphasis being on Haematology and Immunology.

Compulsory Modules (each 15 credits) consist of:
- Biomedical Ethics & Grant Proposal
- Project Management & Business Planning
- Advanced Laboratory Techniques*
- Research Methodologies *
- Case Studies in Blood Science I
- Case Studies in Blood Science II
- Clinical Pathology I
- Clinical Pathology II

*Students who have attained the IBMS Specialist Diploma and are successfully enrolling with accredited prior certified learning are exempt from these two modules.

Dissertation – Biomedical Blood Science Research Project (60 credits)

This research project and final dissertation of 20,000 words is an excellent opportunity for students to undertake laboratory based research in their chosen topic and should provide an opportunity for them to demonstrate their understanding of the field via applications in Biomedical Science. Biomedical Science practitioners are expected to complete the laboratory and data collection aspects of this module in conjunction with their employers.

Requirements for an Award:
In order to obtain the Masters degree, students are required to satisfactorily accrue 180 M Level credits. Students who exit having accrued 60 or 120 M Level credits excluding the ‘Dissertation – Biomedical Blood Science Research Project’ are eligible to be awarded the Postgraduate Certificate (PgC) and Postgraduate Diploma (PgD) respectively

Teaching and Learning Methods

This programme places just as much emphasis on developing the way in which students approach, integrate and apply new knowledge and problem-solving as it is with the acquisition of higher level information. As such, particular emphasis is placed on developing critical thinking, innovation, reflective writing, autonomous learning and communication skills to prepare candidates for a lifetime of continued professional development.

The teaching and learning methods employed throughout this programme reflect these principles. For example, there is greater emphasis on looking at the subject from a patient-orientated, case study driven perspective through problem-based learning (PBL) that encourages students to think laterally, joining up different pieces of information and developing a more holistic level of understanding.

Assessment

The rich and varied assessment strategy adopted by this programme ensure student development of employability
and academic skills, providing an opportunity to demonstrate both professional and academic attainment. Assessment design is
largely driven by a number of key principles which include: promotion of independent learning, student autonomy, responsibility for personal learning and development of innovation and originality within one’s chosen area of interest. Note that not all modules culminate in a final examination.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Color science is broadly interdisciplinary, encompassing physics, chemistry, physiology, statistics, computer science, and psychology. Read more

Program overview

Color science is broadly interdisciplinary, encompassing physics, chemistry, physiology, statistics, computer science, and psychology. The curriculum, leading to a master of science degree in color science, educates students using a broad interdisciplinary approach. This is the only graduate program in the country devoted to this discipline and it is designed for students whose undergraduate majors are in physics, chemistry, imaging science, computer science, electrical engineering, experimental psychology, physiology, or any discipline pertaining to the quantitative description of color. Graduates are in high demand and have accepted industrial positions in electronic imaging, color instrumentation, colorant formulation, and basic and applied research. Companies that have hired graduates include Apple Inc., Benjamin Moore, Canon Corp., Dolby Laboratories, Eastman Kodak Co., Hallmark, Hewlett Packard Corp., Microsoft Corp., Pantone, Qualcomm Inc., Ricoh Innovations Inc., Samsung, and Xerox Corp.

The color science degree provides graduate-level study in both theory and practical application. The program gives students a broad exposure to the field of color and affords them the unique opportunity of specializing in an area appropriate for their background and interest. This objective will be accomplished through the program’s core courses, selection of electives, and completion of a thesis or graduate project.The program revolves around the activities of the Munsell Color Science Laboratory within the College of Science. The Munsell Laboratory is the pre-eminent academic laboratory in the country devoted to color science. Research is currently under way in color appearance models, lighting, image-quality, color-tolerance psychophysics, spectral-based image capture, archiving, reproduction of artwork, color management, computer graphics; and material appearance. The Munsell Laboratory has many contacts that provide students with summer and full-time job opportunities across the United States and abroad.

Plan of study

Students must earn 30 semester credit hours as a graduate student to earn the master of science degree. For full-time students, the program requires three to four semesters of study. Part-time students generally require two to four years of study. The curriculum is a combination of required courses in color science, elective courses appropriate for the candidate’s background, and either a research thesis or graduate project. Students require approval of the program director if they wish to complete a graduate project, rather than a research thesis, at the conclusion of their degree.

Prerequisites: The foundation program

The color science program is designed for the candidate with an undergraduate degree in a scientific or other technical discipline. Candidates with adequate undergraduate work in related sciences start the program as matriculated graduate students. Candidates without adequate undergraduate work in related sciences must take foundation courses prior to matriculation into the graduate program. A written agreement between the candidate and the program coordinator will identify the required foundation courses. Foundation courses must be completed with an overall B average before a student can matriculate into the graduate program. A maximum of 9 graduate-level credit hours may be taken prior to matriculation into the graduate program. The foundation courses, representative of those often required, are as follows: one year of calculus, one year of college physics (with laboratory), one course in computer programming, one course in matrix algebra, one course in statistics, and one course in introductory psychology. Other science courses (with laboratory) might be substituted for physics.

Curriculum

Color science, MS degree, typical course sequence:
First Year
-Principles of Color Science
-Computational Vision Science
-Historical Research Perspectives
-Color Physics and Applications
-Modeling Visual Perception
-Research and Publication Methods
-Electives
Second Year
-Research
-Electives

Other admission requirements

-Submit scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
-Submit official transcripts (in English) for all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit two professional recommendations.
-Complete an on-campus interview (when possible).
-Have an average GPA of 3.0 or higher.
-Have completed foundation course work with GPA of 3.0 or higher (if required), and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants who native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 94 (internet-based) are required. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) scores will be accepted in place of the TOEFL exam. Minimum scores will vary; however, the absolute minimum score required for unconditional acceptance is 7.0. For additional information about the IELTS, please visit http://www.ielts.org.

Additional information

Scholarships and assistantships:
Students seeking RIT-funded scholarships and assistantships should apply to the Color Science Ph.D. program (which is identical to the MS program in the first two years). Currently, assistantships are only available for qualified color science applicants to the Ph.D. program. Applicants seeking financial assistance from RIT must submit all application documents to the Office of Graduate Enrollment Services by January 15 for the next academic year.

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The MSc Archaeological Science will provide you with a solid grounding in the theory and application of scientific principles and techniques within archaeology. Read more
The MSc Archaeological Science will provide you with a solid grounding in the theory and application of scientific principles and techniques within archaeology. The programme also develops critical, analytical and transferable skills that prepare you for professional, academic and research careers in the exciting and rapidly advancing area of archaeological science or in non-cognate fields.

The programme places the study of the human past at the centre of archaeological science enquiry. This is achieved through a combination of science and self-selected thematic or period-based modules allowing you to situate your scientific training within the archaeological context(s) of your choice. The programme provides a detailed understanding of the foundations of analytical techniques, delivers practical experience in their application and data processing, and the ability to design and communicate research that employs scientific analyses to address archaeological questions. Upon graduation you will have experience of collecting, analysing and reporting on data to publication standard and ideally equipped to launch your career as a practising archaeological scientist.

Distinctive features

The MSc Archaeological Science at Cardiff University gives you access to:

• A flexible and responsive programme that combines training in scientific enquiry, expertise and vocational skills with thematic and period-focused archaeology.

• Materials, equipment, library resources and funding to undertake meaningful research in partnership with a wide range of key heritage organisations across an international stage.

• A programme with core strengths in key fields of archaeological science, tailored to launch your career in the discipline or to progress to doctoral research.

• A department where the science, theory and practice of archaeology and conservation converge to create a unique environment for exploring the human past.

• Staff with extensive professional experience in researching, promoting, publishing, and integrating archaeological science across academic and commercial archaeology and the wider heritage sector.

• An energetic team responsible for insights into iconic sites (e.g. Stonehenge, Çatalhöyük), tackling key issues in human history (e.g. hunting, farming, food, and feasts) through the development and application of innovative science (e.g. isotopes, residue analysis, DNA, proteomics)

• A unique training in science communication at every level - from preparing conference presentations and journal articles, to project reports, press releases and public engagement, our training ensures you can transmit the excitement of scientific enquiry to diverse audiences.

• Support for your future career ambitions. From further study to science advisors to specialists – our graduates work across the entire spectrum of archaeological science as well as moving into other successful careers.

Structure

There are two stages to this course: stage 1 and stage 2.

Stage 1 is made up of:

• 40 credits of Core Skills and Discipline-Specific Research Training modules for Archaeology and Conservation Master's students
• A minimum of 40 credits of Archaeological Science modules
• An additional 40 credits of Archaeological Science or Archaeology modules offered to MA and MSc students across the Archaeology and Conservation department

Stage 2 comprises:

• 60 credit Archaeological Science Dissertation (16-20,000 words, topic or theme chosen in consultation with academic staff)

Core modules:

Postgraduate Skills in Archaeology and Conservation
Skills and Methods for Postgraduate Study
Archaeological Science Dissertation

Teaching

Teaching is delivered via lectures, laboratory sessions, interactive workshops and tutorials, in addition to visits to relevant local resources such as the National Museum Wales and local heritage organisations.

Lectures take a range of forms but generally provide a broad structure for each subject, an introduction to key concepts and relevant up-to-date information. The Archaeological Science Master's provides students with bespoke training in scientific techniques during laboratory sessions. This includes developing practical skills in the identification, recording and analysis of archaeological materials during hands on laboratory sessions. These range from macroscopic e.g. bone identification, to microscopic e.g. material identification or status with light based or scanning electron microscopy, to sample selection, preparation and analysis e.g. isotopic or aDNA and include health and safety and laboratory management skills. Students will be able to develop specialist practical skills in at least one area of study. In workshops and seminars, you will have the opportunity to discuss themes or topics, to receive and consolidate feedback on your individual learning and to develop skills in oral presentation.

This programme is based within the School of History, Archaeology and Religion and taught by academic staff from across Cardiff University and by external speakers. All taught modules within the Programme are compulsory and you are expected to attend all lectures, laboratory sessions and other timetabled sessions. Students will receive supervision to help them complete the dissertation, but are also expected to engage in considerable independent study.

Assessment

The 120 credits of taught Modules within Stage 1 of the Programme are assessed through in-course assessments, including:

Extended essays
Oral presentations
Poster presentations
Statistical assignments
Critical appraisals
Practical skills tests
Data reports
Research designs

You must successfully complete the taught component of the programme before progressing to Stage 2 where assessment is:

Dissertation (16-20,000 words)

Career prospects

After successfully completing this MSc, you should have a broad spectrum of knowledge and a variety of skills, making you highly attractive both to potential employers and research establishments. You will be able to pursue a wide range of professional careers, within commercial and academic archaeology and the wider heritage sector. Career paths will generally be specialist and will depend on the choice of modules. Graduates will be well placed to pursue careers as a specialist in isotope analysis, zooarchaeological analysis or human osteoarchaeology. They will also be in a position to apply for general laboratory based work and archaeological fieldwork. Working within science communication and management are other options. Potential employers include archaeological units, museums, universities, heritage institutions, Historic England and Cadw. Freelance or self-employment career routes are also common for animal and human bone analysts with postgraduate qualifications.

The archaeology department has strong links and collaborations across the heritage sector and beyond. British organisations that staff currently work with include Cadw, Historic England, English Heritage, Historic Scotland, National Museum Wales, the British Museum, the Welsh archaeological trusts and a range of other archaeology units (e.g. Wessex Archaeology, Oxford Archaeology, Cambridge Archaeology Unit, Archaeology Wales). In addition, staff are involved with archaeological research across the world. You will be encouraged to become involved in these collaborations via research projects and placements to maximise networking opportunities and increasing your employability.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Theoretical Computer Science at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Theoretical Computer Science at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

Computer Science is at the cutting edge of modern technology, is developing rapidly, and Swansea Computer Science graduates enjoy excellent employment prospects.

Computer Science now plays a part in almost every aspect of our lives - science, engineering, the media, entertainment, travel, commerce and industry, public services and the home.

The MSc by Research Theoretical Computer Science enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The

Theoretical Computer Science programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

As a student of the Theoretical Computer Science MSc by Research programme, you will be fully integrated into one of our established computer science research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features of Theoretical Computer Science

The Department of Computer Science is amongst the top 25 in the UK, with a growing reputation in research both nationally and internationally in computer science. It is home to world class researchers, excellent teaching programmes and fine laboratory facilities.

All postgraduate Computer Science programmes will provide you the transferable skills and knowledge to help you take advantage of the excellent employment and career development prospects in an ever growing and changing computing and ICT industry.

Facilities

The Department of Computer Science is well equipped for teaching, and is continually upgrading its laboratories to ensure equipment is up-to-date – equipment is never more than three years old, and rarely more than two. Currently, our Computer Science students use three fully networked laboratories: one, running Windows; another running Linux; and a project laboratory, containing specialised equipment. These laboratories support a wide range of software, including the programming languages Java, C# and the .net framework, C, C++, Haskell and Prolog among many; integrated programme development environments such as Visual Studio and Netbeans; the widely-used Microsoft Office package; web access tools; and many special purpose software tools including graphical rendering and image manipulation tools; expert system production tools; concurrent system modelling tools; World Wide Web authoring tools; and databases.

As part of the expansion of the Department of Computer Science, we are building the Computational Foundry on our Bay Campus for computer science and mathematical science.

Research

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that we lead Wales in the field of Computer Science and are in the UK Top 20.

We are ranked 11th in the UK for percentage of world-leading research, and 1st in Wales for research excellence. 40% of our submitted research assessed as world-leading quality (4*).

Links with Industry

Each spring, Computer Science students prepare and present a poster about their project at a project fair – usually together with a system or software demonstration. The Department of Computer Science also strongly encourages students to create CVs and business cards to take along to the fair, as businesses and employers visit to view the range of projects and make contact with the graduating students.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Data Science at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Data Science at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

MSc in Data Science aims to equip students with a solid grounding in data science concepts and technologies for extracting information and constructing knowledge from data. Students of the MSc Data Science will study the computational principles, methods, and systems for a variety of real world applications that require mathematical foundations, programming skills, critical thinking, and ingenuity. Development of research skills will be an essential element of the Data Science programme so that students can bring a critical perspective to current data science discipline and apply this to future developments in a rapidly changing technological environment.

Key Features of the MSc Data Science

The MSc Data Science programme focuses on three core technical themes: data mining, machine learning, and visualisation. Data mining is fundamental to data science and the students will learn how to mine both structured data and unstructured data. Students will gain practical data mining experience and will gain a systematic understanding of the fundamental concepts of analysing complex and heterogeneous data. They will be able to manipulate large heterogeneous datasets, from storage to processing, be able to extract information from large datasets, gain experience of data mining algorithms and techniques, and be able to apply them in real world applications. Machine learning has proven to be an effective and exciting technology for data and it is of high value when it comes to employment. Students of the Data Science programme will learn the fundamentals of both conventional and state-of-the-art machine learning techniques, be able to apply the methods and techniques to synthesise solutions using machine learning, and will have the necessary practical skills to apply their understanding to big data problems. We will train students to explore a variety visualisation concepts and techniques for data analysis. Students will be able to apply important concepts in data visualisation, information visualisation, and visual analytics to support data process and knowledge discovery. The students of the Data Science programme also learn important mathematical concepts and methods required by a data scientist. A specifically designed module that is accessible to students with different background will cover the basics of algebra, optimisation techniques, statistics, and so on. More advanced mathematical concepts are integrated in individual modules where necessary.

The MSc Data Science programme delivers the practical components using a number of programming languages and software packages, such as Hadoop, Python, Matlab, C++, OpenGL, OpenCV, and Spark. Students will also be exposed to a range of closely related subject areas, including pattern recognition, high performance computing, GPU processing, computer vision, human computer interaction, and software validation and verification. The delivery of both core and optional modules leverage on the research strength and capacity in the department. The modules are delivered by lecturers who are actively engaged in world leading researches in this field. Students of the Data Science programme will benefit from state-of-the-art materials and contents, and will work on individual degree projects that can be research-led or application driven.

Modules

Modules for the MSc Data Science programme include:

- Visual Analytics

- Data Science Research Methods and Seminars

- Big Data and Data Mining

- Big Data and Machine Learning

- Mathematical Skills for Data Scientists

- Data Visualization

- Human Computer Interaction

- High Performance Computing in C/C++

- Graphics Processor Programming

- Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition

- Modelling and Verification Techniques

- Operating Systems and Architectures

Facilities

The Department of Computer Science is well equipped for teaching, and is continually upgrading its laboratories to ensure equipment is up-to-date – equipment is never more than three years old, and rarely more than two. Currently, our Computer Science students use three fully networked laboratories: one, running Windows; another running Linux; and a project laboratory, containing specialised equipment. These laboratories support a wide range of software, including the programming languages Java, C# and the .net framework, C, C++, Haskell and Prolog among many; integrated programme development environments such as Visual Studio and Netbeans; the widely-used Microsoft Office package; web access tools; and many special purpose software tools including graphical rendering and image manipulation tools; expert system production tools; concurrent system modelling tools; World Wide Web authoring tools; and databases.

As part of the expansion of the Department of Computer Science, we are building the Computational Foundry on our Bay Campus for computer science and mathematical science.

Career Destinations

- Data Analyst

- Data mining Developer

- Machine Learning Developer

- Visual Analytics Developer

- Visualisation Developer

- Visual Computing Software Developer

- Database Developer

- Data Science Researcher

- Computer Vision Developer

- Medical Computing Developer

- Informatics Developer

- Software Engineer



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This innovative distance learning MSc in Blood Science focuses on the diagnostic techniques, QA/QC and regulatory issues within this emerging field combining haematology, immunology, transfusion and clinical biochemistry developed from increasing automation within pathology. Read more
This innovative distance learning MSc in Blood Science focuses on the diagnostic techniques, QA/QC and regulatory issues within this emerging field combining haematology, immunology, transfusion and clinical biochemistry developed from increasing automation within pathology.

The course now benefits from accreditation by the Institute of Biomedical Science enabling students to take full advantage of the opportunities for knowledge and career development that this affords.

More about this course

This MSc distance-learning course is designed to promote a deep understanding of the emerging mixed disciplinary area of blood science. You will examine different theoretical perspectives, methodological approaches, research interests and practical applications within the subject area, as an independent learner.

Designed with input from current practitioners in the field, the course is suitable for biomedical science practitioners and graduates of biomedical or related life sciences. The programme covers areas relevant to staff working within or wishing to work in blood science departments within pathology.

Delivered as a flexible distance-learning programme through our e-Portal WebLearn, you will be able to continue to work whilst studying. The self-guided eLearning materials have been specially designed to support your engagement with the course content.

Each module has a module leader who is responsible for developing the curriculum and coordinating the production of the eLearning materials. Some sessions are ‘broadcast live’ with modules running face-to-face so you can engage with tutors, lecturers and other students. You can also contact your module leader and discuss ideas with other students via email, discussion boards, and during live peer-to-peer support sessions.

Your final research project is to be conducted in your place of work with joint supervision provided by your laboratory training officer and a member of staff from the School of Human Sciences. For those not working in a suitable laboratory, research may be conducted at London Metropolitan University with additional bench fees for materials.

The course is designed to support professionals in their career development in the healthcare profession, biomedical/biotechnology industry or in academia and has the potential to lead on to doctoral studies.

This course has many benefits:
-You can study at your own pace, with the support of our Biomedical Science team - no attendance required.
-Single modules can be undertaken to gain continuing professional development (CPD) points.
-You can start your course either in the September or January of the academic year.

Exercises and short phase tests will be used to provide you with feedback on your progress. Summative assessment of students’ knowledge base and their understanding will be incorporated into formal in-course tests/exercises, personal learning logs and end of module assessments completed at the end of each unit.

MSc research project assessment will culminate in the presentation of a dissertation and a poster presentation (via face-to-face messaging system or similar technology).

Professional accreditation

This course is accreditated by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS), enabling students to take full advantage of the opportunities for knowledge and career development that this affords.

Students are eligible for eStudent Membership of the IBMS. Single modules taken for CPD obtain 100 points per 10 credits with the IBMS. It is also recommended by the Canadian Society for Medical Laboratory Science (CSMLS).

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Advanced Immunology (core, 20 credits)
-Bioethics, Research and Grant Proposal (core, 20 credits)
-Clinical Biochemistry (core, 20 credits)
-Haematology (core, 20 credits)
-Research Project (Biomedical Science) (core, 60 credits)
-Transfusion Science (core, 20 credits)
-Haemoglobinopathies (option, 10 credits)
-Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology in Health and Disease (option, 20 credits)
-Introduction to Cell Biology (option, 10 credits)
-Introduction to Cellular Pathology (option, 10 credits)
-Introduction to Clinical Genetics (option, 20 credits)
-Introduction to General Microbiology (option, 10 credits)
-Introduction to Medical Microbiology (option, 20 credits)
-Introduction to Molecular Biology and Genetics (option, 10 credits)
-Introduction to Toxicology (option, 10 credits)

After the course

This course provides an extension of knowledge allowing practising biomedical scientists to be considered for promotion at work. Healthcare scientists are training in this discipline area too.

Career opportunities include employment in NHS hospital laboratories and other health-related areas. Graduates will also be well placed to apply for research studentships.
This course allows students to be considered for promotion at work.

Graduates with two years relevant professional experience can apply for the Member grade of membership

PhD research, pharmacology, biotechnology and similar employment opportunities are available.

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