• Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of York Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Glasgow Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Regent’s University London Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
King’s College London Featured Masters Courses
University of Greenwich Featured Masters Courses
University of Birmingham Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
"laboratory" AND "animals…×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Laboratory Animals)

  • "laboratory" AND "animals" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 47
Order by 
The Institute for Neuroscience has clinicians and scientists working together to understand the brain and behaviour. Read more
The Institute for Neuroscience has clinicians and scientists working together to understand the brain and behaviour. From the basic biology of neurons through to complex processes of perception and decision-making behaviour, we address how the mind, brain, and body work together and translate this knowledge into clinical applications for patient benefit.

We offer MPhil supervision in the following research areas:

Motor systems development, plasticity and function

We conduct clinical and preclinical studies of normal and abnormal development and plasticity of the motor system. We run functional studies and computer modelling of motor system activity throughout the neuraxis. We also research the development and assessment of novel therapies for motor disorders/lesions including stem cell and brain-machine interface.

Visual system development, plasticity and repair]]
We research the development and assessment of novel neuro-technological approaches to retinal dystrophy repair including brain-machine interface and stem cells. We use in vitro approaches to look at retinal development and visual system wiring.

[[Neural computation and network systems
We conduct experimental and theoretical (computational) studies aimed at understanding how neurones throughout the brain interact in localised networks to compute complex tasks. Our research looks at the role of network activity in a wide range of neurological, neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders.

Auditory neuroscience

We conduct clinical and preclinical studies aimed at understanding the brain mechanisms involved in detection, discrimination and perception of sound. We are interested in how these mechanisms are affected in individuals with brain disorders, including dementia, autism and stroke.

Pain

Our research focuses on:
-Understanding mechanisms underlying pain, analgesia, and anaesthesia
-The development of methods to assess pain and to alleviate pain in animals and humans

Psychobiology

We conduct studies in laboratory animals, healthy volunteers and patient populations investigating the mechanisms underlying mood, anxiety and addiction disorders and their treatment. Allied research looks at normal neuropsychology, and the physiology and pharmacology of neurotransmitter and endocrine systems implicated in psychiatric disorders.

Neurotoxicology

Our research focuses on delineating the effects and understanding the mechanisms of action of established and putative neurotoxins, including environmental and endogenous chemicals, and naturally occurring toxins.

Forensic psychiatry and clinical psychology

Our research covers:
-The assessment, treatment and management of sex offender risk
-Development and assessment of cognitive models
-Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) treatment for bipolar disorder, psychosis, anxiety and developmental disorders
-Developmental disorders of perception and cognition

Systems and computational neuroscience

We conduct theoretical (computational) and experimental studies aimed at understanding the neuroanatomy, neuropharmacology of vision, visual attention and episodic memory.

Behaviour and evolution

Many research groups take an evolutionary and comparative approach to the study of brain and/or behaviour, comparing brain function and behaviour among such disparate groups as insects, birds and mammals, and studying the ecological and evolutionary functions of behaviour. Much of our work is at the forefront of the fields of neuroethology, behavioural ecology and comparative cognition, and has important implications for the study and practice of animal welfare.

Visual perception and human cognition

We research:
-Colour and depth perception - perception of natural scenes
-Psychophysics and attention - memory
-Word learning in children
-Body image dysfunction
-Visual social cognition and face processing
-Advertising and consumer behaviour

Pharmacy

Our new School of Pharmacy has scientists and clinicians working together on all aspects of pharmaceutical sciences and clinical pharmacy.

Read less
Animal welfare science and ethics is an expanding topic of international concern, which is why the University of Glasgow offer an Animal Welfare MSc programme. Read more
Animal welfare science and ethics is an expanding topic of international concern, which is why the University of Glasgow offer an Animal Welfare MSc programme. It aims to improve our knowledge and understanding of animals’ needs, which is required to provide a high standard of care to the whole range of animals kept in captivity.

Why this programme

◾Top 100 University
◾This Animal Welfare Degree programme is offered by the Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine (IBAHCM); a grouping of top researchers who focus on combining ecology and evolution with more applied problems in animal health
◾When studying Animal Welfare you will be taught by research-active staff using the latest approaches in understanding and responding to animal welfare-related issues, legislation related to use of animals, and both theoretical and applied ethics.
◾In addition, you will have opportunities to develop skills in quantitative methods, sequence analysis, conservation biology, epidemiology and practical approaches to assessing biodiversity.
◾A unique strength of the Animal Welfare MSc at the University of Glasgow for many years has been the strong ties between veterinarians and ecologists, which has now been formalised in the formation of the IBAHCM. This direct linking is rare but offers unique opportunities to provide training that spans both fundamental and applied research.
◾The IBAHCM also offers an MSc in Quantitative Methods in Biodiversity, Conservation and Epidemiology. This degree is more focused on ecology and evolutionary biology and provides the opportunity for you to gain key quantitative skills that are not often a focus of welfare-based programmes.
◾You will have the opportunity to base your independent research projects at the University field station on Loch Lomond (for freshwater or terrestrial-based projects); Millport field station on the Isle of Cumbria (for marine projects); or Cochno farm in Glasgow (for research based on farm animals). We will also assist you to gain research project placements in zoos or research laboratories, whenever possible.
◾You will gain core skills and knowledge across a wide range of subjects that will enhance your selection chances for competitive PhD programmes. In addition to academic options, career opportunities include roles in zoos, government agencies, officers of animal welfare, protection, or wildlife crime, veterinary nursing and aquaculture
◾We have many links with animal welfare-related organisations through them coming to us to teach their expertise to our Animal Welfare degree and the class going to visit their organisation to obtain a first-hand view of what working is like at these organisations. Many of them also provide the students with opportunities to carry out their independent research project within their company. Students will also be able to capitalise on the strong ties between the veterinarians and ecologists at the IBAHCM. This allows us to directly link fundamental and applied research and offers unique opportunities to provide training that spans both theory and praxis.
◾We have currently the following partners involved in this programme: ◾Scottish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (Scottish SPCA)
◾Highland Wildlife Park, Kingussie
◾BlairDrummondSafari Park
◾ChesterZoo
◾The Aspinall Foundation (Howletts & Port Lympne)
◾National Museum Scotland

Programme structure

The programme provides a strong grounding in scientific writing and communication, statistical analysis, and experimental design. It is designed for flexibility, to enable you to customise a portfolio of courses suited to your particular interests.

You can choose from a range of specialised options that encompass key skills in:
◾Ethics, legislative policy and welfare science – critical for promoting humane treatment of both captive and wild animals.
◾Monitoring and assessing biodiversity – critical for understanding the impacts of environmental change
◾Quantitative analyses of ecological and epidemiological data – critical for animal health and conservation.

Core courses
◾Key research skills: Scientific communication; Introduction to R; Advanced linear models; Experimental design and power analysis
◾Animal ethics
◾Animal welfare science
◾Legislation related to animal welfare
◾Independent research project.

Optional courses
◾Enrichment of animals in captive environments
◾Care of captive animals
◾Biology of suffering
◾Assessment of physiological state
◾Freshwater sampling techniques
◾Marine sampling techniques
◾Invertebrate identification
◾Vertebrate identification
◾Molecular analyses for DNA barcoding and biodiversity measurement
◾Phyloinformatics
◾Conservation genetics and phylodynamics
◾Infectious disease ecology and the dynamics of emerging disease
◾Single-species population models
◾Multi-species models
◾Spatial processes
◾Introduction to Bayesian statistics.

Animal Welfare is a very broad and applied field and the programme aims to provide coverage of all the different aspects of the topic which are often treated separately. Science is an essential skill in order to have a good understanding of welfare but we appreciate that applicants may come from diverse backgrounds and therefore the course includes a rigorous training in science communication, experimental design, data analysis and interpretation. The programme also includes teaching by practitioners and visits to organisations with first-hand experience of applied welfare problems. The programme also attempts to cover the entire spectrum of animal welfare, including zoos, farms, laboratory animals and wildlife.

Career prospects

Students are exposed to potential work places and can make valuable contacts with professionals in the welfare community. Where possible this is a two-way exchange in which communities are offered help with any issues they have and for which assistance may be provided in finding a solution (e.g. through independent research projects, supervised by university staff). This is also an option open to other courses and could benefit the students in the long-term as well as give the university valuable connections with the wider community.

Read less
1-year fully funded studentships still available (for EU students only). Read more
1-year fully funded studentships still available (for EU students only)

MRes in Experimental Physiology and Drug Discovery (Bio-Imaging) is a unique 12 month full-time multi-disciplinary course which aims to give all participants an introduction to the different aspects of biomedical imaging (including hardware and probe development, in vivo and in vitro experimental application, software development and data analysis). In addition, participants will be given training in comparative anatomy, physiology and pharmacology of laboratory animals, they will also obtain a Home Office Personal licence and hands-on experience of a range of in-vivo techniques used in research.


Students will follow already taught courses in Biomedical Imaging, and Experimental Physiology and Drug Discovery. Students will also be taught transferrable skills subjects, such as safety awareness, intellectual property management, time and project management and presentation and communication skills. In addition, students will undertake an individual research project throughout the course and submit a research thesis.


Aims and Objectives

Provide science graduates with:

- an introduction to the different aspects of biomedical imaging
- the ability to perform biomedical imaging, such as probe development or the experimental applicatoin of imaging in vivo
- intensive hands-on in vivo functional biology research training
- the ability to perform the physiological and pharmacological studies in drug development


Content and Structure

Part A: Bio-imaging, animal handling, Home Office training course, comparative anatomy and physiology and drug discovery.

Part B: Six practical modules focused on in vivo research skills (problem solving, e-learning, journal club and lectures).

Part C: 21 week in vivo research project

Career opportunities

The course will provide students with an insight into the principles of drug discovery and translational medical science. Importantly, those students wanting to undertake a PhD in in-vivo science will have gained a Home Office personal licence and be confident in animal handling and techniques. The students will thus be well equipped to make rapid progress in research. Furthermore, having learnt about biomedical imaging from development to application, they will also be better equipped to develop a fully integrative approach to their research problem. The multidisciplinary nature of the course will give students the ability to appreciate the importance of translating the results of scientific and cliical discoveries into potential benefits to healthcare.

Read less
Study animals from the past with the techniques of the future. The MSc in Zooarchaeology at York is the UK's only dedicated programme in the archaeological study of animals. Read more
Study animals from the past with the techniques of the future

Why choose this course?

The MSc in Zooarchaeology at York is the UK's only dedicated programme in the archaeological study of animals. Any consideration of the human past is incomplete without examining the essential roles that animals have played in our economies and societies, and on this course you will study archaeological animal remains on a macro and micro scale to investigate what they tell us about how humans and other species have co-existed over the millennia.

Housed within BioArCh, York's world-leading centre for research into ancient biomolecules, the MSc in Zooarchaeology also draws heavily on the expertise of functional and comparative anatomists from the Centre for Anatomical and Human Sciences, part of the Hull York Medical School. We use the full range of available techniques, including advanced biomolecular methods and sophisticated morphometrics, to investigate and interpret animal bone data in a variety of cultural contexts.

The scope of the course is global, equipping you with the knowledge and techniques to study the roles of animals in human societies from the Palaeolithic to the present, around the world. You will learn from leading academics in both traditional and biomolecular zooarchaeology, and from dedicated specialists in evolutionary anatomy, enabling you both to master the latest analytical techniques and to examine skeletal anatomy at a level of detail not possible elsewhere.
-Study past relations between people and other animals, through the archaeological record
-Examine zooarchaeology across the entire span of human prehistory and history, right around the world
-Develop advanced skills in bone taphonomy and understand its importance to osteoarchaeological studies
-Explore biomolecular techniques, including DNA analysis, proteomics and stable isotope analysis
-Investigate skeletal anatomy in intricate detail
-Work alongside leading academics in zooarchaeological research
-Receive career and research guidance from Department of Archaeology staff with significant experience of successfully placing PhD students

What does the course cover?
This course covers the practical skills, analytical techniques, and interpretative frameworks necessary to study the roles of animals in past societies from the bones and other remains that we find on archaeological sites. Core modules and laboratory classes will provide you with a solid grounding in the essential tools of the zooarchaeologist's trade, while the option modules and dissertation allow you to explore and potentially specialise in a unique range of biomolecular and anatomical approaches.

Who is it for?
This course is aimed primarily at graduates in archaeology who want to specialise in the analysis and interpretation of animal remains, either as a basis for future research or as a practical specialism to further a career in archaeology. We are also happy to accept graduates of disciplines such as biology, zoology, ecology, and palaeontology who wish to focus on the study of animals in a human context.

What can it lead to?
The advanced skills and specialist knowledge gained on this course can provide the springboard for many varied careers or further study at PhD level. Previous graduates of the course have gone on to careers in museum services, universities, conservation organisations and commercial archaeology units around the world.

Careers

By the end of the MSc Zooarchaeology course you will have:
-Gained a thorough grounding in all aspects of vertebrate zooarchaeology, including general aspects that are applicable to invertebrate zooarchaeology
-Experienced the processes of data collection, analysis and interpretation, both in principle and in practice
-Developed a range of analytical abilities by studying and undertaking quantitative analysis of zooarchaeological data
-Gained essential critical skills through reviewing and assessing published work from throughout the world, including hunter-gatherer and agrarian sites, and socially complex societies
-Studied the vertebrate skeleton, its evolutionary origins and its adaptations
-Identified and recorded archaeological bone assemblages
-Reviewed the field of taphonomy and the practical recognition of the taphonomic ‘imprint’
-Developed independent research skills by completing a dissertation project

Many our MSc Zooarchaeology postgraduates go on to conduct further research at PhD level. Others progress into careers with archaeological units, museum services, conservation bodies and a range of other organisations.

Here’s a selection of possible destinations and careers for students of this course:
-Academia
-Professional archaeologists – field and laboratory based
-Museum outreach programmes and the heritage sector
-University/research technicians
-Commercial laboratory technicians
-US graduate school programmes

Read less
The department of pathobiology is dedicated to the advancement of knowledge in veterinary and comparative pathology, infectious diseases and immunology. Read more
The department of pathobiology is dedicated to the advancement of knowledge in veterinary and comparative pathology, infectious diseases and immunology. research in the department addresses such diverse areas as the pathogens of animals and how they interact with their hosts, emerging and zoonotic pathogens, antimicrobial resistance, the immunologic and genetic bases of resistance to infectious disease, development and progression of cancer, and mechanisms of immune-mediated and inflammatory diseases. We work on diseases of domestic mammals, poultry, laboratory animals, fish, wildlife, zoo and companion animals, from the molecular level to that of the population.

Programs

Research-based Msc or phd degrees are offered to veterinarians and non-veterinarians in all fields of study in the department. Veterinary specialty training is offered through dvsc and graduate diploma programs in anatomic pathology, clinical pathology, comparative pathology, laboratory animal science, fish disease, and zoo medicine/pathology for applicants with a dvM degree. Our graduate students typically continue their career in a diversity of positions, including academics, the public sector in Canada (provincial and federal government) and abroad, private industry and laboratories, as well as in speciality practice.

Faculty and laboratories

At the present time, there are 25 faculty, 42 staff members, and 60 graduate students who work in a new building with well-equipped shared laboratories and state-of-the-art equipment for quantitative rt-pCr, flow cytometry, fluorescent and optical microscopy, analysis of microarrays, 2d protein gel electrophoresis, multiplex elisa, laser capture microdissection, and tissue microarray. As well, our investigators have close interactions with other departments and other universities, and with the animal health laboratory, Center for public health and Zoonoses, and the public health agency of Canada.

Read less
The Master of Biological Science with a specialisation in Zoology will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the structure, function, diversity and evolution of animals, as well as the interaction of animals with each other and the environment. Read more
The Master of Biological Science with a specialisation in Zoology will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the structure, function, diversity and evolution of animals, as well as the interaction of animals with each other and the environment.

You will have the opportunity to study animals and their habitats, including Western Australia's exciting fauna. These habitats are diverse, and range from deserts through to temporary wetlands and rainforests and ultimately the sea. Zoologists discover the solutions to the problems presented by these habitats.

This specialisation integrates theory with practical (both field and laboratory) studies utilising many of the animals and ecosystems from the diverse state of Western Australia as examples.

The Faculty is well equipped for teaching through the School of Animal Biology and is supported by the world class research of the Centre for Evolutionary Biology, the Oceans Institute, and the Centre of Excellence in Natural Resource Management.

Zoologists are concerned with theoretical topics as diverse as molecular evolution, anatomy, physiology, reproduction, behaviour and community ecology, and with applied aspects that range from fauna conservation and pest management to stream ecology and water quality studies.

Why study Zoology at UWA?

1. Discover the vast diversity of animals in south-west Western Australia and beyond
2. Understand how these animals interact with each other and their surrounding environment.
3. Gain first-hand experience with these animals in both the laboratory and the field
4. Appreciate how climate change will affect this fauna along with the impact of other threats such as habitat destruction and fragmentation.
5. Learn how scientific knowledge can be used to develop and implement management strategies to combat these threats.

Read less
Our MSc Veterinary Microbiology programme, run in partnership with local world-leading veterinary research institutes (Pirbright, APHA and VMD), offers an in-depth understanding of veterinary infectious diseases and global issues such as AMR, and their associated impact on man. Read more
Our MSc Veterinary Microbiology programme, run in partnership with local world-leading veterinary research institutes (Pirbright, APHA and VMD), offers an in-depth understanding of veterinary infectious diseases and global issues such as AMR, and their associated impact on man.

It offers specialist practical training in the diagnosis of important viral and bacterial diseases of global animal and human health importance.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

This programme is intended for those who wish to enhance their understanding of the role of microorganisms in animal health and disease, and provides an excellent grounding in molecular biology, immunology, epidemiology and microbiology.

This grounding leads into the study of the complex mechanisms of host/microbe interactions that are involved in the pathogenesis of specific animal diseases, and provides insights into diagnosis and interventions, such as vaccines, essential for disease control.

You will enhance your critical and analytical skills and gain hands-on experience in the diagnosis of veterinary diseases, such that you may identify problems, formulate hypotheses, design experiments, acquire and interpret data, and draw conclusions.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Microbiology and Veterinary Immunology
-Microbial Genetics
-Molecular Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases
-Transmission and Control of Infectious Diseases of Animals (Non-vector)
-Transmission and Control of Infectious Diseases of Animals (Vector)
-Infectious Diseases of Animals - Practical sessions (APHA, Pirbright ^ PHE/VMD)
-Diseases of Animal Systems: Gastro-intestinal Diseases of Animals
-Diseases of Animal Systems: Respiratory Diseases of Animals
-Diseases of Animal Systems: Multi-system Diseases of Animals
-Diseases of Animal Systems: CNS/Skin Diseases of Animals
-Research Project

WHO IS THE PROGRAMME FOR?

This is a full or part-time programme, intended mainly for graduates, those already working in veterinary diagnostic/research laboratories and staff from other laboratories who want to enhance their understanding of the role of microorganisms in animal health and disease.

Pharmaceutical research personnel, policymakers, veterinarians, public health personnel and environmental biologists will also benefit.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

This is a one year full-time programme aimed at preparing graduates to work in a range of fields in which a detailed understanding of veterinary microbiology is a valuable asset.

These fields include research, commerce, government and policy, reference laboratory and diagnostic work, epidemiology and disease mapping, veterinary science, farming especially animal production, wild and zoo animal conservation and education.

As such, it is intended that graduates will achieve the highest levels of professional understanding of veterinary microbiology within a range of contexts.

The programme combines the study of the theoretical foundations of, and scholarly approaches to, understanding the application and various practices of veterinary microbiology within the contexts described above along with the development of practical and research skills.

The main aims are to enable students to:
-Acquire sound knowledge of the major principles of veterinary microbiology
-Develop the skills to perform relevant interpretation and evaluation of data
-Apply those acquired skills in practice through research
-To utilise acquired knowledge and evaluative skills to communicate successfully with stakeholders

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas.

The learning outcomes have been aligned with the descriptor for qualification at level 7 given in the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) produced by the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) for Higher Education.

Knowledge and understanding
-The main principles of current veterinary microbiology
-The methods and approaches used for the molecular characterisation, and diagnosis of disease agents
-The main principles of infectious diseases epidemiology
-The analysis of disease and disease carriage that impact on the development and application of control measures to combat diseases
-Modes of control of infectious diseases
-Modes of transmission
-The various aspects of host pathology and immune responses to disease agents
-Analytical skills to allow interpretation of data and formulation of conclusions

Intellectual/cognitive skills
-Critically appraise scholarly and professional writing on a wide range of subjects pertaining to the various aspects of veterinary microbiology
-Critically analyse experimental data to enable the formulation of hypotheses
-Design relevant experiments to test formulated hypotheses
-Efficiently analyse new developments in technology and critically assess their utilisation to answer existing and new problems

Professional practical skills
-Plan and execute an experiment/investigation, act autonomously and demonstrate originality
-Analyse numerical data using appropriate computer tools including specialist computer packages
-Communicate experiments at a project level, including report writing
-Perform specific specialised experimental skills

Key/transferable skills
-Problem solve
-Evaluate and exploit new technology
-Communicate ideas, principles and theories effectively by oral, written and visual means
-Work effectively in small groups and teams towards a common goal/outcome
-Apply basic statistical and numerical skills to data
-Use information technology including specialist packages

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Over the past 30 years, interventions, for reasons of health, welfare and the conservation of free-living wild animals, have been undertaken with increasing frequency. Read more
Over the past 30 years, interventions, for reasons of health, welfare and the conservation of free-living wild animals, have been undertaken with increasing frequency. Specialist veterinary expertise is required in order to diagnose and control diseases in wildlife.

Emerging infectious diseases are also recognised as a serious hazard, both for wild animal species and for the domestic animal and human populations that interact with them. In addition, a large number of wild animal species are kept in captivity – in zoos and in laboratories – which has led to an increased demand for specialist skills and knowledge.

Under the microscope

The MSc in Wild Animal Health is a world-class specialist postgraduate veterinary science programme taught jointly by the RVC, University of London and the Zoological Society of London.

Aimed at qualified veterinarians, the MSc in Wild Animal Health will equip you with an in-depth knowledge of the management of wild animals and the epidemiology, treatment and control of wild animal disease.

The course

The MSc in Wild Animal Health consists of thee levels:

Certificate in Wild Animal Health - you are introduced to the course objectives, the mission of the partner organizations running the Course and the services you can receive at the Zoological Society of London and the Royal Veterinary College. You will also study four core modules:

- Conservation biology
- The impact of disease on populations
- Health and welfare of captive wild animals
- Interventions


Diploma in Wild Animal Health - building on the knowledge and skills learned in the Certificate in Wild Animal Health, you will study four further modules:

- Detection, surveillance and emerging diseases
- Ecosystem health
- Evaluation of the health and welfare of captive wild animals
- Practical module


MSc in Wild Animal Health - a graduate of the Master of Science in Wild Animal Health must demonstrate (in addition to the achievements of the PG Certificate and Diploma):

- A comprehensive understanding of research and inquiry including (i) critical appraisal of the literature, (ii) scientific writing and (iii) scientific presentation
- The ability to design and analyse hypothesis-driven laboratory and/or field studies

Research planning - in this module we will develop the extensive skills required to design and conduct practical research projects, critically appraise and review the literature, deliver effective scientific presentations, and write scientific papers suitable for submission to peer-reviewed journals.

Project - you will be required to undertake an individual research project, between mid-June and the end of August, and to submit a typewritten report not exceeding 10,000 words in the form of a literature review and a scientific paper suitable for submission to a peer-reviewed journal. The project will encompass a practical study on an approved aspect of wild animal health. The project may be undertaken at any place approved by the Institute/College with the guidance of a course supervisor.

Assessment - you will be assessed by four written papers, course work (assignments and casebook), an individual research project report and an oral examination for all candidates, irrespective of their performance in other parts of the course.

Project reports are submitted at the end of August and oral examinations are held in mid-September.

How will I learn?

The MSc in Wild Animal Health is completed over one year of full-time study.

The course starts in mid-September each year, and can be broken down broadly into three sections, comprising two groups of taught modules and a research project. The first section is completed by mid-January, the second by mid-May, and the MSc research project is undertaken during the summer months, finishing in mid-September. More detailed information can be found in the course outline (see link in the top left of the page).

We deliver the programme through two terms of lectures, seminars, tutorials and problem-based learning, with modular examinations. There are no part-time or distance-learning options available.

Learning outcomes

During the programme you will acquire:

- A critical awareness of current problems in wildlife disease with implications for wildlife conservation and welfare
- A new insight into veterinary interventions for the management of captive and free-living wild animal species
- A systematic understanding of the biological principles underpinning wild animal conservation and management, and the epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of wildlife disease
- Basic competence in veterinary techniques and preventative medicine for wild animals
- A conceptual and practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create knowledge in the field of wild animal health
- A comprehensive understanding of scientific skills, including critical review of the scientific literature, and design and analysis of laboratory or field studies.

Upon completion of the MSc in Wild Animal Health, you will have gained the analytical skills, the understanding, the confidence and the language to influence thinking and policy making within a wide range of organisations, such as zoos, national parks, universities, conservation organisations and government departments worldwide.

Read less
Wild animal health has become increasingly popular among non-veterinarians with a first degree in zoology and biology. Read more
Wild animal health has become increasingly popular among non-veterinarians with a first degree in zoology and biology. Recognising this, the RVC, University of London, together with the Zoological Society of London, has developed a unique course aimed at non-veterinary biological science graduates and leading to the MSc in Wild Animal Biology.

Under the microscope

This course has been designed to provide you with practical exposure to wild animal species and an understanding of wild animal health, welfare and conservation, as well as providing training in research methods relevant to the study of wildlife.

You will benefit from working and studying alongside veterinary graduates taking the MSc in Wild Animal Health as well as learning from internationally renowned experts in their field.

The course

The MSc in Wild Animal Biology consists of three levels:

Certificate in Wild Animal Biology - you are introduced to the course objectives, the mission of the partner organizations running the Course and the services you can receive at the Zoological Society of London and the Royal Veterinary College. You will also undertake four core modules:
- Conservation biology module
- The Impact of disease on populations
- Health and welfare of captive wild animals
- Interventions


Diploma in Wild Animal Biology - building on the knowledge and skills learned in the Certificate in Wild Animal Biology, you will undertake four further modules of study:
- Detection, surveillance and emerging diseases
- Ecosystem health
- Evaluation of the health and welfare of captive wild animals
- Practical module


Master of Science in Wild Animal Biology - a graduate of the Master of Science in Wild Animal Biology must demonstrate (in addition to the achievements of the PG Certificate and Diploma):
- A comprehensive understanding of research and inquiry including (i) critical appraisal of the literature, (ii) scientific writing and (iii) scientific presentation
- The ability to design and analyse hypothesis-driven laboratory and/or field studies

Research planning - develop the extensive skills required to design and conduct practical research projects, critically appraise and review the literature, deliver effective scientific presentations, and write scientific papers suitable for submission to peer-reviewed journals.

Project - each MSc student will be required to undertake an individual research project, between mid-June and the end of August, and to submit a typewritten report not exceeding 10,000 words in the form of a literature review and a scientific paper suitable for submission to a peer-reviewed journal. The project will encompass a practical study on an approved aspect of wild animal biology. The project may be undertaken at any place approved by the Institute/College with the guidance of a course supervisor.

Assessment - you will be assessed by four written papers, course work (assignments, casebook), an individual research project report and an oral examination, irrespective of students’ performance in other parts of the course. Project reports are submitted by the end of August and oral examinations are held in mid-September

Project reports are submitted at the end of August and oral examinations are held in mid-September.

How will I learn?

The MSc in Wild Animal Biology is completed over one year of full-time study.

The course starts in mid-September each year, and can be broken down broadly into three sections, comprising two groups of taught modules and a research project. The first section is completed by mid-January, the second by mid-May, and the MSc research project is undertaken during the summer months, finishing in mid-September. More detailed information can be found in the course outline (see link in the top left of the page).

We deliver the programme through two terms of lectures, seminars, tutorials and problem-based learning, with modular examinations. There are no part-time or distance-learning options available.

Learning outcomes

During the programme you will acquire:
- A critical awareness of current problems in wildlife disease with implications for wildlife conservation and welfare·
- A new insight into veterinary interventions for the management of captive and free-living wild animals·
- A systematic understanding of the biological principles underpinning wild animal conservation and management, and the epidemiology, diagnosis and control of wildlife disease·
- Basic competence in veterinary techniques and preventative medicine for wild animals·
- A conceptual and practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create knowledge in the field of wild animal health·
- A comprehensive understanding of scientific skills, including critical review of the scientific literature, and design and analysis of laboratory or field studies.
- Upon completion of the MSc in Wild Animal Biology, you will have gained the analytical skills, understanding, confidence and the language to progress your career within a wide range of organisations, such as zoos, national parks, universities, conservation organisations and government departments worldwide.

Read less
Our MSc Animal Behaviour is unusual in that it is offered within a Psychology department. Read more
Our MSc Animal Behaviour is unusual in that it is offered within a Psychology department. This benefits you by providing a strong background in a broad cross-section of research methods used by researchers studying human and animal behaviour, a strong training in statistical methods and multidisciplinary study environment. You will learn how to formulate and test relevant research questions, and critically evaluate the research carried out by others in the field.

The programme will give you an insight into the varied means of performing animal behaviour research in a wide array of locations with wild and (semi-)captive animals – in the wild, laboratory, zoo or under human management. As part of the taught component you will be exposed to lectures and seminar discussions, research talks and discussions with speakers, boost and consolidate your knowledge and skills in statistical data analysis, participate in a one-week residential field course (during the Easter break) and in research skill training sessions. During the course you will continuously develop your abilities in critical analysis of the literature and of scientific evidence, project development, communication and scientific writing.

You will be part of the lively, internationally-recognised Centre for Research in Animal Behaviour (http://psychology.exeter.ac.uk/research/centres/crab/) and will have the opportunity to work alongside our experienced researchers on a research apprenticeship which is a central component of the course. The apprenticeship enables you to develop your research skills further and write up the research in the form of a journal article for potential publication. Apprenticeships can also be undertaken under the supervision of researchers at various institutions with whom we have developed long-term relationships.

On successful completion of the MSc you will have the skills to pursue a PhD, work as a research assistant and project manager or follow a career working in zoos, research centres, nature reserves, wildlife and other animal-related offices, education, scientific media and the expanding field of eco-tourism.

Research Apprenticeship

A distinctive feature of all our taught Masters programmes is the Research Apprenticeship. The Apprenticeship enables you to develop your research skills by working alongside experienced researchers or practitioners. You will also gain experience of writing up your research in the form of a dissertation.

Many students undertake their apprenticeship with researchers in the Centre for Research in Animal Behaviour in our School, both in the labs and in the field around the campus, Devon and abroad. Students work on a wide range of topics and with different animals, for example:
• Social behaviour, animal welfare and enrichment, zoo research, animal cognition, navigation, sensory ecology, behavioural ecology, ecotoxicology
• Fish (guppies, sticklebacks, killifish), mammals (primates, squirrels, whales, donkeys, dogs, meerkats, coyotes), birds (pigeons, chickens, pheasants, magpies, flamingoes, wood and sea birds), invertebrates (crabs, honeybees, bumblebees, desert ants, wood ants)

Programme structure

The programme is made up of compulsory modules. Constituent modules may be updated, deleted or replaced as a consequence of the annual programme review of this programme.

Compulsory modules

The compulsory modules can include; Advanced Statistics; Behavioural Science Research Skills; Advances and Methods in Animal Behaviour; Research Apprenticeship; Current Research Issues in Animal Behaviour;

Read less
This programme is the only one of its kind in the UK. It is designed for high-calibre, veterinary graduates from clinical backgrounds who want to explore and benefit from veterinary research, perhaps with a view to pursuing a PhD or a career in research. Read more

Research profile

This programme is the only one of its kind in the UK. It is designed for high-calibre, veterinary graduates from clinical backgrounds who want to explore and benefit from veterinary research, perhaps with a view to pursuing a PhD or a career in research.

The programme offers you the opportunity to undertake a research project in a laboratory or department relevant to your speciality. The choice of research projects carried out is wide, and ranges from bench research to clinical research.

Admission to this programme is subject to identifying a suitable research project and appropriate supervisor before starting the degree. Examples of projects completed in session 2015-2016 were:

1. Interactions of natural killer cells and dendritic cells in bovine tuberculosis immunity.
2. Defining correlates of protective immunity against Mycobacterium bovis.

Subjects include:

epidemiology
gene delivery
genetics
immunology
microbiology
neuroscience
parasitology
pathology
welfare and zoo animals.

The programme begins with a month of teaching to give you an overview of the whole range of techniques used in medical research. The first two weeks comprise lectures on subjects from stem cell biology to ethics and clinical trials and statistics training. This will follow with two weeks of practical workshops in cell biology and molecular medicine and learning practical techniques, including basic tissue culture, how to do PCRs and run Western Blots. After the first month of teaching you will move to a laboratory most relevant to your own speciality.

Career opportunities

Most MVetSci graduates go on to study for a PhD. Those who choose to return to clinical practice go back with a broader experience of research than is afforded by the undergraduate clinical veterinary curriculum.

Read less
Suitable for highly capable students wishing to pursue a research career in evolutionary psychology or related field. Advanced research training in a range of intellectual and practical skills associated with evolutionary and comparative approaches to the study of mind. Read more

MSc in Evolutionary and Comparative Psychology: The Origins of Mind

• Suitable for highly capable students wishing to pursue a research career in evolutionary psychology or related field.

• Advanced research training in a range of intellectual and practical skills associated with evolutionary and comparative approaches to the study of mind.

• Gain a detailed knowledge of the evolutionary and comparative literature and principal theoretical and methodological issues in this field.

• Gain the statistical and methodological skills necessary to undertake research in evolutionary psychology.

• This distinctive programme tackles fundamental issues associated with the origins of human cognition via a wide range of theoretical and methodological approaches.

Features

* The School of Psychology & Neuroscience has 42 full-time academic staff, 9 technical staff, 72 research postgraduates, 18 postdoctoral researchers and 54 taught postgraduate students.

* The School has an international reputation for the quality of its teaching and research and has some of the best psychological laboratory facilities in the UK. The School of Psychology & Neuroscience has consistently been ranked one of the best research departments in the UK.

* The breadth and variety of psychology and neuroscience taught in the School are particular strengths with significant opportunities to collaborate and benefit from a range of techniques applied to understanding the behaviour of humans and animals.

* Considerable contact time with researchers occurs via tutorials and research project supervision’.

Postgraduate community

The School’s size promotes a friendly atmosphere with a crossflow of ideas while providing the depth and breadth necessary to pursue major scientific programmes at an international level. We have active links with other Schools and Departments within the University, with other Scottish universities and with research institutions outside the UK.

We have a large and thriving community of research staff and postgraduate students. We believe that good teaching and good research go hand-in-hand and we take pride in our research-based culture of teaching.

Facilities

We are equipped with modern technology to perform virtually all aspects of psychological research. Facilities include laboratories in neurophysiology, psychopharmacology, psychophysics, animal learning and cognition, cognitive psychology, developmental psychology and social psychology. We have extensive computing facilities for both online control of experiments and offline analysis of data.

Careers

We see postgraduate study as part of your long-term career development. Alongside the University’s Careers Centre (see page 26), we offer advice and support in planning your career. The School provides opportunities to gain experience of working in an academic context, by being involved in tutorials, laboratory classes and other aspects of academic work.

The vast majority of our postgraduates have gained postdoctoral and lecturing positions in universities across the world while others have jobs in healthcare (as researchers and clinicians), wildlife conservation, information technology and management services.

Read less
This programme is designed as training for highly capable students wishing to pursue a higher research degree in Psychology (e.g. Read more

MSc Research Methods in Psychology

• This programme is designed as training for highly capable students wishing to pursue a higher research degree in Psychology (e.g. PhD), in order both to equip you with the specific skills necessary for the completion of your research and to provide you with the general skills necessary for undertaking a career as a research psychologist.

• Appropriate for students who wish to pursue research in psychology that is related to the social sciences.

• The programme is recognised by the UK Economic and Social Research Council.

Features

* The School of Psychology & Neuroscience has 42 full-time academic staff, 9 technical staff, 72 research postgraduates, 18 postdoctoral researchers and 54 taught postgraduate students.

* The School has an international reputation for the quality of its teaching and research and has some of the best psychological laboratory facilities in the UK. The School of Psychology & Neuroscience has consistently been ranked one of the best research departments in the UK.

* The breadth and variety of psychology and neuroscience taught in the School are particular strengths with significant opportunities to collaborate and benefit from a range of techniques applied to understanding the behaviour of humans and animals.

* Considerable contact time with researchers occurs via tutorials and research project supervision’.

Postgraduate community

The School’s size promotes a friendly atmosphere with a crossflow of ideas while providing the depth and breadth necessary to pursue major scientific programmes at an international level. We have active links with other Schools and Departments within the University, with other Scottish universities and with research institutions outside the UK.

We have a large and thriving community of research staff and postgraduate students. We believe that good teaching and good research go hand-in-hand and we take pride in our research-based culture of teaching.

Facilities

We are equipped with modern technology to perform virtually all aspects of psychological research. Facilities include laboratories in neurophysiology, psychopharmacology, psychophysics, animal learning and cognition, cognitive psychology, developmental psychology and social psychology. We have extensive computing facilities for both online control of experiments and offline analysis of data.

Careers

We see postgraduate study as part of your long-term career development. Alongside the University’s Careers Centre (see page 26), we offer advice and support in planning your career. The School provides opportunities to gain experience of working in an academic context, by being involved in tutorials, laboratory classes and other aspects of academic work.

The vast majority of our postgraduates have gained postdoctoral and lecturing positions in universities across the world while others have jobs in healthcare (as researchers and clinicians), wildlife conservation, information technology and management services.

Read less
The School of Psychology, University of St Andrews offers two Postgraduate Distance Learning Programmes. Certificate/Diploma/Master Programme in Adults with Learning Disabilities who have Significant and Complex Needs. Read more
The School of Psychology, University of St Andrews offers two Postgraduate Distance Learning Programmes:
• Certificate/Diploma/Master Programme in Adults with Learning Disabilities who have Significant and Complex Needs. http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/psychology/teaching/dl_complex_needs.shtml
• International Certificate Programme in Adult Support, Protection and Safeguarding. http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/psychology/teaching/dl_safeguarding.shtml
Key issues in current practice, research, evaluation and audit are covered (Challenging Behaviour, Mental Health, Profound and Multiple Disabilities, Offenders with Learning Disabilities, Older People, Vulnerability and Abuse).
Online delivery and assessment is through the Moodle System (Modular Object-Oriented Dynamic Learning Environment.)
This is a postgraduate/post qualified programme for staff who have a degree or a professional qualification.

Features

* The School of Psychology & Neuroscience has 42 full-time academic staff, 9 technical staff, 72 research postgraduates, 18 postdoctoral researchers and 54 taught postgraduate students.

* The School has an international reputation for the quality of its teaching and research and has some of the best psychological laboratory facilities in the UK. The School of Psychology & Neuroscience has consistently been ranked one of the best research departments in the UK.

* The breadth and variety of psychology and neuroscience taught in the School are particular strengths with significant opportunities to collaborate and benefit from a range of techniques applied to understanding the behaviour of humans and animals.

* Considerable contact time with researchers occurs via tutorials and research project supervision’.

Postgraduate community

The School’s size promotes a friendly atmosphere with a crossflow of ideas while providing the depth and breadth necessary to pursue major scientific programmes at an international level. We have active links with other Schools and Departments within the University, with other Scottish universities and with research institutions outside the UK.

We have a large and thriving community of research staff and postgraduate students. We believe that good teaching and good research go hand-in-hand and we take pride in our research-based culture of teaching.

Facilities

We are equipped with modern technology to perform virtually all aspects of psychological research. Facilities include laboratories in neurophysiology, psychopharmacology, psychophysics, animal learning and cognition, cognitive psychology, developmental psychology and social psychology. We have extensive computing facilities for both online control of experiments and offline analysis of data.

Careers

We see postgraduate study as part of your long-term career development. Alongside the University’s Careers Centre (see page 26), we offer advice and support in planning your career. The School provides opportunities to gain experience of working in an academic context, by being involved in tutorials, laboratory classes and other aspects of academic work.

The vast majority of our postgraduates have gained postdoctoral and lecturing positions in universities across the world while others have jobs in healthcare (as researchers and clinicians), wildlife conservation, information technology and management services.

Read less
A conversion route into Psychology for students who hold an Honours degree in a subject other than Psychology. Accredited by the British Psychological Society. Read more

MSc Psychology (Conversion)

• A conversion route into Psychology for students who hold an Honours degree in a subject other than Psychology.

• Accredited by the British Psychological Society.

• Equips students with the necessary skills to facilitate research at MPhil or PhD level in the area of psychology or go on to a professional training programme.

• Facilitates conversion to psychology from business and economic backgrounds to improve employability for a wider range of job opportunities.

• Provides the statistical and methodological skills necessary to undertake research in psychology.

• Gain a detailed knowledge of the core areas of psychology and principal theoretical and methodological issues in the field.

Features

* The School of Psychology & Neuroscience has 42 full-time academic staff, 9 technical staff, 72 research postgraduates, 18 postdoctoral researchers and 54 taught postgraduate students.

* The School has an international reputation for the quality of its teaching and research and has some of the best psychological laboratory facilities in the UK. The School of Psychology & Neuroscience has consistently been ranked one of the best research departments in the UK.

* The breadth and variety of psychology and neuroscience taught in the School are particular strengths with significant opportunities to collaborate and benefit from a range of techniques applied to understanding the behaviour of humans and animals.

* Considerable contact time with researchers occurs via tutorials and research project supervision’.

Postgraduate community

The School’s size promotes a friendly atmosphere with a crossflow of ideas while providing the depth and breadth necessary to pursue major scientific programmes at an international level. We have active links with other Schools and Departments within the University, with other Scottish universities and with research institutions outside the UK.

We have a large and thriving community of research staff and postgraduate students. We believe that good teaching and good research go hand-in-hand and we take pride in our research-based culture of teaching.

Facilities

We are equipped with modern technology to perform virtually all aspects of psychological research. Facilities include laboratories in neurophysiology, psychopharmacology, psychophysics, animal learning and cognition, cognitive psychology, developmental psychology and social psychology. We have extensive computing facilities for both online control of experiments and offline analysis of data.

Careers

We see postgraduate study as part of your long-term career development. Alongside the University’s Careers Centre (see page 26), we offer advice and support in planning your career. The School provides opportunities to gain experience of working in an academic context, by being involved in tutorials, laboratory classes and other aspects of academic work.

The vast majority of our postgraduates have gained postdoctoral and lecturing positions in universities across the world while others have jobs in healthcare (as researchers and clinicians), wildlife conservation, information technology and management services.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page


Share this page:

Cookie Policy    X