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Masters Degrees (Korean)

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This will suit students wishing to embark on research degrees with a focus on Korea. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

This will suit students wishing to embark on research degrees with a focus on Korea. Also, professionals wishing to pursue careers directly related to Korea, including government departments (of both the UK and other countries), and in firms requiring particular skills and knowledge related to trading, investment and promotional interests outside Europe.

The two-year language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with Korea in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course would enable them to reach a high level of Korean language proficiency.

This two-year programme (or four years part-time) will provide students with the opportunity to combine Masters’ level training with intensive Korean language study in order to acquire the skills necessary for future professional or research careers. The programme will enable students to engage with the subjects of their Masters’ programme in the context of Korea through Korean, to engage with primary Korean sources and data and to conduct research and professional work in Korea.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/ma-and-intensive-language-korean/

May be combined with

- MA Korean Studies
- MA Japanese Studies
- MA Historical Research Methods
- MA History
- MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia
- MA Religions of Asia and Africa
- MA Medical Anthropology
- MA Anthropological Research Methods
- MA Migration and Diaspora Studies

Once you have checked the structure for this programme via the structure tab, please click into the above discipline that you would like to study. You will then see the full list of optional courses available to you.

Structure

Students will take 4 course units of language over the two-year period, alongside the 3 units plus 1 unit of dissertation of their concurrent Masters programme. (Or the programme can be taken part-time over four years.) Progression can only be made if all language units are passed. If language units are failed, students are recommended to pursue the discipline only pathway.

In the two-year language pathway, the intensive language courses will be assessed by a combination of exams and continuous assessment, involving in-class tests. The assessment in the summer school is handed over to the Korean partner university but will be counted as one unit.

MA ... and Intensive Language (Korean) (pdf; 148kb) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/ma-and-intensive-language-korean/file93939.pdf)

Knowledge

To acquire/develop skills in Korean language to higher intermediate level.

Intellectual (thinking) skills

To demonstrate awareness of the conceptual and communicative underpinnings of Korean and through this interlinguistic and intercultural understanding.

Subject-based practical skills

Communicate in written and spoken medium in contemporary Korean.

Transferable skills

Engage with people from different linguistic and cultural backgrounds, understand the role of different frames of reference.

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MA in Korean Literature aims to. - provide extensive, critical knowledge of pre-modern and modern Korean literary traditions;. Read more
The MA in Korean Literature aims to:

- provide extensive, critical knowledge of pre-modern and modern Korean literary traditions;

- develop advanced competency in reading and understanding literary works in Korean, and literary translation skills into English;

- develop advanced skills in research, analysis, and critical method in the study of Korean literature, with consideration to socio-historical context and comparative approaches;

- serve as a foundation for students who wish to pursue further research or work in the fields of literary translation, writing and publishing.

The programme suits anyone interested in the literary cultures of Korea, as well as students of literature with no prior knowledge of Korean literature who are looking for new areas of inquiry.

Incoming students will be expected to have completed at least the equivalent of two years of undergraduate Korean language study. Students with knowledge of classical Chinese (hanja) will be encouraged to read pre-modern texts in the original classical Chinese.

The programme will benefit anyone wishing to pursue a research degree (MPhil/PhD) afterwards. It also provides a solid basis for anyone wishing to pursue a career in literary translation or publishing.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/makorlit/

Structure

Students are required to take three taught units and to write a dissertation of 10,000 words. Two of the taught units are compulsory; the third is selected from the list of optional units below. Students with no prior background in literary studies are strongly advised to select the first optional unit, Theories and Techniques of Comparative Literature. The Directed Readings course [as directed by the supervisor] must not cover the same subject matter as one of the compulsory courses.

In very exceptional cases (and if the student has sufficient background in literary studies AND an advanced knowledge of Korean), students may be permitted to take a course from other East Asian (Korean, Chinese, or Japanese) programmes as a minor provided that the course is directly relevant to the candidate’s dissertation

Programme Specification

MA Korean Literature- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 30kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/makorlit/file80728.pdf

Teaching & Learning

The taught part of the course consists of core lectures introducing basic concepts, theory and methodology; and additional seminars that extend the core material into other areas. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take.

A 10,000-word dissertation written over the summer offers students the opportunity to develop original research in an area of special interest. The course is formulated within two tracks:

- Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in MA Korean Literature from SOAS provides students with competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, history, cinema, politics, economics or law. Graduates of this programme will develop their ability to engage with and explore relationships between indigenous aesthetics of the region and contemporary literary theories. Some graduates leave SOAS to pursue careers directly related to their study area, while others have made use of the intellectual training for involvement in analysing and solving many of the problems that contemporary societies now face.

Postgraduate students gain linguistic and cultural expertise enabling them to continue in the field of research or to seek professional and management careers in the business, public and charity sectors. They leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources. A postgraduate degree in Korean Literature is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This programme offers those with an interest in Korean language learning and teaching extensive practical and rigorous theoretical training. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

This programme offers those with an interest in Korean language learning and teaching extensive practical and rigorous theoretical training. The programme provides you with the skills and knowledge to succeed, whether you are interested in pursuing a career in linguistic research or Korean teaching.

You will study general areas of linguistic inquiry and study how they relate to the study of second language acquisition and language teaching. You will also learn about teaching Korean in higher education.

Throughout the degree, you will evaluate published materials (e.g. textbooks) and research papers related to Korean language teaching, conduct pedagogical research, and design teaching materials and lesson plans.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/ma-korean-language-learning-and-teaching/

Structure

Students take core courses up to the value of three full units plus a 10,000-word dissertation. This includes two core compulsory courses, Language Pedagogy and Korean Language Learning and Teaching. For those who have not previously studied linguistics an introductory course, Introduction to the Study of Language (ISL), is required. Students that have studied Linguistics before are required to take, History and Structure of the Korean Language.

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Department of Linguistics

The department is a centre for linguistic study in an unparalleled range of languages, many of which we are documenting for the first time. They include languages of Africa, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, Central Asia, Australia, the Pacific, and Siberia. The department has close academic ties to the rest of our faculty, the Departments of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, as well as the Language Centre.

The research interests of members of staff cover a wide range of theoretical and applied aspects of linguistics, including syntax, phonology, semantics, information structure, sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, linguistic typology, language documentation and description, language contact and multilingualism, language support and revitalisation, language archiving, lexicography, language pedagogy, translation studies, and the studies of individual languages and language families.

View Degree Programmes - http://www.soas.ac.uk/linguistics/programmes/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MA North Korean Studies provides the only dedicated master’s degree in this subject area outside South Korea. Read more

Programme Overview

The MA North Korean Studies provides the only dedicated master’s degree in this subject area outside South Korea. Uniquely, this one year course embeds the learning and teaching in a graduate introduction to social science philosophies and methods, provides training in the Korean language geared to the language level of the student (beginners, intermediate, or advanced) and, at the same time, introduces a wide range of materials on the society, economy, politics and International relations of North Korea. The course director, Professor Hazel Smith, is a world-leading scholar whose publications provide global benchmark studies on North Korea. The MA is taught by staff situated in UCLan’s International Institute of Korean Studies, which works within a globally established network of influential academics, diplomats, journalists and public policy officials who work on North Korea.

The course will provide you with the comparative advantage in journalism, diplomacy, international organisations, NGOs, and global business of gaining knowledge and expertise, not just on North Korea, but in the international relations of East Asia, which is the motor force of the world economy yet also contains some of the globe’s pressing security problems; the most important to all of the global powers of which is North Korea’s nuclear programme. Students graduating from this master’s course will have developed knowledge, analytical skills and language skills (Korean at beginners, intermediate or advanced level) that will equip them to work in a number of employment sectors dealing with international affairs. The strong support from policy makers in the UK (FCO and parliament) will also bring networks to our students that will facilitate employability prospects.

Modules

Inter-Korean relations: Theory and Practice
Research Methods
North Korea: History, Politics and International Relations
North Korea: Economy and Society
Korean Language 1
Korean Language 2
Dissertation

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This degree is designed either to prepare the student for advanced graduate work in a wide range of subjects related to Korea or as an end/qualification in itself. Read more
This degree is designed either to prepare the student for advanced graduate work in a wide range of subjects related to Korea or as an end/qualification in itself.

The programme explores the history, politics, art, music and literature of Korea, as well as providing opportunities to study the languages of the region.

The MA in Korean Studies consists of four components. Students choose one major course and two minor courses from the lists on the Course Detail page.

Students who plan to go on to further research can take a higher-level Korean language course as a minor.

Students take three taught courses and must also complete a 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/makorstud/

Programme Specification

MA Korean Studies - Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 27kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/makorstud/file80729.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Students are exposed to a wide range of topics through participation in the seminars, general lectures and specialised workshops.

- Lectures and Seminars

In most courses there is one 2-hour class each week. This may be an informal lecture followed by a discussion or student presentation.

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take.

- Dissertation

The 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic linked with one of the taught courses.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Employment

As a student specialising in Korean, you will gain competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, literature and culture (which can include literature, film, music, art and religion) of various parts of Korea.

Graduates leave SOAS not only with linguistic and cultural expertise, but also with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and management careers in both business and the public sector. These include written and oral communication skills, attention to detail, analytical and problem-solving skills, and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The programme is tailored for students who wish to proceed to further research on the doctoral level on a topic related to the history of the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, East Asia and Africa, but it also makes sense as a stand-alone programme for those who wish to explore a specific topic or question within a shorter period of time. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme is tailored for students who wish to proceed to further research on the doctoral level on a topic related to the history of the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, East Asia and Africa, but it also makes sense as a stand-alone programme for those who wish to explore a specific topic or question within a shorter period of time.

The two-year intensive language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with a country in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course would enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

Career opportunities include:

- Further historical research (PhD)
- Research positions in government institutions, NGOs, journalism, etc.

This is the only Master-level programme in Historical Research Methods focusing on the study of Asia and Africa in the UK. It provides the unique opportunity to develop and carry out a research project under the guidance of regional specialists and thus an ideal preparation for a research degree. It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

Please see the webpage for the Japanese pathway of the programme, and contact the MA convenor of that pathway for further information on the language component. Further information on entry level language requirements can be found on the programme page.

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

Email:

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/history/programmes/ma-historial-research-methods-and-intensive-language/

Structure

Students take 4 course units over the period of their programme of study (i.e. 2 or 4 years). This includes the core course Sources and Research Design in Historical Research (1 unit), which is taught on a one-to-one basis by the dissertation supervisor, the compulsory course Research Methods in History with Special Reference to Asia and Africa (1 unit), a minor course or courses (to the value of 1 unit) from a list of approved options and/or a language course from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures, and a 10,000 word dissertation (1 unit).

In the intensive language pathways, students take 2 intensive language units and one history unit in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad (location dependant on language). Upon their return, they will take 1 language unit and 2 history units and complete work on their dissertation (1 unit). For example, Year 1: 2 intensive language units + compulsory course Research Methods in History with Special Reference to Asia and Africa; Year 2: 1 intensive language unit + core course Sources and Research Design in Historical Research (1 unit) + minor courses to the value of 1 unit + dissertation.

Aims and Outcomes

- Knowledge of a variety of theoretical issues and methodological approaches relevant for the study of historical problems

- Practical research and writing skills, developed through the study of primary and secondary sources related to Asian and African history

- A sound grounding for further research, either in a doctoral programme or in a professional environment

- A near proficient ability in the a language.

Knowledge:
1. How to locate materials and use research resources (particularly research library catalogues, archival hand lists, and digital resources), assess data and evidence critically from manuscripts, printed, and digital sources, and solve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations.

2. How to formulate and carry out a research project, based on a thorough knowledge and understanding of the particular field of study chosen by the student, the relevant literature and current debates.
3. Language skills appropriate to chosen region of study.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:
1. Students should become precise and cautious in their assessment of evidence and understand what the different types of historical sources can and cannot tell us.

2. Students should question interpretations, however authoritative, maintain an open-minded attitude to interpretations that challenge older interpretations, and reassess evidence for themselves.

3. Students should be able to think critically about the nature of the historical discipline, its methodology, historiography, and openness for interdisciplinary approaches.

4. Students should be able to reflect about the potential of historical research on non-Western societies and civilizations for the advancement of the historical discipline and human civilization in general.

Subject-based practical skills:
1. Effective writing and referencing skills, attention to detail and accuracy in presentation.

2. Effective oral presentation of seminar papers, articulation of ideas, and constructive participation in seminar discussions.

3. Ability to retrieve, sift and select information from a variety of sources, effective note-taking, record keeping and planning of projects.

4. Effective use of relevant professional databases.

5. In the two year intensive language pathway, to acquire/develop skills in a language to Effective Operational Proficiency level, i.e., being able to communicate in written and spoken medium in a contemporary language

Transferable skills:
1. Critical thinking.

2. Ability to communicate effectively in oral and written forms.

3. Information gathering skills from conventional and electronic sources.

4. Effective time-management, writing to word limits, and meeting deadlines.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The programme would suit students with a keen interest in learning about the historical conditions of the contemporary world, and in particular those who are prepared to look at the world from the perspective of other people and cultures. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme would suit students with a keen interest in learning about the historical conditions of the contemporary world, and in particular those who are prepared to look at the world from the perspective of other people and cultures. While the course is open to students from a broad range of backgrounds, the ideal applicant would have an UG degree in History (or a related discipline), some knowledge of foreign, including Asian or African languages, and preferably some relevant background in the region of specialism.

Graduates will find a wide range of career options open to them, in particular those involving inter-cultural or international contact, such as in international organizations, government institutions, non-profit organizations, and journalism, but also museums, educational institutions, or the publishing sector more generally. It would also be a suitable preparation for students considering embarking on a research degree focusing on one of the regional or topical areas of expertise represented in the department.

The two-year intensive language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with Asia, Africa and the Near and Middle East in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course would enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

This is the only Master-level programme in History focusing on the study of Asia, the Middle East and Africa in the UK, and can therefore offer an unrivalled breadth of courses on the history of these regions. The programme provides a sound training in the historical sciences.

It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

Email:

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/history/programmes/ma-history-and-intensive-language/

Structure

The programme includes the following elements totalling four units: Courses totalling at least two units from List A [History courses], including a half or full unit designated as the Major course; further minor courses totalling one unit from Lists A [Major and minor history courses], B [Courses from other departments], C [Language courses] or D [Intercollegiate courses]; and a dissertation of 10,000 words written in conjunction with the Major course (one unit).

There are five regional pathways within the MA History: Africa, East Asia, Near and Middle East, South Asia and South East Asia. To meet the pathway requirement, students must choose courses from the relevant regional section in List A to the minimum value of 1.5 units, including their Major.

In the two-year intensive language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and one discipline unit in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad. Upon their return, they will take one intensive language unit in their second year and two discipline units. They would also be expected to choose a Major in which to write the dissertation. In the intensive-language pathway, the same rules apply as for the usual MA.

Please see the webpage for the Japanese pathway of the programme, and contact the MA convenor of that pathway for further information on the language component. Further information on entry level language requirements can be found on the programme page.

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

MA History and Intensive Language Programme Specification (pdf; 362kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/history/programmes/ma-history-and-intensive-language/file93560.pdf

Aims and Outcomes

- An advanced understanding of the historical sciences and its various methodologies and approaches in general, and specialist knowledge of Asian and African history in particula

- Practical research and writing skills, developed through the study of primary and secondary sources related to Asian and African history

- The critical, conceptual, and analytical skills required for historical research as well as for positions of responsibility in all other professions

- In the two-year pathway, the student will also be provided with a near proficient ability in a language.

Knowledge:
1. Factual knowledge about the histories of Asian and African societies, the ways they interacted with each other and other world regions of the world, and the major historical forces that shaped our contemporary world.

2. Familiarity with a variety of different approaches to historical research and current scholarly debates, and, on that basis, the ability to formulate a valuable research question.

3. How to locate materials and use research resources (particularly research library catalogues, archival hand lists, and digital resources), assess data and evidence critically from manuscripts, printed, and digital sources, and solve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations.

4. Language skills appropriate to chosen region and field of study (recommended).

Intellectual (thinking) skills:
1. Students should be able to synthesize different kinds of information, become precise and cautious in their assessment of evidence and understand what the different types of historical sources can and cannot tell us.

2. Students should question interpretations, however authoritative, maintain an open-minded attitude to interpretations that challenge older interpretations, and analyse and reassess evidence and research questions for themselves.

3. Students should be able to think critically about the nature of the historical discipline, its methodology, historiography, and openness for interdisciplinary approaches.

4. Students should be able to reflect about the potential of historical research on non-Western societies and civilizations for the advancement of the historical discipline and human civilization in general.

Subject-based practical skills:
1. Effective writing and referencing skills, attention to detail and accuracy in presentation.

2. Effective oral presentation of seminar papers, articulation of ideas, and constructive participation in seminar discussions.

3. Ability to retrieve, sift and select information from a variety of sources, including relevant professional databases, effective note-taking, record keeping and planning of projects.

4. Ability to formulate research questions and design an independent research project, including the use of primary sources.

5. In the two year intensive language pathway, to acquire/develop skills in a language to Effective Operational Proficiency level, i.e., being able to communicate in written and spoken medium in a contemporary language

Transferable skills:
1. Critical thinking.

2. Ability to communicate effectively in oral and written forms.

3. Information gathering skills from conventional and electronic sources.

4. Effective time-management, writing to word limits, and meeting deadlines.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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- Intercalating medical students, or students intending to pursue a medical degree. - Students with a degree in the social sciences or humanities wishing to acquire a broad understanding of medical anthropology with reference to Asia or Africa, but also including other parts of the world. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

- Intercalating medical students, or students intending to pursue a medical degree.

- Students with a degree in the social sciences or humanities wishing to acquire a broad understanding of medical anthropology with reference to Asia or Africa, but also including other parts of the world

- People with professional experience in medical practice who have an interest in cross-cultural understandings of health and illness.

- Students with a degree in social anthropology wishing to pursue more specialist topics in the anthropology of medicine.

- Students without a previous degree in Anthropology looking for an MA conversion degree to serve as a qualification for pursuing a further research degree in anthropology

- The two-year intensive language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with a country in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language courses will enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

As one might expect of study at SOAS, our programme is unique in that we take a cultural and phenomenological approach to the anthropology of medicine. That is, we stress a truly cross-cultural method, one which unites all medical systems in a unified comparative perspective. This allows students to grasp the underlying principles and questions common to all therapeutic systems. Given the diversity of the School’s courses, students may choose options which strengthen either the humanities or the development studies aspects of their interests.

It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

The Japanese pathway is available for students who have an intermediate level of Japanese. Students will be required to take a placement exam in the week before classes begin in order to determine if their level is suitable. Please contact Professor Drew Gerstle () for further information.

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-medical-anthropology-and-intensive-language/

Structure

- Core course: Cultural Understandings of Health - 15PANC093 (1.0 unit).

- Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology - 15PANC999 (1.0 unit). This is a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed with the Programme Convenor of the MA Medical Anthropology and the candidate’s supervisor.

- In addition, all MA Anthropology students 'audit' the course Ethnographic Research Methods during term 1 - this will not count towards your 4 units.

- Students without previous experience of anthropology must take the foundation course, Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology - 15PANC008 (1.0 unit).

Option Courses - Group A and Group B:

Students then choose TWO 0.5 unit courses from the Group A and B lists.

- AT LEAST ONE of the two 0.5 unit courses normally must come from Group A
- Students not taking Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology may then select their fourth unit (either a single 1.0 unit course or two 0.5 unit courses) from the Option Courses list.
- Alternatively, one language course may be taken from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures
- In the two-year language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and Cultural Understandings of Health (1 unit) in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad (location dependant on language). Upon their return, they will take one intensive language unit in their second year and two optional anthropology units. In the intensive-language pathway, the same rules apply as for the usual MA.

Programme Specification

MA Medical Anthropology and Intensive Language Programme Specification (pdf; 230kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-medical-anthropology-and-intensive-language/file93566.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Aims and Outcomes:
- All students are introduced to the types of problem and areas of questioning which are fundamental to the anthropology of medicine.

- Students new to the discipline are given knowledge of the general principles of anthropological enquiry

- All students develop advanced knowledge and understanding of the theoretical approaches which help form an anthropological perspective.

- All students gain an understanding of the practical methods by which this perspective is applied in field research.
All students will be provided with a near proficient ability in a language.

Knowledge:

- Students will be familiar with the foundational literature on the basis of which medical anthropology is linked to and emerges from broader disciplinary concerns.

- Students will have knowledge of the intersections linking medical anthropology to related fields, such as social studies of science, studies in bioethics, and critical approaches to public health

- Students will be familiar with the numerous ethnographic studies of health and illness.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:

- Students will learn to deploy an ethnographic kind of questioning – one directed toward teasing out of complex situations the sets of particular norms or principles which condition or shape them.

- As anthropologists, they will be trained to look for the specifically social in everything (even & especially in the “natural”)

- Students will learn how to form an anthropological problem – that is to distinguish an anthropological problem from a mere topic or area of interest.

Subject-based practical skills:

- Personal drive: Students are expected to take responsibility for their own learning

- Students will develop research skills: including location and adjustment to differing types of library collection, as well as locating organizations and people who hold significant information

- Listening & understanding: Students will be able to assimilate complex arguments quickly on the basis of listening – and to discuss or disagree constructively with points made by others.

- Planning and problem solving: students will be able to set targets and achieve them, and will be able to work well to deadlines.

- Working in a group: students will learn to lead by contributing to the development of consensus.

- In the two year intensive language pathway, to acquire/develop skills in a language to Effective Operational Proficiency level, i.e., being able to communicate in written and spoken medium in a contemporary language.

Transferable skills:

- Students will develop an ability to begin from a general question or issue and develop an appropriate research model and method.
- Ability to clearly represent a concise understanding of a project/problem and its solution.
- An ability to recognize and appreciate for what it is an unconventional approach or an unfamiliar idea
- An ability creatively to resolve conflict while working in a team; being able to see the other person’s point of view
- An ability to work and feel at ease in multicultural or cross cultural environments.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Students who wish to know more of the transnational nature of the modern world;. Students who wish to continue their anthropological study at a postgraduate level and engage in critical contemporary theory;. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

Students who wish to know more of the transnational nature of the modern world;

Students who wish to continue their anthropological study at a postgraduate level and engage in critical contemporary theory;

Students who wish to understand cultural transformation from a global perspective;

Students who come from other disciplines, such as Law or Politics, and now wish to incorporate an anthropological perspective on issues of migration and diaspora.

Students with a degree in social anthropology wishing to pursue more specialist migration and diaspora related topics along with regional or language-based study
Students without a previous degree in Anthropology looking for an MA conversion degree to serve as a qualification for pursuing a further research degree in issues relating to migration and diaspora.
The two-year intensive language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with a country in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language courses will enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

The MA in Migration and Diaspora Studies is a broad-based degree for students who want to receive specialized research training in Migration and Diaspora Studies, including a relevant language, which will prepare them to proceed to advanced postgraduate research in Migration and Diaspora Studies at SOAS or elsewhere.
The programme encourages a transdisciplinary approach to issues of migration and diaspora, providing historical depth as well as perspectives from anthropology, sociology, and postcolonial studies. The programme also works closely with a number of departments across the school, such as Development Studies, the Centre for Gender Studies as well as Law and Politics, which also run migration and diaspora related courses. Most of these courses are available as options on the programme, making it a unique MA in terms of both its breadth and depth.
The MA in Migration and Diaspora Studies is considerably enriched by the SOAS Centre for Migration and Diaspora Studies, which runs seminars, films and public lectures and also hosts a number of international scholars. The Centre is also a part of a migration research network of London colleges including LSE and UCL. Students on the programme therefore have unparalleled access to a critical body of scholars and scholarship on migration and diaspora related issue.

It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

The Japanese pathway is available for students who have an intermediate level of Japanese. Students will be required to take a placement exam in the week before classes begin in order to determine if their level is suitable. Please contact Professor Drew Gerstle () for further information.

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-migration-and-diaspora-studies-and-intensive-language/

Structure

Core course:

- African and Asian Diasporas in the Contemporary World (1 unit)
- Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology (1 unit)
- Additionally all MA Anthropology students 'audit' the course Ethnographic Research Methods during term 1 - this will not count towards your 4 units.

Foundation course:
- Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology (1 unit). This is recommended for students without a previous anthropology degree.

OPTION COURSES
- Students choose their remaining unit (or two units if not taking Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology) from the Option Courses list. A language course from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures may also be included.

In the two-year language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and African and Asian Diasporas in the Contemporary World (1 unit) in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad (location dependant on language). Upon their return, they will take one intensive language unit in their second year and two optional anthropology units. In the intensive-language pathway, the same rules apply as for the usual MA.

Programme Specification

MA Migration and Diaspora Studies and Intensive Language Programme Specification (pdf; 253kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-migration-and-diaspora-studies-and-intensive-language/file93570.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Aims and Outcomes:
- To introduce students to important areas of contemporary social theory which deal with issues of migration, globalisation, the postcolonial world, and cultural transformations.

- To ground students in the historical basis of these issues

- To encourage transdisciplinary thinking on issues of migration

- To enable students to translate theoretical perspectives for practical application in the material world.

- To provide students with a near proficient ability in a language.

Knowledge:

- Students will be expected to grasp the key debates in migration and diaspora studies from a critical perspective

- To understand the global/historical/political and cultural background within which issues of migration and diaspora occur.

- A critical understanding of the ways that migration has shaped the modern world, and the implications of this for future research.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:

- The development of analytical and theoretical skills based on a detailed understanding of the social science literature on migration and diaspora.

- To approach theories and debates from a critical and reflexive basis.

- To develop their presentation skills and their ability to articulate arguments coherently in order to promote class discussion and critical engagement with ideas and practices.

Subject-based practical skills:

- Communicate effectively in writing, in academic English

- Retrieve, sift and select information from a variety of sources including print and other forms of mass media

- Listen to and discuss ideas introduced during seminars.

- Students with no knowledge of media technologies will have the opportunity to learn photographic and film making techniques through the Media unit.

- Practice research techniques in a variety of specialized research libraries and institutes

- In the two year intensive language pathway, to acquire/develop skills in a language to Effective Operational Proficiency level, i.e., being able to communicate in written and spoken medium in a contemporary language

Transferable skills:
Students will be expected to learn to:

- Plan, organise and write masters’ level essays and dissertations.
- Structure and communicate ideas effectively both orally and in writing.
- Understand unconventional ideas.
- Present (non–assessed) material orally.
- Function as a student and researcher in a radically different environment.
- Be able to apply for funding to do a PhD.
- Be prepared to enter a Social Science PhD programme.
- An ability to work, and be at ease in, a multicultural environment

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MA Religions of Asia and Africa is in the first place a rewarding cultural and human experience. It is designed both as an end qualification in itself and as a platform preparing students for more advanced graduate work. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The MA Religions of Asia and Africa is in the first place a rewarding cultural and human experience. It is designed both as an end qualification in itself and as a platform preparing students for more advanced graduate work.

It typically suits students falling into one of the following three categories:

- students planning to pursue further research, which may involve at a subsequent stage the acquisition of a doctoral degree and a career in higher education;

- students willing to pursue a career or professional activity, for which advanced knowledge of the religions of Asia and Africa and of the theoretical and practical issues involved in their study is essential: arts, media, teaching, NGOs and charities, interfaith dialogue, consultancy for governmental agencies or the private sector, religious institutions, museums, and more.

- students who wish to pursue the academic study of religions as a complement to their personal experience and commitments: religious ministers and clerics from all confessions, believers, yoga and meditation practitioners; anyone interested in specific religious traditions or in religion as an essential dimension of life, and in the critical and experiential enhancement that their academic study may offer.

The two-year intensive language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with a country in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course will enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

The MA Religions of Asia and Africa at SOAS is the premier postgraduate curriculum in the U.K. for the study of the religions of Asia and Africa. It covers a wider range of religious traditions than most comparable programmes, whether in the U.K. or abroad: Buddhism in nearly all its doctrinal and regional varieties, Asian and African Christianities, Hinduism, Islam, Jainism, Judaism, Shinto, Taoism, Zoroastrianism as well as the local religious cultures of Asia and Africa. It is strongly interdisciplinary and methodologically diverse, offering advanced learning in the theory of religion as well as in historical, anthropological, philosophical, sociological and textual approaches to the study of particular religious traditions.

It provides a unique opportunity to tap cutting-edge academic expertise and library facilities on Asian and African religions as part of a spirited, cosmopolitan student community and within the intense religious and cultural scene of London.

It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

For the Japanese pathway please see the webpage for the Japanese pathway of the programme and contact the MA convenor of that pathway for further information on the language component. Further information on entry level language requirements can be found on the programme page at: http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/ma-and-intensive-language-japanese/

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

Email:

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/religions-and-philosophies/programmes/ma-religions-of-asia-and-africa-and-intensive-language/

Structure

Students are generally required to follow taught units to the equivalent of three full courses (which may include one language course), and to submit a dissertation of 10,000 words.

In the two-year language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and one discipline unit in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad (location dependant on language). Upon their return, they will take one intensive language unit in their second year and two discipline units.

Programme Specification

MA Religions of Asia and Africa and Intensive Language Programme Specification (pdf; 300kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/religions-and-philosophies/programmes/ma-religions-of-asia-and-africa-and-intensive-language/file93574.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Aims and Outcomes:

- Advanced knowledge and understanding of selected approaches, methods and theories in the study of religions, with particular reference to the religious traditions of Asia and Africa.

- Advanced skills in researching and writing about topics in religious studies, also as a platform for further research at doctoral level.

- Advanced skills in presentation or communication of knowledge and understanding of topics in religious studies.

- Specialisation in one area from among those covered by the units listed in the programme structure.

- In the two-year pathway, the student will also be provided with a near proficient ability in a language.

Knowledge:

- Students will learn how to assess data and evidence critically, locate and synthesise source materials, critically evaluate conflicting interpretations and sources, use research resources (library catalogues, journal databases, citation indices) and other relevant traditional sources.

- Subject specific skills, such as manuscript transcription, textual bibliography, the editing of texts; familiarity with the study of religions as an academic field of study and its varieties.

- Aspects of literature in the Study of Religions, philosophy, learning, iconography and history, the impact of religion on society.

- Acquisition of language skills.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:

- Students should become precise and cautious in their assessment of evidence, and to understand through practice what documents can and cannot tell us.

- Students will develop the capacity to discuss theoretical and epistemological issues in an articulate, informed, and intellectual manner.

- Students will learn to become precise and critical in their assessment of scholarly arguments and to question interpretations, however authoritative, in order to reassess evidence for themselves.

- Students will learn to present complex theoretical arguments clearly and creatively.

- Those students who take a language option should be able to assess primary sources in foreign languages and critically evaluate interpretations proposed by different scholars.

- Students will acquire both theoretical and regional expertise in order to develop and apply self-reflexive approaches to the issues raised by the cross-cultural study of religions.

Subject-based practical skills:
The programme aims to help students with the following practical skills:

- Academic writing.

- IT-based information retrieval and processing.

- Presentational skills.

- Examination techniques.

- Independent study skills and research techniques.

- Reflexive learning.

- In the two year intensive language pathway, to acquire/develop skills in a language to Effective Operational Proficiency level, i.e., being able to communicate in written and spoken medium in a contemporary language

Transferable skills:
The programme will encourage students to:

- Write concisely and with clarity.

- Effectively structure and communicate ideas (oral and written).

- Explore and assess a variety of sources for research purposes.

- Work to deadlines and high academic standards.

- Assess the validity and cogency of arguments.

- Make judgements involving complex factors.

- Develop self-reflexivity.

- Develop an awareness of the ethical complexity of representational practices.

- Question the nature of social and cultural constructs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This Masters is designed for students wishing to pursue a PhD in social anthropology. The programme might also be taken as a stand-alone MA for those wanting training in anthropological research methods for professional development or practical application. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

This Masters is designed for students wishing to pursue a PhD in social anthropology. The programme might also be taken as a stand-alone MA for those wanting training in anthropological research methods for professional development or practical application.

It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

It is intended for students with a good first degree (minimum of a 2.1) in social anthropology or a taught Masters degree in social anthropology. Students who would like to take this path must demonstrate a solid grounding in the discipline as well as the regional and language expertise necessary for continuing onto a PhD.

Exceptionally this course may be taken as a conversion MA. Students wishing to take this path must demonstrate a solid grounding in the discipline as well as the regional and language expertise necessary for continuing onto a PhD.

The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MA Res) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training programme]. In the latter case, the MA Res therefore serves as a shortcut into the PhD. It is designed to train students in research skills, including language training, to the level prescribed by the ESRC’s research training guidelines.

Most students would be expected to progress to PhD registration at the end of the degree.

The Japanese pathway is available for students who have an intermediate level of Japanese. Students will be required to take a placement exam in the week before classes begin in order to determine if their level is suitable. Please contact Professor Drew Gerstle () for further information.

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropological-research-methods-and-intensive-language/

Structure

The student must successfully complete the following core course:

Research Methods in Anthropology (15 PAN C011)
This full unit course is composed of Ethnographic Research Methods (15 PAN H002, a 0.5 unit course) and Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research (15 PPO H035, a 0.5 unit course, offered by the Department of Politics and International Studies).

MA Anthropological Research Methods students and first year MPhil/PhD are also required to attend the Research Training Seminar which provides training in the use of bibliographic/online resources, ethical and legal issues, communication and team-working skills, career development, etc. The focus of the Research Training Seminar is the development and presentation of the thesis topic which takes the form of a PhD-level research proposal.

The MA dissertation is submitted no later than mid-September of the student’s final year of registration.

A typical program of study would involve enrolling and passing three full units (this includes the two half units on research methods) and submitting a dissertation.

In the two-year language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and Research Methods in Anthropology (1 unit) in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad. Upon their return, they will take one intensive language unit in their second year and two optional anthropology units. In the intensive-language pathway, the same rules apply as for the usual MA.

Students can choose to study any African or Asian language that is normally available to students taking one of the taught masters programs.

The two-year Intensive Language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with a country in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course will enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

MA Anthropological Research Methods and Intensive Language Programme Specification (pdf; 277kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropological-research-methods-and-intensive-language/file93546.pdf

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This programme gives students the opportunity to develop deep understanding and analytical excellence in a field of increasing importance, international studies. Read more

About the course

This programme gives students the opportunity to develop deep understanding and analytical excellence in a field of increasing importance, international studies. A wide selection of modules allows them to specialise in a variety of different areas. Dissertations are written under the guidance of experienced academic staff, which includes world-leading experts on China, Japan, the UK, the US, the Middle East, Africa, Europe and Russia, among others. Students will be introduced to key concepts and theories, will be trained in research methods, and gain access to (and we hope contribute to) the latest research in international relations and world history.

Students can choose from a range of modules in international relations and international history, which include, in addition to subjects directly related to international relations and world history, modules in diplomacy/foreign policy analysis, development, international economics, international organisations, European politics, regionalism, traditional and non-traditional security, environmental policy, area studies (including China, Russia, the US, Europe, the UK, Japan, the Middle East, Africa, etc.) and of course research methods, to name a few. Small seminars allow students to develop their analytical skills, and oral and written presentation techniques, as well as their capacity to research, compile and produce thematic reports, essays, and papers.

Case studies and occasional simulation games deepen students’ theoretical and practical knowledge of negotiations, diplomacy, world history and international relations. The dissertation will give students the opportunity to prove the breadth and depth of their knowledge.

Course structure

The MA in International Relations and World History is offered as a two year programme. A part time path is also an option. Students must take 240 credits to graduate, comprised of 60 credits each semester for three semesters (four modules each semester at 15 credits each), plus 60 credits for the dissertation (normally done the final semester of the second year). Students must pass the taught components before proceeding to the dissertation.

Year one

Compulsory modules:

Core Concepts in International Relations and World History
Contemporary China Issues
Government and Politics of China
China in International Relations
Economic Development in Contemporary China

Students will also have the option to choose some of the modules below in year one:

The Rise of Modern China
Contemporary Chinese Culture, Ideology and Society
Management for China
Chinese Business and Society
Mandarin 1A
Mandarin 1B
Welfare States
US Foreign Policy
Democratisation in Asia, Africa and Latin America
Politics and History of the Middle East
Other languages 1A (French, German, Spanish, Japanese, Italian or Korean)
Diplomacy in a Globalised World
Special World History Project
The Rise and Fall of the British Empire
Regionalism in Europe and Asia
Global Shift: Power, Order, Change
International Organization
Research Methods II (Quantitative)
China and Africa
Other languages 1B (French, German, Spanish, Japanese, Italian or Korean)

Year two

Compulsory modules:

Research Methods I
Dissertation

Students will also have the option to choose some of the modules below in year two:

Internship*
China and the World
Mandarin 2A
Welfare States
US Foreign Policy
Democratisation in Asia, Africa and Latin America
Politics and History of the Middle East
Languages 2A (French, German, Spanish, Japanese, Italian or Korean)
Mandarin 2B
Diplomacy in a Globalised World
Special World History Project
The Rise and Fall of the British Empire
Regionalism in Europe and Asia
Global Shift: Power, Order, Change
International Organization
China and Africa
Research Methods II (Quantitative)
Languages 2B (French, German, Spanish, Japanese, Italian or Korean)

*The Internship can start in the summer of Year 1 and be completed by the end of Autumn semester of Y2. Assessement will be in the Autumn semester of Y2. Long-term part-time internships may be agreed with the School in consultation with the convenor.

Please visit the website for more detailed module information by clicking the link below

http://www.nottingham.edu.cn/en/internationalstudies/pg/ma-china-in-international-relations-and-world-history.aspx

Our staff

The School of International Studies has academic staff from all across the world, who are world-leading experts in their fields. Students gain from a variety of perspectives and backgrounds which compliment the global nature of this programme.

Your degree certificate

All students who successfully complete their studies at The University of Nottingham Ningbo China will be awarded a University of Nottingham, UK degree.

There are no differences between certificates awarded in the UK and those awarded in China.

Postgraduate scholarships

To encourage academic excellence, The University of Nottingham Ningbo China (UNNC) offers a comprehensive and expanding range of scholarships to postgraduate students. For more information please click the link below

http://live-china-uon.cloud.contensis.com/en/study/postgraduate/masters/scholarships/index.aspx

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The degree is suitable for students with an interest in anthropological approaches to diverse aspects of tourism as a cultural force in the contemporary world, from sustainable development to cultural heritage. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The degree is suitable for students with an interest in anthropological approaches to diverse aspects of tourism as a cultural force in the contemporary world, from sustainable development to cultural heritage. Our students come from all over the world, following BA study, a masters degree in another field, or work and travel experience. This combination of diverse backgrounds and skills creates a uniquely stimulating intellectual environment. Many of our graduates go on to a PhD; others pursue careers in research and consulting; NGOs; museums and other cultural institutions; travel-writing; alternative tourism enterprises; and government agencies.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-of-travel-and-tourism/

Programme Overview

The SOAS MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism enables students to pursue specialist interests in global voluntary mobility while gaining advanced training in social and cultural anthropology in a world-leading department. Combining a rigorous set of core courses with options to suit each student’s unique interests, the programme is designed to accommodate students with or without a prior degree in Social Anthropology.

Students will develop expertise in anthropological theory and practice; learn to undertake ethnographic research; and gain comprehensive grounding in the anthropological study of travel and tourism, including issues of development, political economy, cultural change, heritage, cross-cultural encounter, representation and meaning, space and place, commodification, and interconnections between diverse histories and cultures of travel worldwide.

Tourism is not only a culturally and historically shaped form of travel, but a complex social field that spans the globe, comprised of diverse actors, institutions, activities, and modes of interaction that overlap with and cross-cross other forms of global interconnection. As a whole, it comprises the world's largest industry and the single greatest peacetime factor moving people around the globe.

Both a manifestation and a medium of globalisation, tourism has profound significance in multiple realms of human life—economic, environmental, material, social, and cultural. This makes it an ideal lens through which to explore core themes in contemporary social anthropology, such as identity and alterity, political economy, development, heritage, locality, representation, imagination, commodification, and the global circulation of people, objects, ideas, images, and capital.

The MA programme draws upon:

- the emerging body of theoretically sophisticated, ethnographically rich work involving tourism and travel;

- a thorough grounding in the history and contemporary theoretical trends of social-cultural anthropology;

- close engagement with noted and rising scholars in the field, via the programme's Colloquium Series in the Anthropology of Tourism and Travel, as well as opportunities for informal dialogue with visiting anthropologists and sociologists of tourism;

- other areas of expertise in the Department of Anthropology, including anthropology of development, migration and diaspora, museums and material culture, anthropology of food, global religious movements, anthropology of media, human rights, and anthropology of globalisation;

- the unparalleled concentration of area expertise among SOAS' academic staff, covering Africa, Asia, and the Middle East, together with their diasporas;

- the opportunity to engage with numerous other units at SOAS, such as the Centre for Migration and Diaspora Studies, the Food Studies Centre, and the Centre for Media Studies, among many others; and

- the vibrant intellectual and cultural life of the School, the University of London, and the city of London itself—a global tourist destination inviting study on a daily basis.

Prospective students are encouraged to contact the Director of Studies, Dr Naomi Leite, at an early stage of their application in order to seek advice on the most appropriate options for study.

View a sampling of past MA dissertation titles (http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-of-travel-and-tourism/ma-anthropology-of-travel-tourism-dissertations.html)

View profiles of alumni and current students (http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-of-travel-and-tourism/student-profiles.html)

Language Study

Beginning in 2016-27, the MA programme will also be available as a 2- or 4-year (full- or part-time) MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism with Intensive Study of Arabic, Japanese, or Korean (other languages likely to be added). For information, contact Director of Studies Dr Naomi Leite.

All SOAS MA students, regardless of department or degree, are entitled to register for one language course for free through our Language Entitlement Programme (LEP). This course is additional to your regular syllabus and is not for credit. Languages normally available include Arabic, Chinese, French, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Turkish and Urdu. Others are often offered. You must sign up before instruction begins and space fills quickly. Learn more and reserve your place here: Language Entitlement Programme (http://www.soas.ac.uk/languagecultures/studentinfo/language-entitlement-programme/)

Email:

Programme Structure

The SOAS MA in the Anthropology of Travel and Tourism is designed to offer students a chance to pursue specialist interests via a considered selection of courses to suit their individual needs. It provides:

1. a broad-based MA programme for students with some background in issues of tourism/travel who wish to enhance their knowledge in light of contemporary anthropological research.

2. a special-interest MA which will enable students to study topics involving tourism/travel in-depth, in relation to a specific theoretical approach or region.

The programme consists of four units, comprised of a combination of full-year (1 unit) and half-year (.5 unit) courses.

Teaching & Learning

The learning environments making up the MA programme in Anthropology of Travel and Tourism run the gamut from lecture halls to intimate seminar rooms, suiting a wide range of learning styles. Study a language; take a course (or two) in anthropology of human rights, development, globalisation, religion, or gender, among many others; choose a course in another department that catches your interest and contributes to your dissertation plans, from world music to development studies.

The academic staff in the Department of Anthropology are dynamic, experienced teachers who are widely recognised for their expertise and enjoy working directly with students. Renowned scholars from other institutions also come to share their knowledge: nearly every day of the week, the SOAS Anthropology Department has a public lecture series running, including series in the general Social Anthropology, Anthropology of Food, Migration and Diaspora Studies, and, of course, Anthropology of Tourism and Travel.

In addition to these formal settings for learning, our students also learn from one another. Hailing from around the globe and bringing diverse life experiences to bear on their studies, all MA students in the Department of Anthropology can take courses together, making it a rich environment for intellectual exchange. Students also benefit from campus-wide programmes, clubs, study groups, and performances.

Many students in the MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism opt for hands-on learning via the half-unit Directed Practical Study in Anthropology of Tourism course, with placements in leading UK-based NGOs like Equality in Tourism and Tourism Concern, among others, as well as in private tour operator firms, providing background material for future research.

While students in the MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism may take a language course for credit, all SOAS MA students, regardless of department or degree, are also entitled to register for non-credit free courses in a single language through the Language Entitlement Programme (LEP). Languages normally available include Arabic, Chinese, French, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Turkish and Urdu. Others may also be offered.

Destinations

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (https://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MTI/MIR program is designed to meet the needs of proficient bilinguals who aim to work as professional translators and interpreters and also have professional and academic knowledge and skills as well as advocacy skills for international relations. Read more

Overview

The MTI/MIR program is designed to meet the needs of proficient bilinguals who aim to work as professional translators and interpreters and also have professional and academic knowledge and skills as well as advocacy skills for international relations. Students will acquire the skills and knowledge required to perform translating and interpreting in a range of institutional settings common to community and commercial translating and interpreting practice in Australia and overseas while also acquiring the skills to mediate internationally in a variety of settings.

See the website http://courses.mq.edu.au/international/postgraduate/doublemaster/master-of-translation-and-interpreting-studies-with-the-degree-of-master-of-international-relations

Key benefits

- The focus is on the acquisition of theoretical knowledge and practical skills relevant to translating and interpreting practice as well as international relations.
- Students are guided to independent research and to execute practicum projects with our industry partners in a variety of settings.
- There is a strong emphasis on technological skills to prepare students for a fast-changing marketplace.

Suitable for

Suitable if you have an excellent knowledge of two languages: English and either Chinese (Mandarin), Japanese, Korean or another language supported at Macquarie University in the Translation and Interpreting programs, and if you wish to acquire professional translation and interpreting skills and an in-depth understanding of international affairs.

Please note our working languages for practical units are Chinese (Mandarin), Korean, Japanese, Spanish, and other languages depending on demand.

Work experience requirements

No work experience is required but it would be an advantage.

English language requirements

IELTS of 7.0 overall with minimum 6.5 in each band, or equivalent

All applicants for undergraduate or postgraduate coursework studies at Macquarie University are required to provide evidence of proficiency in English.
For more information see English Language Requirements. http://mq.edu.au/study/international/how_to_apply/english_language_requirements/

You may satisfy the English language requirements if you have completed:
- senior secondary studies equivalent to the NSW HSC
- one year of Australian or comparable tertiary study in a country of qualification

Notes

Our working languages for practical units are Chinese (Mandarin), Korean, Japanese, Spanish, and other languages depending on demand.

Careers

- Accreditation
The program is a NAATI (National Accreditation Authority for Translators and Interpreters) approved course for accreditation at professional translator and interpreter's level. For detailed information on languages that are approved for accreditation, please contact the program at

- Career Opportunities
Graduates will demonstrate advanced T&I skills and will be well prepared to pursue a career as professional translator and interpreter particularly in a public or private organisation which has a strong international focus.

See the website http://courses.mq.edu.au/international/postgraduate/doublemaster/master-of-translation-and-interpreting-studies-with-the-degree-of-master-of-international-relations

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This two-year programme combines the strengths of the MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia with intensive language training in Japanese or Korean. Read more
This two-year programme combines the strengths of the MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia with intensive language training in Japanese or Korean. Students study the arts of China, Korea and Japan, exploring a wide range of East Asian arts, from Chinese archaeology to Japanese prints, Korean installation works to Buddhist monuments, in historical and contemporary periods. Instruction in the language of their choice is provided by teachers in the Faculty of Languages and Cultures. By the end of the programme, which includes a summer language school abroad, students have received sufficient instruction to reach near-proficiency in the language.

The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in the art history and archaeology of East Asia, whose ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students working in other related fields, such as East Asian Music, Film and Media, as well as the expertise of specialist language teachers.

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/ma-art-and-archaeology-of-east-asia-and-intensive-language/

Structure

Students take two intensive language units and one East Asian History of Art and Archaeology unit in their first year. During the summer, they participate in a summer school abroad. Upon their return, they take one intensive language unit in their second year and two East Asian History of Art and Archaeology units. The dissertation is written on East Asian History of Art and Archaeology and submitted in September of year 2.

Teaching

Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory.

In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London.

Assessment

For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September of year 2.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including:

Asia House
Bonhams
British Museum
Christie's Hong Kong
Design Museum
Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum
Hong Kong Museum Of Art
India Foundation For The Arts
Museum of East Asian Art
National Gallery National Museum of Singapore
People Projects Culture & Change
Schoeni Art Gallery
Sotheby's
Taiwan Embassy
The Alliance for Global Education
The British Embassy
The Chester Beatty Library
The National Museum Of Korea
The Royal Collection

Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include:

Manager of Communications
Culture Programme Coordinator
Research Assistant
Social Anthropology Lecturer
Specialist - Indian Art
Architect
Art Historian
Development Specialist
Archivist
Gallery Director Innovation Programmes Learning Manager
Creative Director
Organisational Consultant
Travel writer
Art Collector
Chinese Painting Specialist
Professor of Silk Road History
Rights and Reproductions Officer
Public Education Coordinator
Senior Curator of Photographs

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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