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Masters Degrees (Kings College London)

We have 18 Masters Degrees (Kings College London)

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The MRES in Global Health Systems Theory and Policy is a pre-doctoral training programme designed to provide a critical, research led approach to the study of Global Heath systems, together with training in the key research skills appropriate for Doctoral level study. Read more
The MRES in Global Health Systems Theory and Policy is a pre-doctoral training programme designed to provide a critical, research led approach to the study of Global Heath systems, together with training in the key research skills appropriate for Doctoral level study. Alongside a suite of substantive modules offered in conjunction with the School's Global Health MScs, the programme includes core modules in research design, qualitative and quantitative methods taken jointly with social science students from a range of disciplines across QMUL, Kings College London and Imperial College as part of the training offered by the ESRC funded London Interdisciplinary Social Science Doctoral Training Partnership.

Students who successfully complete the programme will be able to move on to a PhD and eventually work in health policy and other fields of public health and public policy with a global perspective and equipped to enhance capacity and work effectively in multi-disciplinary teams on behalf of local populations.

Why study the MRES in Global Health Systems Theory and Policy at Queen Mary?
There are a number of distinct features about the course which include: an emphasis on the social determinants of health; a focus on the interface between politics and policy; a concern for social justice; and a stress upon primary care acting as a platform for effective public health action.

The course offers an opportunity to develop a pronounced multi-disciplinary analysis that includes sociology, anthropology, economics, law, geography as well as public health medicine. You will therefore learn from a truly multidisciplinary programme, which will give you a genuinely broad education and wide perspective.

Furthermore, the Barts and London School of Medicine and Dentistry is comprised of two renowned and prestigious teaching hospitals: St Bartholomew’s and The Royal London. Both continue to make an outstanding contribution to modern medicine and together have been consistently ranked among the top five in the UK for medicine.

The Global Health Unit combines the local and the global in a stimulating and challenging research and teaching environment – we have strong links to the NHS, local authorities, third-sector organisations, policymakers in the UK and elsewhere, and leading international figures in global health.

We integrate different types of teaching delivery including small group seminars and participation in public health conferences. We have collaborations with other universities and organisations from around the world to aid research, teaching, policy development, and community engagement, and we encourage students to get involved in both our local and international work.

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The International Human Resource Management MRes is a pre-doctoral training programme designed to provide a critical, research led approach to the study of aspects of human resource management and employment relations. Read more
The International Human Resource Management MRes is a pre-doctoral training programme designed to provide a critical, research led approach to the study of aspects of human resource management and employment relations. The programme reflects research interests of the academics in the Centre for Research in Equality and Diversity who provide the majority of the teaching for the programme, together with training in the key research skills appropriate for Doctoral level study. Alongside a suite of substantive modules offered in conjunction with the School's International Human Resource Management MSc, the programme includes core modules in research design, qualitative and quantitative methods taken jointly with social science students from a range of disciplines across QMUL, Kings College London and Imperial College as part of the training offered by the ESRC funded London Interdisciplinary Social Science Doctoral Training Partnership (LISS-DTP).

The International Human Resource Management MRes is in an approved pathway for ESRC funding, enabling students to apply for ESRC 1+3 funding to cover both the MRes and a PhD, and successful MRes graduates to apply subsequently for ESRC +3 PhD funding. The MRes also caters more generally for those seeking to develop their ability to apply knowledge and understanding of human resource management in a complex global environment –and is an ideal preparation for a career in multi-national business or in a human resource management role in national and international contexts, as well as for those pursuing advanced studies.

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Our established MA Librarianship degree includes guest lectures from industry professionals and field visits. Through group work, you’ll hone your organisational and teamworking skills. Read more

About the course

Our established MA Librarianship degree includes guest lectures from industry professionals and field visits. Through group work, you’ll hone your organisational and teamworking skills. We can also help you to develop leadership and management capabilities.

This CILIP-accredited course prepares you for a library career in a variety of sectors. Most applicants have around 12 months’ work experience but there is flexibility around this. Please contact us if you have queries about your work experience. If you’re more experienced, you should take the Professional Enhancement Programme.

Your career

Effective use of information improves the world and makes a positive difference to our lives. It is also central to economic development. The rapid pace of technological change and the globalisation of markets means that organisations in all sectors must realise the value of information systems.
The world needs graduates who are information literate.

Our graduates work for all kinds of organisations, in the public and private sectors. Employers include:

Adidas; BBC; British Red Cross; Cambridge University; The Department of Health; Ernst and Young; GCHQ; Goldman Sachs; Hewlett-Packard CDS; House of Commons Library; Imperial College London; IBM; Kings College London; NHS; Pepsico; Pricewaterhouse Coopers; Stanford University

If you’re already an experienced professional, you can develop new skills and advance your career with one of our Professional Enhancement Programmes.

Your subject

Our courses are research-led, which means you’ll learn about the latest concepts from academics who work with organisations to drive developments in this field. Alongside the theory and technical skills, you’ll develop some valuable attributes including effective communication, application of research methods and creative problem solving.

How we teach

All our courses (except our distance learning courses) include lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical laboratory classes, group work, online discussion, case studies and lectures by visiting speakers. Our MA Librarianship course also includes visits to library and information service organisations. You’ll be assessed using a wide variety of methods including essays, reports, small projects, in-class tests, presentations, posters, group work and a research-based dissertation.

Learning Environment

Our dedicated departmental teaching suite contains two networked laboratories with 60 computers and a 30-seat lecture room. Our state of the art iLab includes a Usability Lab and Digital Media Lab designed to collect research data into human–computer interaction.

The iSpace is an open plan, social learning area for students. It has display facilities, open-access PCs and bookable partitioned group work areas. There is Wi-Fi coverage throughout the department, and you can connect your own laptop to our network. Mobile devices and tables are available for you to borrow for project work.

We’re right in the middle of the campus and close to the Information Commons and the new Diamond building so you’ll be able to access the University’s many resources.

Part time study

Part-time students normally take one or two taught module in each semester, depending upon whether the course is taken over three or two years. In the final year you’ll also take a dissertation module. For most modules, you’ll usually need to come in for three to four hours per week.

Core modules

Dissertation; Management for Library and Information Services; Information Retrieval: Search Engines and Digital Libraries; Information Literacy; Libraries, Information and Society; Research Methods and Dissertation Preparation.

Examples of optional modules

Including: Archives and Records Management; Information Governance and Ethics; Researching Social Media; Data and Society; Digital Advocacy; Business Intelligence; Database Design; Human Computer Information Interaction: Content Management Systems; Digital Multimedia Libraries; Public and Youth Library Services; Academic and Workplace Library, Information and Knowledge Services.

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About the course. This CILIP-accredited course focuses on the theoretical and practical skills you need for a career in information management. Read more

About the course

This CILIP-accredited course focuses on the theoretical and practical skills you need for a career in information management. The aim is to make you into the kind of person employers are looking for: information literate with the technical know-how to develop, design and manage information systems.

You’ll acquire valuable transferable skills such as presentation and report writing. We can help develop your skills as an information leader.

If you’re an experienced professional, you could consider taking the Professional Enhancement Programme.

Your career

Effective use of information improves the world and makes a positive difference to our lives. It is also central to economic development. The rapid pace of technological change and the globalisation of markets means that organisations in all sectors must realise the value of information systems.

The world needs graduates who are information literate.

Our graduates work for all kinds of organisations, in the public and private sectors. Employers include:

Adidas; BBC; British Red Cross; Cambridge University; The Department of Health; Ernst and Young; GCHQ; Goldman Sachs; Hewlett-Packard CDS; House of Commons Library; Imperial College London; IBM; Kings College London; NHS; Pepsico; Pricewaterhouse Coopers; Stanford University

If you’re already an experienced professional, you can develop new skills and advance your career with one of our Professional Enhancement Programmes.

Your subject

Our courses are research-led, which means you’ll learn about the latest concepts from academics who work with organisations to drive developments in this field. Alongside the theory and technical skills, you’ll develop some valuable attributes including effective communication, application of research methods and creative problem solving.

How we teach

All our courses (except our distance learning courses) include lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical laboratory classes, group work, online discussion, case studies and lectures by visiting speakers. Our MA Librarianship course also includes visits to library and information service organisations. You’ll be assessed using a wide variety of methods including essays, reports, small projects, in-class tests, presentations, posters, group work and a research-based dissertation.

Learning Environment

Our dedicated departmental teaching suite contains two networked laboratories with 60 computers and a 30-seat lecture room. Our state of the art iLab includes a Usability Lab and Digital Media Lab designed to collect research data into human–computer interaction.

The iSpace is an open plan, social learning area for students. It has display facilities, open-access PCs and bookable partitioned group work areas. There is Wi-Fi coverage throughout the department, and you can connect your own laptop to our network. Mobile devices and tables are available for you to borrow for project work.

We’re right in the middle of the campus and close to the Information Commons and the new Diamond building so you’ll be able to access the University’s many resources.

Core modules

  • Dissertation
  • Information and Knowledge Management
  • Information Governance and Ethics
  • Information Retrieval: Search Engines and Digital Libraries
  • Information Systems in Organisations
  • Research Methods and Dissertation Preparation

Examples of optional modules

Including:

  • Database Design Information Systems Change Management
  • Researching Social Media
  • Digital Advocacy
  • Business Intelligence
  • Academic and Workplace, Library, Information and Knowledge Services
  • Human Computer Information Interaction
  • Archives and Records Management
  • Information Systems Project Management
  • E-Business and E-Commerce
  • Information Literacy Research
  • Content Management Systems

Teaching and assessment

You can expect a mix of lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical laboratory classes, group work, online discussion, case studies and lectures by visiting speakers.

You'll be assessed using a wide variety of methods including essays, reports, small projects, in-class tests, presentations, posters, group work and a research-based dissertation.



Read less
About the course. This CILIP-accredited course will prepare you for a career in the private or the public sector. It’s run in partnership with the Department of Computer Science so you can specialise in either a technical computing route or an organisational and information-focused route. Read more

About the course

This CILIP-accredited course will prepare you for a career in the private or the public sector. It’s run in partnership with the Department of Computer Science so you can specialise in either a technical computing route or an organisational and information-focused route.

You’ll acquire valuable transferable skills such as presentation and report writing. We can help develop your skills as an information systems leader.

If you have little or no relevant work experience, this course is for you. If you’re more experienced, you should take the Professional Enhancement Programme.

Your career

Effective use of information improves the world and makes a positive difference to our lives. It is also central to economic development. The rapid pace of technological change and the globalisation of markets means that organisations in all sectors must realise the value of information systems.

The world needs graduates who are information literate.

Our graduates work for all kinds of organisations, in the public and private sectors. Employers include:

Adidas; BBC; British Red Cross; Cambridge University; The Department of Health; Ernst and Young; GCHQ; Goldman Sachs; Hewlett-Packard CDS; House of Commons Library; Imperial College London; IBM; Kings College London; NHS; Pepsico; Pricewaterhouse Coopers; Stanford University

If you’re already an experienced professional, you can develop new skills and advance your career with one of our Professional Enhancement Programmes.

Your subject

Our courses are research-led, which means you’ll learn about the latest concepts from academics who work with organisations to drive developments in this field. Alongside the theory and technical skills, you’ll develop some valuable attributes including effective communication, application of research methods and creative problem solving.

How we teach

All our courses (except our distance learning courses) include lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical laboratory classes, group work, online discussion, case studies and lectures by visiting speakers. Our MA Librarianship course also includes visits to library and information service organisations. You’ll be assessed using a wide variety of methods including essays, reports, small projects, in-class tests, presentations, posters, group work and a research-based dissertation.

Learning Environment

Our dedicated departmental teaching suite contains two networked laboratories with 60 computers and a 30-seat lecture room. Our state of the art iLab includes a Usability Lab and Digital Media Lab designed to collect research data into human–computer interaction.

The iSpace is an open plan, social learning area for students. It has display facilities, open-access PCs and bookable partitioned group work areas. There is Wi-Fi coverage throughout the department, and you can connect your own laptop to our network. Mobile devices and tables are available for you to borrow for project work.

We’re right in the middle of the campus and close to the Information Commons and the new Diamond building so you’ll be able to access the University’s many resources.

Core modules

  • Foundations of Object-Oriented Programming
  • Professional Issues
  • Information Systems Project Management
  • Information Systems Modelling
  • Information Systems in Organisations
  • Information Systems and the Information Society
  • Dissertation

Examples of optional modules

Including:

  • Advanced Java Programming
  • Computer Security and Forensics
  • Web Technologies
  • Cloud Computing
  • E-Business and E-Commerce
  • Content Management Systems
  • Information Systems Change Management
  • Researching Social Media
  • Information Governance and Ethics
  • Business Intelligence
  • Database Design
  • Human Computer Information Interaction

Teaching and assessment

You can expect a mix of lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical laboratory classes, group work, online discussion, case studies and lectures by visiting speakers.

You'll be assessed using a wide variety of methods including essays, reports, small projects, in-class tests, presentations, posters, group work and a research-based dissertation.



Read less
About the course. This CILIP-accredited course is about the creation, management and use of digital libraries and resources. It will introduce you to the strategic thinking and project management skills you need for a successful career. Read more

About the course

This CILIP-accredited course is about the creation, management and use of digital libraries and resources. It will introduce you to the strategic thinking and project management skills you need for a successful career. You’ll learn about digitisation, repositories, web creation and how to design digital libraries people want to use.

The course combines lectures from academics and professionals, seminars, small-group work and computer labs. We can also help you to develop leadership and management capabilities.

Your career

Effective use of information improves the world and makes a positive difference to our lives. It is also central to economic development. The rapid pace of technological change and the globalisation of markets means that organisations in all sectors must realise the value of information systems.

The world needs graduates who are information literate.

Our graduates work for all kinds of organisations, in the public and private sectors. Employers include:

Adidas; BBC; British Red Cross; Cambridge University; The Department of Health; Ernst and Young; GCHQ; Goldman Sachs; Hewlett-Packard CDS; House of Commons Library; Imperial College London; IBM; Kings College London; NHS; Pepsico; Pricewaterhouse Coopers; Stanford University

If you’re already an experienced professional, you can develop new skills and advance your career with one of our Professional Enhancement Programmes.

Your subject

Our courses are research-led, which means you’ll learn about the latest concepts from academics who work with organisations to drive developments in this field. Alongside the theory and technical skills, you’ll develop some valuable attributes including effective communication, application of research methods and creative problem solving.

How we teach

All our courses (except our distance learning courses) include lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical laboratory classes, group work, online discussion, case studies and lectures by visiting speakers. Our MA Librarianship course also includes visits to library and information service organisations. You’ll be assessed using a wide variety of methods including essays, reports, small projects, in-class tests, presentations, posters, group work and a research-based dissertation.

Learning Environment

Our dedicated departmental teaching suite contains two networked laboratories with 60 computers and a 30-seat lecture room. Our state of the art iLab includes a Usability Lab and Digital Media Lab designed to collect research data into human–computer interaction.

The iSpace is an open plan, social learning area for students. It has display facilities, open-access PCs and bookable partitioned group work areas. There is Wi-Fi coverage throughout the department, and you can connect your own laptop to our network. Mobile devices and tables are available for you to borrow for project work.

We’re right in the middle of the campus and close to the Information Commons and the new Diamond building so you’ll be able to access the University’s many resources.

Core modules

  • Dissertation
  • Designing Usable Websites
  • Digital Multimedia Libraries
  • Management and Strategy for Digital Libraries
  • Information Retrieval: Search Engines and Digital Libraries
  • Research Methods and Dissertation Preparation

Examples of optional modules

Including:

  • Researching Social Media
  • Information Systems in Organisations
  • E-Business and E-Commerce
  • Database Design
  • Libraries, Information and Society
  • Information Governance and Ethics
  • Data and Society
  • Business Intelligence
  • Academic and Workplace Library, Information and Knowledge Services
  • Archives and Record Management
  • Advanced Digital Humanities


Read less
About the course. This CILIP-accredited course is aimed at health care professionals who want to improve services in their sector by getting more out of information and communication technologies. Read more

About the course

This CILIP-accredited course is aimed at health care professionals who want to improve services in their sector by getting more out of information and communication technologies. It’s taught online so you can fit it around your work.

Alongside the more specialised knowledge, you’ll acquire valuable transferable skills such as presentation and report writing. We can also help you develop leadership and management capabilities.

First year students take part in an online induction before the course starts. The rest of the course uses specialised software to deliver lectures, seminars and tutorials online, in real time. In the final year, you’ll complete a research dissertation, supervised by an academic.

Your career

Effective use of information improves the world and makes a positive difference to our lives. It is also central to economic development. The rapid pace of technological change and the globalisation of markets means that organisations in all sectors must realise the value of information systems.

The world needs graduates who are information literate.

Our graduates work for all kinds of organisations, in the public and private sectors. Employers include:

Adidas; BBC; British Red Cross; Cambridge University; The Department of Health; Ernst and Young; GCHQ; Goldman Sachs; Hewlett-Packard CDS; House of Commons Library; Imperial College London; IBM; Kings College London; NHS; Pepsico; Pricewaterhouse Coopers; Stanford University

If you’re already an experienced professional, you can develop new skills and advance your career with one of our Professional Enhancement Programmes.

Your subject

Our courses are research-led, which means you’ll learn about the latest concepts from academics who work with organisations to drive developments in this field. Alongside the theory and technical skills, you’ll develop some valuable attributes including effective communication, application of research methods and creative problem solving.

How we teach

All our courses (except our distance learning courses) include lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical laboratory classes, group work, online discussion, case studies and lectures by visiting speakers. Our MA Librarianship course also includes visits to library and information service organisations. You’ll be assessed using a wide variety of methods including essays, reports, small projects, in-class tests, presentations, posters, group work and a research-based dissertation.

Learning Environment

Our dedicated departmental teaching suite contains two networked laboratories with 60 computers and a 30-seat lecture room. Our state of the art iLab includes a Usability Lab and Digital Media Lab designed to collect research data into human–computer interaction.

The iSpace is an open plan, social learning area for students. It has display facilities, open-access PCs and bookable partitioned group work areas. There is Wi-Fi coverage throughout the department, and you can connect your own laptop to our network. Mobile devices and tables are available for you to borrow for project work.

We’re right in the middle of the campus and close to the Information Commons and the new Diamond building so you’ll be able to access the University’s many resources.

Core modules

  • Placing Electronic Records at the Centre of Care
  • Evidence-based Practice and Health Care Information
  • The Internet, Web and E-Health
  • Information and Knowledge Management
  • Information Systems in Health
  • Introduction to Health Informatics
  • Research Methods and Dissertation Preparation
  • Dissertation

Examples of optional modules

  • Introduction to Telehealth and Telecare
  • Public Health; Informatics Leadership, Strategy and Change
  • Analysis of Health Information


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About the course. This CILIP-accredited course produces highly employable graduates for a rapidly expanding global job market. It was developed in collaboration with external organisations across a range of sectors to make sure you gain knowledge and learn skills that employers are looking for. Read more

About the course

This CILIP-accredited course produces highly employable graduates for a rapidly expanding global job market. It was developed in collaboration with external organisations across a range of sectors to make sure you gain knowledge and learn skills that employers are looking for.

You’ll learn the theory and the skills you need to support data-driven decision-making in organisations. The course covers three core areas: data management, data analysis and business insight. You’ll get hands-on experience with data management and analysis. Industry experts contribute to the course, sharing their experience and talking you through examples of data science in action.

Our graduates are not just technically proficient. They’re also keenly aware of broader issues such as data presentation, privacy and ethics. That extra edge makes them even more attractive to employers.

Your career

Effective use of information improves the world and makes a positive difference to our lives. It is also central to economic development. The rapid pace of technological change and the globalisation of markets means that organisations in all sectors must realise the value of information systems.

The world needs graduates who are information literate.

Our graduates work for all kinds of organisations, in the public and private sectors. Employers include:

Adidas; BBC; British Red Cross; Cambridge University; The Department of Health; Ernst and Young; GCHQ; Goldman Sachs; Hewlett-Packard CDS; House of Commons Library; Imperial College London; IBM; Kings College London; NHS; Pepsico; Pricewaterhouse Coopers; Stanford University

If you’re already an experienced professional, you can develop new skills and advance your career with one of our Professional Enhancement Programmes.

Your subject

Our courses are research-led, which means you’ll learn about the latest concepts from academics who work with organisations to drive developments in this field. Alongside the theory and technical skills, you’ll develop some valuable attributes including effective communication, application of research methods and creative problem solving.

How we teach

All our courses (except our distance learning courses) include lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical laboratory classes, group work, online discussion, case studies and lectures by visiting speakers. Our MA Librarianship course also includes visits to library and information service organisations. You’ll be assessed using a wide variety of methods including essays, reports, small projects, in-class tests, presentations, posters, group work and a research-based dissertation.

Learning Environment

Our dedicated departmental teaching suite contains two networked laboratories with 60 computers and a 30-seat lecture room. Our state of the art iLab includes a Usability Lab and Digital Media Lab designed to collect research data into human–computer interaction.

The iSpace is an open plan, social learning area for students. It has display facilities, open-access PCs and bookable partitioned group work areas. There is Wi-Fi coverage throughout the department, and you can connect your own laptop to our network. Mobile devices and tables are available for you to borrow for project work.

We’re right in the middle of the campus and close to the Information Commons and the new Diamond building so you’ll be able to access the University’s many resources.

Core modules

  • Introduction to Data Science
  • Data Mining and Visualisation
  • Data Analysis
  • Database Design
  • Research Methods and Dissertation Preparation
  • Dissertation

Examples of optional modules

  • Information Systems in Organisations
  • Business Intelligence
  • Information Governance and Ethics
  • Researching Social Media
  • Information Retrieval: Search Engines and Digital Libraries
  • Digital Advocacy
  • Data and Society.

Teaching and assessment

You can expect a mix of lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical laboratory classes, group work, online discussion, case studies and lectures by visiting speakers.

You'll be assessed using a wide variety of methods including essays, reports, small projects, in-class tests, presentations, posters, group work and a research-based dissertation.



Read less
About the course. Change happens fast in information management. As a professional, you need to keep up with new technologies and approaches if you want to provide great services. Read more

About the course

Change happens fast in information management. As a professional, you need to keep up with new technologies and approaches if you want to provide great services. That’s what we’re here for.

Our new CILIP-accredited MA helps you develop the skills you need to move your career forward. It’s also a unique opportunity to share your experience with fellow professionals. We offer modules that focus on leadership and on your own personal and professional development.

This course is designed to suit busy professionals. It’s taught completely online so you can fit it around your other commitments. And you can study from anywhere in the world.

Your career

Effective use of information improves the world and makes a positive difference to our lives. It is also central to economic development. The rapid pace of technological change and the globalisation of markets means that organisations in all sectors must realise the value of information systems.

The world needs graduates who are information literate.

Our graduates work for all kinds of organisations, in the public and private sectors. Employers include:

Adidas; BBC; British Red Cross; Cambridge University; The Department of Health; Ernst and Young; GCHQ; Goldman Sachs; Hewlett-Packard CDS; House of Commons Library; Imperial College London; IBM; Kings College London; NHS; Pepsico; Pricewaterhouse Coopers; Stanford University

If you’re already an experienced professional, you can develop new skills and advance your career with one of our Professional Enhancement Programmes.

Your subject

Our courses are research-led, which means you’ll learn about the latest concepts from academics who work with organisations to drive developments in this field. Alongside the theory and technical skills, you’ll develop some valuable attributes including effective communication, application of research methods and creative problem solving.

How we teach

All our courses (except our distance learning courses) include lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical laboratory classes, group work, online discussion, case studies and lectures by visiting speakers. Our MA Librarianship course also includes visits to library and information service organisations. You’ll be assessed using a wide variety of methods including essays, reports, small projects, in-class tests, presentations, posters, group work and a research-based dissertation.

Learning Environment

Our dedicated departmental teaching suite contains two networked laboratories with 60 computers and a 30-seat lecture room. Our state of the art iLab includes a Usability Lab and Digital Media Lab designed to collect research data into human–computer interaction.

The iSpace is an open plan, social learning area for students. It has display facilities, open-access PCs and bookable partitioned group work areas. There is Wi-Fi coverage throughout the department, and you can connect your own laptop to our network. Mobile devices and tables are available for you to borrow for project work.

We’re right in the middle of the campus and close to the Information Commons and the new Diamond building so you’ll be able to access the University’s many resources.

Part time study

Part-time students normally take one or two taught module in each semester, depending upon whether the course is taken over three or two years. In the final year you’ll also take a dissertation module. For most modules, you’ll usually need to come in for three to four hours per week.

Core modules

  • Libraries, Information and Society
  • Information Literacy
  • Leadership, Strategy and Change
  • Information Retrieval: Search Engines and Digital Libraries
  • Information and Knowledge Management
  • Personal and Professional Development Portfolio
  • Research Methods and Dissertation Preparation
  • Dissertation

Examples of optional modules

  • Public and Youth Library Services
  • Academic and Workplace Library, Information and Knowledge Services
  • Information Governance and Ethics
  • Database Design and Data Management


Read less
Our MRes programme provide a personalised and focused introduction to postgraduate research allowing you to develop as an independent researcher with the support of an expert in Latin American Studies. Read more
Our MRes programme provide a personalised and focused introduction to postgraduate research allowing you to develop as an independent researcher with the support of an expert in Latin American Studies. It provides a rigorous overview of the current state of scholarship in your selected field, guides you, through a programme of directed, individualised reading, to the selection of a feasible research project, and allows you to complete a substantial piece of research.

As an MRes student you will benefit from your membership of the university research community, both students and academic staff. You will also have access to facilities available to doctoral students e.g. free Interlibrary loans, a print allowance and a research allowance.

Key Facts

REF 2014
We're ranked in top 50% for 4* and 3* research with 90% of environment at 4* and 3* (world leading and internationally excellent).

French
Since 2001, the Department has housed three major AHRC-funded projects in French; it also continues to be one of the leading centres in French studies for innovation in the application of IT and new technology to text-based research and the creation of international research networks. A major new monograph series, Liverpool University Press’s ‘Contemporary French and Francophone Cultures’, is co-edited within Modern Languages and Cultures.

German
Research in German studies at Liverpool continues to develop its breadth and vitality, through new appointments, and through a strategy directed towards promoting cooperation among staff in different subject areas. Colleagues are actively involved in interdisciplinary research centres, namely the Research Centre in Eighteenth-Century Studies, the Centre for the Study of International Slavery, and CAVA (The Centre for Architecture and the Visual Arts). These research centres provide a dynamic context for the development of staff and postgraduate research, and underpin and vitalise interdisciplinary research within the section and department as a whole.

Hispanic Studies
We continue to extend research activity over a broad range of areas in Iberian and Latin American Studies. The School is now at the forefront of high profile research in literary, historical, linguistic and cultural studies. Our research emphasises our understanding of ‘Hispanic studies’ in the broadest sense, as relating to the multiple geographical and linguistic contexts that make up the Hispanic and Lusophone worlds.

Latin American Studies and Italian Studies
The section has recently made new appointments including a new post extending our expertise to North America and the Caribbean. We have consolidated research clusters in American, Brazilian, Hispanic and Caribbean Studies, enhancing the research environment by providing institutional support to colleagues with related and overlapping interests. A University-wide research centre Research Institute of Latin American Studies (RILAS) fosters a robust research environment based in the Department.
Research in Italian studies is a recent addition to the School’s portfolio. The focus is on the contemporary and staff are involved in interdisciplinary research projects which feature, amongst others, the Linguistic Landscape, Italian political cinema and European cinema.

Why Department of Modern Languages and Cultures?

Introduction to Modern Languages and Cultures

We are a smaller department than many, but manage at the same time to maintain a variety of very distinctive areas of strength in research. As a result we are uniquely placed to offer taught programmes which are tailored to the individual in a friendly, supportive atmosphere and, for research students, close contact with your supervisors from the outset.

There is a high degree of interdisciplinary activity, with students and staff from all disciplines interacting through institutional research centres, cross-School reading groups, research groups and seminars.

We offer an MA in Latin American Studies and an MA in Modern Languages (French / German / Hispanic Studies/Italian) and supervision on a wide range of topics for both MPhil and PhD study.

Applications are welcome for both full-time and part-time study. Postgraduate students form an integral part of our research culture, and are encouraged to become involved in conference, workshops and seminar series, in addition, we have postgraduate reading groups and a regular programme of postgraduate workshops involving leading scholars visiting the institution. We have an active and vibrant research community, with staff engaging in research covering eight language areas consisting of French, German, Italian, Spanish, Galician, Catalan, Portuguese and Corsican. Research interests range from medieval manuscripts to contemporary cyber literature, and cover a wide geographical remit, with staff working on American, Latin American, and Caribbean, African and Indian contexts as well as European ones.

We are home to three scholarly journals: Bulletin of Hispanic Studies, Bulletin of Latin American Research, and Migrations and Identities as well as a number of prominent book series.

Research Overview

Our research activities are broadly organised around four research groups in addition to the Research Institute of Latin American Studies. The groups are engaged in interdisciplinary work, taking in literary, visual and historical sources, and collaborating across the language areas.

Latin American Studies

Latin American Studies is one of Modern languages and Cultures' major research specialisms. The six permanent members of staff have research interests in the following domains of Latin American Studies: anthropology, cultural studies, history, literature, politics, and sociology and extend to Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Central America, the Caribbean and southern USA. The Sydney Jones Library is an acknowledged centre of excellence for collections in Latin American Studies. Additional facilities for all postgraduates include access to regular seminars and short conferences, language tuition, and use of the University’s networked computer facilities.

Career prospects

Former postgraduates in French, German and Hispanic Studies are currently employed in senior positions at the universities of: Aberdeen, Sussex, Leeds, Sheffield, Kings College London, Loughborough, Salford and Liverpool, as well as in a variety of careers.

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Our MRes programme provide a personalised and focused introduction to postgraduate research allowing you to develop as an independent researcher with the support of an expert in Modern Languages and Cultures. Read more
Our MRes programme provide a personalised and focused introduction to postgraduate research allowing you to develop as an independent researcher with the support of an expert in Modern Languages and Cultures. It provides a rigorous overview of the current state of scholarship in your selected field, guides you, through a programme of directed, individualised reading, to the selection of a feasible research project, and allows you to complete a substantial piece of research.

Within Modern Language and Cultures, we offer pathways in:

- Latin-American Studies
- Hispanic Studies
- Spanish Studies
- Portuguese Studies, Catalan Studies
- Basque Studies
- French Studies
- German Studies
- Italian Studies
- Film Studies
- Chinese Studies.

As an MRes student you will benefit from your membership of the university research community, both students and academic staff. You will also have access to facilities available to doctoral students e.g. free Interlibrary loans, a print allowance and a research allowance.

Why Department of Modern Languages and Cultures?

We are a smaller department than many, but manage at the same time to maintain a variety of very distinctive areas of strength in research. As a result we are uniquely placed to offer taught programmes which are tailored to the individual in a friendly, supportive atmosphere and, for research students, close contact with your supervisors from the outset.

There is a high degree of interdisciplinary activity, with students and staff from all disciplines interacting through institutional research centres, cross-School reading groups, research groups and seminars.

We offer an MA in Latin American Studies and an MA in Modern Languages (French / German / Hispanic Studies/Italian) and supervision on a wide range of topics for both MPhil and PhD study.

Applications are welcome for both full-time and part-time study. Postgraduate students form an integral part of our research culture, and are encouraged to become involved in conference, workshops and seminar series, in addition, we have postgraduate reading groups and a regular programme of postgraduate workshops involving leading scholars visiting the institution. We have an active and vibrant research community, with staff engaging in research covering eight language areas consisting of French, German, Italian, Spanish, Galician, Catalan, Portuguese and Corsican. Research interests range from medieval manuscripts to contemporary cyber literature, and cover a wide geographical remit, with staff working on American, Latin American, and Caribbean, African and Indian contexts as well as European ones.

We are home to three scholarly journals: Bulletin of Hispanic Studies, Bulletin of Latin American Research, and Migrations and Identities as well as a number of prominent book series.

Research Overview

Our research activities are broadly organised around four research groups in addition to the Research Institute of Latin American Studies. The groups are engaged in interdisciplinary work, taking in literary, visual and historical sources, and collaborating across the language areas.

French Studies

Research interests in French Studies cover all areas of French literature, culture and history, including Medieval studies, sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth century studies, French theatre, French cinema, travel literature, francophone postcolonial studies (including French language representations of India),modern and contemporary France, and sociolinguistics. Colleagues are actively involved in interdisciplinary research centres, namely the Research Centre in Eighteenth-Century Studies, the Centre of International Slavery, the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies and the India in the World Research Centre.

German Studies

Postgraduate teaching and supervision in German Studies covers the full range of modern (post 1750) German literary and cultural studies, including German cinema. It also offers tuition and supervision in many areas of social history, where staff specialisms include gender and women’s history since the eighteenth-century, twentieth-century labour history, Holocaust studies, issues of race and ethnicity (Afro-German and Gypsy studies), the culture and politics of East and West Germany and contemporary Berlin. The University Library’s Special Collections include uniquely rich holdings on German and European Gypsy studies. Research contacts exist with numerous universities and institutes in Germany and the United States.

Hispanic Studies

The University has the oldest chair of Spanish in the country (established 1908). It has a distinguished tradition of excellence within an extensive area of Hispanic Studies teaching and research which includes not only the Peninsula (Spain and Portugal), but also Latin America (Peru, Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, Chile, etc). Among the section’s achievements and publications in research are the Bulletin of Hispanic Studies, a quarterly journal of international influence (published by Liverpool University Press), Hispanic Textual Research and Criticism (TRAC) and a scholarly series of books and editions. Postgraduate supervision and courses are offered in diverse specialist subjects within the broad range of Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan and Latin American Studies. This reflects the varied research interests and publications of members of staff in the section. Postgraduate students have at their disposal in the Sydney Jones Library large holdings in Hispanic books and periodicals, which are among the most comprehensive in the country.

Italian Studies

Postgraduate supervision in Italian is provided in the following areas: sociolinguistics, Italian dialectology, Italian cinema and crime/detective fiction. Postgraduate students benefit from the remarkable digitised collections and resources available in the Sydney Jones Library and the personalised services provided by library staff.

Latin American Studies

Latin American Studies is one of Modern languagesa dn Cultures' major research specialisms. The six permanent members of staff have research interests in the following domains of Latin American Studies: anthropology, cultural studies, history, literature, politics, and sociology and extend to Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Central America, the Caribbean and southern USA. The Sydney Jones Library is an acknowledged centre of excellence for collections in Latin American Studies. Additional facilities for all postgraduates include access to regular seminars and short conferences, language tuition, and use of the University’s networked computer facilities.

Career prospects

Former postgraduates in French, German and Hispanic Studies are currently employed in senior positions at the universities of: Aberdeen, Sussex, Leeds, Sheffield, Kings College London, Loughborough, Salford and Liverpool, as well as in a variety of careers.

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Current government policy recognises the need for specialist practitioner nurses who are prepared to take on leadership and management roles, develop research skills and be innovative and creative in practice. Read more

About the course

Current government policy recognises the need for specialist practitioner nurses who are prepared to take on leadership and management roles, develop research skills and be innovative and creative in practice.

This postgraduate diploma aims to develop specialist practitioners who are competent to practise and able to influence and facilitate change within the community nursing environment. It enables nurses to qualify as community specialist practitioners able to influence and facilitate change within the community environment.

Literacy and Numeracy Tests

Literacy and Numeracy tests are being held as part of the centralised application process for Health Visiting and School Nursing. To gain sponsorship for the Health Visiting and School Nurse pathways most Trusts will require a numeracy and literacy assessment undertaken at a participating university. Click the link below for further information and to book your place.

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/o/scphn-programme-teams-city-university-of-london-brunel-university-london-kings-college-london-london-south-bank-university-university-of-greenwich-9439138668

If you are considering studying Specialist Community Public Health Nursing at Brunel University London then you are committed to working jointly with the NHS to demonstrate the values and beliefs of the constitution.

NHS values
Patients, public and staff have helped develop this expression of values that inspire passion in the NHS and that should underpin everything it does. Individual organisations will develop and build upon these values, tailoring them to their local needs. The NHS values provide common ground for co-operation to achieve shared aspirations, at all levels of the NHS.


The following specialisms are available:

Health Visiting: Develops skills in the promotion of health and the prevention of ill health at the individual, group and community level.

Occupational Health Nursing: Develops skills in the provision of healthcare in the workplace.

School Nursing: Develops practitioners able to lead a school nursing team and plan quality health care for school children and their families.

Course Content

Compulsory Modules - all programmes:

Mental Health and well being

Optional Modules - all programmes:

Nursing Prescribing

Compulsory Modules - all programmes:

Developing Specialist Community Public Health Nursing Practice
Health Promotion and Public Health Leadership
Approaches to Research
Consolidated Practice
Dissertation

Occupational Health Nursing Programmes:
Managing Professional Perspective in SCPHN-OHN

School Nursing Programmes:
Managing Professional Perspective in SCPHN-SN

Health Visiting Programmes:
Managing Professional Perspective in SCPHN-HV

Work Placements

Fifty per cent of the course involves supervised work placements within the chosen area of specialist practice. You will be allocated an experienced practice teacher who provides support and undertakes assessment in practice. Strong links have been forged between the University, practice teachers, managers and purchasers to ensure a quality programme.

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This course focuses on the history of Britain, Europe and the wider world between c.1500–1800, highlighting themes of political, cultural… Read more

This course focuses on the history of Britain, Europe and the wider world between c.1500–1800, highlighting themes of political, cultural, religious and social history. The course is taught by experts in the histories of the Reformation and the Enlightenment, gender, the material world of the Renaissance, race and racism, and on Britain, Ireland, France, the Netherlands, Portugal and the Iberian world, offering you the opportunity to choose from a wide range of modules.

Leads to further research or careers in museums, journalism, finance and the cultural sector.

Key benefits

  • One of the best history departments in the world, ranked 5th in the UK for Research Quality (REF 2014) and in the Top 10 departments of History in Europe (QS World University Rankings 2016).
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. Kings is ranked in the top 6 in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016).
  • A wide set of optional modules all taught by established experts in the field
  • A rigorous core course that trains students in historical research in archives, manuscripts, print and objects
  • Central London location and staff expertise offers students unrivalled access to world-class museums, collections, archives and libraries as well as easy access to resources in Europe.
  • Vibrant research culture of seminars, workshops and conferences in the department and at the Institute of Historical Research, in which students are encouraged to participate.

Description

Our Early Modern History MA bridges the division between British and European history that exists on many courses, focusing on ways in which cultural, political and social themes stretch across the period c.1500–1800.

The course is taught by experts in the histories of the Reformation and the Enlightenment, gender, the material world of the Renaissance, race and racism, and on Britain, Ireland, France, the Netherlands, Portugal and the Iberian world. Their research connects the political and the social, the cultural and the religious dimensions of the early modern world, and our course will give you interdisciplinary perspectives on early modern history.

You will write a dissertation at the end of your course, but you will begin by testing concepts such as identity, mentality, religion; by challenging models of change including modernization, state-building, the civilising process, reformation, enlightenment and revolution; and by trying out different methodologies such as cultural history, gender, thinking with material objects, global history, using digital data.

Our optional modules offer you different perspectives on religion, society, politics and culture, by examining primary sources of all kinds alongside the most recent historiographical interpretations. We will also develop your practical skills through modules such as advanced historical skills, including palaeography, Latin from beginner to advanced levels, and offer the chance to learn a European language. The flexibility of the course means that you can also take relevant modules from other departments in, for example, early modern English or French literature, the Iberian world and Digital Humanities. You can also attend relevant undergraduate lecture series such as Power, Culture and Belief in Europe 1500–1800 and Early Modern Britain 1500–1750.

You will have access to an excellent range of library resources. Our long-standing expertise in the early modern period means our library has an extensive collection of journals and books in this field. You can also use the British Library, Senate House Library (University of London) and the Institute of Historical Research. We provide access to the most significant online collections of primary printed material, Early English Books Online and the Eighteenth Century Online and to JSTOR and other online resources for secondary material.

Course purpose

The MA Early Modern History course offers a rigorous introduction to the advanced study of early modern history, providing training in the historiographical and technical skills necessary for doctoral study, but is also designed for those who want to deepen their knowledge of the period.

Course format and assessment

Teaching Style

We teach our modules through small seminar groups where we will debate and discuss ideas based on extensive reading.

If you are a full-time student, we will provide you with six to nine hours of teaching each week, and we will expect you to undertake 32 to 34 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide you with two to six hours of teaching each week, and we will expect you to undertake 14 to 18 hours of independent study.

For your dissertation we will provide you with six hours of one-to-one supervision and we will expect you to undertake 574 hours of independent study.

Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

We will assess your performance through coursework and occasionally exams. The majority of the history modules are assessed by coursework essay; other optional modules may differ.

Regulating body

King’s College is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England.

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This programme, run in conjunction with, and based at the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families, provides a unique foundation for individuals interested in pursuing a psychotherapy training or an academic career in childhood development. Read more

This programme, run in conjunction with, and based at the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families, provides a unique foundation for individuals interested in pursuing a psychotherapy training or an academic career in childhood development. The programme combines psychoanalytic theory of development and inter-family relationships with a year-long observation of infants in a family setting, and a research project.

About this degree

Students develop a theoretical grounding in psychoanalysis as related to child development and clinical practice. Observations of parents and children allow students to witness some of these theoretical constructs in real world contexts and help students develop the observational skills essential in clinical work. The research teaching covers qualitative and quantitative research methodologies and gives students the tools necessary for conducting reliable, valid and ethical research.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits, with the research dissertation accounting for 60 of these credits.

The programme consists of seven core modules (105 credits), one elective module (15 credits), and a research disseration( 60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) is also offered on both a full-time and part-time basis.

Core modules

  • Psychoanalytic Perspectives on Child Development I: Infancy
  • Psychoanalytic Perspectives on Child Development II: Toddlerhood and Early Childhood
  • Psychoanalytic Perspectives on Child Development III: Latency and Adolescence
  • An Introduction to Psychoanalytic Theory
  • The Clinical Theory of Psychoanalysis
  • Research Methods II: Introduction to Statistical Analysis
  • Observation I: Parent Infant

Optional modules

Students choose one of the following:

  • Observation II: Observation of a Young Child - a second observation of young children, their parent/carer/staff/clinician within a nursery school, playgroup or toddler group setting.
  • Parenting: Theory, Research and Clinical Interventions
  • Evaluating Clinical Interventions
  • Multiple Perspectives on Developmental Psychopathology

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an independent research project, supported by a supervisor, which culminates in a dissertation of a maximum of 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, workshops, and theory and observation seminars. Seminar groups are small, often led by clinicians and allow plenty of opportunity for discussion and reflection. Research work is supported by an individual supervisor and by workshops throughout the year. Assessments include a variety of essays, examinations, observation papers and a research dissertation. Assessment occurs throughout the programme (usually at the end of the relevant module). 

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Psychoanalytic Developmental Psychology MSc

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Students who successfully complete the MSc can apply their degree in a variety of settings. Our graduates have found work as psychology assistants or child mental health workers, taken up posts as research assistants and have been admitted to psychotherapy trainings in both adult and child programmes and to PhD positions.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Assistant Psychologist, Royal Free Hospital (NHS)
  • DClinPsy in Clinical Psychology, UCL
  • PhD Epidemiology, University College London (UCL)
  • Educator, Ready, Steady, Go Nursery
  • Research Assistant, UCL/University of Cambridge

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Teaching on the programme is based at the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families in London, a world-renowned centre for research, training and clinical practice in the field of child mental health.

Please note: during the course of the academic year 2018/19, the centre will relocate from Hampstead to a new, purpose-built campus near Kings Cross Station.

The MSc is based within UCL's Division of Psychology & Language Sciences, one of the world’s leading integrated departments of research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language.

Testimonials from previous students are available on the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families website.



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Health Psychology plays a key role in improving the health and wellbeing of the population. This course, based in the heart of London, was one of the first Masters in Health Psychology and has been accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) since 1999. Read more

Health Psychology plays a key role in improving the health and wellbeing of the population. This course, based in the heart of London, was one of the first Masters in Health Psychology and has been accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) since 1999. It includes an innovative portfolio of assessments geared to developing transferable skills, and relating directly to the world of work. The course also provides the opportunity to gain work experience and apply your knowledge in a health psychology setting, whilst considering future career plans. The course is taught by a core team of enthusiastic and supportive research-active staff, with collaborative links to external institutions in London and beyond. Successful completion of the course (Stage 1) is a prerequisite for the further training (Stage 2) to become a health psychologist registered with the Health Professions Council (HPC).

In addition to the core taught programme, we work with a range of practitioners to provide additional professional training in areas such as resilience, coaching and clinical practice.

The course will give you an in-depth understanding of the theoretical and applied bases of health, illness and disease. The main aim is to help you to develop the theoretical and methodological skills essential for conducting independent research and applying health psychology in practice.

We provide a coherent programme of study covering the content, methods and application of health psychology. In particular, the course emphasises the importance of an evidence-based approach to health psychology, and develops the core skills needed for Stage 2 training. Within the core modules, there is considerable flexibility for you to choose particular areas of study of interest.

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of what you study on this course.

Core modules

Option modules

Work experience

Students can choose to undertake a work experience placement within a health related setting by taking the optional ‘work experience in a psychological setting’ module. Students will negotiate with tutors on finding a placement and arrange suitable supervision. Some recent examples of work experience opportunities include:

Hospitals: The Cassel Hospital (Personality Disorder service); The Royal Marsden Hospital (Neuro-oncology, paediatrics); Kings College (Dental Institute); Sussex Partnership Trust Children and Young Person's Mental Health Services; Great Chapel Street Medical Centre; Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital in Stanmore; Great Ormond Street Hospital; Mildmay Hospital; The Royal Brompton Hospital, London.

Charities: EnhanceAble (a registered charity that provides services for people with learning disabilities, physical disabilities, acquired brain injuries and autism); Westminster Drug Project; Southwark Your Way (a programme that offers flexible mental health support and guidance to suit service user’s needs); Headway Hertfordshire; Mind, Hammersmith and Fulham; British Red Cross; The 240 Project (a community and activity centre in West London which works with vulnerable and excluded people); Terrence Higgins Trust; Jewish Women's Aid; Westminster Parent Mentoring project; Turning Point Drug and Alcohol Service; Women and Girls Network; NSPCC; Kith and Kids; Alzheimer's Society; Freedom from torture; The Muslim Youth Helpline.

Career path

The course is a prerequisite for those wishing to pursue Stage 2 training leading to Registration with the HCPC as a Health Psychologist. This route is only available to those who have Graduate Basis for Chartership (GBC) with the BPS. However, it also serves as a precursor to those wishing to pursue a PhD in Psychology, and other areas of applied psychology such as clinical or counselling psychology. The majority of our graduates work in academic or health-related professions, for example: psychology researcher or lecturer, smoking cessation advisor, chronic pain therapist, health consultant.

Graduates from the Health Psychology MSc course at the University of Westminster work at all levels and, in all areas of health and related professions. Most students go on to undertake further postgraduate training be it in research, teaching or work related training. Many alumni of the course work as HCPC registered applied psychologists including, health, counselling and clinical psychology. Others have worked to enhance their career opportunities in their chosen disciplines including Occupational Therapy, Nursing, Advertising and Recruitment. Others work as, consultants, freelancers and academics.



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