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Masters Degrees (Juvenile)

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This one-year degree is designed for students who already hold a first degree (BA or BSc) in Forensic Anthropology or a related subject, and is intended to provide advanced training in subject areas which are germane to current professional requirements, but which are not available collectively at any other institution in the world. Read more
This one-year degree is designed for students who already hold a first degree (BA or BSc) in Forensic Anthropology or a related subject, and is intended to provide advanced training in subject areas which are germane to current professional requirements, but which are not available collectively at any other institution in the world.

Why study Anatomy & Advanced Forensic Anthropology at Dundee?

Forensic anthropology is the analysis of human remains for the medico-legal purpose of establishing identity. The discipline has adopted a pivotal role in UK and International investigations in cases of inter-personal violence and homicide, repatriation, mass disasters and war crimes.

Recent mass fatality incidents have highlighted the requirement for national and international disaster victim identification (DVI) capability, and cemented the forensic anthropologist’s role as a significant component within the multi-disciplinary response facility.

Traditionally the forensic anthropologist has dealt with human skeletal remains resulting from unexplained deaths; this professional definition is unrealistically restrictive given the multi-disciplinary nature of the demands of human identification in the twenty-first century. In particular there is a significant requirement for anatomically-trained forensic anthropologists who are competent in dealing with both soft and hard tissues in order to fulfil the requirements of DVI deployment.

Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification

This course is taught within the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identfication (CAHID) and is located in the Medical Sciences Institute at the University of Dundee, Scotland.

Prof Sue Black heads the Centre, she was awarded an OBE for her International Human Identification work from mass graves and co-authored Developmental Juvenile Osteology and The Juvenile Skeleton.

The award-winning staff of this Centre are amongst the most experienced in the UK in the fields of human identification, forensic anthropology, craniofacial identification and the study of the human body.

The core remit of the Centre is the study of anatomy. The Centre delivers high quality anatomy teaching at all levels, via whole body dissection which allows students to develop a sound knowledge of the human body. The Centre relies on the generosity of donors for the ability to teach students to the highest standard possible.

The Centre was awarded a prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher Education in November 2013. Presented in recognition of 'world class excellence', the Queen’s Anniversary Prizes are among the

Aims of the Programme

The aim of this programme is to provide training in anatomically-based forensic anthropology, and specifically to provide advanced training in musculoskeletal anatomy, juvenile osteology, comparative forensic osteology and DVI training.

What you will study

Course Structure:
This is a one year full time taught Masters programme in which all modules are compulsory. The research dissertation can be in the form of original laboratory research in an area pertinent to anatomy and forensic anthropology.

Human Gross Anatomy (Semesters 1 & 2):
Provides the opportunity to conduct whole body dissection, with particular emphasis on functional and musculoskeletal anatomy
Exposure to human form and function with direct relevance to the identification process
Only institution in the UK offering the opportunity to dissect cadavers which have been embalmed using the Thiel soft-fix method, which provides life-like preservation of the soft tissues.

Developmental Juvenile Osteology (Semester 1):
Focuses on the development of the human juvenile skeleton as a means to understanding adult skeletal form
Through practical examination, each bone of the body will be studied from its embryological origin, through key developmental milestones, until the attainment of its adult form
Practical sessions will focus on the unique Scheuer collection of juvenile skeletal remains.
Forensic Anthropology as Expert Evidence

Covering the more specialised skills including forensic anatomy, trauma analysis and age estimation in the living this module will cover the skills required to present your analyses in a court of law.

Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) training (Semesters 1 & 2):
Provides a thorough understanding of the DVI process in the UK and abroad
Developed by experienced practitioners, it is based on the National DVI Training course for the UK DVI team
Delivers a robust theoretical underpinning for anyone undertaking DVI work on a practical basis.

MSc Research Project (Semester 3):
Students will undertake an advanced level practical project supervised by a research-active practitioner
CAHID staff have significant experience in many areas of forensic human identification, including juvenile osteology, facial anthropology, facial reconstruction, age assessment in the living and dead, analysis of sexual dimorphism and ancestry, soft tissue biometric systems, human provenance, skeletal pathology and trauma, and virtual anthropology

How you will be assessed

A variety of assessment methods will be employed including practical spot exams, online assessment and traditional essay based examination.

Careers

There is a significant requirement for anatomically-trained forensic anthropologists who are competent in dealing with both soft and hard tissues in order to fulfill the requirements of DVI deployment. This degree will train individuals to be competent in specialist areas of anatomy and forensic anthropology.

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MTSU offers a Master of Criminal Justice (M.C.J.) degree in cooperation with Tennessee State University. Read more
MTSU offers a Master of Criminal Justice (M.C.J.) degree in cooperation with Tennessee State University. A graduate degree can help pave the way for advancement in professional opportunities in law enforcement, homeland security, courts, police administration, correctional management, probation, parole, juvenile justice, drug rehabilitation, and private security or investigations. Master's candidates are not required to take classes at both campuses, but an individual can earn up to 18 hours at the partner institution to transfer to the home institution. Students officially accepted in MTSU’s graduate program may participate in the department’s internship program, with placements available in prosecutor and public defender offices, sheriff and police departments, probation and parole offices, courts, and state and federal agencies. Master’s candidates may choose either the thesis option or a non-thesis track requiring an internship.

Career

A Master of Criminal Justice degree allows graduates to pursue advanced opportunities in law enforcement, courts, and corrections at the federal, state, or local level, or with private security or businesses associated with the criminal justice system. M.C.J. holders also may continue studies for careers in higher education or for law degrees. Some occupations for MTSU graduates from this program:

Attorney
Chief of police
Corporate security officer/director
Court administrator
Criminal justice professor
Crisis counselor
Emergency services director
Family resource specialist
Forensic scientist
Investigator
Juvenile court judge
Police officer
Pre-trial release/pre-trial diversion officer
Probation officer/director
Public information officer
Regulatory board investigator
Sheriff
Social services district director
Special agent
State director of safety/homeland security
State trooper
U.S. deputy marshal
Warden
Employers of MTSU alumni include
Blue Ridge Center, Asheville, N.C.
Cannon County
City of Atlanta
Cope, Hudson, Scarlett, Reed, McCreary
Cumberland University
Eastern Kentucky University
Family Voices of Tennessee
Fillauer & Wilson, P.C., Cleveland, Tenn.
Forensic Medical
Gallatin Police Department
Hendersonville Police Department
Humphreys County 911
Keiser University
La Vergne Police Department
Litigation Paralegal
Metro-Nashville Government
Metro-Nashville Police Department
Murfreesboro Police Department
Oasis Center
Regions Bank
Rutherford County
State of Tennessee
State of West Virginia
Tennessee Bureau of Investigation
Tennessee Correction Academy
Tennessee Department of Human Services
Tennessee Department of Safety & Homeland Security
Tennessee Highway Patrol
Tennessee Parole Board
U.S. Department of Justice
U.S. Probation Office (various locations)
University of South Carolina

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This is an intensive interdisciplinary programme, designed to explore issues such as child law and how it is implemented through policy and practice, and the implications of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child for child welfare, disability, education, family studies, juvenile justice, social policy and social work. Read more

Programme description

This is an intensive interdisciplinary programme, designed to explore issues such as child law and how it is implemented through policy and practice, and the implications of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child for child welfare, disability, education, family studies, juvenile justice, social policy and social work.

This programme responds to the increasing importance of the study of childhood in disciplines as widespread as philosophy, sociology and geography. It offers an opportunity to develop skills in research and consultation with children and young people.

You’ll examine the implications of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and gain knowledge and analytical perspectives on particular areas of legislation, policy, theory and practice that affect children. The programme benefits from the childhood studies expertise of academic staff across the University.

Programme structure

Teaching combines lectures, seminars and tutorials, plus a combination of essays and assessed coursework. You will complete three compulsory courses and three option courses followed by an independently researched dissertation.

Career opportunities

This qualification serves both as a conversion course if you wish to pursue careers working with children or children’s issues, and as a career development opportunity if you already have experience in these fields.

Graduates have gone on to a variety of posts, such as employment with national and international non-governmental organisations, research posts and PhD study, and national and local government positions.

You will develop a range of transferable skills, such as communication and project management, which can be applied to roles in any field.

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Is accessible to London and Eastern England. Is flexible with a wide range of optional modules taken alongside four core modules. Read more

About the programme

Is accessible to London and Eastern England
Is flexible with a wide range of optional modules taken alongside four core modules
Is podiatry specific concentrating on evidence in clinical practice
Provides Continuing Professional Development supporting the career progression of podiatrists
Is research based emphasizing critical evaluation of clinical practice
Gives access to state-of-the-art clinical focussed research facilities supported by staff with a wide range of specialist knowledge and expertise
Is self-directed allowing freedom to focus on specific areas of clinical practice relevant to the individual
Will encourage life-long learning

The MSc programme is structured on a semester basis and can be taken over a period of one to six years. The first semester of the academic year runs from September to January; the second semester from February to June. The dissertation is completed in the summer period (semester C).

All modules are at M Level and are awarded 30 M Level Credits. The taught component of each module lasts for 12 weeks. Each of the modules will entail the same amount of study (300 hours). This is divided between contact time at the University, directed study (pursuing learning objectives specifically associated with the module) and private study which includes reading and preparation of assignments. The allocation of the hours will vary between modules. The dissertation can be taken as a 30 credit (short) dissertation consisting of a piece of work relating to work based practice such as an audit, patient survey or service development or the dissertation can be taken as a 60 credit (long) dissertation involving an in-depth research project.

Tutorial support is available to you from personal development tutors, module leaders and project supervisors and there are additional resources available within the University to assist you with your study skills.

We are pleased to invite podiatry graduates to apply for an MSc scholarship funded through the Scholl Podiatric Research and Education Fund. This scholarship provides funding for the successful candidate to undertake the Master’s degree in Podiatry on a full time basis. The scholarship includes the payment of MSc fees and a small sabbatical fund to complete the research project. The project will investigate the podiatric needs of adolescent patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. Applicants should hold a BSc (Hons) in podiatry (minimum 2.1).
Application closing date : 20th September 2014. For further information on this and other scholarship opportunities please e-mail: .

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The Master of Criminology (MCrim) provides the opportunity for candidates to study a multidisciplinary, critical approach to criminology, criminal law and criminal justice. Read more
The Master of Criminology (MCrim) provides the opportunity for candidates to study a multidisciplinary, critical approach to criminology, criminal law and criminal justice.

You will be able to select units of study from a wide range of subject areas including: criminal law; criminal
justice policy; juvenile and restorative justice; forensic psychiatry; crime and indigenous issues; international and comparative criminal justice; and policing.

The course recognises the importance of research, policy and applied learning and this, along with the cutting-edge contemporary focus of the study provided, will equip students for occupations within criminal justice agencies including public and private, social welfare, psychology and psychiatry, public policy, social research and legal practice.

To ask a question about this course, visit http://sydney.edu.au/internationaloffice/

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The MSc Forensic Anthropology is designed to equip students with the skills necessary for the analysis and identification of human skeletal remains. Read more
The MSc Forensic Anthropology is designed to equip students with the skills necessary for the analysis and identification of human skeletal remains. The one-year degree is uniquely designed for students who already hold a degree in a relevant biomedical science and wish to pursue further study in Forensic Anthropology.

Why study Forensic Anthropology at Dundee?

Forensic anthropology is the analysis of human remains for the medico-legal purpose of establishing identity. The discipline has adopted a pivotal role in UK and International investigations in cases of inter-personal violence and homicide, repatriation, mass disasters and war crimes.

Our course provides you with training in dedicated laboratory areas with exclusive access to the unique skeletal collections in the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identfication (CAHID). The programme offers a unique mix of theoretical subject matter combined with hands on practical experience which is delivered by case active academic staff who are world leaders in the field.

Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification

This course is taught within Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID). The award winning staff of CAHID are amongst the most experienced in the UK in the fields of human identification, forensic anthropology, cranio-facial reconstruction and the study of the human body. The Centre is regularly contacted for advice and input in high-profile forensic cases both at home and abroad. The cases in which staff have involvement are reflected in much of the research undertaken by the Centre, enabling it to maintain a high profile within the forensic community.

The Centre was awarded a prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher Education in November 2013. Presented in recognition of 'world class excellence', the Queen's Anniversary Prizes are among the most highly-regarded awards for the UK's universities and colleges.

Top 10 reasons to study Forensic Anthropology at Dundee

Only institution in the UK to offer a career progression pathway in Forensic Anthropology
Opportunity to review forensic case work undertaken by CAHID staff
Teaching by world leading forensic practitioners
Access to several unique skeletal collections
Opportunity to act as an expert witness in simulated courtroom exercises
We teach and train towards RAI accreditation standards following the approved Forensic Anthropology curriculum
Multidisciplinary approach with excellent links across subject boundaries
Access to cases from CAHID's virtual anthropology communication service
Regular programme of seminars delivered by invited speakers from the UK and abroad
Diversity of career opportunities – our graduates work in a variety of related fields

Teaching & Assessment

This course is taught by a team based in the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID). Specialist teaching is undertaken by case-active forensic practitioners. The cases in which our staff have involvement are reflected in much of the research undertaken by the Centre, enabling it to maintain a high profile within the forensic community. In turn, this research feeds into our teaching.

The course starts in September each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis.

How you will be taught

The programme will be taught through a combination of face-to-face lectures and on-line learning resources as well as a large practical involving direct examination of the adult human skeleton.

Course Structure

This is a one year full time taught Masters programme in which all modules are compulsory. The research dissertation can be in the form of original laboratory research in an area pertinent to anatomy and forensic anthropology.

- Forensic Osteology (20 Credits)
- Peri and Post mortem processes (20 credits)
- Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) training (20 credits)
- Research Methods (20 credits)
- Forensic Human Identification (20 credits)
- Forensic Science and the Law (20 credits)
- Developmental Juvenile Osteology (20 credits)
- Research Project (60 credits)

How you will be assessed

Assessments will take the form of in-course essays, paper appraisal and presentation exercises in addition to final degree examinations and MSc research dissertation.

Careers

There is a significant requirement for anatomically-trained forensic anthropologists who are competent in dealing with both soft and hard tissues in order to fulfil the requirements of DVI deployment. This course will greatly increase the professional employment characteristics of any student undertaking it who seeks a career in forensic anthropology, forensic osteology or DVI.

Where are our graduates now?

Previous graduates in Forensic Anthropology have progressed to become teachers and researchers in the field with some going on to provide their skills and services on both the national and international forensic front.

Some of our graduates have gone on to pursue careers in biomedical research, scene of crime analysis, forensic science, human biology and osteological research.

Many have chosen to enter a degree in medicine or dentistry and have found that the skills they have acquired in Forensic Anthropology stand them in good stead, particularly with regards to radiology, paediatrics, gerontology and orthopaedics.

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Why get a master’s degree from the Department of Criminal Justice? Do you want to. - increase your job opportunities and earning potential?. Read more
Why get a master’s degree from the Department of Criminal Justice? Do you want to:

- increase your job opportunities and earning potential?
- gain the credential you need to ascend to the top of federal agencies, state organizations, and private corporations?
- learn from expert faculty members about how you can become the expert?
- get the opportunity to publish articles in national and international journals?
- build lasting relationships with other top students?

Graduates of our master’s program have gone on to become the deputy director of the United States Secret Service; the counterterrorism chief for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives; the chief of police for Birmingham, Alabama; the director of federal affairs at the Business Council of Alabama; the editor-in-chief of LawOfficer.com; the lead agent/corporate security supervisor at Georgia Power Company; a cyber security systems analyst at Southern Company; and highly accomplished working professionals in many other important positions.

In addition, our graduates who then sought their PhDs or JDs have been accepted to some of the highest ranking social science programs and law schools in the nation, including Harvard University and The University of Virginia.

Admission

The application process is simple:

1. Visit The University of Alabama’s Graduate School website and click on the APPLY NOW button.
2. Use the online system to complete the basic graduate application form and submit your application fee, along with a few other things that you’ll need:
- A statement of purpose (Tell us about your interest in criminal justice and your exciting career plans — no more than one single-spaced page, please!)
- Your undergraduate transcripts
- Your exam score from the GRE
- Three letters of recommendation (Through the online system, you can submit contact information for the three people who have agreed to write letters of recommendation for you.)

APPLICATION DEADLINES

For students who would like to start in the fall semester:

Early admission deadline: February 15 (students applying by this date will receive extra consideration for funding)
Regular admission deadline: June 15

For students who would like to start in the spring semester:

Early admission deadline: October 1 (students applying by this date will receive extra consideration for funding)
Regular admission deadline: November 15

Funding

Assistantships come with a financial stipend paid directly to the student, along with significant tuition and health insurance support.

They are awarded on a competitive basis, after the Graduate Program Committee’s discretionary assessment of the quality of each student’s (1) academic performance prior to admission, (2) academic performance after admission (when applicable), and (3) professional performance as a departmental employee (when applicable).

Graduate Courses

We have only three required courses in our entire program, which means that the vast majority of our students’ degrees are made up of courses they choose.

Past courses have covered the topics of cybercrime, cybersecurity, terrorism, hate crimes, organized crime, civil and criminal trials, danger and disorder issues, white collar crime, murder in America, gender and crime, social inequality and crime, law and society, juvenile delinquency, drugs and crime, judicial process, health and crime, corrections, law enforcement, and more.

In addition, our students have the option to build their expertise by counting up to 6 credits of relevant coursework from other departments at The University of Alabama toward their MS in criminal justice, including courses from political science, history, social work, gender and race studies, American studies, anthropology, and counseling.

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The Master of Arts program in the Department of Sociology offers students sociological training in three core areas. sociological theory, methodology and statistics. Read more
The Master of Arts program in the Department of Sociology offers students sociological training in three core areas: sociological theory, methodology and statistics. Our program is research oriented and students are required to demonstrate competence in one substantive area of concentration through the successful completion and defence of their thesis projects.

The expertise of our faculty is wide-ranging. Under their supervision, students in the MA program have conducted original research on a variety of topics, including, for example: offence specialization amongst juvenile delinquents, social support and stress, Chinese social clubs, women athletes' perception of coaches, bisexual identity and politics, ethnic and gender inequality, contraceptive risk-taking, youthful involvement in prostitution, the subculture of sky-diving, trust and the health care system and perceived victimization.

Once students are admitted to the program, they have a variety of opportunities to get to know faculty research interests, and what might be possible for thesis project research at the Master's level.

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For over 20 years, the IUP Master's in Criminology program has prepared students like you for administrative and research careers in the criminal justice system. Read more
For over 20 years, the IUP Master's in Criminology program has prepared students like you for administrative and research careers in the criminal justice system. For those of you who want to go on and pursue doctoral studies, the MA program provides a solid foundation from one of the top criminology and criminal justice programs in the country.

To graduate you will be required to complete 30 semester hours. You may choose between a thesis or non-thesis curriculum. The thesis option requires that you complete a six-credit thesis. The non-thesis option requires that you complete six hours of elective course work, for both the online and on-campus programs.

To gain admittance you must:
-Demonstrate a sound understanding of criminological theory and the criminal justice system.
-Have knowledge gained through experience within the justice system, by specialized training or by completing graduate or undergraduate studies in a related field.
-Apply by March 15 for best consideration. Students begin the program in the fall term. (The online program allows full-time students to being in the fall and part-time students to begin in the spring.)

MA IN CRIMINOLOGY

-Prepare for advanced positions in federal, state, and local law enforcement and corrections; federal and county probation and parole; juvenile justice, and more.
-Develop a foundation for doctoral study to become a future college and university professor and researcher.
-Engage in the rigorous study of criminology theory, legal issues, organizational dynamics, research methodology, quantitative analysis, and ethical and philosophical issues in criminology.

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The Master of Science in criminal justice offers a multidisciplinary curriculum to give students the sophisticated working knowledge of the major systems within the field. Read more
The Master of Science in criminal justice offers a multidisciplinary curriculum to give students the sophisticated working knowledge of the major systems within the field.  Students will take challenging and rigorous courses rooted in history, law, philosophy, research, psychology, management, and political science that involve critical analysis of complex issues.

Faculty provide a quality education to students who have demonstrated competence and commitment to learning and growth, who desire to make a meaningful contribution to the field of criminal justice and who share the values of idealism, honesty, integrity, justice, and fairness.

Internet scheduling and evening courses make full- or part-time graduate study at WCU convenient for anyone interested in pursuing this degree.  The program is well-suited for current or future criminal justice professionals, as well as those who plan to pursue further graduate study.

Course Content

The Department of Criminal Justice offers a strong core of required courses, enhanced by an eclectic selection of electives designed to meet the interests and needs of our students. Each course is taught by a qualified faculty member who has direct experience in the particular subject matter.

Criminal Justice is very interdisciplinary in nature. Students interested in Criminal Justice may be interested in careers such as law enforcement and investigation, criminal prosecution or defense, probation and parole, juvenile treatment, corrections victims' advocacy, crime mapping, research, and more.  The program is designed to offer flexibility so that the student can tailor course selection to professional career goals. In this regard, students work closely with advisors to select courses each semester.

Course material is constantly updated to incorporate the ever-changing base of knowledge in this quickly evolving field. We offer such diverse electives as:  Victimology, crime Mapping, White Collar Crime, Terrorism, Environmental Crime, Organized Crime, Criminal Investigations, Interviewing and Assessing the Offender, Animal Cruelty,Evidence and Advocacy, Contemporary Legal Issues, and Justice Studies. 

Curriculum

• Required modules (15 semester hours)
CRJ 505, 507, 508, 509, and 600

• Optional Thesis* (3 semester hours)

• Electives (12-15 semester hours)
Chosen from among the following: CRJ 500, 503, 504, 506, 522, 524, 526, 530, 535, 555, 560, 566, 570, 582, 590, 599, *610 with departmental approval, and 999 (All courses listed are three semester hours unless otherwise noted.)

Please see the website for more information about these modules:

http://catalog.wcupa.edu/graduate/business-public-management/criminal-justice/#coursestext

Philadelphia Campus

The M.S. in Criminal Justice is also offered at the Philadelphia campus.

Curriculums for programs offered at the alternative PASSHE Center City satellite campus in Philadelphia are equivalent to those found on WCU’s main campus. With state-of-the-art classrooms, the Center City location serves the needs of degree completers and/or adult learners who are balancing work and family obligations.

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