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Masters Degrees (Jurisprudence)

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Businesses today face greater pressure than ever before in complying with a growing host of complex legislative regulations. To meet this challenge, Delaware Law offers. Read more
Businesses today face greater pressure than ever before in complying with a growing host of complex legislative regulations. To meet this challenge, Delaware Law offers

online graduate programs

for those seeking a career in

legal compliance

Unlike compliance programs at other academic institutions, our compliance degrees are offered

entirely online

and do not require an on-campus immersion component.

By understanding compliance issues within the legal and regulatory environment, we offer professionals from any industry a solid foundation for career advancement.

Our students include:

Healthcare providers
Senior-living and other healthcare administrators
Human resources personnel
Contract analysts
Risk managers
Political science majors
Government employees
Corporate managers
Auditors
Insurance agents
Accountants
Engineers
Current compliance officers

ONLINE Master of Jurisprudence Degrees and Certificates

Our online MJ degrees provide specialized concentrations for focused studies:

Master of jurisprudence (MJ) in health law, with a concentration in regulatory analysis & compliance.
Master of jurisprudence (MJ) in corporate and business law, with a concentration in regulatory analysis & compliance.
Dual degree: Master of jurisprudence in corporate and business law and master of business administration (MJ/MBA)

We also offer online graduate-level certificates, including:

Corporate law certificate in regulatory analysis & compliance
Health law certificate in regulatory analysis & compliance
Certificate in Higher Education Compliance


In a unique collaboration, Delaware Law’s Graduate and Compliance Programs and Widener University’s School of Business now offer an

MJ/MBA dual degree.

This leading-edge program can give you a strategic advantage in pursuing graduate education in both compliance and business, with these advantages:

Outstanding instruction from experienced practitioners who work in the heart of corporate and business law, compliance, and administration
Training in real-world skills essential for success in today’s corporate and business job markets
An accessible online learning environment that works with your schedule
The choice of taking the MBA courses online or on campus at Widener University’s main campus in Chester, PA
An accelerated course of joint study (combined required credits are reduced from 62 to 48), enabling completion of both degrees in 2½ years

ONLINE master of jurisprudence (MJ) in corporate and business law offers rigorous, graduate-level training in legal analysis and regulatory compliance in a corporate, business, nonprofit, or government environment. The program has the distinction of being accredited by the Compliance Certification Board (CCB). This online program offers a flexible course of study for working professionals who wish to enhance their employment opportunities or keep pace with changing regulatory issues and requirements. The program offers concentrations in regulatory analysis & compliance and global compliance & ethics.

ONLINE master of business administration (MBA) reflects the idea that people learn best by doing. This intensive online program will guide you through the philosophy of business and provide the practical, real-world knowledge that companies seek. The School of Business Administration is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). This professional accreditation places us among the top third of college business schools in the U.S. and Europe.

Flexible Scheduling

Online specialized courses are accessible 24/7.
Experienced faculty are available both online and through virtual, one-to-one connections.
Busy professionals may work toward their goals anytime, anywhere.

Advantages

Accommodates working professionals
Access to Delaware Law’s library online databases
Learn at a “military friendly” institution

CCB Accredited

Delaware Law’s intensive compliance programs, among the few of their kind in the nation, have the added distinction of being accredited by the Compliance Certification Board (CCB).
Added Value

Students who complete CCB-accredited compliance coursework from a CCB-accredited university, such as Delaware Law, are exempt from the 1500 hours of work experience in a compliance-related field normally required to be eligible for a CCB exam. Learn more about Delaware Law’s status as an accredited CCB university and the benefits this accreditation offers our students.

Delaware Law is a member of the Health Care Compliance Association (HCCA) and the Society for Corporate Compliance and Ethics (SCCE). Delaware Law is a proud recipient of the SCCE’s International Compliance Award for Excellence in developing educational programs that promote the professions of compliance and ethics.

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The Master of Jurisprudence (MJur) is an interdisciplinary program that caters for students who are interested in the principles and operations of legal systems or interdisciplinary research methodology. Read more
The Master of Jurisprudence (MJur) is an interdisciplinary program that caters for students who are interested in the principles and operations of legal systems or interdisciplinary research methodology.

The course is designed to expose students to the importance of legal theory in its broad sense, which includes philosophical reflection, sociological theory and comparative enquiry.

Participants come from a wide range of backgrounds, including: law students who want to specialise in legal theory and comparative studies of law; students from other disciplines, including teachers of legal studies courses in secondary education, who require a systematic introduction to and a comprehensive understanding of the operation of law; and international students from all disciplines who want to use their studies in Sydney to gain an overview of the principles and operations of legal systems.

To ask a question about this course, visit http://sydney.edu.au/internationaloffice/

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In a unique collaboration, Delaware Law’s Graduate and Compliance Programs and Widener University’s School of Business now offer an MJ/MBA dual degree. Read more
In a unique collaboration, Delaware Law’s Graduate and Compliance Programs and Widener University’s School of Business now offer an MJ/MBA dual degree. This leading-edge program can give you a strategic advantage in pursuing graduate education in both compliance and business, with these advantages:


Outstanding instruction from experienced practitioners who work in the heart of corporate and business law, compliance, and administration
Training in real-world skills essential for success in today’s corporate and business job markets
An accessible online learning environment that works with your schedule
The choice of taking the MBA courses online or on campus at Widener University’s main campus in Chester, PA
An accelerated course of joint study (combined required credits are reduced from 62 to 48), enabling completion of both degrees in 2½ years

ONLINE master of jurisprudence (MJ) in corporate and business law offers rigorous, graduate-level training in legal analysis and regulatory compliance in a corporate, business, nonprofit, or government environment. The program has the distinction of being accredited by the Compliance Certification Board (CCB). This online program offers a flexible course of study for working professionals who wish to enhance their employment opportunities or keep pace with changing regulatory issues and requirements. The program offers concentrations in regulatory analysis & compliance and global compliance & ethics.

ONLINE master of business administration (MBA) reflects the idea that people learn best by doing. This intensive online program will guide you through the philosophy of business and provide the practical, real-world knowledge that companies seek. The School of Business Administration is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). This professional accreditation places us among the top third of college business schools in the U.S. and Europe.
Eligibility

A bachelor’s degree with a minimum 3.0 GPA is recommended.
The GMAT is waived.

Tuition

Tuition for the 2016-2017 academic year is $1,098 per credit.* Financial aid is available for qualified students.

*Tuition amount is for MJ classes only. Contact the MBA office for tuition rates for MBA courses. Rates are subject to change.

For more information, contact the program manager at 844.386.7321.

Apply Now

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Individual and population health is a matter of growing social concern. Achieving good health and delivering effective healthcare demands innovation. Read more

Individual and population health is a matter of growing social concern. Achieving good health and delivering effective healthcare demands innovation. A variety of fields have a role to play, including law.

This programme examines topics that reflect some of the main contemporary legal and ethical challenges faced by those working in medicine, and places them in their social and historical context.

These include issues that arise in the context of genetics, assisted reproduction, abortion, standards of medical treatment, transplantation medicine, mental health, advance decisions, assisted suicide, medical research, and the allocation of scarce resources.

We offer students the opportunity to study the fundamentals of medical law and ethics, both international and domestic, at an advanced level, and the opportunity to take more specialised courses on issues of contemporary significance, encouraging and supporting the development of research skills necessary for a career in medical law or ethics.

The legal and ethical experts who deliver this programme come from a wide range of disciplines from across the University, and they benefit from a close association with the J Kenyon Mason Institute for Medicine, Life Sciences and Law.

Programme structure

This programme offers a range of subjects that covers a broad spectrum of contemporary issues in medical law, jurisprudence and ethics, from an international and interdisciplinary perspective, allowing you to tailor a programme to suit your interests.

For 2017/18 the programme consists of 180 credits, comprising taught courses worth 120 credits (60 credits per semester) and a 10,000 word dissertation worth 60 credits.

The 120 credits of taught courses for 2017/18 are made up of the following mandatory and option courses.

Mandatory courses (100 credits)

20 credit courses in semester 1

  • Fundamental Issues in Medical Jurisprudence
  • Governance of Innovative Medicine - New for 2017!
  • Risk and Regulation: Health and the Environment

20 credit courses in semester 2

  • Contemporary Issues in Medical Jurisprudence
  • Biotechnology, Bioethics and Society* (10 credits)
  • Medical Negligence* (10 credits)

*These programmes are co-requisite.

Option Courses

The remaining 20-credits can be taken from the list of Law School courses and courses offered by other Schools in the University of Edinburgh from the list below.

Courses from the School of Law

  • Human Rights Law in Europe
  • Mental Health and Crime
  • Inter-State Conflict and Humanitarian Law

Courses from outside the School of Law

  • Controversies in Science and Technology (School of Social and Political Science - 20 credits, semester 2)
  • Cultures of Human Rights & Humanitarianism (School of Social and Political Science - 20 credits, semester 2)
  • Climate Change, Justice and Responsibility (School of Social and Political Science - 20 credits, semester 2)
  • Gender and Development (School of Social and Political Science - 20 credits, semester 2)
  • Gender and Sexuality in Global Politics (School of Social and Political Science - 20 credits, semester 2)
  • Social Determinants of Health and Public Policy (School of Social and Political Science - 20 credits, semester 2)

We cannot guarantee that all courses will run each year, and will provide adequate notice of any changes to the programme structure and courses.

Learning outcomes

By the end of the programme, you will be able to:

  • identify areas of law relevant to contemporary issues in the broad healthcare setting
  • identify gaps, inconsistencies, or instances of inappropriate or over-regulation in healthcare and nascent fields
  • build on your understanding of key values in medical law and ethics, such as autonomy, solidarity, justice, reciprocity
  • build on your understanding of key mechanisms in medical law and ethics, such as consent, confidentiality, human rights, etc
  • appreciate the international dimensions of medicine and its regulation, including the growing importance of European regulation and international agreements
  • appreciate the limits of law in discerning appropriate social responses to new medical and technical advances
  • develop critical thinking informed by legal, ethical, and social science analysis, and apply that thinking to comment upon the law’s role and appropriate responses to contemporary issues
  • experience the benefits of undertaking study in different learning environments (both on-campus and online)

You will engage with different learning environments and modes of class participation, and will draw upon and develop a range of skills. The programme will foster imaginative ways of unpacking and responding to contemporary issues in ways that do not necessarily follow or merely apply existing paradigms or legal constructs.

You will demonstrate a sound grasp of the foundational elements of medical law and ethics, including the role of the law and its various mechanisms (eg: consent, confidentiality, reasonableness, negligence) and the cross-cutting human rights dimensions.

You will develop critical thinking informed by ethical analysis, and apply that thinking to comment on and critique the law’s role in regulating medicine, healthcare services, research, and nascent fields.

Other skills you will develop include:

  • general intellectual skills, such as independent critical analysis, interdisciplinary understandings of common problems, problem-solving through reasoned and well-justified ethical and legal discourse, synthesis of complex information and ability to subject to informed critique
  • personal skills, such as written and oral skills, group working and interaction skills, intellectual development through interdisciplinary engagement and blended learning environment
  • study-derived personal virtues, such as autonomy, critical self-reflection, consideration of others and academic integrity

Career opportunities

This programme can lead to a range of employment opportunities and specialised academic work, including: specialised training for solicitor or advocate work with an emphasis on health related issues; professional care providers; ethics review panel members; health policy and/or patient advocates (e.g. NGOs); or health policy designers (e.g. governmental legal advisers, consultants, etc).



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The LLM in Legal Theory programme draws on the expertise of Queen Mary to offer advanced training in legal theory. The modules offered allow students the chance to explore a variety of theoretical approaches to law. Read more
The LLM in Legal Theory programme draws on the expertise of Queen Mary to offer advanced training in legal theory. The modules offered allow students the chance to explore a variety of theoretical approaches to law.

Your fellow students will come from the UK and more than 80 other countries, each able to draw on prior academic and in many cases professional experiences from different jurisdictions to enrich discussion and debate in class.

Centre for Law and Society in a Global Context (CLSGC)

The Centre for Law and Society in a Global Context (CLSGC) at Queen Mary is a home for multidisciplinary research into the global dimensions of law and society. The CLSGC aims to work towards a better theorisation of law in its changing social contexts, exploring the challenges posed for this endeavour by law’s increasingly important global dimensions. As well as undertaking collaborative research, we supervise postgraduate research, and regularly host workshops, seminars and conferences.

Modules:

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Legal Theory (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.

◦ QLLM023 Courts in Comparative Perspective (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM035 Gender, Law and the State: Current Legal Issues (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM038 Human Rights of Women (45 credits)
◦ QLLM047 International and Comparative Social Justice (45 credits)
◦ QLLM077 Medical Jurisprudence (45 credits)
◦ QLLM112 Jurisprudence A (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM113 Jurisprudence B (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM127 International Human Rights Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM155 Principles of Regulation (Sem1)
◦ QLLM167 Indigenous Rights: Selected Issues in Practice and Theory (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM169 Punishment in England 1750-1950 (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM170 Cultural Diversity and Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM171 Asian and African Legal Systems (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM325 Visual Cognition and Legal Theory (sem 2)
◦ QLLM399 Imagination and Legal Cognition (Sem 1)

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This unique and innovative programme is designed to develop students’ knowledge of the key areas of Islamic Studies. This programme will introduce Islam in terms of its fundamental beliefs, history and development from the Arabian Peninsula to other parts of the world. Read more
This unique and innovative programme is designed to develop students’ knowledge of the key areas of Islamic Studies. This programme will introduce Islam in terms of its fundamental beliefs, history and development from the Arabian Peninsula to other parts of the world. Students will examine the key teachings of Islam as a religion and a civilisation that has come in contact with other cultures and civilisations. They will also explore other areas such as women and Islam, Islamic core sources and Islamic ethics in light of contemporary developments.

This programme is SCQF credit-rated by the Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA). It is available on a full-time or part-time basis.

Future Study and Careers

This programme is relevant to any candidate who wants to learn about Islam and its connection with other revealed religions such as Christianity and Judaism.

Through establishing a foundation and some critical thinking on the subject matter, candidates will become confident in addressing various challenges in response to their personal or professional situations through working in a multicultural society.

Additional Information
For students requiring a Tier 4 student visa, an overall score of 6 in IELTS for UKVI (with 6.0 in writing and 5.5 in all other areas) is required.
The programme is comprised of five compulsory units (+ 1 optional unit).

The whole programme is equal to 72 credit points with 12 credit points for each unit. The Advanced Diploma will be awarded to students who successfully pass all units.

The compulsory units are as follows:

Introduction to Islamic Studies will introduce students to Islam, its history, important personalities in the early history of Islam, the development of Islam, its main sources and basic teachings. The students will also be introduced to the skill of transliterating for correct pronunciation of some Arabic/Islamic terms. On successful completion of this unit, students should know the basic teachings and the main sources of Islam. In addition, students will be able to understand some of the similarities and differences between Islam and other religions.

Islamic Core Sources and Approaches will give students a comprehensive understanding of the Islamic core sources and approaches. They will be introduced to the different sciences developed within Islamic studies from exegesis (tafsir) to Islamic law (fiqh) and principles of jurisprudence (usul al-fiqh). On successful completion of this unit, students should know the different methodological approaches developed by Muslim scholars within the Islamic tradition.

Islamic Ethics (Akhlaq) has always been an intrinsic and fundamental part of Islamic thought, manifested in both Muslim jurisprudence and Islamic theology. This unit will look at the centrality of ethics in the Islamic core sources and how early and classical Muslim scholars have conceptualised it. Modern debates about the significance of ethics in Islamic core sources will be critically examined.

Women and Islam is a lively subject used by those in both the Islamic and western worlds. It is a subject often used by critics to portray Islam as a misogynistic and oppressive religion. In their arguments, their first point of reference is the plight of Muslim women in many Islamic societies. The advocates of women’s rights in Islam encourage differentiation between the teachings of Islam and diverse cultural practices.

Research Methodology in Social Sciences and Islamic Studies is designed to strengthen students’ critical thinking while writing or reading scientific research, to familiarise students with theories and the practical application of research methodology, methods, design and strategy while conducting a research proposal. The unit also includes aspects of methodology of Muslim scholars in searching for the truth by considering the revealed knowledge of the Qur’an and Sunnah, evidence from iltizamand qiyas (logic) or even disputed sources

Core Units 

•Introduction to Islamic Studies (SCQF 9)
•Islamic Core Sources and Approaches (SCQF 10)
•Islamic Ethics (SCQF 10)
•Women and Islam (SCQF 10)
•Research Methodology in Social Sciences and Islamic Studies (SCQF 10)”

Optional Units 

•Arabic as a Foreign Language (SCQF 5)
•Arabic as a Foreign Language (SCQF 6)
•Arabic as a Foreign Language (SCQF 7)
•Arabic as a Foreign Language (SCQF 8)
•Arabic as a Foreign Language (SCQF 9)
•Arabic for Special Purposes (SCQF 10)
•Islamic Economics and Finance (SCQF 11)
•Islamic Commercial Law (SCQF 11)
•Applied Islamic Banking and Insurance (SCQF 11)
•Islamic Accounting and Auditing (SCQF 11)

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Programme description. This general LLM programme is the ideal choice for students wishing to expose themselves to diverse areas of advanced legal scholarship. Read more

Programme description

This general LLM programme is the ideal choice for students wishing to expose themselves to diverse areas of advanced legal scholarship.

Edinburgh Law School offers a very wide range of specialist courses, many taught by internationally recognised experts in their fields.

At present, key areas of research and teaching include:

international law

commercial and corporate law

criminal law

international economic law

international banking and finance

medical ethics

criminology

intellectual property

information technology law

European law

private law

comparative law

human rights

public law.

This allows students on the general LLM to take courses which make up a diverse and challenging curriculum and through which they will be able to develop a broad expertise in cutting-edge legal scholarship.

Programme structure

To ensure a programme of general interest there are no mandatory courses, however you may only select a certain number of credits (60 per semester) from particular fields. This is indicated in the course options list below. Please note that courses in bold are mandatory courses for other programmes and therefore may have waiting lists in operation.

Commercial Law

Choose a maximum of 40 credits:

Company Law (40 credits, full year course)

Contract Law in Europe (40 credits, full year course)

The Law of International Trade (40 credits, full year course)

Corporation Law and Economics (20 credits, semester 1)

International Commercial Arbitration (20 credits, semester 1)

Principles of Corporate Finance Law (20 credits, semester 1)

The Law of Secured Finance (20 credits, semester 1)

Comparative Corporate Governance (20 credits, semester 2)

Corporate Social Responsibility and the Law (20 credits, semester 2)

European Labour Law (20 credits, semester 2)

Insolvency Law (20 credits, semester 2)

Principles of Insurance Law (20 credits, semester 2)

Criminal Law and Evidence

Choose a maximum of 60 credits:

General Principles of Criminal Law (20 credits, semester 1)

Current Issues in Criminal Law (20 credits, semester 2)

Sexual Offending and the Law (20 credits, semester 2)

Criminology

Choose a maximum of 60 credits:

Criminological Research Methods (40 credits, full year course)

Theoretical Criminology (20 credits, semester 1)

Criminal Justice and Penal Process (20 credits, semester 1)

Global Crime and Insecurity (20 credits, semester 1)

Cybercrime (20 credits, semester 2)

Mental Health and Crime (20 credits, semester 2)

Responding to Global Crime and Insecurity (20 credits, semester 2)

Surveillance and Security (20 credits, semester 2)

EU Law

Choose a maximum of 60 credits:

EU Competition Law (40 credits, full year course)

EU Constitutional Law (20 credits, semester 1)

EU Fundamental Rights Law (20 credits, semester 2)

IP, Media and Technology Law

Choose a maximum of 40 credits:

Intellectual Property Law 1: Copyright and Related Rights (20 credits, semester 1)

International Intellectual Property System (20 credits, semester 1)

The Legal Challenges of Information Technologies (20 credits, semester 1)

Robotics and the Law (20 credits, semester 1)

Contemporary Issues in the Law and Policy of e-Commerce, the Digital Economy and International Information Governance (20 credits, semester 2)

Data Protection and Information Privacy (20 credits, semester 2)

Information: Control and Power (20 credits, semester 2)

Intellectual Property - Law and Society (20 credits, semester 2)

International and European Media Law (20 credits, semester 2)

Law and New Technologies: Artificial Intelligence, Risk and the Law (20 credits, semester 2)

Law of E-Commerce (20 credits, semester 2)

Managing Intellectual Property (20 credits, semester 2)

International Law

Choose a maximum of 40 credits:

Fundamental Issues in International Law (40 credits, full year course)

International Criminal Law (40 credits, full year course)

International Environmental Law (40 credits, full year course)

WTO Law (40 credits, full year course)

History and Theory of International Law (20 credits, semester 1)

International Climate Change Law (20 credits, semester 1)

International Human Rights Law (20 credits, semester 1)

International Investment Law (20 credits, semester 1)

International Law of the Sea (20 credits, semester 1)

Advanced Issues in International Economic Law (20 credits, semester 2)

Diplomatic Law (20 credits, semester 2)

EU Climate Change and Energy Law (20 credits, semester 2)

Inter-State Conflict and Humanitarian Law (20 credits, semester 2)

Legal History and Legal Theory

Choose a maximum of 60 credits:

Traditions of Legal Inquiry (20 credits, semester 1)

Reasoning with Precedent (20 credits, semester 1)

Law and the Enlightenment (20 credits, semester 2)

The Anatomy of Public Law (20 credits, semester 2)

Medical Law

Choose a maximum of 60 credits:

Fundamental Issues in Medical Jurisprudence (20 credits, semester 1)

Risk and Regulation: Health and the Environment (20 credits, semester 1)

Contemporary Issues in Medical Jurisprudence (20 credits, semester 2)

Life Sciences, Society and Law (10 credits, semester 2)

Medical Negligence (10 credits, semester 2)

Private Law

Choose a maximum of 60 credits:

Comparative Property Law (20 credits, semester 1)

Delict and Tort (20 credits, semester 1)

Principles of International Tax Law (20 credits, semester 1)

Comparative and International Trust Law (20 credits, semester 2)

EUCOTAX Wintercourse (20 credits, semester 2)

Family Law in Comparative Perspectives (20 credits, semester 2)

International Private Law: Jurisdiction and Enforcement of Judgments (20 credits, semester 2)

Principles of European Tax Law (20 credits, semester 2)

Public Law

Choose a maximum of 60 credits:

Human Rights and Conflict Resolution (20 credits, semester 2)

Human Rights Law in Europe (20 credits, semester 2)

The Anatomy of Public Law (20 credits, semester 2)

Learning outcomes

By the end of this programme, you should have acquired a more sophisticated understanding of your chosen subjects, including the diverse functions of law in contemporary society, differing approaches to the subject and a greater familiarity with research materials and methods.



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The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmlawmena/

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Law in the Middle East and North Africa specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAC176 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAC150 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAC121 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAC130 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAH056 (0.5 Unit)
- Religion & Comparative Constitutionalism - 15PLAH052 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAD176 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAD150 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAD121 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAD130 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmislamiclaw/

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Islamic Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAC176 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAC150 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAC121 (1 Unit)
- Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAC159 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in South Asia - 15PLAC129 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAC130 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAH056 (0.5 Unit)
- Religion & Comparative Constitutionalism - 15PLAH052 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below.

- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAD176 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAD150 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAD121 (1 Unit)
- Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAD159 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in South Asia - 15PLAD129 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAD130 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission by during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed. It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law.

It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmlawcultsoc/

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Law, Culture and Society specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAC176 (1 Unit)
- Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAC155 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAC121 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in South Asia - 15PLAC129 (1 Unit)
- Law and in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAC130 (1 Unit)
- Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAC134 (1 Unit)
- Modern Chinese Law and Institutions - 15PLAC139 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Chinese Constitutionalism - 15PLAH043 (0.5 Unit)
- Comparative Constitutional Law - 15PLAH046 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
- Law & Critique - 15PLAH053 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Postcolonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit)
- Migration, Gender and the Law in South East Asia and Beyond - 15PLAH023 (0.5 Unit)
- Religion & Comparative Constitutionalism - 15PLAH052 (0.5 Unit)

Examples of non-Law module options:
- Childhood, Politics and Law - 15PPOH037 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAD176 (1 Unit)
- Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAD155 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAD121 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in South Asia - 15PLAD129 (1 Unit)
- Law and in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAD130 (1 Unit)
- Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAD134 (1 Unit)
- Modern Chinese Law and Institutions - 15PLAD139 (1 Unit)

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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On this programme you will acquire specialised and in-depth knowledge and understanding of international human rights law, political theory of rights and international relations relating to human rights. Read more
On this programme you will acquire specialised and in-depth knowledge and understanding of international human rights law, political theory of rights and international relations relating to human rights. The programme is interdisciplinary thus building on the strengths in this area of the Sutherland School of Law and the School of Politics and International Relations. Members of staff in the Sutherland School of Law have engaged in major research in this area spanning the full range of international human rights law from asylum law and practice, the EU and fundamental rights to the law of privacy in Ireland.

The LLM in International Human rights differs from existing degrees in Ireland by having a distinct interdisciplinary nature flowing from the co-ordination between the School of Law and the School of politics and International relations (SpIre).

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmininternationalhumanrights/

Your studies

On this programme you will acquire a specialised and in-depth knowledge and understanding of international human rights law, political theory of rights and international relations relating to human rights in a single course.
Your core modules will include International Human Rights Law and the Politics of Human Rights. You will also choose from modules such as: International Security; Politics of Development; Discrimination Law; and, Media and Regulation. You will complete a supervised dissertation and will also have international exchange opportunities during the programme. On completion of your studies, you will:
- be able to understand and think critically about the intersections between law, politics and international relations in the study of human rights;
- be able to apply this knowledge and understanding to real and hypothetical situations;
- be able to conduct independent research and write coherent, well-structured papers;
- have identified doctrinal and practical trends in legal practise and their impact; and,
- have an increased ability to identify and analyse problems from a legal perspective.

Studying abroad

The School affords its students the opportunity to spend a semester abroad as part of the Comparative, International and European Law (CIEL) Graduate exchange programme with our partner Universities in Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Spain. Students participating in the programme will have their dissertations jointly supervised by staff in UCD and in the institution which
they are visiting. Successful completion of the semester abroad will lead to the award of a Certificate in Comparative, International and European Law.

Your future

The programme qualifies you to work in the field of human rights, either domestically or internationally, as a practising lawyer, legal-adviser, policymaker, advocate, researcher, or academic. Career opportunities exist in intergovernmental organisations (United Nations, Council of Europe, European Union, Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe), government departments, international and domestic non-governmental organisations, law firms, and Universities.

Features

The Sutherland School of Law offers a wide range of modules for the Masters programmes. Reflecting its interdisciplinary nature, there are core modules that must be taken in both Law and Politics. The core law modules are

- International Human Rights considers the theoretical underpinnings and development of contemporary international human rights law, critically examines the institutional architecture developed by the UN system and regional systems to implement human rights norms as well as national methods of implementation of human rights law.

- Law of the ECHR offers a critical examination of key aspects of the operation and substantive law of the ECHR focussing on its incorporation into domestic law and an in-depth analysis and evaluation of the Court's jurisprudence for a number of substantive rights.

- Other Law modules of especial interest to those undertaking this programme include:

- Comparative Constitutional Law discusses a number of constitutional issues from a comparative perspective including the influence of the ECHR and its jurisprudence on constitutional structures and systems.

- Media Regulation discusses the regulatory environment in which the media operates, and encourages a critical analysis of the implications which the current system has for media freedom, journalistic ethics and practices, democracy and governance

CIEL

Any student admitted to an LLM programme in the Law School also can apply on a competitive basis to spend their second semester at one of our sister Law Schools:
- University of Antwerp
- Maastricht University
- The University of Mannhein
- Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona
- Universite de Toulouse 1 – Capitole

Students must score 6.5 in IELTS or 90 in the internet TOEFL exams in the relevant language of instruction (English, French or German). Spaces are allocated on a competitive basis. Students who are accepted onto this programme graduate with an LLM and are awarded a certificate in International and Comparative Law (CIEL).

Careers

This programme will equip graduates with the knowledge, skills and capacity to work in the field of human rights, either domestically or internationally, as practising lawyers, legal-advisers, policy-makers, advocates, researchers or academics. Career opportunities in the field of human rights can arise in a variety of different contexts. These include, but are not limited to, intergovernmental organisations (United Nations, Council of Europe, European Union, Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe), government departments, international and domestic non-governmental organisations, law firms and Universities.

We have an excellent Careers Development Centre here at UCD, designed to help you with information regarding future employment or studies. UCD hold a number of graduate events throughout the year including a dedicated law fair at which at which many of the big Law firms will be in attendance. The School of Law has a dedicated careers advisor on it’s Academic staff, Dr. Oonagh Breen, and a staff member from the careers office will be in attendance at the School of law on a number of occasions throughout the academic year. To see the full range of services offered by the careers office go to http://www.ucd.ie/careers/

Find out how to apply here http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmininternationalhumanrights/apply,80081,en.html

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmininternationalhumanrights/

Scholarships

The University and UCD Sutherland School of Law have a list of scholarships that are open to Irish, EU and International applicants.
For further information please see http://www.ucd.ie/scholarships
International students may wish to visit: http://www.ucd.ie/international

Why you should choose UCD

In the state-of-the-art UCD Sutherland School of Law, graduate students engage in advanced study with internationally renowned
specialists to develop the transformative potential of law.

The School is ranked by the authoritative QS World University Rankings as Ireland's number one law school and amongst the world's 100 leading law schools. Students benefit from the School’s strong links with university partners; businesses; NGOs; and, domestic, EU and international governments.
We place particular emphasis on the quality and breadth of our graduate programmes across Diploma, Masters and Doctoral levels. Our graduate degrees are available on a full-time or part-time basis, beginning in either January or September.
We also offer part-time Diploma programmes and single subject certificates with the possibility of securing CPD points and building study up to achieve diploma or masters awards.

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- LLM Full Time Law and Economics Programme Code. M2Q3. - LLM Part Time Law and Economics Programme Code M2Q4. The LLM Law and Economics programme is a joint programme offered by the Centre for Commercial Law Studies and the School of Economics and Finance at Queen Mary University of London. Read more

LLM (Master of Laws) Law and Economics

- LLM Full Time Law and Economics Programme Code: M2Q3
- LLM Part Time Law and Economics Programme Code M2Q4

The LLM Law and Economics programme is a joint programme offered by the Centre for Commercial Law Studies and the School of Economics and Finance at Queen Mary University of London. It is a specialist programme which aims to provide rigorous training in theoretical and applied economic analysis as a means of analysing law and the legal framework. It is designed for students with a strong academic background in Law or Economics.

Aims of Programme

Graduates of the programme will possess a solid grounding in Legal theory and modern Economics that will enable them to conduct, assess, and supervise both theoretical and applied research in the field. Students who perform well on the programme are encouraged to apply for a joint doctoral study in the School of Economics and Finance and the Centre for Commercial Law Studies. For those seeking to develop or start their careers outside of academia, the new LLM programme will include a number of practical and knowledge transfer components that will allow a better transition to work outside the higher education sector. Students will, for example, have the opportunity to engage in an academic year-long Investment Club. During this time, students will be gaining hands on experience in trading and portfolio analysis alongside their studies.

Who is the course aimed at?

Such interdisciplinary skills make this LLM ideal for those already in, or planning a career in law or economics in academia, the public sector, international institutions, financial or legal industry or management consulting.

Structure of Programme

The LLM in Law and Economics is available to study full-time for one year or part-time over two years.

The programme of study provides a flexible mix of classroom based teaching (assessed by formal examinations and/or coursework) through:
◦An introductory pre-sessional in mathematics and statistics
◦Two compulsory taught modules which lay a foundation to Law and Economics theories
◦A 15,000 word dissertation
◦Choice of optional law and/or economic modules

Modules

Modules

For the LLM in Law and Economics you take a total of 180 credits. The two compulsory modules and the dissertation have a value of 90 credits. The remaining 90 credits are going to be selected from the range of law or economics modules.

You may study on one of two pathways: Jurisprudence, if you have a legal background or an undergraduate degree in law; or Economics, if you have an economic/finance background or have an undergraduate degree in economics or finance.

If you want to review concepts such as statistical distributions and matrix algebra, you also have the option to attend pre-sessional modules during induction week (week zero) and week one of the first term within the School of Economics and Finance. You will be also presented with basic statistics and statistical software during the first term.

You are required to balance your taught modules equally across the two teaching semesters – a full explanation of this process will be available during induction and before module selection.

Jurisprudence Pathway:
◦Pre-sessional course in mathematics and statistics (optional)

Compulsory modules
◦Law and Economics I (for Lawyers) - 22.5 credits
◦Law and Economics II - 22.5 credits
◦Dissertation – 45 credits

Optional modules

A further 90 credits from the optional law and/or economic modules:
◦90 law credits. Or,
◦90 economic credits. Or,
◦Combination of 45 credits in law and 45 credits in economic modules

Economics Pathway:
◦Pre-sessional course in mathematics and statistics (optional)

Compulsory modules
◦Law and Economics I (for Economists) - 22.5 credits
◦Law and Economics II - 22.5 credits
◦Dissertation - 45 credits

Optional modules

A further 90 credits from the optional law and/or economic modules:
◦90 law credits. Or,
◦90 economic credits. Or,
◦Combination of 45 credits in law and 45 credits in economic modules.

Visit the LLM in Law and Economics module page to see the full list of modules available on this course. Please note that not all options will be available every year.

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The MA in Islamic Law allows students to study Islamic law and its application in a broad range of legal areas, including Islamic jurisprudence, Islamic family law, Law of Islamic finance and human rights, as well as its relationship to society in the Middle East, Asia and Africa. Read more
The MA in Islamic Law allows students to study Islamic law and its application in a broad range of legal areas, including Islamic jurisprudence, Islamic family law, Law of Islamic finance and human rights, as well as its relationship to society in the Middle East, Asia and Africa. All SOAS modules are designed not only to introduce students to the general fields of law, but also to provide an understanding of how generic legal structures and processes may operate in non-Western social and cultural settings. All teachers on modules offered at SOAS are experts in their designated field. Many have years of experience advising governments, international organisations or non-governmental organisation, and many also have been or continue to be legal practitioners in their specialised fields.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/ma/maisllaw/

Structure

To facilitate the study of law, all MA students are required to attend a two-week Preliminary Law, Legal Reasoning and Legal Methods in the September before beginning the MA programme.

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units including the dissertation. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised MA are required to take at least two (2.0) of the three (3.0) taught units within their chosen specialism. The third unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules List or the following courses associated with the Islamic Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAC176 (1 Unit)
Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAC150 (1 Unit)
Islamic Law - 15PLAC121 (1 Unit)
Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAC130 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAC159 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
Gender, Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAH056 (0.5 Unit)
Religion & Comparative Constitutionalism - 15PLAH052 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
Dissertation in Law - 15PLAC999 - (1 Unit)

The Department

Key facts:
- LLB (QLD), BA (joint honours), LLM, MA & research degrees

- unique focus on both the developed and developing world

- research and teaching strengths in comparative, regional, international & global law

School of Law in UK top 5 for proportion of publications judged to be 'world-leading':
18 December 2014: the School was also graded in the top 20 nationally for its research environment. Find out more...

Our strengths:
We have unrivalled expertise in comparative law (China, Africa, South/South-East Asia, the Middle East), complemented by specialists in international and transnational law, human rights, transnational commercial law, environmental law and socio-legal method.

Facts and figures

- We are introducing student exchange programmes with leading universities in the US and China

- We achieve one of the highest percentages of training contracts with Magic Circle Law firms awarded to UK Law Schools

Teaching:
- 91% satisfaction for teaching (National Student Survey 2012/13): 96% of law students agreed that our staff are good at explaining things and 91% said their course was ‘intellectually stimulating’

- Excellent staff/student ratio

- Ranked 10th in UK (Guardian University Guide 2015)

Research:
- Thriving research culture with a packed schedule of seminars and conferences across our research centres and specialisms

- Close links with the internationally-renowned Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (IALS) and the Van Vollenhoven Institute, Leiden University

- Each year a number of distinguished Lawyers join SOAS as Research Fellows

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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What is the Master of Laws (LLM) all about?. The programme has . a marked international dimension.  . European law.  is an important focus. Read more

What is the Master of Laws (LLM) all about?

The programme has a marked international dimension. European law is an important focus. This is unsurprising given KU Leuven's close proximity to the EU institutions in Brussels. The programme taps into a large network of legal professionals with daily exposure to and experience in the European institutions. 

The programme includes attending hearings at the Court of Justice of the European Union in Luxembourg in the first semester and at the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg in the second. Discussing current issues in international affairs with the staff members of the Council of Europe and the European Parliament, again in Strasbourg during the second semester, are also part of your LL.M. programme. 

Members of the professorial staff of the LLM programme generally hold degrees from top universities in the United States and the United Kingdom and many have substantial experience as prominent legal practitioners.

Structure

Area of specialization of your choice:

  • International and European Business Law
  • International and European Public Law 
  • International and European Jurisprudence

If you like the courses offered in the other two, you can follow them as elective courses. Each specialisation includes eight clinics led by distinguished legal and business practitioners. 

This is an advanced master's programme and can be followed on a full-time or part-time basis.

Is this the right programme for me?

As a main prerequisite, the student must have a good knowledge of European Institutional Law. For students wishing to strengthen this knowledge, self-study reading materials are available from the beginning of the academic year.

The ideal prospective student will

  • have already obtained a master's degree (or equivalent) in law 
  • have received training in legal principles 
  • have the ability to think critically about the nature and purpose of rules
  • have the analytical skills needed to assess factual situations
  • have a general understanding of the operation of law in society

Objectives

The LL.M. programme is a post-graduate programme. It aims at offering students who already graduated in law in countries with different legal cultures, a high profile programme focusing on European and international law.

The student:

  • has in-depth knowledge of universal legal issues, in particular as they are dealt with in the law of the E.U. and international law
  • is able to independently identify, analyze and solve complex legal problems
  • is able to work in a creative manner with international and national legal sources and techniques
  • is able to conduct individual scientific research
  • is able to argue a legal argument
  • is able to express himself in an adequate and universal legal language
  • is able to present both written and oral information in a clear and well-structured form
  • knows how to use online legal databases
  • conducts legal research to help finding remedies to current social/political issues (eg. to contribute for policy makers/researchers to find the right approach for a complete solution)
  • compares legal systems
  • works independently (self-management during the writing process of their research work, ending in the final submission of their paper).

Career perspectives

Given its philosophy grounded in European law, its highly skilled teachers and its openness to the study and practice of various types of law - and of course, its proximity to Brussels - the Leuven LLM constitutes a significant added value for students seeking legal careers in Europe.



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Ideal preparation for PhD studies. Develop advanced skills in legal research methods and analysis of law and legal issues. Very small cohort of high-calibre students. Read more
  • Ideal preparation for PhD studies
  • Develop advanced skills in legal research methods and analysis of law and legal issues
  • Very small cohort of high-calibre students
  • Sustained training in methodological approaches to legal research
  • Emphasis on doctrinal, theoretical and contextual study of law, and your self-understanding as a participant in the practice of legal scholarship

What will you study?

Sample modules:

  • Research methods
  • Legal knowledge and legal writing
  • Research in jurisprudence
  • Research in criminology
  • Research in international human rights

Please note that all modules are subject to change. Please see our modules disclaimer for more information.

What career can you have?

A postgraduate law degree will open many doors for you, not only in specialised areas of employment, such as law firms, European and intergovernmental and nongovernmental organisations (NGOs), but also in academia (with further postgraduate study), the media (journalism and broadcasting), the civil service, and other branches of public service. 

Graduates from our LLM programmes have gone on to work for a range of national and international law firms, as lawyers and as in-house legal counsel for large multinational companies in the UK and abroad, as well as international organisations and NGOs.



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