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Masters Degrees (Jewish)

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This MA draws on the wide-ranging expertise of UCL Hebrew and Jewish Studies, the only department of its kind in the UK, and offers modules in all areas, periods, and aspects of Jewish Studies. Read more
This MA draws on the wide-ranging expertise of UCL Hebrew and Jewish Studies, the only department of its kind in the UK, and offers modules in all areas, periods, and aspects of Jewish Studies. The programme prepares students for further research, personal engagement, and interdisciplinary study.

Degree information

All students are introduced to the disciplines, theories, methods, and practice of learning and research in Jewish Studies, and those without prior knowledge of Hebrew learn the language at elementary level. An extensive range of optional modules are available in Jewish history, literature, languages, and Jewish thought, from antiquity to the modern world.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one or two (see below) core modules (30/60 credits), between four and six optional modules (60/90 credits), and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
-Jewish Studies MA Core Course
-Biblical Hebrew or Modern Hebrew (for students without prior knowledge of Hebrew)

Optional modules - options may include the following:
-Ancient Jewish Magic; Ancient Hebrew Inscriptions; Judaism and the Origins of Christianity
-European Jewry and the Holocaust; History of the Jews in Poland; Jews and the Metropolis
-Hebrew (biblicial, rabbinic, modern)
-Moses Maimonides in Jewish Thought and History; Hasidism and Modernity
-Old Testament Historical Texts; Introduction to Talmud
-Representation of Trauma; Family Politics in Israeli Literature; Rattling the Gender Agenda
-The Arab-Israeli Conflict; Israel and the Occupied Territories; Anglo-Israeli Relations
-Yiddish; Aramaic; Ugaritic; Syriac; Judeo-Spanish
-Yiddish Memoirs; Yiddish Literature; Special Topics

Dissertation/research project
All students undertake an independent research project which should be based in part on primary sources. The project culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, and other media such as occasional film viewings. Students will be expected to visit the major archives and libraries in the London area, depending on their specific areas of research and interest. Assessment is mainly through unseen examinations, coursework, long essays, and the dissertation.

Careers

Some recent graduates of the programme have gone on to PhD studies, while others have pursued a wide range of professional careers, including education at all levels, NGO activity, electronic and print media, the clergy (Jewish and non-Jewish), diplomacy, film-making, and much more.

Employability
This programme provides an outstanding foundation for those hoping to undertake PhD research and pursue an academic career, but it is also popular with students wishing to go into journalism, the civil service, law, business, museum and heritage, charities, and the education sector. Small-group seminars and tutorials help students to acquire strong presentation and communication skills for their future career. The analytical and research skills gained by taking this programme are highly valued by employers from a range of industries. Many additional activities are available, both within the department and the wider UCL community, to help students focus on employability skills whilst they are here. Both the department and UCL Careers offer advice and support for our MA students who are looking towards the next step in their career development.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Hebrew and Jewish Studies is unique in the UK and Europe, with an outstanding international reputation for its research, teaching, and expertise. We are warm, friendly, and highly ambitious.

We offer a wide range of taught modules, with further options available in other departments at UCL and elsewhere in London. Our students are given individual attention and encouraged to pursue their own interests and research.

UCL is located in central London, within walking distance of the British Museum, the British Library, and other specialist libraries such as the Warburg Institute, and SOAS, University of London. With its own specialist library in Jewish Studies, UCL has access to the best resources for academic research in the subject.

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Summary. Read more

Summary

This course offers a multidisciplinary approach to Jewish history, literature and culture from Antiquity to the contemporary world, with special emphasis on the broad framework of Jewish/non-Jewish relations; studies centre on the resources of the Parkes Library and Archive, and students are taught by members of the Parkes Institute for the Study of Jewish/non-Jewish Relations.

Modules

Approaches to Jewish history and culture; relations between Jews and non-Jews through the ages; research skills 1 and 2; dissertation; plus 2 optional modules from: Britain, the USA and the holocaust, 1933-95; east side/east end: the holocaust in American film; Eastern Europeans; history of the ghetto; holocaust literature; Jewish history; Jewish immigration and settlement in Britain and North America, 1880-1920; Jews in Hellenistic Egypt; other relevant optional modules.

Visit our website for further information



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Taught jointly by the Leo Baeck Institute and the Department of History). (MA title is subject to approval). The Leo Baeck MA is the only taught postgraduate programme in the UK focusing on the rich field of European Jewish History. Read more
Taught jointly by the Leo Baeck Institute and the Department of History)

(MA title is subject to approval)

The Leo Baeck MA is the only taught postgraduate programme in the UK focusing on the rich field of European Jewish History. It trains scholars towards undertaking independent research on Jewish history, culture and thought in Europe. You will consider patterns of inclusion and exclusion and questions of citizenship and emancipation. The MA will introduce you to a wide range of sources for European Jewish studies. Particular attention will be paid to the Jewish response to modernity and problems around issues of assimilation and identity. The role of antisemitism and the origins of the holocaust are central, as is Jewish intellectual history, in particular the ideas of eminent Jewish thinkers about the place of Jews and Judaism in premodern and modern society.

Programme outline
The MA consists of the core module, three modules chosen from a series of options and an individually supervised dissertation. Students will also take a non-assessed research methods module. Part-time students
take the core module and one option in the first year, and two options and dissertation in the second year.

Optional modules may include:

Modern Jewish History and Culture
Christians and Jews in Europe: Perceptions and Encounters, 1100-1600
Jews, Power and Intellectual History
Antisemitism and the Holocaust
Modern European Jewish Literature
Hollywood and the Second World War
Understanding Religion Historically
Overcoming Nazism

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All prospective MPhil applicants are advised to peruse the staff profiles on our website to familiarise themselves with the research and teaching interests of staff members. Read more
All prospective MPhil applicants are advised to peruse the staff profiles on our website to familiarise themselves with the research and teaching interests of staff members. Applicants for this course are expected to have a university qualification in either Hebrew or Arabic (Muslim-Jewish Relations stream) or Persian (Persian Cultural History stream).

Once admitted onto the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies), applicants will have the option of studying one of two streams:

- Muslim-Jewish Relations;
or
- Persian Cultural History

For each of these streams, students are required to choose three papers - courses usually run over two terms - in addition to doing a 15,000-word MPhil dissertation under the supervision of a supervisor. The dissertations are submitted no later than mid-August following the start of the course.

MPhil students attend various training courses offered by the Department in codicology, text reading, and other skills. They are also encouraged to attend fourth-year undergraduate lectures and language courses where relevant. They may attend graduate work-in-progress seminars where they have an opportunity to present their own work to their peers for feedback in a supportive environment.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/amammpmei

Course detail

* Muslim-Jewish Relations*

Students taking the Muslim-Jewish Relations stream will be introduced to the analytical tools required for studying Muslim-Jewish relations, primary sources in translation and original language, bibliographical method, objectivity in the study of interfaith relations and controversial themes. Topics may include the Jewish languages of the Islamic world; key historical documents in the study of Muslim-Jewish Relations; Muslim and Jewish thought; Law and Society and the Arab-Israeli conflict.

* Persian Cultural History*

Students taking the Persian Cultural History stream will be offered readings in Persian cultural history, identifying persisting trends in Persian literature and cultural production from the medieval period down to modern times. These themes revolve around kingship and the image of the ideal prince, theories of justice and good government, and competing sources of secular and religious authority. Similarly, the motif of love, both earthly and divine, is a common thread running through Persian literature and entails also the extensive use of imagery of the natural world. In the modern world, the course examines a number of issues by studying Iranian cinema and focusing on gender, historical adaptation, nation and approaches to narration and resistance to dominant discourses, reflecting also on how the stories and legends of the classical tradition are adapted for contemporary literature and media. In discussing these topics, attention is paid to their visual as well as written representation.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the MPhil programme, students will be expected to have:
- acquired the ability to read, interpret and translate primary sources in Hebrew, Arabic or Persian;
- acquired a good knowledge of the general scholarship on Muslim and Jewish or Persian culture(s);
- acquired an in-depth knowledge of the secondary literature relevant to the subject of their dissertation;
- developed the ability to formulate original research questions and produce a well-constructed, argument to answer them, in the form - of an independent piece of research based on the use of primary and secondary sources;
- acquired the skills to use library and internet resources independently.

Assessment

The one-year MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies) will have the following structure for the (1) Muslim-Jewish Relations option and (2) Persian Cultural History option:

1. Three modules each assessed by an examination or a 5,000 word course exercise
2. A 15,000 word dissertation.

With the approval of the Degree Committee, a candidate may offer, in place of one or more of the examination papers, the same number of essays, each of not more than 5,000 words, including footnotes, but excluding bibliography, or equivalent Alternative Exercises approved by the Degree Committee.

Three written examination papers on subjects approved by the Degree Committee, which shall fall within one of the fields specified in the Schedule to these regulations. With the approval of the Degree Committee, a candidate may offer, in place of one or more of those papers, the same number of essays, each of not more than 5,000 words, including footnotes, but excluding bibliography, or equivalent Alternative Exercises approved by the Degree Committee.

An oral examination on the thesis and on the general field of knowledge within which it falls, but at the Degree Committee’s discretion the requirement for an oral examination may be waived.

Continuing

Applicants for the PhD will be expected to have scored at least 67% or above (or the equivalent from an overseas University) in their Master's degree which should be related to the PhD programme they wish to pursue. All applicants should submit with their GRADSAF (graduate application) a workable and interesting research proposal and demonstrate that they have the required academic knowledge and skills to carry out their project.

Admission is at the discretion of the Degree Committee, which judges each graduate applicant on his or her own merits and in accordance with its own set rules and regulations.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

- Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) -

NB: Applicants should check the Faculty's website before the academic year 2016 - 2017 is due to start to see if AHRC funding is available to apply for. Home PhD and MPhil students and EU students who satisfy home residency criteria may be eligible for a full studentship which covers the University Composition Fee and College Fees plus an annual maintenance stipend. EU students are eligible for a fees-only award.

Further information: http://www.cambridgestudents.cam.ac.uk/fees-and-funding/funding/ahrc-funded-students

- Pembroke College Graduate Studentship in Arabic and Islamic Studies -

This studentship covers the University and College fees at the UK Home rate for applicants who are applying for a PhD and MPhil in Arabic Studies, Persian Studies or Islamic Studies and who are affiliated with Pembroke College.
Further information for this studentship can be found at the following web address:

http://www.pem.cam.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduates/fees-and-financial-support/scholarships-and-bursaries/

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/amammpmei/apply

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Please note. this programme is subject to validation. The MA in Biblical Studies offers excellent scholars who will help you learn, think and reflect about interpreting the Bible in today's world. Read more
Please note: this programme is subject to validation.

Why study Biblical Studies?

The MA in Biblical Studies offers excellent scholars who will help you learn, think and reflect about interpreting the Bible in today's world. You will engage with Scripture in its ancient and modern contexts, by reading the texts in conversation with high-quality scholarship and in relation to a wide range of issues.

This MA is suitable for many kinds of people:

- the MA will prepare you well for doctoral study in Biblical Studies, and includes opportunities to engage with biblical texts in the original languages, or to learn one of the languages which you have not previously studied
- if you serve in Christian or Jewish leadership, the MA will deepen and strengthen your engagement with Scripture in your preaching, teaching and ministry
-the MA is open to you if you have completed suitable prior theological study, to enable you to grow in understanding, reflection and thoughtful engagement with the Bible.

You can focus your MA in different ways through your choice of options and your dissertation topic. In your dissertation you will dig deep into a topic of your choice with the supervision and support of one of our team of outstanding biblical scholars.

Why St Mary's?

Whilst studying the MA in Biblical Studies at St Mary's you will:

- learn from our team of world-class biblical scholars who bring their own research into the classroom
- grow in skills and understanding through first-hand engagement with the Bible in our text-focused modules
- reflect on how others read the Bible in relation to a wide range of issues today, in society, politics, and in faith communities
- have chance to study with fine visiting scholars from elsewhere in the world, who will offer 'intensive' modules focused in a two-week period on their specialism
- be part of a university committed to treating Scripture seriously as part of its mission to serve faith communities
- have access to a good library, including electronic access to many books and journals
- have opportunities to attend the Centre for the Social-Scientific Study of the Bible's conferences, and research seminars on biblical themes and topics

Course content

Full-time students take two modules each semester, plus the dissertation. Part-time students take one module each semester for two years, and write their dissertation in the third year.

Every module is not offered every year, to ensure that class sizes are sufficient for a good student experience. To gain the MA, you must take the core module, Aspects of Biblical Interpretation, plus three options and the dissertation.

All modules can be seen on our website:
https://www.stmarys.ac.uk/postgraduate-courses-london/biblical-studies

Career opportunities

The MA will enhance employability in a number of roles where advanced skills in interpreting the Bible, and reflecting critically on such interpretation, are key elements, including:

- school teaching
-work with Christian or Jewish charities and agencies, including churches and synagogues
-educational roles with Christian and Jewish communities
-pastoral ministry in church or synagogue; senior leadership within churches and the Jewish community regionally, nationally and internationally

In addition, the MA is designed to lead naturally into doctoral study and the opportunities which such study provides.

The programme will also provide an education which sensitises students to engaging with religious texts from other times, cultures and places, and thus will equip them for work engaging with cross-cultural situations, such as NGOs in the UK and overseas, international relations, and the Civil Service in both the Home and Foreign Offices.

The Careers Service has more information on graduate careers and part-time work available during your course.

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First-year MLitt students are not registered for any degree and must undergo an examination at the end of their first year. If they successfully pass this then they will be registered for the MLitt degree. Read more
First-year MLitt students are not registered for any degree and must undergo an examination at the end of their first year. If they successfully pass this then they will be registered for the MLitt degree. Candidates submit a dissertation of not more than 80,000 words. The dissertation title must be approved by the Degree Committee. There is an oral examination on the dissertation and the general field of knowledge in which the dissertation falls.

The Divinity Faculty at Cambridge has distinguished international reputation for research, teaching and for the formation of graduate students in Theology and Religious Studies. Consistently rated as one of the top research units in the country in our subjects, it offers postgraduate training at an acknowledged world-class standard.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/dvdvmlltr

Specialisms

The teaching officers of the Faculty include leading experts in a wide range of fields:

- Biblical Studies;
- Ancient, Medieval and Modern Judaism;
- Patristics;
- History of Christianity;
- Christian Systematic Theology;
- Philosophy of Religion and Ethics;
- Religion and the Natural Sciences;
- Religion and the Social Sciences;
- Study of World Religions (with special reference to Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism).

Each major research area is centred on a senior seminar meeting fortnightly during term. In practice these seminars are often interdisciplinary in character (such as the D Society in Philosophy of Religion and Ethics and the Hebrew, Jewish and Early Christian Studies Seminar); and a variety of other informal graduate seminars and reading groups also helps to expand the repertoire of exchange. A number of named lectureships (the Stantons, the Hulseans etc) regularly bring international figures from outside Cambridge to contribute to the research culture.

First-year MLitt students are not registered for any degree and must undergo an examination at the end of their first year. If they successfully pass this then they will be registered for the MLitt degree. Candidates submit a dissertation of not more than 80,000 words. The dissertation title must be approved by the Degree Committee. There is an oral examination on the dissertation and the general field of knowledge in which the dissertation falls.

Learning Outcomes

Candidates submit a dissertation of not more than 80,000 words. The dissertation title must be approved by the Degree Committee. There is an oral examination on the dissertation and the general field of knowledge in which the dissertation falls.

Format

Supervisions are given on the dissertation, twelve hours per year full-time (reduced pro rata for part-time).

Feedback will be given by the supervisor in the course of supervisions and in termly reports. In addition, there will be a report from the assessors following the first-year examination.

Assessment

Dissertation of not more than 80,000 words with a compulsory viva.

A first-year examination for which students must submit the following:
- a summary of the scope, purpose, methodology and value of research project;
- a provisional outline of dissertation with a timetable for the conduct and completion of the research and writing;
- a bibliography of topic and its immediate intellectual context set out in accordance with the conventions current field of study;
- a sample of written-up research of no more than 10,000 words, with appropriate footnotes and bibliographical references (included in word-count).

Students will have a meeting with two assessors to discuss the submitted work.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Faculty Studentships:

- Burney & Gregg Bury Studentship (Philosophy of Religion & Christian Theology)
- Peregrine Maitland Studentship (Spread of Christian Religion, comparison between Christianity &other religions, the contact of Christian & other civilizations)
- Polonsky-Coexist Studentship in Jewish Studies
- Shapiro Fund (Jewish Studies0
- Theological Studies Fund Studentship

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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One of the big strengths of our Theology MA is how well it matches the current research interests of our academic staff. That means you get the maximum benefit of our expertise whichever module options you choose. Read more
One of the big strengths of our Theology MA is how well it matches the current research interests of our academic staff. That means you get the maximum benefit of our expertise whichever module options you choose. We will train you in research methodologies and skills so that you can engage with key texts and sources, we can also help you develop expertise in biblical languages as well as Latin, patristic Greek and Aramaic if you need it.

You will have the chance to take an interdisciplinary approach to Theology, which is increasing in popularity and importance with Research Councils. You might choose to exchange insights with disciplines like Philosophy, Anthropology, Sociology, Archaeology, Classics and Ancient History.

We pride ourselves on being a friendly and supportive department. We are always happy to make time to talk to you one-to-one and give you all the support you need to be a success. We hope you will join us at Exeter and become an active part of our vibrant research community.

Programme Structure

The degree normally involves five taught modules and a dissertation.

Compulsory modules

The compulsory modules can include; Research Skills in Theology; Dissertation; Research Proposal in Theology ; Evaluative Bibliographical Diary and Philosophy of the Social Sciences.

Optional modules

Some examples of the optional modules which may be available are; Reception of Christian and Jewish Traditions; Intermediate Biblical Hebrew; Introducing Biblical Hebrew; Theology, Ethics and Public Issues; Reading Early Jewish and Christian Texts; Approaches to Biblical Studies

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand

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The SOAS MA in Ancient Near Eastern Languages offers an intensive programme of text-reading and language-learning for those who already have a good knowledge of the Akkadian language - usually at least two years' experience. Read more
The SOAS MA in Ancient Near Eastern Languages offers an intensive programme of text-reading and language-learning for those who already have a good knowledge of the Akkadian language - usually at least two years' experience. The degree is intended to widen the student's experience in the vast legacy of written documentation in Akkadian and other languages from ancient Mesopotamia and Anatolia. The programme is tailor-made to serve as an intermediate level between SOAS's three-year BA in Ancient Near Eastern Studies (or an equivalent qualification) and postgraduate Assyriological research at the level of MPhil and PhD. It can, of course, be taken for its own sake.
Email:

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/maanel/

Structure

The degree comprises three taught courses chosen from the MA list and a dissertation on an agreed subject. The courses that are avaliable at SOAS in Akkadian, Sumerian and Hittite are in the list below.

Instead of one of these SOAS courses candidates may, if qualified, take one of the following topics from MA programmes run by University College London:

- Hebrew and other North-West Semitic languages (MA in Hebrew and Jewish Studies)
- Ancient history, currently Change and Continuity in the Ancient Near East (MA in Ancient History, 91AHG003)
- Archaeology (MA in Archaeology of the Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East)

Not all the courses listed are available every year. Entry to courses run by University College is subject to the approval of the academic department in question (the Department of Hebrew and Jewish Studies, the Department of History, and the Institute of Archaeology).

Courses avaliable at SOAS
- Mesopotamian Languages and Literature A: the third millennium - 15PNMC021 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
- Mesopotamian Languages and Literature B: the second millenium BC - 15PNMC022 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
- Mesopotamian Languages and Literature C: the first millenium bc - 15PNMC023 (1 Unit) - Full Year
- Sumerian Language - 15PNMC024 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
- Christians and Muslims in Syriac Texts - 15PSRC175 (1 Unit) - Full Year
- Hittite Language - 15PNMC025 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017

MA Ancient Near Eastern Languages- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 24kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/maanel/file80794.pdf

Teaching & Learning

- Course Information
Courses are listed under the menu item Programme Structure on the left-hand side of this page. Each course is taught two or three hours weekly in small classes of usually one to five students. Courses in language and literature comprise the reading, translation and discussion of set texts. Thorough preparation is essential.

- Dissertation
The dissertation will be on a topic agreed with the student's teachers and will extend to about 10,000 words. It may take the form of an extended essay on an approved topic or an edition with introduction and commentary of a previously unedited text or group of texts. The deadline for submission is 15 September in the year of examination.

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The M.Phil. in Theology and Religious Studies is a nine-month Masters course. The M.Phil. offers the opportunity for advanced study in Theology and Religious Studies across the full range of disciplines and with a strong focus on research. Read more
The M.Phil. in Theology and Religious Studies is a nine-month Masters course. The M.Phil. offers the opportunity for advanced study in Theology and Religious Studies across the full range of disciplines and with a strong focus on research. Students can draw on the expertise of leading scholars from a wide range of subjects, which allows both for specialisation and for interdisciplinary approaches. The M.Phil. is designed for students who wish to study their subject interest at an advanced level for nine-months, but also to enable those who wish to undertake further research at doctoral level to acquire the necessary skills and understanding.

Candidates submit a thesis of between 15,000 and 20,000 words and two pieces of submitted work of not more than 5,000 words which will be an essay or an equivalent exercise. Candidates then chose to do one of the following: a three-hour language examination; an exercise; or an alternative exercise within the candidates's chosen subject area if one has not already been offered.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/dvdvmpmtr

Learning Outcomes

On completion of the M.Phil. students should have acquired:

- an introduction to research methods and skills appropriate to a chosen sub-discipline of the subject, such as will serve both: as a preparation for more advanced research or as offering skills of value to potential employers;
- more advanced and specialised knowledge of some fundamental issues and literatures at the forefront of research in that sub-discipline;
- the ability to construct a substantive, if preliminary, contribution to research on a particular issue within that sub-discipline, through the writing of a thesis.

Format

Teaching is by seminars, supervisions, and, as appropriate, classes and lectures. Each module shall normally be taught by four seminars of two hours duration in one term (though some subject areas may provide one-and-a-half hour seminars where there is no essay work being assessed during the seminar itself). Teaching for the exercises varies according to the nature of the exercise. Students may be required to submit preliminary written work for seminar presentations, or practice essays or exercises ahead of their submitted essays or exercises.

The seminars themselves constitute the teaching for the essays arising from the seminar course.

Other essays will be supervised individually. The norm is 2 hours of supervision (distributed between 2 or 3 meetings) per essay.

For theses, the norm is 4 hours of supervision, though that time may be distributed in various ways.

Feedback will be given on essays or exercises related to the seminar modules when the marks and comments are available. Feedback will be given regarding progress in the thesis during the supervisions given for it. There will also be termly reports on CGSRS.

Assessment

A thesis of between 15,000 and 20,000 words. The examiners may at their discretation request an oral examination in any aspect of the work submitted by the candidate.

Two pieces of written work, each of which shall be an essay of not more than 5,000 words, or an equivalent exercise related to a student's chosen seminar modules.
If a student does not choose to study a language, a further written exercise.

One three-hour language examination (if a student chooses to study a language).

Continuing

In order to be eligible to continue to the Ph.D., students must achieve at least a mark of 71 for the thesis and an overall average of at least 71% in the M.Phil. as a whole.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

- Burney & Gregg Bury Studentship (Philosophy of Religion & Christian Theology)
- Peregrine Maitland Studentship (Spread of Christian Religion, comparison between Christianity & other religions, the contact of Christian & other civilisations)
- Philosophy of Religion Studentship
- Polonsky-Coexist Studentship in Jewish Studies
- Shapiro Fund (Jewish Studies)
- Theological Studies Fund Studentship

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This course is for anyone with an existing interest and some experience in genealogy and related subjects. It's been developed by academics and genealogy professionals to provide a thorough grounding in the theory and practice of genealogical research, family history, records, archives and heraldry. Read more

Why this course?

This course is for anyone with an existing interest and some experience in genealogy and related subjects. It's been developed by academics and genealogy professionals to provide a thorough grounding in the theory and practice of genealogical research, family history, records, archives and heraldry. You may wish to study the field in more detail or use it in your career. It’s of particular interest for:
- archivists
- lawyers & paralegals
- geographers
- land agents
- heritage sector staff
- historians
- librarians
- museum staff
- records agents

It's also suitable for those who are interested in:
- developing, evaluating or refreshing their expertise in genealogy, records, archives, documents, palaeography and heraldry
- advancing their academic and professional achievement in these subjects
- gaining a deeper, more critical understanding of the field, its literature and professional practice
- providing more expert knowledge and advisory capacity to employers and members of the public, such as in Family History Centres

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/genealogicalpalaeographicheraldicstudies/

How is the course delivered?

The course is delivered online and so it'll require computer access from home. You should be familiar with the use of computers in genealogy and the course is standardised on Microsoft Windows. You'll also need to subscribe or pay for certain online databases and services.

Course overview

You’ll focus on the sources available to genealogists and family historians. You’ll also gain the knowledge, skills and techniques to operate as a professional genealogist in a variety of settings.

The Postgraduate Certificate course deals mainly with Scottish, English/Welsh and Irish records. The Postgraduate Diploma adds American, Canadian, Australian, New Zealand, British Empire, Jewish, European and other sources.

We work together with:
- the National Records of Scotland
- the National Archives at Kew
- various professional and commercial bodies including the Association of Scottish Genealogists and Researchers in Archives (ASGRA), DC Thomson Family History, Deceased Online and FamilyTreeDNA

When you complete the Certificate and Diploma degrees, you'll have a suitable portfolio to submit to various certification boards and other bodies for professional accreditation.

Course structure

There are three degree levels within this course.
Most of our students begin with the PG Certificate before moving to the PG Diploma and then onto the MSc.
There's also a one-year MSc option. This combines all three levels into one academic year.
There are a few external equivalents to the PG Certificate which would allow direct entry onto the PG Diploma. If you're interested in learning more about these contact our Course Administrator.

You’ll study

You’ll need to commit time each week to cover:
- reading
- participation in online discussion forums
- research
- completion of course work

Postgraduate Certificate

We offer two options with the PG Cert:

- One year
If you'd like to study over a year, and can commit 20 hours a week to the course, this is the option for you. It'll run from October until June with assessments throughout the course.

- Two year (modular)
If you'd like to study over two years, you can do this by studying the six classes individually over this time period. This option gives you the opportunity to begin studying in October, January or April - whichever suits you best. The classes must be taken in order, and are all compulsory to complete the PG Cert. This option will require roughly 14 hours a week of study.

- Topics
You'll study topics including:
- genealogical professional practice
- search strategies & using repositories
- social history, demography & geographic sources
- church & civil records (England/Wales & Scotland)
- census records & their substitutes (England/Wales & Scotland)
- genetic genealogy
- migration & records
- Irish records
- military & occupational records (England/Wales & Scotland)
- land & inheritance records (England/Wales & Scotland)
- palaeography
- Latin for genealogists
- heraldry

Once you successfully complete the certificate, you can progress to the Diploma.

Postgraduate Diploma

The PG Dip allows you to develop a greater understanding of social and historical contexts and provides an in depth study of the professional and academic aspects of genealogical work. We suggest you allow around 20-25 hours a week for studying this degree.

- Topics
You'll study topics including:
- methods of professional enquiry (includes submission of a 5,000-word research project)
- Irish records in depth
- US & Canadian sources
- British empire sources
- heraldry & mediaeval genealogy
- European & Jewish sources
- Australian & New Zealand sources
- palaeographic & document-focused studies

After successfully completing the Diploma you can progress to the MSc, if the tutor team agrees.

MSc

The Masters is the third year in the part-time course.
The MSc requires the student to plan, implement and evaluate a piece of research and development work, which involves carrying out a research project of genealogical relevance, which will be assessed on a report of 12,000-16,000 words.
The part-time MSc runs from October with the dissertation submitted the following June. There's tutor guidance on academic writing, study and research skills.

- One-year MSc option
If you have an undergraduate degree along with experience in genealogical research, this could be an option for you.
You'll have to commit around 40 hours a week and there will be compulsory online tutorials for you to attend every week.
This option will begin in the middle of September and will run through to late July. The course content is the same as the three degree levels of the course. You can find these in the course content tab.

Teaching staff

Academic input is provided by:
- the Centre for Lifelong Learning
- the University’s Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences
- appropriate external specialists

Professional recognition

ASGRA (Association of Scottish Genealogists and Researchers in Archives) will admit PG Certificate graduates as Probationer Members and PG Diploma graduates as Full Members (additional evidence of client work is also required).
The Association of Genealogists and Researchers in Archives (AGRA) recognises the PG Certificate as satisfying the requirement for Associate Members to hold a qualification in genealogy.

Computer & software access

You need to have regular access to a computer at home as we’ll issue you with various log-ins and passwords you can’t use on public computers.

Your computer must have a recent version of Microsoft Windows and Microsoft Office or Open Office. It should also be capable of running Java and be enabled for pop-ups.

We’ll communicate with you by e-mail and via the University's Virtual Learning Environment. Please make sure you can use the following programs:
- Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint or a compatible program, eg OpenOffice
- an e-mail program compatible with Microsoft software. We recommend Outlook
- a graphics program compatible with Microsoft software. We recommend Irfanview
- WinZip or the ability to un-zip files and folders
- Adobe Acrobat Reader

Family Tree Maker software is sent to you before the start of the course. You can also choose to use comparable software from other vendors. A six-month subscription to the worldwide version of Ancestry is normally included with the copy of Family Tree Maker but this is not guaranteed.

Entry requirements

Some assignments and assessments require the use of genealogy software. If you've not previously used such software you should learn the basics before the course begins.

- PgCert
Normally, a degree or similar, but non-standard educational or professional qualifications may also be considered. There's a requirement to have some relevant genealogical or related experience.
The Centre for Lifelong Learning offers a number of eight-week courses available both online and on-campus. These are intended to provide the basic skills and knowledge required to facilitate progression to the Postgraduate Certificate. Successful completion of one or more of these courses may serve as evidence of the necessary study skills and/or relevant genealogical experience.

- PgDip
Entry will normally follow successful completion of the PgCert.
Students who've gained equivalent academic qualifications at PgCert level may be accepted directly onto the PgDip. Those seeking admission with advanced standing may include prior learning in recognised courses and/or genealogical-based experience as entry criteria. Further information is available on request.

- MSc
Direct entry to the part-time MSc isn't available. Students must first complete the PgDip at an appropriate level before being allowed to continue on to the MSc.
For the one-year MSc, candidates should normally hold an undergraduate degree, though other forms of qualification and experience may be taken into account. First degrees may also be augmented by previous postgraduate qualifications, such as an MSc.
Some experience in genealogical (or other relevant) research is required and we may ask to see examples of reports and/or charts you have created.
Students who already hold the PgCert or PgDip in Genealogical, Palaeographic and Heraldic Studies from Strathclyde, or certain other relevant qualifications from specified institutions, will be able to transfer credits, up to a defined limit. However, no fee discounts will be available. These students may wish to undertake the part-time versions of the MSc programme.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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Royal Holloway’s Holocaust Research Centre is the leading academic centre of its kind in Europe and we are internationally recognised for our research, teaching, public advocacy and creative work. Read more
Royal Holloway’s Holocaust Research Centre is the leading academic centre of its kind in Europe and we are internationally recognised for our research, teaching, public advocacy and creative work.

The Research Centre’s mission is to promote research into the Holocaust, its origins and aftermath, and to examine the extent to which genocide, war and dictatorship can be understood as defining elements in the history of the twentieth century. It is an international forum bringing together researchers working on different aspects of the Holocaust in a range of disciplines, including history, literary and language studies, film and media studies, philosophy and sociology.

The MA Holocaust Studies is taught by staff from several different Royal Holloway Departments, including English, Modern Languages and History. Courses are taught both at the Wiener Library in central London and the Royal Holloway Egham campus.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/history/coursefinder/maholocauststudies.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The Holocaust Research Centre has a very active research culture which features lectures from the leading figures in the field. Recent speakers have included Robert Jan van Pelt, Ulrich Herbert, Reinhard Rürup, Dina Porat, Saul Friedländer, Geoffrey Hartman and Jeffrey Herff.

- We host several workshops each year on cutting edge research and regular international conferences.

- Our core staff, which includes internationally recognised scholars Peter Longerich, Dan Stone, Colin Davis, Zoe Waxman and Robert Eaglestone, have published over 30 books in the last five years with major presses and three books have won international prizes.

Department research and industry highlights

In responding to the Holocaust we research in a range of disciplines, including history, literary studies, theory film and media studies and philosophy, and welcome graduates in any of these areas. We especially welcome students with interdisciplinary projects.

The research of the members of the Centre has been supported by grants from Leverhulme, the AHRC, the British Academy, DAAD, Humboldt, the US Holocaust Memorial Museum and elsewhere.

Course content and structure

You will study one core course unit, three elective units and undertake a dissertation.

Core course units:
- History and Historiography of the Holocaust
This unit will introduce you to the history of the Holocaust and will focus on major historical debates.

- Dissertation
The dissertation must be between 14,000 - 16,000 words and is mainly written in the third term and the summer (deadline 1st September). Students are expected to develop a topic together with their supervisor(s) during the Spring Term. Topics can be taken from various areas, like history and presentation of the Holocaust or its impact on literature, culture, media and philosophy.

Elective course units:
- Holocaust Literature
You will consider various cultural representations of the Holocaust in British and American literature and in particular the relationship between history, testimony and literature.

- Post-Holocaust Philosophy
This unit looks at the response in European philosophy to the murder of the Jews. To what extent does the Holocaust render previous philosophy redundant?

- Documents of the Holocaust
You will study in depth crucial documents regarding the Nazi persecution of the Jews and the “Final Solution”. All documents will be presented in English translations.

- Faith, Politics, and the Jews of Europe, 1848-1918
This unit explores the emergence of conservative Jewish movements opposed to assimilation and the response to anti-Jewish movements and ideologies from the late 1870s onwards.

On completion of the course graduates will have advanced knowledge and understanding of:
- the most important aspects of the history and historiography of the Holocaust
- significant questions of schools of culture, philosophy and representation arising from the Holocaust
- methods and concepts of various disciplines (historical, literary, philosophical and others).

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by coursework and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different areas, including careers in academia, charities (such as the Holocaust Educational Trust) and the media. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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How did the ancient Romans view religious-political differences? How did ancient Jewish, Christian, and Muslim authorities use authoritative texts? What potential for pluralism exists in modern monotheisms and secularisms?. Read more
How did the ancient Romans view religious-political differences? How did ancient Jewish, Christian, and Muslim authorities use authoritative texts? What potential for pluralism exists in modern monotheisms and secularisms?

Tension between group solidarity and productive relations with ' others' has been part of human history for as long as evidence exists. In Europe it has played out most enduringly in relations among the monotheistic religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Today, in the face of mass migration from Muslim regions, questions of political identity and belonging remain bound up with religious affiliation. This one-year degree programme focuses on relations between Jews, Christians and Muslims in the antique world and how these relations have formed our modern society. We will explore concepts as religious pluralism, politics, and their many interfaces globally in particular.

In this track within the Master's Programme in Theology & Religious Studies, you will:
* examine the literary sources of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam in a historically informed way in order to bring critical perspectives to modern interpretations;
* identify continuing issues in Jewish, Christian, and Islamic self-definition, toleration of difference, and exclusionary or conversionist tendencies;
* map a range of ancient possibilities for coexistence or conviviality and their opposites under changing conditions.

Why Groningen?

• rated best Master's programme in Theology & Religious Studies in the Netherlands
• top 100 university
• integrated approach of religious pluralism, politics, and their many global interfaces
• focus on historical context of modern societies
• taught by internationally recognized experts in the field
• opportunity to pursue your own research interests

Job perspectives

As a graduate you can become an adviser and policymaker on interreligious issues and multicultural society. You may work in cultural organisations and companies in the public sector. In addition, you can work in the media. You can become a teacher of religion or philosophy. If you want to pursue an academic career, you can follow this track as a specialization within the research Master's programme.

Job examples

• Consulting & Policy
You are able to provide well-founded advice on interreligious issues and multicultural society. You can use this expertise in an advisory position at cultural organizations, in companies or in the public sector. Your knowledge equips you for policymaking positions in this field.

• Media & Journalism
The current debate often refers to perceived historical realities. Your expertise in the formative periods of Judaism, Christianity and Islam enables you to ask critical questions concerning modern-day claims about these religious traditions. You can use your knowledge and skills as an editor at a publishing company, broadcasting company, newspaper or news and current affairs magazine. You could also work as a freelancer.

• Education
Once you have completed this Master's programme you will have enough knowledge of the subject to become a secondary school teacher in the subject of Religious Studies and Philosophy or Social Studies. You could also opt for a position in higher vocational education, for example teaching Theology at a university of applied sciences. As you also need didactic skills as a teacher, it is advisable to do a Master's in Education after you have completed your regular Master's programme.

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Supervision in Theology can be offered in areas such as Biblical studies; Patristics; Church History; History and Interpretation of Christian doctrine; Systematics/Constructive Theology; Modern Theology and Philosophy, Theology and Sexuality; Theology and Theatre/Performance Studies, Political Theology and Black Theology. Read more
Supervision in Theology can be offered in areas such as Biblical studies; Patristics; Church History; History and Interpretation of Christian doctrine; Systematics/Constructive Theology; Modern Theology and Philosophy, Theology and Sexuality; Theology and Theatre/Performance Studies, Political Theology and Black Theology.

Supervision in Religious Studies can be offered in areas such as Comparative Religious Studies; Jewish Studies; Jewish-Christian dialogue; Hindu Studies; Buddhist Studies; Tibetan Studies; Religion and Visual Culture; Religion and Literature; Philosophy of Religion; Religion and Social Theory; Religion, Gender and Sexuality; Religion and Postmodernity.

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/theology-and-religious-studies-by-research.aspx

Course detail

You should discuss your initial ideas for a MA by research topic with a suitable supervisor from the programme team in the area of your study. If you are unsure, please contact Dr Maria Diemling, the Subject Lead in Theology and Religion, Philosophy and Ethics, who will be able to advise you whom to contact.

Your research topic may develop from a recent undergraduate encounter with a particular aspect of Theology or Religion, Philosophy and Ethics or you may be returning to education looking for a structured environment in which to formally pursue an established passion.

Please note that while students can build up on their BA research dissertation, they will not be allowed to submit identical material again under the current QAA policies.

Suitability

Are you fascinated by religions and their role in shaping our diverse, globalised, and multicultural world? Are you drawn to thinking about God, or relish the prospect of understanding how people of faith have instilled life with religious meaning? Are you concerned about questions of ethics, society, and justice in modern life? Do you value open-minded, independent and critical thinking? If so, you will enjoy studying the Theology and Religious Studies MA by Research.

Format

The teaching team at Canterbury Christ Church provide an excellent student experience in Theology and Religious Studies. They are passionate about their subject, and encourage students to share their enthusiasm and excitement. Drawing on academic expertise in major areas of Judaism and Christian Theology, as well as Indian and Chinese Philosophies, the team can offer supervision in an exciting and broad range of topics, including studies in world religions, the history and interpretation of religious thought, and the study of critical challenges in the contemporary world.

Assessment

Students will write a research thesis on their chosen topic. For an MA by Research students will need to demonstrate critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights, much of which is at the forefront of their own academic discipline.

The length of the Masters by Research thesis excluding bibliography and appendices, but including footnotes, is 25,000-30,000 words.

The MA by research will be assessed by dissertation. The examination will be done by an internal and an external examiner and might include a viva voce examination.

What can I do next?

This programme is a significant qualification in its own right but could also fast-track you, if you're successful, to MPhil and ultimately to PhD qualifications.

The research and writing skills you'll gain, together with the specialist disciplinary knowledge developed during the course, will enhance your employability and can provide an invaluable grounding for careers in teaching, media and journalism, publishing and marketing.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

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In this distinguished MA degree, students can tap into our rich tradition of excellence in textual, theological and philosophical study while also gaining perspective on ways religion shapes and is shaped by the contemporary world. Read more

In this distinguished MA degree, students can tap into our rich tradition of excellence in textual, theological and philosophical study while also gaining perspective on ways religion shapes and is shaped by the contemporary world. Attracting students from around the globe, the MA in Religion offers an outstanding range of teaching from internationally leading scholars, with the option to follow one of four pathways of study or to forge your own path.

Key benefits

  • King’s is home to a large, vibrant Department of Theology and Religious Studies, with special expertise in Islam, Judaism, Christianity and Buddhism and a variety of contemporary religious movements within and outside these traditions.
  • The Department is ranked joint third in the UK for world-leading and internationally excellent research (Research Excellence Framework 2014).
  • Our teaching makes the most of London’s immensely diverse and rich religious culture and resources, including many places of worship and the collections of the British Museum and the National Gallery.
  • King’s central location offers easy access to numerous libraries across London.
  • Students develop key transferable skills which can lead to a variety of different careers

Description

The MA in Religion is designed to be both rigorous and flexible. Under the umbrella of a single MA, you will have the choice of four pathways that can be tailored to your interests.

If you wish to gain a deeper understanding of religion in the contemporary world from political, sociological and anthropological perspectives, follow the Religion in Contemporary Society pathway.

For a comprehensive understanding of Christian thought and practice as it has been reasoned and debated over the centuries, take the Systematic Theology pathway.

The Biblical Studies pathway introduces students to the world, text and context of the Bible in antiquity and in the modern world, reading it as literature and as a theological text.

The Jewish Studies pathway opens up the richness of Jewish texts and experience from antiquity to modern times, with particular attention to current issues in multi-religious societies.

The final option available to you is to not follow a pathway and to instead forge your own path, choosing the MA-level teaching you desire from across our diverse and interdisciplinary Department of Theology and Religious Studies and beyond.

 

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We strongly believe that teaching and research should be closely related. All our teaching staff are therefore research-active, many enjoying international reputations as leaders in their fields. Our commitment to original research means that we can introduce students to new discoveries in a diverse range of fields being explored by our staff.

If you are a full-time student, each week we will provide six to eight hours of teaching through lectures and seminars. We will expect you to undertake 34 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, each week we will provide two to four hours of teaching through lectures and seminars. We will expect you to undertake 17 hours of independent study.

Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

Methods of assessment vary between modules, but typically involve the submission of some coursework (usually an essay) and a written examination. A few modules are assessed through only one of these methods.

Career prospects

Our graduates use the skills and knowledge that they develop with us to pursue careers in teaching, journalism, media, civil service, policy consultancy, museum work, community organisations and the church or other religious institutions. Others have continued their studies to further research.



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If you want to widen the scope of careers open to you within the discipline or go on to teach, work in the ministry, in church leadership or charitable organisations this programme may help you achieve your career aspirations. Read more

Your programme of study

If you want to widen the scope of careers open to you within the discipline or go on to teach, work in the ministry, in church leadership or charitable organisations this programme may help you achieve your career aspirations. Biblical and Religious Studies has been taught at Aberdeen since its inauguration in 1495 making it one of the oldest and most established universities to study this discipline area. Teachers are highly regarded internationally and the programme is made up of wide ranging spiritual areas of study. Students come from the British Isles and overseas and follow a wide range of professions upon graduation.

The programme in Biblical Studies is designed to stimulate reflection on the use of the Bible in theology by crossing the conventional disciplinary boundaries between biblical exegesis and systematic theology. Special attention will be given to the issues of canonical criticism, narrative reading, and the use of Scripture in the construction of theological arguments.

Courses listed for the programme

The Emergence of Christology
Jewish History and Culture
Readings in Systematic Theology
The Christian Doctrine of God
Creation in Christian Ethics
Great Thinkers in Theological Ethics
Spiritual Formation
Patterns and Principles of Church Leadership
Special Subjects x 2
Senior Honours Special Subject x 2
Reading New Testament Greek x 2
Hebrew Language lii and lv

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page
https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/degree-programmes/922/biblical-studies/

Why study at Aberdeen?

• One of the oldest universities in the UK, with one of the oldest departments founded in 1495
• Alumni have gone on to teach, work in the ministry, church leadership, charitable organisations and doctoral studies
• You are taught by a great range of experts with access to the library and special collections

Where you study

• University of Aberdeen
• Full Time and Part Time
• 12 Months and 24 Months
• September

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees:
https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/tuition-fees-and-living-costs-287.php

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page
https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/finance-funding-1599.php
https://www.abdn.ac.uk/funding/

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:
• Your Accommodation
• Campus Facilities
• Aberdeen City
• Student Support
• Clubs and Societies

Find out more about living in Aberdeen:
https://abdn.ac.uk/study/student-life

Living costs
https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/finance.php

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