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Masters Degrees (Jewellery Making)

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The best contemporary jewellery combines excellent craftsmanship with strong conceptual and critical thinking. This stimulating new course will expand your approach to jewellery practice and challenge you to consider how collaboration and interdisciplinary projects can shape future ways of working and making. Read more
The best contemporary jewellery combines excellent craftsmanship with strong conceptual and critical thinking. This stimulating new course will expand your approach to jewellery practice and challenge you to consider how collaboration and interdisciplinary projects can shape future ways of working and making.


Why study MA Jewellery Futures at Middlesex?

At Middlesex we take a highly practical and critical approach to Jewellery that ensures that you spend the majority of your postgraduate study researching and making. This combination of in-depth analysis and hands-on experience will enable you to draw on a diverse range of expertise and resources while questioning and developing your practice in a contemporary context for a stimulating and successful career.Based in our University's £80 million Art and Design School, our course features state-of-the-art facilities with dedicated studio space for each of our MA students to ensure that we cater for a diverse range of interests and ambitions. With opportunities to collaborate with students from across the School, you'll be part of a supportive and interdisciplinary environment of artists who are shaping the future of creative industries worldwide with their award-winning, innovative work.

This course is flexibly designed to put you at the centre of your learning by using a range of teaching and assessment approaches that take into account your individual interests, abilities and ambitions in jewellery.

Course leaders Helen Carnac and Tim Carson are practising artists who have exhibited internationally, known also for developing thought about new practices. You will be encouraged to look at jewellery practice as more than an isolated solo activity, considering the anthropological, sociological, economic, political and geographic aspects that influence the field. You will explore how jewellery underpins and enables human sociability, engagement and interaction, and how it comes to impact other disciplines.

You will develop your work through individual and interdisciplinary projects, making full use of the many collaboration opportunities available at Middlesex. You will also be supported by some of the best facilities and equipment in the country, with technical tuition on a range of modern and traditional art and design tools.

Course Highlights

- World-class teaching from some of the UK's leading artists, curators, practitioners who have substantial experience in building successful careers with their artistic talents
- Innovative facilities that allow you to experiment and develop your individual approach to jewellery using a wide range of contemporary and traditional equipment, spaces and software
- Exhibition opportunities off-site to create networking opportunities, build industry links and explore new ways of working and creating
Direct access to London's art and craft world with valuable industry links to a range of galleries, high-profile creators, libraries and collections to enhance your research and inform your practice
- Flexible module structure to meet the needs, ambitions and abilities of each student whatever stage you are at in your creative career
- Access to networking opportunities, world-leading research and expertise through the Lansdown Centre for Electronic Arts (LCEA) and Art & Design Research Institute (ADRI) on campus

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MA Design - Jewellery is concerned with the development of advanced craft and design practice. Jewellery activity within a contemporary context should be considered as a prospective and not prescriptive pursuit so the question ‘What can contemporary jewellery be?’ is particularly relevant. Read more
MA Design - Jewellery is concerned with the development of advanced craft and design practice. Jewellery activity within a contemporary context should be considered as a prospective and not prescriptive pursuit so the question ‘What can contemporary jewellery be?’ is particularly relevant.

The flexible nature of the programme not only allows the development of advanced practice within a discreet jewellery related area but also and importantly, encourages the cross fertilisation of ideas, preoccupations and practices.

Course Content

The MA Design: Jewellery is made up of four units totalling 180 credits.

The programme is designed to help you acclimatise to the challenges of MA level research and practice, enabling you to identify and describe a clear direction for your postgraduate design study.

You will be encouraged to develop design propositions that encompass key design issues and have complexity and ambition, taking full consideration of the relative contextual drivers.

You will also be encouraged and supported to extend your experience in the professional sphere either through a practical project, research context, exchange, work experience, or other negotiated professional set of interactions with an external partner, groups of students and creative industry.

Towards the end of the programme you will undertake a major project to consolidate your past research and practice into fully realised collections, pieces, proposals, business plans, or exhibitions – whatever means is appropriate to the work. You will also have developed a strategy for the continuation of your practice located and contextualised to the profession or discipline.

If you choose to progress to MFA Design: Jewellery award you will study a further two units of 60 credits each.

This route is focused on the continuation of your practice aligned to the research and selection of appropriate public or professional venues and platforms to disseminate a significant body of work. You will be required to produce work for a public audience in the most relevant and appropriate form along with any implicit publicity and dissemination material.

Special Features

Access to an extensive range of small metal and jewellery workshops and to a broad range of other three dimensional design and craft cultures, including those related to the design and/or making of domestic products, furniture, glass and ceramics.

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Study jewellery and metalwork at an advanced level and develop your talents for designing and making. You're challenged to think differently about design and creatively push boundaries, while developing the skills needed to become an imaginative and versatile designer. Read more
Study jewellery and metalwork at an advanced level and develop your talents for designing and making. You're challenged to think differently about design and creatively push boundaries, while developing the skills needed to become an imaginative and versatile designer. Your studies are project led and develop through researching, designing, producing and exhibiting your work. As a Postgraduate Design student you join an established network of creative people that encourage and support you to drive your studies to the next level. Our Postgraduate framework of design courses has been specially designed to allow students from different disciplines, backgrounds and cultures to come together, share teaching and learning experiences and explore their creative identities through dialogue and practice. Your studies will be project-led and developed through researching, designing, producing and communicating through presentations and exhibitions of your work.

If you are a highly motivated individual this course prepares you for a career working at the forefront of jewellery and metalwork. You build upon existing craft traditions, extending them in response to the needs of our rapidly changing society both in terms of function and style.

Your work on the course is project led and studio based. You develop and apply advanced skills using traditional and new technologies in the field. You also carry out research through practical and theoretical investigation.

Your individual project work includes research and creative work which explores your study topic. This is supported by lectures and seminars dealing with professional practice issues and reviewing progress. You also take part in regular group and individual tutorials.

This culminates with your final project that demonstrates you can deal with difficult contemporary questions and take a leading role in your profession as a designer. There are also residential study trips at home and abroad, complemented by opportunities to visit design conferences and debates.

See website for more information: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/mamfa-design-jewellery-and-metalwork

Excellent facilities and creative resources

You have access to a huge range of creative resources to experiment and engage with including:
-3D printing for rapid prototyping.
-State-of-the-art hardware and software.
-Photography studios.
-A creative media centre.
-A gallery.
-Well-equipped workshops.

You also have access to our award-winning learning centre featuring a specialist art, design and media library and extensive online resources.

Research-led expertise

We are one of the oldest established art and design institutions in the UK, renowned for producing internationally recognised research. Your projects are supported by lecturers who are reknowned specialists in jewellery and metalwork. You benefit from a strong relationship between the masters design programme and the University’s Art and Design Research Centre which has gained international recognition for its work in both practice-based and strategic research. This has led to an approach to postgraduate study in design which emphasises the role of research in professional practice.

Vibrant and supportive learning environment

During the course you regularly take part in constructive critical debates about your own work and that of your peers. You need to communicate your research, ideas and designs in ways that are appropriate to professional leadership. You study alongside MA and MFA Design students for part of your course and benefit from a vibrant, international, collaborative and supportive postgraduate environment.

Sheffield: an international centre for excellence in metalwork

Sheffield is famous not only for its innovative steel and tool industries but also for being at the leading edge of the design and production of contemporary metalwork, silversmithing and tableware.

MA and MFA study

MA and MFA students complete the same modules during the course except that MFA students complete an extra project module. The MFA project encourages you to develop professional skills that help you to identify, instigate, and deliver projects with external partners, such as communities, galleries or businesses. You find a project partner, agree a brief and then deliver the project to a professional standard. We are normally asked to shortlist applicants before recommending a small number to apply. If this happens, we consider your interview, portfolio of work, academic qualifications and learning aims. We aim to pick people whose abilities and aims are relevant for the company and who are most likely to be successful in a competitive interview.

Course structure

MA
Full time – 1 year continuous or 16 months including a summer break.
Part time – typically 3 years.
MFA
Full time – typically 2 years.
Part time – typically 4 years.
When studying part-time, you share teaching with full-time students.
Starts September.

Full time structure
Semester One
-Project 1
-Theory supporting practice
Semester Two
-Project 2
-Negotiated project
Semester Three
-Major project
Semester Four – MFA students only
-MFA project

Part time structure
Semester One (Year 1)
-Theory supporting practice
-Negotiated project
Semester Two (Year 2)
-Project 1
-Project 2
Semester Three (Year 3)
-Major project
Semester Four – MFA students only (year 4)
-MFA project

Assessment: assessment and feedback are vital parts of the learning process in creative disciplines. Most assessment is through individual project work which combines research and creative practice.

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This is an innovative course which develops creative potential and in-depth knowledge of theories, processes and techniques. Students will use a variety of materials, manufacturing techniques and processes. Read more

Summary

This is an innovative course which develops creative potential and in-depth knowledge of theories, processes and techniques.

Students will use a variety of materials, manufacturing techniques and processes.

The scope for design is very broad and builds on knowledge in the area of personal ornaments, body signification and decorative metal objects. There are also affinities with industrial design, fashion design, fine art and sculpture and content is often informed by philosophy, conceptualisation and critical theory.

Project-based activities will develop creative, design and making skills and enhance students' professional skills. Concepts and products will also be developed. Students will analyse problems and reflect on the relationships between personal objectives, cultural values, market identities, prototyping techniques and new technologies.

This course is divided into three trimesters to allow students to work towards a Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma or a Master's qualification.

Modules

PgCert: Research and Applied Practice.

PgDip: Creative Exploration; Specialist Research Enquiry.

Master's: Master Design Project.

Assessment

Studies include structured, project based learning activities which develop creative, design and making skills, research and investigative abilities, evaluation and independent learning to an advanced level; it includes individual and group tutorials, tutor-led and student-led seminars, lectures, and workshops as well as report writing and project work.

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This unique research degree is tailored to opening new opportunities in creative practice, professional and academic fields. The course provides unparalleled access to a range of resources within a stimulating and creative environment. Read more
This unique research degree is tailored to opening new opportunities in creative practice, professional and academic fields. The course provides unparalleled access to a range of resources within a stimulating and creative environment. You can choose from a number of subject areas, which you can browse in the carousel below. In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

The MA by Project is an innovative degree that gives you the opportunity to set your own agenda as a practitioner / researcher. You will be supported to develop and explore your practice through a self-directed research project, making your own work central to your programme of study throughout the duration of the course.

A core programme of research seminars are designed to open up a range of approaches to research and foster critical, analytical, reflective and evaluative skills. The course team and subject specialists will support you throughout the development and execution of your project. Workshops, presentations and seminars foster discussion and feedback from a multi-disciplinary community.

Projects are supported in the following subject areas: architecture and rapid change, architectural history and theory, cities, interiors, fine art, film and animation, furniture and product design, music, photography, silversmithing and jewellery, textiles and visual communication.

Outputs may take many forms, such as:
-Made objects in a variety of media (for example, painting, photography, printmaking, film, animation, silversmithing and jewellery, musical instruments, furniture, textiles)
-Documented actions such as performance art, live art, exhibitions, installations or events
-A design portfolio allied to one of our many design studios in architecture, cities, interiors, graphic design and illustration
-A written thesis investigating a theoretical or historical topic. This may take the form of a published output, an exhibition text, a case study or a PhD proposal

Resources

The Cass offers unparalleled facilities for designing and making. You will have access to specialist workshops, equipment and facilities all run by highly skilled staff.

Facilities include rapid prototyping, CNC routing, waterjet cutting, 3D printing, woodmill, furniture making workshops, musical instrument workshops, upholstery workshops, soft furnishing, finishing area, metal fabrication workshop, plastic and model making workshop, ceramics, silversmithing and jewellery workshops, restoration and conservation, AV/TV hire shop, recording studios, audio laboratories,editing suites, darkrooms, printroom, textiles workshop.

As well as a dedicated art and design library you will have access to libraries across the University. Our London location means that students are within reach of The National Art Library at the V&A, The British Architectural Library at RIBA, the British Library plus innumerable national and specialist collections.

Graduating students are able to nominate a specialism to be included within their degree award title to reflect either their project discipline or specific topic, eg MA by Project (Fine Art).

Assessment

At the end of each semester work is submitted for assessment.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Research Methods in Art, Architecture and Design (core, 40 credits)
-Research Project Development in Art, Architecture and Design (core, 40 credits)
-Research Project in Art, Architecture and Design (core, 60 credits)
-Theoretical Studies for Art, Architecture and Design (core, 20 credits)
-Contextual Studies: MA by Project (option, 20 credits)

After the course

The MA by Project can help you further your practice and develop new skills, extend your expertise and cultivate your professional profile, explore new avenues of thought and creative potential. You will be encouraged and supported in building a network of opportunities and developing external links that will help formulate the next stage in your career.

Past students have used the MA to launch new businesses as well as further their careers in a variety of professions. The MA by Project provides the opportunity to progress the theoretical development of your practice to a higher level and is therefore a suitable base for the development of a PhD.

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The University of Sunderland has the largest glass and ceramics department in Europe. ‌This course is for people who want to develop a specialism in glass, making use of the outstanding facilities at the National Glass Centre in Sunderland. Read more
The University of Sunderland has the largest glass and ceramics department in Europe.

Course overview

‌This course is for people who want to develop a specialism in glass, making use of the outstanding facilities at the National Glass Centre in Sunderland. We don’t require previous study of glass, but most students have experience in a subject related to art and design.

This course will help you develop a synergy of creative ideas and technical skills. You might focus on one of the three main areas: hot glass, kiln glass, or architectural glass - or combine approaches, and in doing so establish yourself as a professional glass artist. You will be using world-class facilities, and have access to 26 glass kilns, a state-of-the-art water-jet cutter, a hot glass workshop, two cold working studios, a glass mould-making workshop, architectural glass studio and glass and ceramics print studio.

We do not have a ‘house style’; instead, you will be encouraged and supported to develop your own focus. You will be encouraged to develop your independent creativity, improve your technical skills through expert support, and develop academic skills in research and communication.

During the course, we encourage you to develop your personal practice through studio work, critical studies, professional practice, research, critiques, analysis and questioning.

You’ll be joining the largest glass and ceramics department in Europe, made up of an international team of creative and experienced educators and practitioners. All academic staff on this course are engaged in professional practice or research, and tutors’ specialisms include glassblowing, print for glass, kiln forming, and digital fabrication methods.

Sunderland also hosts the Institute for International Research in Glass (IIRG), which promotes and facilitates glass research, develops new working methods and informs teaching. The IIRG has a lively visiting speaker programme of invited professional artists and curators, and also organises conferences, master classes, exhibitions and specialist training.

This course can also be taken part time - for more information, please view this web-page: http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/courses/artsdesignandmedia/postgraduate/glass-part-time/

Course content

The content of the course is shaped by your personal interests with guidance and inspiration from Sunderland's supportive tutors.

Modules on this course include:
Glass 1
-Glass – Self-negotiated Project (20 Credits)
-Studio Work (20 Credits)
-Critical Studies (20 Credits)

Glass 2
-Glass – Self-negotiated Project (20 Credits)
-Studio Work (20 Credits)
-Critical Studies (20 Credits)

Glass 3
-Glass - Exhibition and Contextual Report (60 Credits)

Teaching and assessment

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters requires a higher level of independent working.

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include lectures, seminars, critiques, workshops and practical demonstrations. These are supported by a range of guest speakers from diverse academic and industry backgrounds. You will also have high levels of contact with tutors who give regular feedback and support.

We organise field trips so that you can experience international work in your field. Destinations include cities such as Prague, Berlin and New York.

Facilities & location

The University of Sunderland has the largest glass and ceramics department in Europe, with one of the world’s best-equipped studios for creative glassmaking.

Facilities for this course include:
-26 glass kilns, including a large glass casting kiln
-Hot glass workshop with international-quality equipment
-Glass mould-making workshop
-Cold working studio for sandblasting, cutting, grinding and polishing
-Architectural glass studio
-Printing facility for glass, ceramics and other surfaces
-Water-jet machine/Computer Aided Design
-Lampworking workshop
-Computer suite and project space
-Project and exhibition space
-Multi-function creative and social space
-Arts and Design Library

Journals and research
We subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date articles. Some of the most important sources for your course are:
-Key Glass and Ceramics magazines and journals
-Art Full Text + Art Abstracts, which is a major resource for arts information
-Design and Applied Arts Index, which covers journals featuring both new designers and the development of design and the applied arts since the mid-19th century
-JSTOR (short for ‘Journal Storage’), which provides access to important journals across the humanities, social sciences and sciences

National Glass Centre
The Glass and Ceramics Department is based in the National Glass Centre, a nationally recognised glass production and exhibition centre with a world-class programme of creative projects.

Studying here puts you at the heart of an international network of professionals in the glass sector. You will be exposed to the latest ways of working through visiting artists and designers, and you can become involved in exhibitions that help launch your career.

Employment & careers

Postgraduates are highly employable and, on average, earn more than individuals whose highest qualification is an undergraduate degree. On completing this course, you will be equipped for roles throughout the creative industries.

Many recent Sunderland glass graduates are now working as independent artists with their own workshops and are successful practitioners of glass art around the world.

Our graduates exhibit in venues such as the British Glass Biennale, SOFA Chicago, the European Glass Context, COLLECT at Saatchi Gallery, and the Bombay Sapphire Prize in Milan, and they have been published in texts including Contemporary Glass (Black Dog) and Corning Museum of Glass’s New Glass Review.

Some graduates have moved on to lecturing positions at universities around the world or have chosen to move into other areas, including ceramics, painting, sculpture, jewellery, architecture, interior design, engineering and photography.

During the course we encourage you to gain industry experience which will enhance your skills, build up a valuable network of contacts and boost your employability. This experience can take the form of working on live commissions, entering competitions and exhibiting work in public exhibitions.

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The brand new, broad and practice-based MA Design takes students on a creative journey where you will explore processes making, materials and context. Read more
The brand new, broad and practice-based MA Design takes students on a creative journey where you will explore processes making, materials and context. You will challenge and extend your design practice at an advanced level whilst developing a range of artistic and practical skills.

The course is delivered through a series of project-based modules 'Make', 'Play' and 'Live', through which you will engage with real-world problems and issues of relevance to contemporary design practice and work towards the production of a physical object.

Course detail

The course attracts a diverse range of practicing designers, makers and industry professionals from a range of disciplines, including but not exclusively: ceramics, fashion design, jewellery design, product design, lighting, fine art and architecture and equally broad ranging staff backgrounds in robotics, graphics, product design and fine art. You will work both independently and collaboratively, pushing boundaries and exchanging ideas across design disciplines.

Students value the experience and knowledge of staff, bringing different perspectives and industry insight to teaching in a highly professional and creative environment. Our students benefit from active links with the on-site Centre for Fine Print Research (3 teaching staff are members), leaders in 3D and 2.5D print research, bringing opportunities for placements, collaborative projects and exhibitions.

You will have access to cutting-edge facilities and technical expertise in fabrication, fashion, textiles, print and photography, in addition to regular guest speakers and live projects, bringing you up-to-date with the latest techniques and developments.

Modules

• Make (30 credits)
• Play (30 credits)
• Research Practice (30 credits)
• Practice in a Professional Context (30 credits)
• Live (60 credits)

Format

You will be taught through a combination of seminars, workshops, lectures and individual tutorials.

Students are responsible for setting their own projects, there are no set briefs and a large proportion of your time will be allocated to self-directed study with guidance from teaching and technical staff.

You will have access to a rolling programme of design-focused guest speakers from industry and academia and students are encouraged to make visits relevant to the practice.

Assessment

You will be assessed through a combination of practical work and accompanying critical design log. Research practice is essay and presentation based.

You will present and communicate design ideas to staff and your peer group as part of the 'play' module, and the 'live' module encourages a live aspect to include the degree show or a negotiated live project with industry.

Careers / Further study

The course places strong emphasis on developing making skills, knowledge and creativity commensurate with the needs of professional practice in design and the creative industries today. It aims to prepare you for professional practice as self-employed designer/makers, artists, design teachers/lecturers and for work in design studios and interior design.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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MA Designer Maker at Camberwell College of Arts is aimed at practitioners with well-developed workshop skills who are seeking to develop a critical and reflective approach to their practice. Read more

Introduction

MA Designer Maker at Camberwell College of Arts is aimed at practitioners with well-developed workshop skills who are seeking to develop a critical and reflective approach to their practice. Making and learning are intertwined, and through a contextual programme our students explore the position of the designer and maker within contemporary culture and society.

Content

What students can expect from the course:

- To develop a project from proposal to final exhibition

- To develop an innovative studio practice through exploring new and existing materials and processes

- Seminars and discussions that cover a wide range of subjects, including material culture studies, anthropology, philosophy, sustainability, consumerism, museum studies, psychology and literature

- Visits to collections, makers’ studios, galleries and museums

- To critically engage with contemporary debates in applied arts, design and object-based art through the development of a personal project, as well as collectively exploring human-object relationships and the meaning of making

- A shared lecture programme across the Visual Arts courses that draw upon the richness of research across Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon Colleges

- To produce a wide range of works during the programme and for the final show, which has previously included lighting, design, ceramic works, furniture, jewellery, as well as installations of small-scale sculptures

Structure

Unit One – Research, Development and Practice

Students explore, experiment and research to further develop their Project Proposal. The unit introduces you to pathway specific issues and topics, research methodologies and techniques. It aims to orientate you and your practice within the course, and to develop your contextual, critical and research skills at the onset of your MA learning.

Unit Two – Reflection and Presentation

Resolution and presentation of students' work according to their Project Proposal. A symposium will provide the opportunity to present their research and provide further peer feedback. Students' practice at this stage should synthesise their practical, conceptual and professional abilities and they will be expected to consider their future practice, audience and context of their work in contemporary practice.

The intention and context of students' work will inform their decisions they will take regarding a final exhibition. Students' will also be expected to work collaboratively with their peers to actively plan, organise and install an exhibition as part of their continued Personal and Professional Development.

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Luxury is going through a phenomenon much akin to the Big Bang our Universe has experienced billions of years ago. It is in perpetual movement and the core ideas defining its framework are being dismantled one by one. Read more
Luxury is going through a phenomenon much akin to the Big Bang our Universe has experienced billions of years ago. It is in perpetual movement and the core ideas defining its framework are being dismantled one by one. Is it still accurate to equate luxury with rarity when 94% of Japanese Women in their twenties are said to own a Louis Vuitton bag? Should we still assume that Luxury brands invariably utilize a price skimming strategy when Hermes was forced to hold its first ever sale in Hangzhou China in 2014?

The matter at stake here is to understand if the structural changes faced by this prestigious industry push it to morph and explode into various different, and sometimes paradoxical, ideologies; or if those same structural changes are precisely pushing luxury to initiate a retrenchment to its traditional and secular values, back to its original core? This is the initial postulate structuring one of the most sought after postgraduate courses in IFA Paris: The MBA in Luxury Brand Management.

The philosophy of this revamped MBA is based on the same principles as the other postgraduate courses in IFA Paris:

Discovery:
Students are being immersed in a workshop environment allowing them to get an intensive and practical training based on modules that analyze macro and micro trends in depth.

Experimentation:
While travelling between IFA’s campus locations (Paris, Istanbul, Bangkok and Shanghai) our students are able to experience first-hand the intrinsic characteristics of emerging and mature markets thanks to IFA Paris learning by doing pedagogy.

Self-affirmation:
The overarching Capstone thesis reflects the students’ commitment to the development of a unique and individual project.

The MBA in Luxury Brand Management also takes advantage of the unique heritage and bi-cultural affiliation of IFA Paris as it “sits” perfectly at the confluence of a geographical dichotomy:

The East as the catalyst transforming the “Luxe DNA”:
Thanks to IFA Paris unique combination of campus rotation system and synergistic curriculum, participants will be able to choose between 3 metropolises embodying luxury in developing countries:

Shanghai (2 Terms) where students will discover a country that will become the biggest luxury goods market in the world in 2020, and a city where consumers tastes and knowledge are at such a level of sophistication that some analysts consider they have reached a level of maturity faster than expected
Istanbul (2 Terms) where students will be able to analyse how demographic and lifestyle trends changes are driving one of the healthiest and steadiest industry growth in the European Continent
Bangkok (1 Term following rotations in Paris and Shanghai) where students will be able to explore the thriving fashion retail panorama in a city where the most luxurious brands are increasing their presence
The participants’ experience is reinforced by a unique course structure that offers a variety of modules and seminars opening doors into specific sectors of activity such as luxury watch making, cosmetics and perfume, haute couture or even Oenology and Gastronomy.

Finally, from inception to graduation, and regardless of their location, Postgraduate students of IFA Paris will benefit from the support of a unique department called the “Career and Alumni Center”. The industry relation arm of IFA Paris’ academic courses is in charge of organizing bi-weekly guest lectures and field trips to attune our students with the latest trends in the luxury industry.

Capitalizing on strong collaborations with groups such as LVMH, Richemont or Kering, the Career and Alumni Center will give access to exclusive brand launch events, fashion shows, art exhibitions or professional trade-shows in order to build the students’ own professional network.

Our MBA Courses are structured with the ECTS framework in mind as set by the Bologna Convention. Upon completion of their studies participants will gather a total of 120 ECTS that they will be able to transfer if they wish to further their studies. The Course is also accredited by IDEL/IDEART* and is certified as “International Master”.

*For more information feel free to visit http://www.idel-labels.eu

Course structure
Our Luxury brand Management course covers a wide range of modules clustered into five main module groupings:

Marketing and Management:

This grouping encompasses a series of modules that will be sequentially planned based on the structure of a marketing plan. The overall body of knowledge acquired by the students will prepare them to:

analyse complex marketing challenges based on practical case studies
allocate resources strategically to achieve pre-determined objectives
craft brand DNAs allowing for the achievement of a sustainable competitive advantage

Business Issues:

The capacity to listen and interpret markets’ signals is a key component of today’s managers. It needs to be continuously cultivated. Within this module grouping students will discover the idiosyncrasies of the luxury industry from an economic and financial view point.

Luxury Environment:

The concept of rarity has traditionally been associated to the idea of luxury. However, while rarity is still an important factor in determining the value of a luxury brand, terms such as “exclusivity” or “space” are now strongly resounding within customers’ minds as alternative descriptors. In this module grouping students will study the historical evolution of the luxury industry and will explore macro trends that are structuring the different international markets.

Luxury Lifestyle:

The series of seminars comprised within the “Luxury Lifestyle” module grouping will allow our students to experience diverse industries and give them more specific insights on each of them. Topics such as Haute Couture, Jewellery, Luxury Watch Making…etc will be covered by specialists of the sectors who will guide the students through their discovery process.

The Foundation workshop will be taught over 2 full weeks (75 Hours) and comprise the following modules:

Principles of Marketing – 15 Hours
Quantitative Research Approaches – 15 Hours
Accounting Principles – 15 Hours
Working Methodology – 15 Hours
Project Management – 15 Hours

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MA Design - Ceramics is concerned with the development of advanced craft and design practice. Ceramics activity within a contemporary context should be considered as a prospective and not prescriptive pursuit so the question ‘What can a contemporary ceramics practice be?’ is particularly relevant. Read more
MA Design - Ceramics is concerned with the development of advanced craft and design practice. Ceramics activity within a contemporary context should be considered as a prospective and not prescriptive pursuit so the question ‘What can a contemporary ceramics practice be?’ is particularly relevant.

There is access to an extensive range of ceramics workshops and to a broad range of other three dimensional design and craft cultures, including those related to the design and/or making of domestic products, furniture, glass and jewellery. The flexible nature of the programme not only allows the development of advanced practice within a discreet ceramics related area but also and importantly, encourages the cross fertilisation of ideas, preoccupations and practices.

Course Content

The MA Design: Ceramics is made up of four units totalling 180 credits.

The programme is designed to help you acclimatise to the challenges of MA level research and practice, enabling you to identify and describe a clear direction for your postgraduate design study.

You will be encouraged to develop design propositions that encompass key design issues and have complexity and ambition, taking full consideration of the relative contextual drivers.

You will also be encouraged and supported to extend your experience in the professional sphere either through a practical project, research context, exchange, work experience, or other negotiated professional set of interactions with an external partner, groups of students and creative industry.

Towards the end of the programme you will undertake a major project to consolidate your past research and practice into fully realised collections, pieces, proposals, business plans, or exhibitions – whatever means is appropriate to the work. You will also have developed a strategy for the continuation of your practice located and contextualised to the profession or discipline.

If you choose to progress to MFA Design: Ceramics award you will study a further two units of 60 credits each.

This award is focused on the continuation of your practice aligned to the research and selection of appropriate public or professional venues and platforms to disseminate a significant body of work. You will be required to produce work for a public audience in the most relevant and appropriate form along with any implicit publicity and dissemination material.

Special Features

Extensive ceramic workshops and facilities including mould making, casting, throwing, glazing, digital ceramic transfer printing and firing using electric and gas kilns.

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Whether you want to explore innovative design, promote fashion internationally or set up your own label, we have the world-class facilities, practitioners and industry expertise to prepare you for an exciting career. Read more
Whether you want to explore innovative design, promote fashion internationally or set up your own label, we have the world-class facilities, practitioners and industry expertise to prepare you for an exciting career. Students can choose to work in any of the wide range of fashion areas, covering Fashion Design, Fashion Communication and Promotion, Jewellery and Accessories, or Fashion Textiles – our MA Fashion is uniquely structured to enable you to specialise while drawing on a broad range of resources and expertise.


Why you should study MA Fashion at Middlesex?

At Middlesex we take an innovative approach to Fashion that enables you to specialise while collaborating, experimenting, and enhancing your skills with students and staff from across the department. Taught by some of the UK's leading practitioners and technical experts, you'll explore your chosen area of Fashion within a contemporary framework that will equip you with the practical skills, business acumen and industry insights you need to succeed in today's global market.

Based in our £80 million Art and Design School, our course features state-of-the-art facilities and specialist workshops fitted with both new and traditional equipment to enable you to fully realise your visions. Through a combination of workshop enquiry, in-depth research and critical understanding of your practice, we ensure that you graduate with the skills, knowledge and body of work to advance your Fashion career in new, challenging and imaginative directions.

Course highlights:

- Exceptional facilities that are among the best in the country, including traditional fashion workshops and equipment for screenprinting, knitting, weaving, digital printing, embroidery, metalwork, photography, reprographics, film, laser cutting, 3D printing and more
- Flexibly designed module content to enable you to bring your interests and ambitions to every assessment, whether that's making textiles, designing jewellery, creating a book, producing a magazine, evolving an existing specialism you have, and more
- Despite being a new MA course we have an international reputation for high calibre graduates from our BA Fashion programmes who have gone on to work for Givenchy, Kenzo, Vivienne Westwood, Preen, Aquascutum and ASOS
- Opportunities to start your own label with recent examples including Boudicca, Christopher Raeburn and Ashley Isham
- Access to networking opportunities, world-leading research and expertise through the Art & Design Research Institute (ADRI) on campus

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Students on this course cultivate an innovative view of surface design. They are challenged to ruthlessly explore pattern and decoration, reflecting on the social, cultural and aesthetic context for surface pattern design in the 21st century. Read more
Students on this course cultivate an innovative view of surface design. They are challenged to ruthlessly explore pattern and decoration, reflecting on the social, cultural and aesthetic context for surface pattern design in the 21st century. New relationships like that of surfaces and light are being investigated, while new materials and technologies continually challenge designers to develop fresh ideas and methods. Students get to research and experiment with lots of materials and new technology to decorate ceramics, plastics, cloth, glass, wood, metal and paper. They use our cutting edge digital equipment to develop designs for wallpaper, tableware, floor coverings, interior products, garments and jewellery. We help our students find their own creative process and to develop their own direction and style which enables them to choose a rewarding career.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

Practical work is carried out within our extensive and very well equipped studios and workshops. A programme of guest lecturers and visits to exhibitions, workshops, manufacturers, etc. further supports study.

A special feature of this course is the blend of practice and theory which underpins the student projects. As a student on a MA course in the School of Art, Design and Performance you will belong to a postgraduate design community. You will study some modules alongside students from other design disciplines. Through participation in a common programme, you will experience a strong sense of community, sharing of knowledge and access to a wide range of staff skills and resources.

Practical and theoretical elements will be assessed both during and at the end of each module. Assessment strategies for the Practice modules will usually involve portfolio assessment, presentations, summaries of reflective journals and the learning agreement. There are intermediate exit awards at appropriate stages.

FURTHER INFORMATION

Surface pattern designers work with many different products, processes and materials. They may practice within conventional design studios in traditional industries as well as in the smaller creative industries. The student will be expected to develop a personal focus of research and design or craft practice, which should lead to a package of research activities (live projects, placements, competitions, attendance at exhibitions and trade fairs, etc.) appropriate to their field of study. Throughout the course, students are encouraged to pursue a critical enquiry alongside the physical development of work. They should move toward developing concepts and understanding context.

The core belief of the MA degree is that understanding for the Design Practitioner can only be achieved through doing, making and creating. Thus a central theme of the course is that of 'Reflective Practice' where academic and theoretical issues arise out of Practice itself and where the Practice is informed by the theoretical considerations. Students will be asked to keep a reflective journal to record their thoughts, ideas and discoveries.

The MA exists in the framework of the University modular scheme. The first step for every new student is a two to three week induction block in which the student's proposed area of study is discussed, negotiated and formulated with their supervisor into a learning agreement. Following this induction and diagnostic phase, students continue to develop their physical work in Surface Pattern Practice 1. In Semester 2, they undertake Practice 2, which involves the opportunity for field study or external placement. Running parallel with, and complementary to the practice modules, are two Research for Creative Design Practice modules, one studied in semester 1 and the other in Semester 2.

The course is concluded in Semester 3 with the Postgraduate Project/Dissertation and Surface Pattern Practice 3 modules. In the Practice module, students continue their investigation into a particular personal area of study, leading to a final assessment presentation or public body of work.

Fundamental to the philosophy of the course is providing the opportunity for students to explore and realise their individual aspirations and potential, creating a framework for developing as skilled and informed professional practitioners.

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The MFA Design provides a learning environment and context that transcends the traditional disciplines within design and ranges from the physical and tangible to the virtual and digital, offering the opportunity for an individual to develop their specific design and making skills, at Masters level, in relation to other areas of design practice. Read more
The MFA Design provides a learning environment and context that transcends the traditional disciplines within design and ranges from the physical and tangible to the virtual and digital, offering the opportunity for an individual to develop their specific design and making skills, at Masters level, in relation to other areas of design practice. The course is a hot bed of creativity where each student is asked to challenge their current thinking, explore new possibilities, engage in the current debates surrounding design practice and through this become advanced specialists in their own practice whilst potentially creating new territories of practice.

Visit the website: http://www.ulster.ac.uk/course/mfa-design-ft-bt

Course detail

MFA Design responds to continuing changes in contemporary design practice and challenges the perceived boundaries between the many and varied recognised art and design disciplines.

The course currently supports the areas of: Ceramics, Graphic Design, Illustration, Interaction Design, Jewellery, Silversmithing, and Textiles.

MFA Design was previously known as MFA Multidisciplinary Design. In the redesign of the course, additional staff members have joined the core team, and we now support a range of design disciplines.This richness of knowledge and experience of academic and technical staff enhances the student experience on the program, and opens up additional possibilities for collaboration and innovation, whilst maintaining the rigour in technical, research and development skills required of a masters student.

This change to the course team has also realigned the course to focus on the attainment of advanced, sustainable, skilled practice through research, which is made possible through the technical and specialist facilities available within Belfast School of Art.The course retains the emphasis of entrepreneurship which was a unique strength of the previous version of the program and is built upon tried and tested models developed in conjunction with NESTA (National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts) in recognition of the essential skills necessary for a successful, sustainable practice within the rapidly growing creative industries.

Through ongoing questioning and development during the course a student may identify themselves with a variety of outcomes such as;

Designer Maker – Leading to self employment, professional designer, setting up a SME

Design Researcher – Leading to PhD, research fellowships

Designer Leader – Leading to business leadership or Strategic Thinker within the creative industries.

Teaching and learning assessment

You will be taught in lectures, seminars, group crits, individual and group tutorials and peer feedback sessions. You will work independently, and engage in both practical and written research. Access to discipline specific workshops will be available to enable you to develop, experiment and produce work.

Career options

MFA Design has a very strong employability track record. Graduates from the course have gained employment both nationally and internationally. With the course’s strong entrepreneurial focus, many graduates have gone on to establish their own, successful businesses with many securing substantial venture capital funding.

Our students and graduates are opportunity focused and, during the first six years of the course had secured over £650,000 in project funding. In addition our students and graduates have received international recognition through winning numerous awards and bursaries.

How to apply: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/how-to-apply#pg

Why Choose Ulster University ?

1. Over 92% of our graduates are in work or further study six months after graduation.
2. We are a top UK university for providing courses with a period of work placement.
3. Our teaching and the learning experience we deliver are rated at the highest level by the Quality Assurance Agency.
4. We recruit international students from more than 100 different countries.
5. More than 4,000 students from over 50 countries have successfully completed eLearning courses at Ulster University.

Flexible payment

To help spread the cost of your studies, tuition fees can be paid back in monthly instalments while you learn. If you study for a one-year, full-time master’s, you can pay your fees up-front, in one lump sum, or in either five* or ten* equal monthly payments. If you study for a master’s on a part-time basis (e.g. over three years), you can pay each year’s fees up-front or in five or ten equal monthly payments each year. This flexibility allows you to spread the payment of your fees over each academic year. Find out more by visiting http://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/fees-and-finance/postgraduate

Scholarships

A comprehensive range of financial scholarships, awards and prizes are available to undergraduate, postgraduate and research students. Scholarships recognise the many ways in which our students are outstanding in their subject. Individuals may be able to apply directly or may automatically be nominated for awards. Visit the website: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/fees-and-finance/scholarships

English Language Tuition

CELT offers courses and consultations in English language and study skills to Ulster University students of all subjects, levels and nationalities. Students and researchers for whom English is an additional language can access free CELT support throughout the academic year: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/international/english-language-support

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MA Design - Furniture is concerned with relationships between people, contexts and environments and the designed consequences. Read more
MA Design - Furniture is concerned with relationships between people, contexts and environments and the designed consequences. Furniture design activity in this context should be considered as a prospective and not prescriptive pursuit so the question ‘What can contemporary furniture practice be?’ is particularly relevant.The flexible nature of the programme not only allows the development of a practice within a discreet furniture related area but also and importantly, encourages the cross fertilisation of ideas, preoccupations and practices.

Course Content

The MA Design: Furniture is made up of four units totalling 180 credits.

The programme is designed to help you acclimatise to the challenges of MA level research and practice, enabling you to identify and describe a clear direction for your postgraduate design study.

You will be encouraged to develop design propositions that encompass key design issues and have complexity and ambition, taking full consideration of the relative contextual drivers.

You will also be encouraged and supported to extend your experience in the professional sphere either through a practical project, research context, exchange, work experience, or other negotiated professional set of interactions with an external partner, groups of students and creative industry.

Towards the end of the programme you will undertake a major project to consolidate your past research and practice into fully realised collections, pieces, proposals, business plans, or exhibitions – whatever means is appropriate to the work. You will also have developed a strategy for the continuation of your practice located and contextualised to the profession or discipline.

If you choose to progress to MFA Design:Furniture award you will study a further two units of 60 credits each.

This award is focussed on the continuation of your practice aligned to the research and selection of appropriate public or professional venues and platforms to disseminate a significant body of work. You will be required to produce work for a public audience in the most relevant and appropriate form along with any implicit publicity and dissemination material.

Special Features

Access to an extensive range of workshops, both traditional and digital and to a broad range of three dimensional design and craft cultures, including those related to the design and/or making of domestic products, ceramics, glass and jewellery.

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MA Design – Glass is concerned with the development of advanced craft and design practice. Glass activity within a contemporary context should be considered as a prospective and not prescriptive pursuit so the question ‘What can a contemporary glass practice be?’ is particularly relevant. Read more
MA Design – Glass is concerned with the development of advanced craft and design practice. Glass activity within a contemporary context should be considered as a prospective and not prescriptive pursuit so the question ‘What can a contemporary glass practice be?’ is particularly relevant.

The flexible nature of the programme not only allows the development of advanced practice within a discreet glass related area but also and importantly, encourages the cross fertilisation of ideas, preoccupations and practices.

Course Content

he MA Design: Glass is made up of four units totalling 180 credits.

The programme is designed to help you acclimatise to the challenges of MA level research and practice, enabling you to identify and describe a clear direction for your postgraduate design study.

You will be encouraged to develop design propositions that encompass key design issues and have complexity and ambition, taking full consideration of the relative contextual drivers.

You will also be encouraged and supported to extend your experience in the professional sphere either through a practical project, research context, exchange, work experience, or other negotiated professional set of interactions with an external partner, groups of students and creative industry.

Towards the end of the programme you will undertake a major project to consolidate your past research and practice into fully realised collections, pieces, proposals, business plans, or exhibitions – what ever means is appropriate to the work. You will also have developed a strategy for the continuation of your practice located and contextualised to the profession or discipline.

If you choose to progress to MFA Design: Glass award you will study a further two units of 60 credits each.

This route is focused on the continuation of your practice aligned to the research and selection of appropriate public or professional venues and platforms to disseminate a significant body of work. You will be required to produce work for a public audience in the most relevant and appropriate form along with any implicit publicity and dissemination material.

Special Features

Access to an extensive range of glass studios and workshops and to a broad range of other three dimensional design and craft cultures, including those related to the design and/or making of domestic products, furniture, glass and jewellery.

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