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Masters Degrees (Japan)

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This is a highly flexible course that offers a large range of modules in the social sciences that may be combined with Japanese language tuition at a range of levels. Read more

About the course

This is a highly flexible course that offers a large range of modules in the social sciences that may be combined with Japanese language tuition at a range of levels. The course will cover topics including international relations in Japan, Japanese media, public relations, and business and work culture in Japan. At the end of the course you will have a deep understanding of life in modern Japan.

Your career

Our graduates hold influential positions in business, government, the arts and academia. Some of them are journalists, television producers, interpreters and translators. Others are city brokers and analysts. They work for organisations such as the BBC World Service, BNP Paribas, British Council, British Museum, Deloitte, HarperCollins, Jaguar Land Rover, Lloyds Banking Group, Nintendo, Siemens, Sony, Toyota and the World Food Programme.

Our expertise

We are one of Europe’s leading centres for the study of China, Japan and Korea. We have links with partner universities in East Asia that support our dynamic research culture. Our academics bring theories, methods and findings from their research to their teaching.

All four of our interdisciplinary research clusters inform what we teach. They are: East Asian Business Environment; East Asian Text and Culture; Human Movement and Development in East Asia; Power, Cooperation and Competition in East Asia.

The Sheffield Confucius Institute, which was named Global Confucius Institute of the year in 2015, explores Chinese language and culture. The Institute offers many opportunities for students to get involved in its activities which will help enhance their learning and deepen their cultural understanding of China.

Develop your skills

You’ll learn how to research and analyse, manage projects, write reports and give effective presentations. You will also have the opportunity to take language modules in Chinese, Japanese or Korean if you wish. Your in-depth knowledge of East Asian countries and your understanding of the region will give you an edge in the careers market.

Specialist resources

Our postgrads have their own study space and IT facilities at the Sir Sze-yuen Chung Resource Centre. The University’s libraries have an extensive selection of texts and online resources in Chinese, Japanese and Korean.

Options

You can study a shorter course for a Postgraduate Certificate (four months, 60 credits) or Postgraduate Diploma (nine months, 120 credits). You’ll need 180 credits to get a Masters degree, including 60 credits from your extended project.

Core modules

Media and Public Communication in Japan: Global Governance and Japan: Project.

Examples of optional modules

Choose from a range of modules which may include: Work and Organisation in East Asia; Investing in East Asia; International Business and East Asia; Postwar Japanese Politics; Business and the Economy of Japan; Japanese language modules (of the appropriate level); Project (core).

Teaching and assessment

There are lectures and small-group seminars. You’re assessed on your essays, exams, presentations and an extended project.

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This programme focuses on management and its environment in Japan and includes high-level courses in international management and finance disciplines. Read more
This programme focuses on management and its environment in Japan and includes high-level courses in international management and finance disciplines. It draws upon Japan experts and management specialists within the University and from positions within London-based commerce, finance and government. The core modules enable you to study the principles and applications of international management and the interplay between global and local factors influencing management in Japan. You can use the elective modules to focus on either management skills that can be applied worldwide or specialise in understanding the Japanese business environment. For those who choose to, our programme also offers unique opportunities to improve existing skills in Japanese. No knowledge of Japanese is required to complete the MSc programme successfully, since English language materials are available. Those students who already have Japanese language skills will have every opportunity to use them in studying data and source materials.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/finance-and-management/programmes/mscintmanjapan/

Structure

The MSc International Management for Japan has three components:

1. Four core courses
2. Elective course(s) to the value of 1.0 unit
3. Dissertation of 10,000 words on an approved topic

Electives are divided into the Japanese Managerial Environment and General Management courses. Students are encouraged to take a mixture of both in order to build an understanding of the local business and cultural environment.

The 10,000-word dissertation is worth 25% of your final mark. During term 2 you will submit your dissertation proposal and select an academic supervisor. Over the ensuing months you should meet with your supervisor at least three times before the end of term 3 for guidance. The bulk of your dissertation will be written over the summer to meet the mid-September deadline.

Not all elective courses are offered every year; please check your preferences with the Programme Convenor. Also note that if half units are selected, one term 1 course and one term 2 course needs to be chosen across Regional and General electives.

- Part-time Study
Part-time students are required to complete three of the core courses during their first year, then one core and two elective courses plus the dissertation during the second year.

Those enrolled on the three-year programme are required to complete three of the core courses during their first year, one core and two elective courses in the second year, and the dissertation in the third year.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification (pdf; 58kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/finance-and-management/programmes/mscintmanjapan/file39840.pdf

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

-Excellent student satisfaction for Faculty of Law and Social Sciences
The Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (LSS) at SOAS, University of London has performed extremely well according to the 2014 National Student Survey (NSS).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The last 20 years have been a period of transition for Japan. The abrupt end in the early 1990s of Japan’s seemingly unstoppable economic growth plunged the nation into two decades of recession, which has in turn brought to the fore a range of social and political issues accumulated since the Second World War. Read more

The last 20 years have been a period of transition for Japan.

The abrupt end in the early 1990s of Japan’s seemingly unstoppable economic growth plunged the nation into two decades of recession, which has in turn brought to the fore a range of social and political issues accumulated since the Second World War.

The end of Japanese economic superiority also coincided with the end of the Cold War, an event that brought about new regional and global dynamics, and with them new security challenges.

Meanwhile, Japanese culture has experienced a renaissance, with Japan recognised worldwide as a centre of global ‘cool’, and Japanese cultural products continuing to find new markets and influence new demographics worldwide.

The overall picture is of a rapidly changing nation in the vanguard of post-industrial societies — fascinating not only for its rich traditional heritage and diversity, but also for what its recent experience can tell us about world trends.

Understanding such complexity requires an interdisciplinary approach, and we offer you the opportunity to explore Japanese history, international relations, politics, religion, and arts, and help you see the connections between them.

Using Japanese source materials in tandem with the extensive English language literature on Japan, we will help you build upon and develop your own interests, focus on the aspects of Japan that fascinate you, and support you as you carry out your own original research project.

By the end of the programme you will have acquired specialist skills and knowledge that mark you out as an expert on Japan, and the confidence to apply those skills in industry, academia or beyond.

Programme structure

The programme is taught through a combination of seminars and tutorials. You will take one compulsory and four option courses, as well as a compulsory research skills and methods course. After two semesters of taught courses you will conduct your own research for your dissertation.

Compulsory courses:

  • State, Society and National Identity in Japan after 1989
  • Research Skills and Methods

Option courses may include:

  • The Buddhist Brush: Discursive and Graphic Expressions of Japanese Buddhism
  • Contemporary Japanese Cinema
  • Japanese Performing Arts
  • Japanese Religions in the Modern Era
  • Japanese Cyberpunk
  • East Asian International Relations
  • The Role of Sub-State Actors in East Asian Politics
  • Radical Japan, culture, politics and protest in Japan's 'Long 1960's'

Learning outcomes

Students who follow the programme will:

  • develop critical awareness of at least two specific areas of Japanese Studies, both in terms of the indigenous literary and/or critical traditions and in comparison with Western critical thinking
  • acquire specialist knowledge of Japanese culture and awareness of the interaction of Japanese and other cultures in the contemporary context
  • use the bibliographic, internet and other relevant resources to advanced level
  • develop the ability to read and evaluate critically core texts in the specific areas studied

Those with previous experience in Japanese language learning will have the opportunity to develop the necessary linguistic skills to conduct research in defined areas within Japanese Studies by retrieving, selecting, translating and assimilating information from Japanese sources.

Career opportunities

The flexibility of focus this programme offers makes it an ideal foundation for advanced study, potentially leading to an academic career. Teaching or curatorship roles in cultural institutions are alternative career pathways

The transferable skills you gain in communication, project management and presentation will prove a valuable asset to employers in any field.



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Sophia University's Graduate Programme in Global Studies (GPGS) and the Department of Japan and Korea at SOAS, University of London have launched a Dual Degree Program (DDP) which allows students to benefit from the combined resources of two of the world's leading institutions in Japanese Studies, located in two major global cities – Tokyo and London. Read more
Sophia University's Graduate Programme in Global Studies (GPGS) and the Department of Japan and Korea at SOAS, University of London have launched a Dual Degree Program (DDP) which allows students to benefit from the combined resources of two of the world's leading institutions in Japanese Studies, located in two major global cities – Tokyo and London.

Students will typically study one year at GPGS and one year at SOAS and, after fulfilling the requirements of the two programmes, receive two degrees: an MA from Sophia and an MA from SOAS.

DDP students widen their intellectual horizons by taking classes at two of the world’s leading institutions in Japanese Studies. Supervision of student theses or graduation projects by prominent scholars at both institutions encourages multiple perspectives on Japanese Studies.

Applications from GPGS students for study at SOAS starting in September are now being accepted.

Students entering the GPGS in April typically apply for admission to SOAS during their 1st semester, spend their 2nd and 3rd semesters at SOAS, and return to Sophia in their 4th semester to complete their GPGS requirements.

Students entering the GPGS in September typically apply for admission to SOAS in their 2nd semester, spend their 3rd and 4th semesters at SOAS, and return to Sophia in their 5th semester to complete the GPGS requirements.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/ma-japanese-studies-dual-degree/

Programme Specification

MA Japanese Studies- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 30kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/majapstud/file80726.pdf

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Department of the Languages and Cultures of Japan and Korea

SOAS is unique in the depth and breadth of its regional specialisation and is home to the largest collection of Japan specialists outside of Japan, and the largest concentration of Korean specialists in Europe. The diversified expertise of the Japan and Korea departments allows you to gain focused specialist knowledge in the regions of your interest, both in their classical traditions as well as their contemporary developments, together with more or less intensive study of their languages, both at SOAS and at our many prestigious partner universities in Japan and Korea. In the study of each discipline, we combine theoretical and textual approaches, and cross-examine critically both the western intellectual tradition as well as the regional ones.

View Degree Programmes - http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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SOAS offers the most comprehensive MA in Japanese Studies available anywhere in Europe. Students are able to choose courses that cover all of Japan’s historical periods, from the earliest to the present and ranging over the social and political sciences as well as humanities. Read more
SOAS offers the most comprehensive MA in Japanese Studies available anywhere in Europe.

Students are able to choose courses that cover all of Japan’s historical periods, from the earliest to the present and ranging over the social and political sciences as well as humanities.

The students who take this degree come from many countries and have a wide variety of academic backgrounds. Some have already studied, or lived in, Japan and wish to broaden their knowledge or understanding. Others wish to focus their previous training on the region, while still others will come from Japan or other East Asian countries wishing to study Japan from the perspective of a different culture and academic tradition.

Knowledge of the Japanese language is not a requirement of the course. Language courses, however, are popular options.

SOAS has its own Japan Research Centre and shares the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures with the University of East Anglia. Both can be of great benefit to students.

Also see the Dual Degree Programme in Global Studies between SOAS and Sophia University (Tokyo) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/ma-japanese-studies-dual-degree/).

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/majapstud/

Structure

Students take three course units (three full units, six half units, or a combination). One of the units is designated as a major, in relation to which students complete a 10,000 word dissertation. Note that some courses can only be taken as a major and some, notably language courses, only as a minor.

As the emphasis in the Regional Studies programmes is on interdisciplinary study, students are required to select their three courses from more than one discipline. The two minor units can be taken from the same discipline, but students cannot take a minor unit in the same discipline as their major.

One minor unit can be chosen from a different MA programme, for example the MA Chinese Studies or Korean Studies, subject to the approval of the MA Japanese Studies convenor and the relevant course convenor.

Some disciplines, such as Anthropology, Economics, or Politics, require an appropriate qualification (such as part of a first degree) if any of their courses are to be taken as the major subject. Students interested in such courses are advised to refer to the relevant webpage for details and, if necessary, to contact the convenor. Please note that convenors have discretion in deciding if an applicant's background is sufficient for the course concerned.

All courses are subject to availability

MA Japanese Studies- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 30kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/majapstud/file80726.pdf

Teaching & Learning

- Lectures and Seminars

The style of teaching in the Japanese Studies programme varies according to subject and teacher, but in most courses there is one 2-hour class each week. This may be an informal lecture followed by a discussion or student presentation.
At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take.

- Dissertation

The 10,000 word dissertation on an approved topic linked with one of the taught courses.

- Learning Resources

SOAS has its own Japan Research Centre and shares the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures with the University of East Anglia. Both can be of great benefit to students.

- SOAS Library

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Japanese Studies from SOAS provides its students with competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Postgraduate students develop linguistic and cultural expertise which will enable them to continue in the field of research. Equally, they develop a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and management careers. These include written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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East Asia is the foremost dynamic region in the world. This Master's specialization is organized around the achievements, opportunities and challenges facing East Asia. Read more
East Asia is the foremost dynamic region in the world. This Master's specialization is organized around the achievements, opportunities and challenges facing East Asia. Taught by international staff affiliated with the Centre for East Asian Studies Groningen this International Relations Master's programme focuses on the political economy and international relations of China, Japan and Korea.

The programme takes a multidisciplinary approach. Lectures and seminars are taught by experts in international relations, history, economy or law. You will gain knowledge on the top-three economies in East Asia and develop oral, writing and research skills to analyze developments from a local and global perspective. Work placement and study abroad are optional.

Why in Groningen?

- A unique International Relations Master's programme on the Political Economy of contemporary East Asia
- A multi-disciplinary approach towards developments in contemporary China, Japan and Korea
- Optional opportunities to study or gain hands-on experience in East Asia
- Private sector participation and guest speakers from East Asia
- Further opportunities to focus on Hong Kong, Taiwan or emerging countries such as Mongolia

Job perspectives

This degree has been designed for students who aspire to a career related to East Asia in international business, international cooperation, diplomacy, media and academia.

Job examples

- Business consultant
- Lobbyist
- Diplomat
- Policy advisor
- Researcher
- Manager

Research

Individual research topics of faculty members include: Economic Transition and Institutional Change in Asia, Political Economy of China, China and the World Economy, Land Tenure and Land Governance in China, Land Registration in China, International Trade Law and China, China-EU Relations, 19th Century Business Cycles in China, Religion in Modern China, Private International Law and China, Carbon Emission Trading and Competition Law in East Asia, Political Economies of Global Health in Asia, History of Japan, Foreign Policy of Japan, Japan-EU relations, Technology and Culture in Contemporary Japan, regionalization in Asia, Foreign and Security Policies of Korea, Visual Politics and North Korea, Foreign Policy of Mongolia.

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The region known as "Pacific Asia" can be defined in various ways, but the "core" countries are China, Japan, Korea and the ASEAN nations (Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Brunei, Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar and the Philippines). Read more
The region known as "Pacific Asia" can be defined in various ways, but the "core" countries are China, Japan, Korea and the ASEAN nations (Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Brunei, Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar and the Philippines). Together, they make up one of the most diverse and important regions in the world.

SOAS has more expertise in this part of the world than any other institution in Western Europe; indeed there are very few places anywhere in the world that can boast the same range of expertise.

This degree is a way of bringing together the large number of modules on Pacific Asia currently on offer in SOAS Masters programmes for Chinese Studies, Japanese Studies, South East Asian Studies, and Korean Studies.

The modules chosen must cover three of the four regions of China and Taiwan, Japan, Korea, Southeast Asia.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/sea/programmes/mapacasstud/

Structure

Students take modules to the value of three taught units, one of which is considered a major, and complete a 10,000-word dissertation related to the major.

As a Regional Studies programme students will be expected to select their modules from more than one discipline, The two minor units can be taken from the same discipline (but different to that of the major) or two different ones. The modules chosen must cover three of the four regions of China and Taiwan, Japan, Korea, Southeast Asia.

Programme Specification

MA Pacific Asian Studies- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 33kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/sea/programmes/mapacasstud/file80829.pdf

Teaching & Learning

- Lectures and Seminars

For most modules there is one 2-hour class each week. This may be an informal lecture followed by a discussion or student presentation. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take.

- Dissertation

The 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic linked with one of the taught modules.

- Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Employment

As a student specialising in Pacific Asia, you will gain competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, literature and culture (which can include literature, film, music, art and religion) of various parts of Pacific Asia.

Graduates leave SOAS not only with linguistic and cultural expertise, but also with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and management careers in both business and the public sector. These include written and oral communication skills, attention to detail, analytical and problem-solving skills, and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The two-year language pathway is directed at students with a professional and academic interest in Japan. The intensive training in Japanese language aims at supporting students’ ability to tackle their disciplinary interests by engaging with written texts and in oral communication in Japanese. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The two-year language pathway is directed at students with a professional and academic interest in Japan. The intensive training in Japanese language aims at supporting students’ ability to tackle their disciplinary interests by engaging with written texts and in oral communication in Japanese.

Your chosen discipline is combined with intensive Japanese language over two years (including a period in Japan), making this programme unique in Europe.

Access to the Japanese language pathway is currently available for students with

a) beginner, or

b) post-beginner level of proficiency.

As a point of reference for b), this would correspond to having completed Minna no Nihongo, Volumes 1 and 2 (or an equivalent text), knowledge of approximately 500 kanji, and tuition time of about 220 hours in total. The list of kanji is available here, and a sample test is available here.

Students’ proficiency levels will be assessed through a placement test during registration week (specific dates will be provided to the applicants).

Students bear the costs of travel to and from Japan, as well as living expenses during the period of their stay.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/ma-and-intensive-language-japanese/

May be combined with

- MA Japanese Studies
- MA Korean Studies
- MA Historical Research Methods
- MA History
- MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia
- MA Religions of Asia and Africa
- MA Medical Anthropology
- MA Anthropological Research Methods
- MA Migration and Diaspora Studies
- MA Linguistics and Language

Once you have checked the structure for this programme via the structure tab, please click into the above discipline that you would like to study. You will then see the full list of optional courses available to you.

Structure

In the two-year language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and one discipline unit in their first year. During the summer, they participate in a summer school abroad. Upon their return, in the second year, they take one intensive language unit and two discipline units. They also choose a dissertation topic within their Major.
Students must pass all of the language units in order to qualify for the degree with Intensive Japanese.

In the two-year language pathway, the intensive language courses will be assessed by a combination of exams and continuous assessment, involving in-class tests. The assessment of the summer school element is conducted upon return to SOAS.

Programme Specification Intensive Japanese (pdf; 177kb) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/ma-and-intensive-language-japanese/file101340.pdf)

Teaching & Learning

Learning outcomes will vary depending on the combination of courses chosen by individual students. Learning outcomes for each course can be found under the information provided on the relevant list of postgraduate courses on the departmental page of the SOAS website.

Knowledge
- Students will acquire a comprehensive understanding of Japan’s past and present, within the parameters of the courses and disciplines chosen.
- Students will acquire an advanced understanding of the theoretical and methodological tools of the relevant disciplines.
- Students will improve their knowledge of and ability to use Japanese in their everyday life and professional career.

Intellectual (thinking) skills
- Students will learn how to assess data and evidence critically from a variety of sources and how to resolve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations.
- Students will learn to evaluate the strengths of particular disciplinary and theoretical approaches, cultivating their ability to draw on a variety of such approaches.
- Students will learn how to design and manage an independent research project, formulating the problem to be addressed, identifying the data to be analyzed, and synthesizing the findings to present well-supported conclusions.

Subject-based practical skills
- Students will learn how to read critically, to participate effectively in seminar discussions, and to present their work in both oral and written form.
- More specific skills will depend on the particular courses taken.
- Students will acquire/develop linguistic skills which will enable them to tackle written and spoken tasks in contexts relevant to them.

Transferable skills
- Students will learn how to access and evaluate electronic and other data effectively and efficiently.
- Students will learn how to solve complex problems, for example concerning economic development, historical causation, literary interpretation, or political decision-making.
- Students will learn how to communicate effectively in a variety of settings and formats.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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On this course we focus on business practices and systems in East Asia, namely China, Japan and Korea. You’ll develop a thorough understanding of the Asian business environment and how it is shaped by domestic and social change, globalisation and political developments. Read more

About the course

On this course we focus on business practices and systems in East Asia, namely China, Japan and Korea.

You’ll develop a thorough understanding of the Asian business environment and how it is shaped by domestic and social change, globalisation and political developments. Through optional modules you will have the opportunity to focus your studies on one particular East Asian country if you wish or keep your knowledge broad depending on your interests and career goals.

Your career

Our graduates hold influential positions in business, government, the arts and academia. Some of them are journalists, television producers, interpreters and translators. Others are city brokers and analysts. They work for organisations such as the BBC World Service, BNP Paribas, British Council, British Museum, Deloitte, HarperCollins, Jaguar Land Rover, Lloyds Banking Group, Nintendo, Siemens, Sony, Toyota and the World Food Programme.

Our expertise

We are one of Europe’s leading centres for the study of China, Japan and Korea. We have links with partner universities in East Asia that support our dynamic research culture. Our academics bring theories, methods and findings from their research to their teaching.

All four of our interdisciplinary research clusters inform what we teach. They are: East Asian Business Environment; East Asian Text and Culture; Human Movement and Development in East Asia; Power, Cooperation and Competition in East Asia.

The Sheffield Confucius Institute, which was named Global Confucius Institute of the year in 2015, explores Chinese language and culture. The Institute offers many opportunities for students to get involved in its activities which will help enhance their learning and deepen their cultural understanding of China.

Develop your skills

You’ll learn how to research and analyse, manage projects, write reports and give effective presentations. You will also have the opportunity to take language modules in Chinese, Japanese or Korean if you wish. Your in-depth knowledge of East Asian countries and your understanding of the region will give you an edge in the careers market.

Specialist resources

Our postgrads have their own study space and IT facilities at the Sir Sze-yuen Chung Resource Centre. The University’s libraries have an extensive selection of texts and online resources in Chinese, Japanese and Korean.

Options

You can study a shorter course for a Postgraduate Certificate (four months, 60 credits) or Postgraduate Diploma (nine months, 120 credits). You’ll need 180 credits to get a Masters degree, including 60 credits from your extended project.

Core modules

Work and Organisation in East Asia; Investing in East Asia; Project; International Business and East Asia.

Examples of optional modules

Choose from a range of optional modules which may include Business and Management in Contemporary Korea; Contemporary Chinese Business and Management; Business and the Economy of Japan; International Human Resource Studies; International Management; Negotiation and Intercultural Communication.

Teaching and assessment

There are lectures and small-group seminars. You’ll be assessed on your essays, exams, presentations and an extended project.

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Transform your ambitions. Advance your career. The Stirling MBA is unique in the way it focuses detailed attention on the practices, processes and outcomes of managing in a range of contexts. Read more

Introduction

Transform your ambitions. Advance your career.
The Stirling MBA is unique in the way it focuses detailed attention on the practices, processes and outcomes of managing in a range of contexts: from a large multinational to a small enterprise, from local to global. An emphasis on Responsible Leadership, Sustainable Strategy, Creativity and Change helps inform contemporary debates about how to effectively manage limited resources with maximum impact. Classes are founded on cutting edge research and will challenge how you think about the world and how you can make a positive difference in a range of organisational settings.
Established in 1985, the Stirling MBA combines academic theory with real-life business case study analysis which will equip students with the awareness, knowledge, tools and techniques that are essential for dealing with business challenges in their parts of the world. The course offers a critical coverage of functional areas of business and management (accounting and finance, marketing, economics, operations management and human resource management) that are essential for effective management. This forms the basis upon which advanced modules are introduced that provide a strategic understanding of key concerns that are pertinent in business today.
The Stirling MBA is designed to transform capable managers into successful, significant business leaders. Its focus on combining clear strategic thinking with the ability to recognise and respond to the important details, which will equip you for success in today’s dynamic global market where sustainable, responsible growth has to be achieved against a background of constant change. Constant change requires individuals to cope with ambiguity and complexity in everyday organisational situations requiring novel and often counter intuitive responses. ‌
Delivered by academics of the highest calibre, many of them internationally respected authorities in their field. The Stirling MBA will give you the confidence and resilience to respond to continually developing circumstances, the skills to build and lead a team, and the theoretical and practical knowledge to successfully manage through the pressures and challenges of the modern business environment.
The major functions of organisations – accounting and finance, marketing, economics, operations management and human resource management are integrated through our strategic orientation, which aims to develop group and team management, organisational analysis and communications and influencing skills.

Key information

- Degree type: MBA
- Study methods: Full-time
- Duration: 12 months
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Professor George Burt

Course objectives

Understanding business in terms of inclusion, environmental, cultural, social and economic sustainability is central to the Stirling MBA. These concerns and perspectives are explored in particular in the context of emerging economies with the explicit intent of providing a different business education. Throughout the world, such issues are taken increasingly seriously as a response to the current financial crisis and the Stirling MBA is the first MBA course in Scotland that is specifically designed to cater to this important agenda.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Career opportunities

Where are our graduates now?
Stirling MBA alumni are currently working in countries across the globe, including the UK, Germany, India, USA, Japan, China, Canada, Uganda, Chile, Australia and the United Arab Emirates to name but a few.
Employers of our graduates span the private, public and voluntary sectors. These include: Citibank International, HSBC, KPMG, ExxonMobil, the Bank of China, L’Oreal, Barclays Bank, Adidas, Royal Bank of Canada, Vodaphone as well as various governmental agencies.
Positions secured in the last two years by MBA graduates include:
- Research Analyst (India)
- Relationship Manager (Japan)
- Salesforce Developer (UK)
- Strategic Planning Manager (South Korea)
- Commercial Account Manager (Canada)

MBA students, who had graduated from Stirling between five to ten years ago, now hold the following positions:
- Marketing Manager (Germany)
- Business Analyst (India)
- Investment Operations Specialist (UK)
- Section Manager (Japan)
- Vice President (Business Development) (Canada)

In terms of longer term career progression, students from the Stirling MBA are now in positions such as:
- Director (Hong Kong)
- Senior Vice President (Malaysia)
- Strategic Consultant (Germany)
- Managing Director (UK)
- Chief Financial Officer (East Europe)
- Chief Administrative Officer (Tanzania)

Employability

Our students learn great transferable skills through doing, for example, masterclasses and simulated games. Throughout the year students will learn and will have the opportunity to improve their presentational skills, their ability to research and analyse complex data.

Industry connections

Stirling Management School has excellent links with local, national and international organisations. Senior executives from across the private, public and third sectors regularly engage with our MBA students, providing a practical perspective on contemporary business topics through a series of guest lectures and workshops.
Students have recently learned from representatives from IBM, The Social Enterprise Academy, Morgan Stanley, The Co-operative Group, Enterprise Rent-A-Car, The Chartered Management Institute, Skyscanner, International Co-operative Alliance and Dell.
Stirling MBA students have also benefitted from recent site visits to external organisations such as Bloomberg, The Scottish Parliament, Scott & Fyfe Ltd, Baxters Food Group, Enterprise Rent-A-Car, The Bank of England, and New Lanark Visitor Centre.

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Research profile. First taught at Edinburgh in 1976, Japanese has developed to encompass a thriving postgraduate research programme. Read more

Research profile

First taught at Edinburgh in 1976, Japanese has developed to encompass a thriving postgraduate research programme. Covering a wide spectrum of interests, it also allows for joint supervision, should your research goals be interdisciplinary.

Postgraduate researchers can choose from array of topics covering Japanese history, politics and the performing and literary arts. These include:

  • Japanese performing arts, both traditional (especially Japanese drama of the Tokugawa period) and contemporary
  • Japanese/Chinese relations
  • media and politics
  • the history of Japanese religion (especially Zhenyan or Shingon Buddhism)
  • the Meiji period
  • traditional and modern Japanese literature

Training and support

Throughout your studies, you will have the opportunity to liaise closely with the Consulate General of Japan in Edinburgh, the Japan Society and the Japan Foundation, each of which can offer a variety of events and resources.

Facilities

As well as the comprehensive collections of the University, we can offer a specialised collection of journals and reference works. Additional research resources are available at the nearby Edinburgh Central Library and National Library of Scotland. You will also be involved in a programme of regular seminars and workshops, as well as tuition in subject-appropriate skills where necessary.



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This course offers comprehensive training addressing both international political issues and media trends in East Asia. You will learn about major international and domestic political trends in the region, while developing a comprehensive knowledge about the role media plays in these developments. Read more

About the course

This course offers comprehensive training addressing both international political issues and media trends in East Asia. You will learn about major international and domestic political trends in the region, while developing a comprehensive knowledge about the role media plays in these developments.

Your career

Our graduates hold influential positions in business, government, the arts and academia. Some of them are journalists, television producers, interpreters and translators. Others are city brokers and analysts. They work for organisations such as the BBC World Service, BNP Paribas, British Council, British Museum, Deloitte, HarperCollins, Jaguar Land Rover, Lloyds Banking Group, Nintendo, Siemens, Sony, Toyota and the World Food Programme.

Our expertise

We are one of Europe’s leading centres for the study of China, Japan and Korea. We have links with partner universities in East Asia that support our dynamic research culture. Our academics bring theories, methods and findings from their research to their teaching.

All four of our interdisciplinary research clusters inform what we teach. They are: East Asian Business Environment; East Asian Text and Culture; Human Movement and Development in East Asia; Power, Cooperation and Competition in East Asia.

The Sheffield Confucius Institute, which was named Global Confucius Institute of the year in 2015, explores Chinese language and culture. The Institute offers many opportunities for students to get involved in its activities which will help enhance their learning and deepen their cultural understanding of China.

Develop your skills

You’ll learn how to research and analyse, manage projects, write reports and give effective presentations. You will also have the opportunity to take language modules in Chinese, Japanese or Korean if you wish. Your in-depth knowledge of East Asian countries and your understanding of the region will give you an edge in the careers market.

Specialist resources

Our postgrads have their own study space and IT facilities at the Sir Sze-yuen Chung Resource Centre. The University’s libraries have an extensive selection of texts and online resources in Chinese, Japanese and Korean.

Options

You can study a shorter course for a Postgraduate Certificate (four months, 60 credits) or Postgraduate Diploma (nine months, 120 credits). You’ll need 180 credits to get a Masters degree, including 60 credits from your extended project.

Core modules

International Politics of East Asia: Media, Culture, and Society in East Asia: Project.

Examples of optional modules

Choose from a range of modules which may include: Contemporary Chinese Society and Media: Media and Public Communication in Japan: China and Korea in the Modern World: The Political Economy of China.

Teaching and assessment

There are lectures and small-group seminars. You’ll be assessed on your essays, exams, presentations and an extended project.



• East Asia
• Politics
• Media
• Journalism
• International relations
• Japan
• China
• Korea

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This innovative Master’s programme is designed for those interested in teaching Japanese to speakers of other languages and in deepening their knowledge of applied linguistics. Read more
This innovative Master’s programme is designed for those interested in teaching Japanese to speakers of other languages and in deepening their knowledge of applied linguistics. You will explore the latest theories of language teaching and learning, and critically evaluate them in the context of Japanese as a foreign language.

“Interest in studying Japanese continues to grow. It is no longer taught only at university and adult education institutes, but is increasingly finding its way into the school curriculum.”
(Embassy of Japan in the UK website)

In the last decade, Japanese language and culture have undoubtedly increased in popularity, particularly amongst young people. However, the area of Teaching Japanese as a Foreign Language (TJFL) is still relatively new outside Japan. TJFL has traditionally been the prerogative of ‘native’ Japanese teachers, adopting traditional Japanese language teaching methods.

Course detail

Our MA in Japanese Language Teaching draws from state-of-the-art teaching approaches derived from TESOL research and practice, an area of expertise at York St John University. This MA would be attractive to global teachers, aspiring teachers and researchers whose first language may be English, Japanese or other. For example, you might have spent time teaching English and learning Japanese in Japan, be a graduate of Japanese from any country, or a Japanese national interested in the application of TESOL principles to TJFL. In the UK, it is the only Masters of its kind outside London.

Although it does not lead to UK Qualified Teacher Status, this MA equips you with the skills and expertise to teach Japanese in a wide range of settings, for example independent schools, colleges, as freelance instructors, in companies and for private individuals.

The MA also provides the research training and subject knowledge to enable you to continue your studies to doctoral level.

Format

The programme is designed to be studied either full-time over 12 months or part-time over a maximum of five years. If you are unable to complete the full Master’s degree or are interested in certain modules, you may work for the intermediate awards of Postgraduate Certificate in Japanese Language Teaching or Diploma in Japanese Language Teaching.

Modules

• Japanese Language Teaching Methodology (A) (15 credits)
• Japanese Language Teaching Methodology (B) (15 credits)
• Japanese Society and Culture (15 credits)
• Themes in Japanese Linguistics (15 credits)
• Second Language Acquisition (30 credits)
• Research in Applied Linguistics (30 credits)
• Dissertation (60 credits)

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please see the following link:
https://www.yorksj.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

Other sources of funding

Information on alternative sources of funding can be found here:
https://www.yorksj.ac.uk/student-services/money/funding-my-course/postgraduate-/postgraduate-funding-/

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This interdisciplinary programme will provide you with in-depth knowledge of the politics, economies and societies of East Asia. Read more

This interdisciplinary programme will provide you with in-depth knowledge of the politics, economies and societies of East Asia.

Taught by leading researchers in our world-class facilities, you’ll learn to apply academic analysis to your experience of the region, or to convert past training in another academic discipline to apply it to the Asian context.

A wide range of optional modules will give you the chance to focus on topics such as business practices, the role of China or Japan in international development or the complex politics of the Asia Pacific among others.

Whether you’re entering a professional career and want to gain regional expertise, or you’re a professional seeking to build on your experience of living and working in an Asian context, you’ll gain an insight into a complex and fascinating part of the world.

By choosing to study East Asian Studies at Leeds you will be joining a leading centre for research in the region, with over 50 years of history. In addition to the academic strengths that have accrued over this time, we have developed an extensive and active international network of alumni. Leeds is also home to very substantial and world-renowned specialist library collections.

If you’re interested in learning or developing your skills in an East Asian language, you might want to consider our East Asian Cultures and Societies (Language Pathway) MA.

Course content

This programme offers a wide range of choice. You’ll select the modules you want to study from a range of options, allowing you to shape the programme according to your own interests and career plans.

You could focus on Japanese business, China’s relationship with the developing world or international politics across the Asia Pacific among many other topics.

A core module will give you an understanding of research methods in the humanities and social sciences, allowing you to develop your skills. This will culminate with your dissertation – an independent research project on a topic of your choice that allows you to demonstrate the knowledge and skills you’ve acquired.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation 45 credits
  • Principles and Practices of Research 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Chinese Politics 15 credits
  • China's Development 15 credits
  • China and the Developing World 15 credits
  • Japan in the Discourse of International Development 15 credits
  • Japan: Politics and International Relations 15 credits
  • Political Economy of the Pacific Rim 15 credits
  • International Politics of the Asia Pacific Region 15 credits
  • Chinese Business 15 credits
  • The Economics of China 15 credits
  • The Rise of China 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read East Asian Cultures and Societies MA in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods to help you benefit from the expertise of our tutors, including lectures, seminars, tutorials and workshops. However, independent study remains an important element of this degree as a chance for you to develop your skills and explore topics that interest you.

Assessment

You’ll also experience a range of assessment methods, depending on the modules you choose. These may include exams and essays as well as presentations, project work and in-course assessment among others.

Career opportunities

This programme will suit you whether you’re just starting your professional career, or you’re a mid-career professional who has lived and worked in an Asian context. You’ll gain subject knowledge as well as transferable skills in topics such as analysis, research, communication, presentations and cultural awareness.

All of these are valuable in a wide range of professions across different sectors and industries, including business, public and third sectors. Graduates from our School have developed exciting careers in the UK and worldwide, as diplomats, educators, and policy-makers, to name just a few.

The programme will also prepare you for PhD study, providing a good stepping stone towards an academic career.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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This award-winning programme combines the expertise of anthropologists and biologists to examine primate conservation biology in a broad context, with particular emphasis on the relationships between humans and wildlife in forest and woodland environments. Read more
This award-winning programme combines the expertise of anthropologists and biologists to examine primate conservation biology in a broad context, with particular emphasis on the relationships between humans and wildlife in forest and woodland environments. It provides an international and multidisciplinary forum to help understand the issues and promote effective action.

Whether working in the lab, with local conservation groups (including zoos and NGOs), or in the field, you will find yourself in a collaborative and supportive environment, working with international scholars in primate conservation and gaining first-hand experience to enact positive change.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/primate-conservation/

Why choose this course?

- A pioneering programme providing scientific, professional training and accreditation to conservation scientists

- Awarded the Queen's Anniversary Prize in 2008

- Opportunity to work alongside leading academics for example Professor Anna Nekaris, Professor Vincent Nijman and Dr Kate Hill

- Excellent learning resources both at Brookes and through Oxford’s museums and libraries including the Bodleian Library, the Radcliffe Science Library, and the Museum of Natural History

- Links with conservation organisations and NGOs, both internationally and closer to home, including Fauna and Flora International, TRAFFIC and Conservation International

- Field trips for MSc students to Apenheul Primate Park in the Netherlands as well as to sanctuaries and zoos in the UK

- A dynamic community of research scholars undertaking internationally recognised and world leading research.

Teaching and learning

Teaching is through a combination of lectures, research seminars, training workshops, tutorials, case studies, seminar presentations, site visits, computer-aided learning, independent reading and supervised research.

Each of the six modules is assessed by means of coursework assignments that reflect the individual interests and strengths of each student. Coursework assignments for six taught modules are completed and handed in at the end of the semester, and written feedback is given before the start of the following semester. A seventh module, the final project, must be handed in before the start of the first semester of the next academic year. It will be assessed during this semester with an examinations meeting at the beginning of February, after which students receive their final marks.

An important feature of the course is the contribution by each student towards an outreach project that brings primate conservation issues into a public arena. Examples include a poster, display or presentation at a scientific meeting, university society or school. Students may also choose to write their dissertation specifically for scientific publication.

Round-table discussions form a regular aspect of the course and enable closer examination of conservation issues through a sharing of perspectives by the whole group.

Careers

This unique postgraduate programme trains new generations of anthropologists, conservation biologists, captive care givers and educators concerned with the serious plight of non-human primates who seek practical solutions to their continuing survival. It provides the skills, knowledge and confidence to enable you to contribute to arresting and reversing the current devastating destruction of our tropical forests and the loss of the species that live in them.

You will be joining a supportive global network of former students working across all areas of conservation in organisations from the BBC Natural History Unit through to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and in roles from keeper and education officer in zoos across the UK and North America to paid researcher at institutes of higher education. Some of our students have even gone on to run their own conservation-related NGOs.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Our vibrant research culture is driven by a thriving and collaborative community of academic staff and doctoral students. In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) 70% of our work was judged to be of international quality in terms of originality, significance and rigour, with 5% "world leading".

Our strong performance in the RAE, along with our expanding consultancy activities, have enabled us to attract high quality staff and students and helped to generate funding for research projects.

Conservation Environment and Development, comprising several research clusters.

The Nocturnal Primate Research Group specialises in mapping the diversity of the nocturnal primates of Africa, Asia, Madagascar and Latin America through multidisciplinary teamwork that includes comparative studies of anatomy, physiology, behaviour, ecology and genetics. Field studies are helping to determine the origins and distribution of these neglected species, as well as indicating the conservation status of declining forests and woodlands. The NPRG has developed a widespread network of collaborative links with biologists, game wardens, forestry officers, wildlife societies, museums and zoos/sanctuaries.

The Human Interactions With and Constructions of the Environment Research Group develops and trains an interdisciplinary team of researchers to investigate priorities within conservation research - using an interdisciplinary framework in anthropology, primatology, rural development studies, and conservation biology.

The Oxford Wildlife Trade Research Group (OWTRG) aims to quantify all aspects of the trade in wild animals through multidisciplinary teamwork including anthropology, social sciences, natural resource management, biodiversity conservation, environmental economics, and legislation. Their strong focus is on wildlife trade in tropical countries –as this is where most of the world's biodiversity resides and where the impacts of the wildlife trade are arguably the greatest. Recognizing that the wildlife trade is a truly global enterprise they also focus on the role of consumer countries.

The Europe Japan Research Centre (EJRC) organises and disseminates the research of all Brookes staff working on Japan as well as a large number of affiliated Research Fellows.

The Human Origins and Palaeo Environments Research Cluster carries out ground-breaking interdisciplinary research, focussed on evolutionary anthropology and environmental reconstruction and change. The study published in the journal Science reports findings from an eight-year archaeological excavation at a site called Jebel Faya in the United Arab Emirates. Palaeolithic stone tools found at the Jebel Faya were similar to tools produced by early modern humans in east Africa, but very different from those produced to the north, in the Levant and the mountains of Iran. This suggested early modern humans migrated into Arabia directly from Africa and not via the Nile Valley and the Near East as is usually suggested. The new findings will reinvigorate the debate about human origins and how we became a global species.

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