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MTSU offers a Master of Criminal Justice (M.C.J.) degree in cooperation with Tennessee State University. Read more
MTSU offers a Master of Criminal Justice (M.C.J.) degree in cooperation with Tennessee State University. A graduate degree can help pave the way for advancement in professional opportunities in law enforcement, homeland security, courts, police administration, correctional management, probation, parole, juvenile justice, drug rehabilitation, and private security or investigations. Master's candidates are not required to take classes at both campuses, but an individual can earn up to 18 hours at the partner institution to transfer to the home institution. Students officially accepted in MTSU’s graduate program may participate in the department’s internship program, with placements available in prosecutor and public defender offices, sheriff and police departments, probation and parole offices, courts, and state and federal agencies. Master’s candidates may choose either the thesis option or a non-thesis track requiring an internship.

Career

A Master of Criminal Justice degree allows graduates to pursue advanced opportunities in law enforcement, courts, and corrections at the federal, state, or local level, or with private security or businesses associated with the criminal justice system. M.C.J. holders also may continue studies for careers in higher education or for law degrees. Some occupations for MTSU graduates from this program:

Attorney
Chief of police
Corporate security officer/director
Court administrator
Criminal justice professor
Crisis counselor
Emergency services director
Family resource specialist
Forensic scientist
Investigator
Juvenile court judge
Police officer
Pre-trial release/pre-trial diversion officer
Probation officer/director
Public information officer
Regulatory board investigator
Sheriff
Social services district director
Special agent
State director of safety/homeland security
State trooper
U.S. deputy marshal
Warden
Employers of MTSU alumni include
Blue Ridge Center, Asheville, N.C.
Cannon County
City of Atlanta
Cope, Hudson, Scarlett, Reed, McCreary
Cumberland University
Eastern Kentucky University
Family Voices of Tennessee
Fillauer & Wilson, P.C., Cleveland, Tenn.
Forensic Medical
Gallatin Police Department
Hendersonville Police Department
Humphreys County 911
Keiser University
La Vergne Police Department
Litigation Paralegal
Metro-Nashville Government
Metro-Nashville Police Department
Murfreesboro Police Department
Oasis Center
Regions Bank
Rutherford County
State of Tennessee
State of West Virginia
Tennessee Bureau of Investigation
Tennessee Correction Academy
Tennessee Department of Human Services
Tennessee Department of Safety & Homeland Security
Tennessee Highway Patrol
Tennessee Parole Board
U.S. Department of Justice
U.S. Probation Office (various locations)
University of South Carolina

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Today more than ever, quantitative skills form an essential basis for successful careers in ecology, conservation, and animal and human health. Read more
Today more than ever, quantitative skills form an essential basis for successful careers in ecology, conservation, and animal and human health. This Masters programme provides specific training in data collection, modelling and statistical analyses as well as generic research skills. It is offered by the Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine (IBAHCM), a grouping of top researchers who focus on combining field data with computational and genetic approaches to solve applied problems in epidemiology and conservation.

Why this programme

-This programme encompasses key skills in monitoring and assessing biodiversity critical for understanding the impacts of environmental change.
-It covers quantitative analyses of ecological and epidemiological data critical for animal health and conservation.
-You will have the opportunity to base your independent research projects at the University field station on Loch Lomond (for freshwater or terrestrial-based projects); Millport field station on the Isle of Cumbria (for marine projects); or Cochno farm in Glasgow (for research based on farm animals). We will also assist you to gain research project placements in zoos or environmental consulting firms whenever possible.
-The uniqueness of the programme is the opportunity to gain core skills and knowledge across a wide range of subjects, which will enhance future career opportunities, including entrance into competitive PhD programmes. For example, there are identification based programmes offered elsewhere, but most others do not combine practical field skills with molecular techniques, advanced informatics for assessing biodiversity based on molecular markers, as well as advanced statistics and modelling. Other courses in epidemiology are rarely ecologically focused; the specialty in IBAHCM is understanding disease ecology, in the context of both animal conservation and implications for human public health.
-You will be taught by research-active staff using the latest approaches in quantitative methods, sequence analysis, and practical approaches to assessing biodiversity, and you will have opportunites to actively participate in internationally recognised research. Some examples of recent publications lead by students in the programme: Blackburn, S., Hopcraft, J. G. C., Ogutu, J. O., Matthiopoulos, J. and Frank, L. (2016), Human-wildlife conflict, benefit sharing and the survival of lions in pastoralist community-based conservancies. J Appl Ecol. doi:10.1111/1365-2664.12632. Rysava, K., McGill, R. A. R., Matthiopoulos, J., and Hopcraft, J. G. C. (2016) Re-constructing nutritional history of Serengeti wildebeest from stable isotopes in tail hair: seasonal starvation patterns in an obligate grazer. Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom., 30:1461-1468. doi: 10.1002/rcm.7572. Ferguson, E.A., Hampson, K., Cleaveland, S., Consunji, R., Deray, R., Friar, J., Haydon, D. T., Jimenez, J., Pancipane, M. and Townsend, S.E., 2015. Heterogeneity in the spread and control of infectious disease; consequences for the elimination of canine rabies. Scientific Reports, 5, p. 18232. doi: 10.1038/srep18232.
-A unique strength of the University of Glasgow for many years has been the strong ties between veterinarians and ecologists, which has now been formalised in the formation of the IBAHCM. This direct linking is rare but offers unique opportunities to provide training that spans both fundamental and applied research.

Programme structure

The programme provides a strong grounding in scientific writing and communication, statistical analysis, and experimental design. It is designed for flexibility, to enable you to customise a portfolio of courses suited to your particular interests.

You can choose from a range of specialised options that encompass key skills in:
-Monitoring and assessing biodiversity – critical for understanding the impacts of environmental change
-Quantitative analyses of ecological and epidemiological data – critical for animal health and conservation
-Ethics and legislative policy – critical for promoting humane treatment of both captive and wild animals.

Core courses
-Key research skills (scientific writing, introduction to R, advanced linear models, experimental design and power analysis)
-Measuring biodiversity and abundance
-Programming in R
-Independent research project

Optional courses
-Molecular analyses for biodiversity and conservation
-Biodiversity informatics
-Molecular epidemiology and phylodynamics
-Infectious disease ecology and the dynamics of emerging disease
-Single-species population models
-Multi-species models
-Spatial and network processes in ecology & epidemiology
-Introduction to Bayesian statistics
-Freshwater sampling techniques
-Invertebrate identification
-Vertebrate identification
-Human Dimensions of Conservation
-Principles of Conservation Ecology
-Protected Area Management
-Animal welfare science
-Legislation related to animal welfare
-Enrichment of animals in captive environments
-Care of captive animals
-Biology of suffering
-Assessment of physiological state

Career prospects

You will gain core skills and knowledge across a wide range of subjects that will enhance your selection chances for competitive PhD programmes. In addition to academic options, career opportunities include roles in zoos, environmental consultancies, government agencies, ecotourism and conservation biology, and veterinary or public health epidemiology.

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A Masters’ studentship is available in the group of Dr. Martin Schröder in the School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences at Durham University to study stress signaling mechanisms originating from the endoplasmic reticulum. Read more
A Masters’ studentship is available in the group of Dr. Martin Schröder in the School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences at Durham University to study stress signaling mechanisms originating from the endoplasmic reticulum. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress contributes to the development and progression of many diverse diseases affecting secretory tissues, such as diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases. The successful candidate will employ modern genetic and molecular techniques to understand the underlying cell biological mechanisms in endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling that maintain the homeostasis of the endoplasmic reticulum.

The MRes student will investigate control of ER stress signaling specificity by the dosage of ER stress. You will use a range of molecular biology and biochemical techniques to study (a) how the severity of ER stress alters the signaling outputs of the ER stress sensing protein kinase-endoribonuclease IRE1 or (b) how ER stress regulates transcriptional responses through the Rpd3-Sin3 histone/lysine deacetylase (see for example Schröder et al., 2000; Schröder et al., 2004). These techniques include protein expression and purification, immunoprecipitation, chromatin immunoprecipitation, cloning, transfection, and RNA analysis by real-time PCR or Northern blotting.

Overall, the studentship will provide interdisciplinary training in molecular biology, genetics, and cell biology.

References

M. Schröder, Cell. Mol. Life Sci. 65 (2008) 862-894: Endoplasmic reticulum stress responses.
M. Schröder, C. Y. Liu, R. Clark, and R. J. Kaufman, EMBO J. 23 (2004) 2281-2292: The unfolded protein response represses differentiation through the RPD3-SIN3 histone deacetylase.
M. Schröder, J. S. Chang, and R. J. Kaufman, Genes Dev. 14 (2000) 2962-2975: The unfolded protein response represses nitrogen-starvation induced developmental differentiation in yeast.

To apply

To apply: send a CV including the names of two references and a one page personal statement describing clearly your background, interest and experience in scientific research to . In your cover letter you should clearly identify the funding source to cover living expenses, tuition fees and bench fees. Further information can be found at https://www.dur.ac.uk/martin.schroeder or by contacting Dr. Martin Schroeder.

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To provide an inter-disciplinary approach to the study of the Victorian period. Members of the Department of History of Art and Film, the School of Historical Studies, and the Centres for English Local History and Urban. Read more
To provide an inter-disciplinary approach to the study of the Victorian period. Members of the Department of History of Art and Film, the School of Historical Studies, and the Centres for English Local History and Urban
History, together with members of the English Department, offer a range of perspectives on Victorian literature, art and society in the light of modern cultural and literary theory. The list of course tutors below
illustrates the inter-disciplinary nature of the course.

Professor R Colls: Historical Studies
Rev Dr J Crossley: History of Art and Film
Dr G Dawson: English
Dr H Furneaux: English
Professor R Foulkes: English
Dr J North: English
Professor J Shattock: English
Professor K Snell: Centre for English Local History

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The MSc in Political Research provides you with focused training in research methods. It helps you to develop your professional skills in empirical political science. Read more

Why this course?

The MSc in Political Research provides you with focused training in research methods. It helps you to develop your professional skills in empirical political science.

The course explores different methodological approaches and their application to real-life political problems. It equips you with key transferable skills in:
- research design
- a range of research methods and their application
- the management of different types of data

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/politicalresearch/

You’ll study

Along with giving you research skills, this course will enhance your ability to choose appropriate research methods and confront the issues of research design.
It's organised into core and optional classes. You’ll also complete a dissertation.

Study abroad

You can do a research placement through the Erasmus programme.
Options range from Finland to Italy, and from Portugal to Slovakia.

Facilities

Established in 2010, the School of Government and Public Policy integrates the Department of Government with three research centres:
- European Policies Research Centre
- Centre for the Study of Public Policy
- Centre for Elections and Representation Studies

English language requirements

If you’re a national of an English speaking country recognised by UK Border Agency (please check most up-to-date list) or you have successfully completed an academic qualification (at least equivalent to a UK bachelor's degree) in any of these countries, then you do not need to present any additional evidence.
For others, the School requires a minimum overall IELTS score of 6.5, with no individual component below 5.5. Pre-sessional courses in English are available.
If you are from a country not recognised as an English speaking country by the United Kingdom Border Agency (UKBA), please check English requirements before making your application.

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options

To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form, or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

The MSc in Political Research is designed not only to give you research skills, but also to enhance your ability to choose appropriate research methods and confront the issues of research design. The course is organised into core and optional classes. You'll also complete a dissertation.

You receive training with a strong empirical focus, and supervision in small-group seminars and in individual sessions You’ll receive considerable time and attention from our staff.

Classes average 20 contact hours, with additional computer laboratory sessions for some methods classes.

Part-time students attend classes across two academic years. They then work on their dissertation over the course of 10 months.

Indicative readings:
- Berg, B.L. (2004).Qualitative Research Methods for the Social Sciences. Pearson
- Box-Steffensmeier, J.M., Brady, H.F. and Collier, D. (2008). The Oxford Handbook of Political Methodology. Oxford University Press
- Gerring, J. (2012). Social Science Methodology: A Unified Framework. Cambridge University Press
- King, G., Keohane, R. and Verba, S. (1994). Designing Social Inquiry. Princeton University Press

Assessment

You’ll be assessed in a variety of ways like essays, options papers and group projects.
These account for two thirds of the total assessment while your dissertation accounts for one third of the total assessment.

Careers

- Where are they now?
Examples of organisations our graduates work for:
Audit Scotland
Centre for African Family Studies
Centre for Scottish Public Policy
Confederation of Passenger Transport
German Red Cross
Hall Aitken Associates
Health and Social Care Alliance
HMRC
Invicta Public Affairs
Ministry of Finance Iceland
Morgan Stanley
National Centre for Social Research
NHS
Ofgem
Santander Bank UK
Scottish Council for Development and Industry
Scottish Refugee Council
Serco Group
The Improvement Service
The Scottish Parliament
United Nations Development Programme
West and Central Voluntary Network

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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This programme (See http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-brewing-and-distilling/ ) prepares candidates for entry into the malting, brewing or distilling industries, or to conduct research. Read more

Overview

This programme (See http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-brewing-and-distilling/ ) prepares candidates for entry into the malting, brewing or distilling industries, or to conduct research.

For more information also visit http://www.icbd.hw.ac.uk/

Programme duration

MSc programmes last for one year (September to August inclusive) and include a substantial research project.

The Diploma covers the same classes as the MSc and includes a short project but lasts for just 9 months (September to May inclusive). Students admitted to the Diploma programme and who perform well in the taught courses may be invited to transfer to the appropriate MSc programme.

Professional recognition

The Postgraduate Diploma/MSc programme is accredited by the Institute of Brewing & Distilling.

Core Courses

- Cereals, Malting and Mashing
- Wort Boiling, Fermentation and Beer Maturation
- Project Studies
- Distillation and Whisky Maturation
- Filtration and Packaging
- Production Management

English language requirements

If your first language is not English, or your first degree was not taught in English, we’ll need to see evidence of your English language ability. The minimum requirement for English language is IELTS 6.5 or equivalent. We offer a range of English language courses (See http://www.hw.ac.uk/study/english.htm ) to help you meet the English language requirement prior to starting your masters programme:
- 14 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with no more than one skill at 4.5);
- 10 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with minimum of 5.0 in all skills);
- 6 weeks English (for IELTS 5.5 with minimum of 5.5 in reading & writing and minimum of 5.0 in speaking & listening)

Postgraduate Taught Funded places

This programme has been selected to support the skills demand in Scotland's key economic growth areas. A number of full fee bursaries are available to applicants permanently resident in Scotland. Download an application form (http://www.hw.ac.uk/student-life/scholarships/postgraduate-funded-places.htm ) and submit to .

Find information on Fees and Scholarships here http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-brewing-and-distilling/

Contacts
Dr Hill A E
+44(0)131 451 3458
+44 (0)131 451 3009

http://www.icbd.hw.ac.uk

Dr Bryce J H
+44(0) 131 451 3453
+44(0) 131 451 3009


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A central feature of the work of professionals in education and training today is the evaluation and development of practice, and the ability to bring about change within their institutions. Read more

About the course

A central feature of the work of professionals in education and training today is the evaluation and development of practice, and the ability to bring about change within their institutions. The EdD is a research-based programme focused on the improvement of professional practice. You will work at doctorate level on issues or problems that are of direct relevance to your professional interests and institutional concerns, bringing significant benefit to the organisation in which you work.

You will undertake a programme of studies in the areas of professional development and impact on practice; research approaches and methods appropriate to practice-based research; and leadership issues in promoting the learning of others. In consultation with tutors you will develop a programme of work which leads to the presentation of a thesis.

The programme is intended for professionals with an education or training function from public sector or commercial/business organisations. These include: people working in education settings such as schools, further education, higher education, and local education authorities; trainers and consultants; staff working in inter-agency settings; youth and social workers.

Study themes for Phase 1 (Years 1 and 2) are: issues in professional learning and development; approaches to research.

Study Themes for Phases 2 and 3 (Years 3 to 5) are: professional learning and development of practice-based research, with supervisory support leading to the production of a substantial thesis.

A programme of sessions relating to the themes provides opportunities for you to present and evaluate your own work.

How to apply

Before making your formal application, we recommend that you discuss your proposed research with Dr Jon Berry , to establish that it is appropriate for this award.

Download our information pack on studying for a Doctorate in Education. - https://www.herts.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/83921/Information-pack-2015.pdf

Applications should be returned to Dr Janice Turner, Research Administrator, SSAHRI

Why choose this course?

The Doctorate in Education (EdD) offers the opportunity for those with an enthusiasm for learning to gain the highest level of professional qualification available in the field.

Teaching methods

A series of bi-monthly study days are organised in two-day blocks and single days (including weekend days), supervision meetings, e-learning support and University Research Degrees' Generic Training for Researchers sessions. This research course has a strong cohort experience and attendance to the bi-monthly study days is compulsory. During the study days, which are led by the EdD team, students develop research skills and discuss their ongoing projects. Students are supervised by a principal and up to two second supervisors. The EdD core team includes professionals with a wide range of expertise at the forefront of education and social inquiry:

Jon Berry, PhD. Programme Tutor, Professional Doctorate in education (EdD). Areas of expertise: teachers’ professional autonomy, education policy, the politics of education. Representative publication: Teachers' professional autonomy in England: are neo-liberal approaches incontestable? Forum Vol. 54: 3 2012

Bushra Connors. Current research interests: critical realism, interdisciplinarity, structure and agency interactions, globalisation and Higher Education, pedagogy in a changing world, behaviour management in schools, science teaching pedagogy. Representative publication: Global mechanisms and Higher Education (presented at the Conference of the International Association for Critical Realism, Bologna, 2010).

Joy Jarvis, PhD, Associate Dean, Learning Teaching and Employability. Areas of expertise: professional learning and development including pedagogy in schools and HE, professional identity, professional development and leadership in learning and teaching. Research interests focus on narrative and arts-based forms of enquiry. Representative publication: Other ways of seeing; other ways of being: imagination as a tool for developing multiprofessional practice for children with communication needs (with Trodd, in Child Language Teaching and Therapy, Vol. 24, 2008).

Roger Levy, PhD, Associate Head of School, Research and Enterprise. Areas of expertise: professional learning and development, including mentoring, enquiry into work-based practice and the capacity of organisations to manage change; conceptions of teaching and learning; teacher development, professionalism; curriculum, programme evaluation; qualitative methodology. An active member and past Chair of the International Professional Development Association.

Philip Woods, PhD FRSA, Professor of Educational Policy, Democracy and Leadership. Areas of expertise: policy, leadership, democracy and education, enterprise and entrepreneurialism, alternative education, sociology, research and evaluation. Representative publication: Transforming education policy: Shaping a democratic future(Policy Press, 2011). Active links with US include University Council for Educational Administration and the New DEEL (Democratic Ethical Educational Leadership) network.

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In the Master of Business Administration program you will learn management skills, technical understanding and a global perspective that will ready you to succeed in a rapidly changing business world. Read more
In the Master of Business Administration program you will learn management skills, technical understanding and a global perspective that will ready you to succeed in a rapidly changing business world. You will learn to write for multiple business settings, make effective business presentations, recognize and respond to ethical problems and apply global perspectives to business solutions all while attending classes at a convenient St. Cloud or Twin Cities location.

Program Highlights

Courses offered either on campus or at the Twin Cities Graduate Center in Maple Grove.
The Maple Grove program is a part-time program targeted to meet the needs of individuals working full time while the St. Cloud program is flexible to accommodate both part-time and full-time students.
Curriculum combines business theory with hands-on applications.
Courses scheduled to accommodate employment responsibilities, vacations and holidays to allow students to balance their studies, work and personal lives.
Graduate assistantships offered each year for students attending in St. Cloud.

Program Distinctions

Accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business.
Faculty all hold PhD. or J.D. degrees or are professionally-qualified.

Requirements and Details

The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is required for admission consideration to the Master of Business Administration program.

The MBA program requires a minimum GMAT score of 470 be posted for an applicant's admission packet to be reviewed by the program.

The MBA program may consider acceptance of expired GMAT scores. A determination is made by the MBA director.
If an applicant holds a master-level degree the program may consider the GRE in lieu of the GMAT. A determination is made by the MBA director.
If an applicant has been unconditionally accepted into a different master's degree at St. Cloud State and is electing to change his/her graduate program, a GRE may be considered in lieu of the GMAT.
The GMAT may be waived for applicants who hold a terminal degree such as an Ed.D., Ph.D., J.D., M.D. and D.V.M. A determination is made by the MBA director.
Substitution of any graduate entrance examination for the GMAT is subject to approval of the MBA director and the School of Graduate Studies.
To complete your application you will need to include your transcripts, official GMAT score, a statement of intent, your resume/curriculum vitae and three recommendations.

International students

The MBA program will consider applicants seeking a language admission who provide a strong academic profile including submission of GMAT scores.
Due to the advanced level of scholarship, the MBA program does not consider applicants seeking a conditional language admission.
To complete your application you will need to include your English proficiency exam results and your international transcript evaluations.

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A graduate degree in apparel and textiles enables students to pursue careers in higher education, business, and government. The program prepares students for careers in college teaching, research, extension, education administration, marketing, consumer service, product development/evaluation, and entrepreneurship. Read more

GRADUATE STUDY IN APPAREL AND TEXTILES

A graduate degree in apparel and textiles enables students to pursue careers in higher education, business, and government. The program prepares students for careers in college teaching, research, extension, education administration, marketing, consumer service, product development/evaluation, and entrepreneurship. Emphasis is placed on the development of analytical skills and problem-solving skills and equips graduate students for continued intellectual and career growth. Graduates receive the degree of Master of Science in human environmental sciences, with a major in clothing and textiles.

Visit the website http://www.ctd.ches.ua.edu/graduate-program.html

PROGRAM OF STUDY

Students in the graduate program may concentrate in the behavioral aspects of clothing; the international aspects of textiles and apparel; or historic costume and textiles. The faculty assists each graduate student in planning an individualized program suited to the student’s career goals. The program requires a minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate courses. A graduate course in statistics must be completed successfully. Graduate students are encourages to participate in research and service activities of the faculty as a means of developing direction for the graduate program. Since graduate courses in the department have prerequisites, students should contact the Department of Clothing, Textiles and Interior Design for information about minimum preparation for graduate study.

PROGRAM FACULTY

At present, we have faculty doing research in the following areas:

- Dr. Marcy Koontz has been exploring the scholarship of engagement in higher education for the several years. Her work focuses on the implementation and assessment of meaningful sustainable projects that engage students in the local community - from preservation of cultural heritage resources to helping develop and implement innovative programs that address community issues from a design perspective. Her previous research focused on emerging technologies with an emphasis on the application of advanced computer graphics software in the field of apparel and textiles, and developing and constructing advanced computer-based curricula for apparel and textiles instruction.

- Dr. Amanda J. Thompson's topics of research include textile science issues, historic and archaeological textile analysis, and cultural interpretation of textiles and the crafts that support textiles. She also is working with alternative fibers and 3D printing and its use in textiles.

- Dr. Michelle (Xiao) Tong's current research interests include soft-goods branding management, E-commerce, international marketing and international trade of textiles and apparel products.

- Dr. Virginia Wimberley's research deals with application of microscopy and other analytical methodology to the analysis of pre-historic, historic and contemporary dress and textiles for their contributions to the material culture. She has worked on Native American prehistoric collections from Ohio, Georgia and Alabama. Currently she is starting an investigation of the role of clothing in sex role stereotyping by preschool children.

FACILITIES

The Department of Clothing, Textiles and Interior Design maintains the Carolyn Stewart Historic Costume Collection and the Comer Historic Textiles Collection for use in teaching and research. The University’s research facilities include the Mary Harmon Bryant Hall which is the repository for the department’s historic costume and textile collections with the Mary Harmon Moman Doll Collection and the Wade Hall and Greg Swem Quilt Collection, as well as other University collections; Amelia Gayle Gorgas Library, which belongs to the selective Association of Research Libraries; Central Analytical Facility; and the Seebeck Computer Center. Excellent computing capabilities exist within the College. Campus agencies that foster interdisciplinary research include the Small Business Development Center, the Capstone International Center, the Hess Institute, and the Institute for Social Science Research.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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The Master of Science in Exercise and Nutrition Science prepares students to work in government, business, the sports industry and in education as practitioners on professional interdisciplinary teams. Read more
The Master of Science in Exercise and Nutrition Science prepares students to work in government, business, the sports industry and in education as practitioners on professional interdisciplinary teams. The program is for students seeking a terminal degree as well as for those seeking a strong foundation for further study and research. The program offers three entry points throughout the academic year, and courses are scheduled to allow an efficient timeline to degree completion for full-time students. Students are provided experiential learning opportunities both inside and outside of the classroom, and are prepared for both the Certified Sports Nutritionist (CISSN) and Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) examinations, the premier certifications in strength and conditioning and sports nutrition, upon graduation if they choose to pursue certification.

Visit the website http://www.ut.edu/msexercisenutrition/

High-Tech Facilities

Having published more than 100 papers and abstracts, and secured several hundred thousand dollars in funding over the last three years, the students and staff working in the UT Human Performance Research Lab have become nationally and internationally recognized. The lab is one of the most sophisticated and advanced human performance and sport nutrition laboratories in the world, allowing students the opportunity to advance their skills in human performance testing. Equipment contained in the lab includes:

- AMTI force plate for power and velocity

- Dynavision for vision training, reaction time and cognitive function

- Tendo units for movement, specifically power and velocity

- Ultrasonography to measure skeletal muscle size, locate soft tissue injuries and quantify blood flow and blood vessel diameter

- Wingate peak power bikes for anaerobic power testing

- Electromyography for neural function and skeletal muscle activation

- Metabolic carts for VO2 max and resting metabolism measures

- Dual X-ray absorbtiometry for bone mineral density, lean mass and fat mass

- Minus 80°C freezer to maintain the integrity of biological samples

- High tech motion analysis and heavy duty motorized treadmills with 40-degree incline ability

- BTR Primus isokinetic, isotonic and isometric dynomometers for measurement of force, power and velocity in virtually any plane

- Blood lactate analyzers to examine metabolic stress and lactate threshold

- A fully equiped strength and conditioning laboratory

Converging Exercise and Nutrition Sciences Like Never Before

Most university programs segregate the study of exercise and nutrition sciences. The goal of UT’s M.S. in Exercise and Nutrition Science is to examine the relationship between the two fields in regard to optimizing athletic performance. The program combines advanced concepts from exercise physiology and strength and conditioning to teach students how nutrition can impact each area. Through numerous hands-on experiences and rigorous classroom study, students gain an unparalleled awareness of the intersection of these sciences.

Learning by Doing

M.S.-ENS students “learn by doing” through performance-based programming, which prepares practitioners to work with a wide variety of athletes. The department’s advanced labs and technology help students prepare for the real world. UT’s relationships with numerous local athletic teams such as the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and Tampa Bay Lightning allow students put their theories to test. UT faculty and students have also conducted extensive research with more than a dozen high-impact companies that are involved in exercise and nutrition/supplementation. These collaborations give students an insider’s view of the industry and provide a strong network for post-graduation jobs.

Internationally Recognized

Based on the rigor and innovation of the M.S.-ENS program, the International Society of Sports Nutrition recognized it as the first graduate program in Florida to offer approved coursework for preparation for the CISSN examination.

Outstanding Faculty

The program’s highly respected faculty has achieved national and international reputations for academic and applied success in their respective fields.

- J.C. Andersen, Ph.D. – pain and sports medicine

- Mary Martinasek, Ph.D. – mixed-method research inquiry and health program evaluation

- Jay O’Sullivan, Ph.D. – internships in exercise and nutrition science

- Ronda Sturgill, Ph.D. – kinesiology and program evaluation

- Eric Vlahov, Ph.D. – exercise physiology, nutrition and sports psychology

Flexible Program

Our highly flexible program allows students to complete the program within one year. With three entry points into the program, students are able to take classes throughout the year and take time off as needed.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ut.edu/apply

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Recent data and predictions on the forthcoming rate of urbanisation make cities the most common living environment of the future. Read more

Why this course?

Recent data and predictions on the forthcoming rate of urbanisation make cities the most common living environment of the future.

What kind of life will it be for the seven billion people who will live in existing or developing cities? Cities hold tremendous potential, but at the same time are sources of stress, inequalities and pollution. We're working to improve cities to better support fulfilling and diverse lifestyles.

Urban design has an important role in determining both the current and future form of cities. The responsibility for the development and management of cities is becoming increasingly shared.

This course is designed for practitioners and students to enhance their understanding of the city as a complex and dynamic system.

While your focus will be on physical planning and the design of urban spaces and buildings, the various influencing factors that affect form will also be considered.

The major topic is the European metropolis, or city region, within the context of globalisation. You’ll learn to develop appropriate strategies for sustainable urban development. This will encompass social, political, economic, environmental, architectural, aesthetic and psychological aspects.

Study mode and duration:
- MSc: 12 months full-time; 24 months part-time
- PgDip: 9 months full-time; 18 months part-time
- PgCert: 5 months full-time; 9 months part-time

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/urbandesign/

You’ll study

Your course is delivered through studio work, lectures, seminars and a research project.

The studio involves work on the design of a complex urban area. This includes the levels of the entire city, the neighbourhood and the individual public space defined by urban architecture.

The course is strongly linked to the Urban Design Studies Unit's research agenda. All that is taught in both classes and studio is based on our excellent research record and helps advance it.

The department is in a partnership board with the department of Urban Studies at Glasgow University. Its renowned teachers and researchers contribute a real estate and policy and practice overview to the course.

Facilities

- Studios
There are two fully-networked design studios; one dedicated to student self-study, the other to interactive design teaching.

- Library
In addition to the main University library, we have our own, on-site, reference library. Our collection is developed in direct response to the teaching delivered in the department.

- Workshop
A full range of hand and portable power tools are available (complete with instruction).
We offer plotter printing, scanning and laser cutting services.

Accreditation

This MSc course has recently gained accreditation from the Royal Town Planning Institute as a specialist course.

Student competitions

Students have previously won:
- The Urban Design Group Award
- The RTPI Scotland Chapter Award
- The Urbanpromo International Jury Design 1st Prize

If you come from a non-design based discipline, please explain in your Statement of Purpose where your interest in urbanism comes from, and try and give us an overview of your knowledge in the area. We would be delighted to review a portfolio, if you have one, of any work you might have collected relevant to the subject of the course.

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.

To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form. To ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

Courses are taught through lectures, seminars and studio work as well as a piece of research (MSc students only).

Lectures and seminars are delivered through a variety of modes including short intensive sessions to allow for flexible booking by CPD and part-time students. There's also occasional site visits.

The taught element of the course starts from a solid grounding in urban design history and theory. It then concentrates on current urban challenges, from climate change to the pressures for development in both developed and developing countries. It culminates with the research work carried out in the Urban Design Studies Unit and teaches you the unit’s ethos and approach to urbanism.

- Guest lectures
We regularly organise a guest lecture series linked to the taught and design element of the course. The Urban Design Studies Unit also organise specialist events. In the coming session students of the course will be involved in a week-long seminar/event with the famous advocate-urbanist and writer Chuck Wolfe.

Recent speakers include:
- Joan Callis, Benedetta Tagliabue EMBT, Architects to the Scottish Parliament
- Prof Neil Spiller, Professor of Architecture and Digital Theory, Rachel Armstrong Senior Lecturer in Research and Enterprise, University of Greenwich
- Andres Duany, Principal Duany Plater Zyberk and Company
- Andy Cameron, Author of Manual for Streets, Director WSP
- Murray Grigor, Photographer and Film Maker
- Prof Ian Borden, Author and Professor of Architecture, Bartlett, UCL
- Richard Murphy OBE, Architect
- Gordon Benson, Benson and Forsyth. Museum of Scotland, National Museum of Ireland
- Professor C J Lim, Vice-Dean at The Bartlett Faculty of the Built Environment at University College London. Has 4 RIBA President’s Medals International Teaching Awards
- Chris McAvoy, Steven Holl Architects, Glasgow School of Art Reid Building.

Assessment

Assessment criteria are linked to the learning outcomes set for each individual class and these are published in the modules descriptors which are available to students. The criteria is also explained by staff at the start of each class, to make sure that you're comfortable and clear with what is expected of you.

The assessment of studio work is developed collaboratively between staff and students. Learning outcomes are linked to criteria and performances. This increases your sense of ownership of the learning process and is integral to the course.

On successful completion of studio and classes you’ll be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma. If you complete an additional research element you’ll receive an MSc in Urban Design.

Careers

Graduates leave us with a detailed knowledge and innovative skills in an area now in great demand. Past graduates are now working in:
- large practices (i.e. Rogers and Associates, Llewelyn & Davies)
- government
- academia, as teachers and researchers
- local non-governmental organisations
- local authorities
- their own practices

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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In international politics, the primary day-to-day means of contact between states is through the institution of diplomacy. A rich legal tradition of how this diplomacy is governed has evolved, and the practices of diplomacy by states continue to change and shape the patterns of world politics around us. Read more

Overview

In international politics, the primary day-to-day means of contact between states is through the institution of diplomacy. A rich legal tradition of how this diplomacy is governed has evolved, and the practices of diplomacy by states continue to change and shape the patterns of world politics around us. So one important way to understand international politics is to examine the practices of diplomats and the contexts within which they operate.

Keele's MA/MRes in Diplomatic Studies aims to meet this need. The first of its kind in the UK, it continues to provide a solid, advanced grounding in the legal foundations, and the theory and practice of diplomacy. Many students on the course are from diplomatic backgrounds, and so the course provides a useful link between the worlds of academia and of practical policy-making.

The course is taught over a 12 month period (September-September; January-January). It is available as a full-time and/or part-time mode of study. Students completing the course have gone on to a variety of careers in the public, private and voluntary sectors.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/diplomaticstudies/

Course Aims

The course aims to ground students in the central legal, theoretical and practical aspects of diplomacy. It does this within a context of a more general understanding of International Relations. It also prepares students for research – both research that they may do for their dissertation, but also research that they may undertake in their future academic or professional work. The optional modules and the dissertation give students a broad scope in which to pursue topics of their own choosing.

Course Content

Taught masters programmes require satisfactory completion of at least 180 credits, made up of 6 taught module (120 credits) plus a 15,000 word dissertation (60 credits). The MA and MRes programmes differ in that the MA programme contains more subject-specific modules and less research training, while the MRes programme contains more research training, in preparation for a research career or for undertaking a research degree such as a PhD.

MA
• Power, Knowledge and the World (30 credits)
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Research in Action (15 credits)
• Three (15 credits) optional modules chosen from the list below
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in Diplomatic Studies (60 credits)

MRes
• Research Design and Process (20 credits)
• Two 15 credits optional modules chosen from the list below
• Perspectives in Politics and international Relations (30 credits)
• Quantitative Data Analysis I (20 credits)
• Qualitative Data Analysis (20 credits)
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in Diplomatic Studies (60 credits)

Options
Optional modules can be drawn from modules such as those listed below, although the precise list of available modules may vary from year to year.

• Approaches to European Integration: History and Practice
• Comparative Public Management Reform (recommended)
• Comparative European Politics
• Diplomatic Law (recommended)
• Diplomatic Practice (recommended)
• Dimensions of Environmental Politics
• Environmental Diplomacy
• Environmental Movements: North and South
• Environmental Politics and Policy in India and China (recommended)
• Parties and Democracy
• Right-Wing Radical Parties
• The Changing International Agenda
• The Politics of Global Security
• The Theory of Global Security
• US Environmental Politics and Policy
• US Foreign Policy

Options available outside SPIRE
It is also possible to take a modern foreign language as a replacement for one of your optional modules. Languages currently available are; French, Russian, German, Spanish and Japanese, at beginners, intermediate or advanced level.

Background reading:
There is no single textbook for this course. Some of the basic texts include: R.P. Barston, Modern Diplomacy, G.R. Berridge, Diplomacy: Theory and Practice, C.M. Constantinou, On the Way to Diplomacy, J. Der Derian, On Diplomacy, K. Hamilton and R. Langhore, The Practice of Diplomacy, H. Nicoslon, The Evolution of Diplomatic Method, E. Satow, Guide to Diplomatic Practice, and A. Watson, Diplomacy: The Dialogue Between States.

Teaching & Assessment

Postgraduate teaching and learning generally takes place in a combination of large seminars and smaller discussion groups. Our academics typically lead the sessions, encouraging discussion between all students. Sometimes students will give presentations, either individually or in groups.

There is a strong emphasis on independent learning and students are expected to work on their own to produce their essays and dissertation. Most modules are assessed by a diverse range of coursework (e.g., essays, critiques, reports, presentations), though some modules may also be assessed by seminar contributions and/or written exams. Students take three modules in each semester. The taught modules are completed by May, leaving the summer months for students to write their dissertation.

Additional Costs

Apart from purchasing textbooks and other sundry materials, no significant additional costs are compulsory for this course.

International

SPIRE is a thoroughly international school, and is particularly welcoming to international students, as well as providing plenty of opportunities for home students to broaden their horizons.

We have staff with educational backgrounds in a wide variety of countries, such as Sweden, Canada, Bulgaria, Italy, Austria, Romania, and Turkey, who present their research all around the world. Students have the opportunity to hear visiting lecturers from various different countries, arranged through our ERASMUS partnerships.

International students will join established international communities at Keele, and will find plenty of support mechanisms in place to help them make the transition to study in the UK.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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The MSc in Biomedical Engineering at Keele is a multidisciplinary course that will prepare you for an exciting career across a wide range of areas of engineering in medicine, be that in academic or industrial research, the medical devices sector or in the clinical arena. Read more

Overview

The MSc in Biomedical Engineering at Keele is a multidisciplinary course that will prepare you for an exciting career across a wide range of areas of engineering in medicine, be that in academic or industrial research, the medical devices sector or in the clinical arena. The course is professionally accredited and suitable for people with both engineering and life science backgrounds, including medicine and subjects allied to medicine.

Course Director: Dr Ed Chadwick ()

Studying Biomedical Engineering at Keele

The course will cover the fundamentals of engineering in medicine, introduce you to the latest developments in medical technology, and expose you to the challenges of working with patients through clinical visits. Learning and teaching methods include lectures and demonstrations from medical and engineering specialists, practical classes using state-of-the-art facilities and seminars with leading national and international researchers.

Graduate destinations for our students could include: delivering non-clinical services and technology management in a hospital; designing, developing and manufacturing medical devices in the private sector; working for a governmental regulatory agency for healthcare services and products; undertaking further postgraduate study and research (PhD); pursuing a university-based, academic research career; or providing technical consultancy for marketing departments.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/biomed/

Course Accreditation by Professional Body

The course is accredited by the Institute for Physics and Engineering in Medicine, whose aims are to ensure that graduates of accredited programmes are equipped with the knowledge and skills for the biomedical engineering workplace, be that in industry, healthcare or academic environments. Accreditation gives you confidence that the course meets strict suitability and quality criteria for providing Masters-level education in this field.‌‌‌

About the department

Now delivered through the Keele Medical School and the Research Institute for Science and Technology in Medicine, the course dates as far back as 1999, when it was established in partnership with Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics at the University Hospital. Most teaching now takes place in the Guy Hilton Research Centre, a dedicated research facility located on the hospital campus. The medical school is one of the top-ranked in the UK, and the research institute has an international reputation for world-leading research.

The centre was opened in 2006 and offers state-of-the-art equipment for translational research including newly-developed diagnostic instruments, advanced imaging modalities and additive manufacturing facilities. Its location adjacent to the university hospital ensures that students experience real-world patient care and the role that technology plays in that. Students also have access to advanced equipment for physiological measurement, motion analysis and functional assessment in other hospital and campus-based laboratories. The School embraces specialists working in UHNM and RJAH Orthopaedic Hospital Oswestry, covering key medical and surgical subspecialties.

The course runs alongside its sister course, the MSc in Cell and Tissue Engineering, and an EPSRC and MRC-funded Centre for Doctoral Training, ensuring a stimulating academic environment for students and many opportunities for engaging with further study and research.

Course Aims

The aim of the course is to provide multidisciplinary Masters level postgraduate training in Biomedical Engineering to prepare students for future employment in healthcare, industrial and academic environments. This involves building on existing undergraduate knowledge in basic science or engineering and applying it to core principles and current issues in medicine and healthcare.

Specifically, the objectives of the course are to:
- provide postgraduate-level education leading to professional careers in biomedical engineering in industry, academia and a wide range of healthcare establishments such as medical organisations, medical research institutions and hospitals;

- provide an opportunity for in-depth research into specialist and novel areas of biomedical and clinical engineering;

- expose students to practical work in a hospital environment with hands-on knowledge of patient care involving technological developments at the forefront of the field;

- introduce students to exciting new fields such as regenerative medicine and novel technologies for physiological monitoring and diagnostics.

Teaching and Learning Methods

The course is taught through subject-centred lectures and seminars, supported by tutorials and practical exercises. Collaborative learning and student-centred learning are also adopted giving widespread opportunity for group work and individual assignments. Students are required to conduct extensive independent study, and this is supported by full access to two libraries, online journal access and a suite of dedicated computers for exclusive use by MSc students on the course. In addition, students are supported by the guidance of a personal tutor within the department, as well as having access to university-wide support services. This includes English language support where appropriate.

Assessment

Modules will be assessed by a mixture of assessment methods, including lab reports, essays, and presentations, and final examination. This ensures the development of a range of transferrable employability skills such as time management and planning, written and verbal communication and numeracy as well as technical and subject-specific knowledge. The project dissertation forms a major component of the student’s assessed work.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this postgraduate programme.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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This specialist creative writing MA course enlists the expertise of our team of writer-lecturers, five of whom are currently published in the field of children’s writing. Read more
This specialist creative writing MA course enlists the expertise of our team of writer-lecturers, five of whom are currently published in the field of children’s writing. It is supported by visiting speakers from the children’s publishing world, including agents, editors, publishers and authors.

Leading Children's Literary Agent Jodie Marsh (United Agents) offers an annual prize for the 'most promising writer for young people'. We have an excellent track record of graduates achieving publication. Novels by Gill Lewis, Sam Gayton, Elen Caldecott, Jim Carrington, Alex Diaz, Marie-Louise Jensen, Sally Nicholls, Maudie Smith, Che Golden, C.J. Skuse and Sarah Hammond and picture books by Karen Hughes have all been published in the last five years. Ways to Live Forever by Sally Nicholls won the Waterstones Children's Book of the Year Award and the Glen Dimplex New Writers Award 2008. Marie-Louise Jensen and Elen Caldecott were both shortlisted for the 2009 Waterstones Prize, and Elen was longlisted for the Carnegie award for How Kirsty Jenkins Stole the Elephant.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

The course is for writers for children of all ages, from the picture-book age through to adolescent and ‘crossover’ writing which aims at markets among adults as well as young people. Though prose fiction is likely to be the main area studied, students will have the chance to look at writing in all forms, including poetry, picture book texts and non-fiction.

The course supports students to create a significant body of writing, with practical plans for its place in the real world of publishing. It is based on the principle that most writers learn and benefit from working closely with their fellow writers, in a disciplined supportive setting, and with tutors who are practising and published writers in their field.

MODULES

Writing Workshops - In the first semester’s writing workshop you will explore a variety of formats and approaches, gaining a sense of the different age- ranges and forms. This is also an introduction to the writing workshop experience which is the heart of the course. In the second semester’s workshop you will be asked to choose your area of writing, and use the workshop’s feedback and encouragement to explore it in more depth. Full-time students take one writing workshop in Semester One and one in Semester Two. Part-time students take one workshop each year.

Context Modules - Each full-time student takes one of these in the first semester and one in the second semester. The first semester’s context module, Writing for Young People: Forms, Ages and Stages, is concerned with the writer’s relationship with their audience, a sense of the history of and issues raised by children’s writing. The second semester’s module looks at Contemporary Children’s Publishing, and aims to give a realistic grasp of the choices open to new writers in the field. Part-time students take one of these context modules in each year of study.

Manuscript - This is the development of a manuscript as near to publishable quality as possible. It is supported by tutorials with a manuscript supervisor. It may be a novel, a book of stories, a collection of poems or picture book texts.

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

The course is modular and offered for full and part-time study. Part-time students take the same course over a two-year period, taking one module each semester. Students complete four taught modules (two writing workshops and two context modules) plus a manuscript (double module).

Modules are normally taught via tutor-led writing workshops, organised in 11 weekly three-hour sessions on the Corsham Court campus. The manuscript is taught via one-to-one tutorials, working with a tutor with particular knowledge of your field of work. Throughout the course, there will be special events to bring in writers to discuss their work, plus literary agents and editors with practical advice on the publishing process. Our current writer in residence is Marcus Sedgwick.

TUTORS

This course is taught by publishing writers and depending on timetables will include:

• Julia Green: her novels for young adults include Blue Moon, Baby Blue and Hunter’s Heart (Puffin), Breathing Underwater, Drawing with Light and Bringing the Summer (Bloomsbury)and her most recent novel for younger children is Tilly’s Moonlight Fox (Oxford University Press).
• Steve May: author of Dazzer Plays On and One Chance (Egmont).
• Jonathan Neale: his novels for children are Lost at Sea and Himalaya.
• Mimi Thebo: author of Wipe Out, Hit the Road Jack, Get Real (Harper Collins); Drawing Together (Walker).
• Steve Voake: his novels include The Dreamwalker’s Child, The Web of Fire, The Starlight Conspiracy, Blood Hunters, Fightback and Dark Woods (Faber & Faber), plus his Daisy Dawson and Hooey Higgins series for younger readers (Walker Books).
• Children’s publishing industry specialists John Mclay and Janine Amos

ASSESSMENT METHODS

The assessed coursework for each Writing Workshop is a folder of creative writing. For the first Context Module the coursework is an essay of approximately 2,500 words and a folder of creative responses. The second context module is assessed by a portfolio of writing tasks connected to the children’s publishing industry, including two book proposals. The manuscript is 35,000-40,000 words, or the equivalent in poetry or picture book texts.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Most of our students want a career as a published children’s author, and many have gone on to achieve this. Others have found work in the children’s publishing industry, or in libraries, bookshops and teaching or other work with young people.

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The object of the course is to impart to students the skills, including theoretical orientation, which are required for conducting research, especially in the fields of developmental and social psychology, for which the Department (4-rated in the 2001 RAE) has a longstanding and international reputation. Read more
The object of the course is to impart to students the skills, including theoretical orientation, which are required for conducting research, especially in the fields of developmental and social psychology, for which the Department (4-rated in the 2001 RAE) has a longstanding and international reputation. It is designed to acquaint students with all aspects of the research process and to introduce them, mainly through active participation, to a wide variety of research techniques.

This enables students either to qualify for posts involving such skills in academic or research settings or, subject to the approval of the Higher Degree Committee of the University, to transfer to a course leading to a PhD.

The course is also highly relevant to those entering such professional fields as educational or clinical psychology where research skills form an important part of job requirements.

Course structure
Instruction in basic research methods, as applied to selected research fields among those listed below, will be given by means of lectures, tutorials and seminars. Emphasis will be placed throughout on practical exercises in the laboratory and in appropriate field settings such as schools and hospitals.

Course components are:
• Quantitative methods – including statistical methods and computing
• Ethical and professional issues
• Survey research methods and questionnaire design
• Interviewing and assessment methods
• Language and discourse analysis
• Observational methods and use of video in the laboratory and in the field
• Cognitive-developmental research methods
• Practical research skills: oral presentation; critical analysis; grant application.

During the last stage of the course, students will be required to design an empirical study and present a thesis on it of not more than 20,000 words.

Assessment
Final assessment will be based on coursework and the thesis. An oral examination may be held at the discretion of the Board of Examiners.

It is expected that some students will subsequently continue the investigation pursued in their thesis work with a view to obtaining a PhD.

Start date and duration
The course commences at the beginning of the academic session in late September/early October and is of 12 months’ duration on a full-time basis only.

Entry requirements
The entry requirements will normally be a first or second class Honours degree in Psychology, or an equivalent qualification recognised for Graduate Membership of the British Psychological Society.

The Department
The Department offers facilities for postgraduate study and research in a number of fields focusing around the following main areas:
• Interactive Learning
• Developmental and Educational Psychology
• Road Use Behaviour
• Applied Social psychology
• Cognitive Neuropsychology

The Department has two Research Centres within it. The Centre for Research into Interactive Learning has a broad remit concerned with:
• Learning through peer interaction
• Expert-novice interaction
• Interaction with and around computers

The Centre for Applied Social Psychology carries out strategic and policy-oriented research into, amongst other topics:
• Use and misuse of illicit drugs
• Health and eating
• Problems of alcohol use in society
• Human factors and safety
• Aids

How to apply
Application forms may be obtained from:

The Secretary, Department of Psychology, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1QE

Tel: +44 (0)141 548 2581
Fax: +44 (0) 141 548 4001
Email:

Further details can be viewed at http://www.strath.ac.uk/Departments/Psychology/

Contact details
For further information please contact:

Prof Kevin Durkin
Course Director
Tel: +44 (0)141 548 2574
Email:

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