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Studying Mathematics at postgraduate level gives you a chance to begin your own research, develop your own creativity and be part of a long tradition of people investigating analytic, geometric and algebraic ideas. Read more
Studying Mathematics at postgraduate level gives you a chance to begin your own research, develop your own creativity and be part of a long tradition of people investigating analytic, geometric and algebraic ideas.

If your mathematical background is insufficient for direct entry to the MSc in Mathematics and its Applications, you may apply for this course. The first year of this Master's programme gives you a strong background in mathematics, equivalent to the Graduate Diploma in Mathematics, with second year studies following the MSc in Mathematics and its Applications.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/148/international-masters-in-mathematics-and-its-applications

About the School of Mathematics, Statistics and Actuarial Science (SMSAS)

The School has a strong reputation for world-class research and a well-established system of support and training, with a high level of contact between staff and research students. Postgraduate students develop analytical, communication and research skills. Developing computational skills and applying them to mathematical problems forms a significant part of the postgraduate training in the School.

The Mathematics Group at Kent ranked highly in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise. With 100% of the Applied Mathematics Group submitted, all research outputs were judged to be of international quality and 12.5% was rated 4*. For the Pure Mathematics Group, a large proportion of the outputs demonstrated international excellence.

The Mathematics Group also has an excellent track record of winning research grants from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), the Royal Society, the EU, the London Mathematical Society and the Leverhulme Trust.

Course structure

At least one modern application of mathematics is studied in-depth by each student. Mathematical computing and open-ended project work forms an integral part of the learning experience. You strengthen your grounding in the subject and gain a sound grasp of the wider relevance and application of mathematics.

There are opportunities for outreach and engagement with the public on mathematics.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

MA552 - Analysis (15 credits)
MA553 - Linear Algebra (15 credits)
MA588 - Mathematical Techniques and Differential Equations (15 credits)
MA591 - Nonlinear Systems and Mathematical Biology (15 credits)
MA593 - Topics in Modern Applied Mathematics (30 credits)
MA549 - Discrete Mathematics (15 credits)
MA572 - Complex Analysis (15 credits)
MA563 - Calculus of Variations (15 credits)
MA587 - Numerical Solution of Differential Equations (15 credits)
MA577 - Elements of Abstract Analysis (15 credits)
MA576 - Groups and Representations (15 credits)
MA574 - Polynomials in Several Variables (15 credits)
MA961 - Mathematical Inquiry and Communication (30 credits)
MA962 - Geometric Integration (15 credits)
MA964 - Applied Algebraic Topology (15 credits)
MA965 - Symmetries, Groups and Invariants (15 credits)
MA968 - Mathematics and Music (15 credits)
MA969 - Applied Differential Geometry (15 credits)
MA970 - Nonlinear Analysis and Optimisation (15 credits)
MA971 - Introduction to Functional Analysis (15 credits)
MA972 - Algebraic Curves in Nature (15 credits)
MA973 - Basic Differential Algebra (15 credits)
CB600 - Games and Networks (15 credits)
MA562 - Nonlinear Waves and Solitons (15 credits)
MA960 - Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

Closed book examinations, take-home problem assignments and computer lab assignments (depending on the module).

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide a Master’s level mathematical education of excellent quality, informed by research and scholarship

- provide an opportunity to enhance your mathematical creativity, problem-solving skills and advanced computational skills

- provide an opportunity for you to enhance your oral communication, project design and basic research skills

- provide an opportunity for you to experience and engage with a creative, research-active professional mathematical environment

- produce graduates of value to the region and nation by offering you opportunities to learn about mathematics in the context of its application.

Study support

Postgraduate resources
The University’s Templeman Library houses a comprehensive collection of books and research periodicals. Online access to a wide variety of journals is available through services such as ScienceDirect and SpringerLink. The School has licences for major numerical and computer algebra software packages. Postgraduates are provided with computers in shared offices in the School. The School has two dedicated terminal rooms for taught postgraduate students to use for lectures and self-study.

Support
The School has a well-established system of support and training, with a high level of contact between staff and research students. There are two weekly seminar series: The Mathematics Colloquium at Kent attracts international speakers discussing recent advances in their subject; the Friday seminar series features in-house speakers and visitors talking about their latest work. These are supplemented by weekly discussion groups. The School is a member of the EPSRC-funded London Taught Course Centre for PhD students in the mathematical sciences, and students can participate in the courses and workshops offered by the Centre. The School offers conference grants to enable research students to present their work at national and international conferences.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Advances in Mathematics; Algebra and Representation Theory; Journal of Physics A; Journal of Symbolic Computations; Journal of Topology and Analysis. Details of recently published books can be found within the staff research interests section.

Global Skills Award
All students registered for a taught Master's programme are eligible to apply for a place on our Global Skills Award Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/gsa.html). The programme is designed to broaden your understanding of global issues and current affairs as well as to develop personal skills which will enhance your employability.

Careers

A postgraduate degree in Mathematics is a flexible and valuable qualification that gives you a competitive advantage in a wide range of mathematically oriented careers. Our programmes enable you to develop the skills and capabilities that employers are looking for including problem-solving, independent thought, report-writing, project management, leadership skills, teamworking and good communication.

Many of our graduates have gone on to work in international organisations, the financial sector, and business. Others have found postgraduate research places at Kent and other universities.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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If you are an ambitious numerate graduate, or a practitioner in the field, this Masters will equip you with the analytical skills for a rewarding career supporting transport delivery and policy-making at national, regional and local level. Read more

If you are an ambitious numerate graduate, or a practitioner in the field, this Masters will equip you with the analytical skills for a rewarding career supporting transport delivery and policy-making at national, regional and local level.

97% of our graduates find employment in a professional or managerial role, or continue with further studies.*

Study transport economics, as well as econometrics and cost-benefit analysis.

Develop a suite of economic skills that will help promote economic growth within a regulatory framework that minimises any damaging health and environmental impacts, whilst incentivising the best use of resources.

Expand your fluency in:

  • Economic appraisal – to better understand the complex interface between transport and the wider economy
  • Micro-economics – to understand pricing techniques, the importance of economic regulation and the valuation of third party costs and benefits
  • Econometrics – to develop your quantitative models with real world data and test economic theories
  • Independent research – opening the gateway to a career in transport research in either academia or consultancy.

Also experience what it is like to be part of a project team working across disciplinary boundaries within the transport sector. Through this, gain insights into how economics, planning, environmental science, modelling and engineering can work together to design sustainable solutions to global challenges. This industry-inspired approach will enable you to apply your knowledge to real-world issues in the field.

Your colleagues will be among the best and brightest from Latin America to the Far East, from Africa to Europe and the UK. Together, you will learn economic research techniques that will help you develop transport networks that are founded on robust evidence, sustainable and equitable principles, state-of-the-art modelling, accurate data analysis, and an understanding of human psychology.

  • *Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA), Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) 2015, http://www.hesa.ac.uk

ITS – the global institute teaching the transport leaders of tomorrow.

We have redesigned our suites of courses following close consultation with Industry and academia.

With a strong focus on industry needs, our degrees will prepare you for employment in your chosen field. They will also address the multi-disciplinary nature of transport – enabling you to make effective decisions for clients, employers and society.

And to experience what it’s really like to work in the transport sector, collaborate with a project team of students from our other degrees through our new Transport Integrated Project module.

Research environment

The Institute for Transport Studies (ITS) was established as the UK’s first multi-disciplinary transport department, and we continue to lead the field with our research.

Our economics research has been successful in bridging the interface between academia and industry. For example, CQC (Cost, Quality, Customer) Efficiency Network initiative which is based at ITS and a joint venture between the National Highways & Transport Network (NHT) and the University of Leeds. The CQC Efficiency Network offers local authorities throughout Britain the ability to quantify the scope for cost savings in the delivery of highway services and to identify better practises.

Other Study Options

This programme is available part time, allowing you to combine study with other commitments. You can work to fund your studies, or gain a new qualification without giving up an existing job. We aim to be flexible in helping you to put together a part-time course structure that meets your academic goals while recognising the constraints on your study time.

Accreditation

This programme fulfils the educational requirements for membership of the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport (CILT UK).

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Shaping Future Transport Systems 15 credits
  • Principles of Transport Economics 15 credits
  • Welfare Economics and Cost-Benefit Analysis 15 credits
  • Transport Econometrics 15 credits
  • Economics of Regulation 15 credits
  • Economic Appraisal and Economic Performance 15 credits
  • Transport Dissertation 60 credits
  • Transport Integrated Project 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Transport Economics MSc Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Transport Economics MSc Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Postgraduate study involves a range of teaching methods, supported by independent learning. In addition to the traditional lecture and seminar formats, you’ll experience a blend of workshops, computer exercises, practical sessions, directed reading, reflective journal, student-led discussions, fieldwork and tutorials.

Assessment

Assessment is equally varied and can include coursework essays, case-study reports, group assignments, posters, presentations and exams.

Field trips

Transport at ITS is an applied subject. We offer plenty of opportunities for students to experience transport systems in action, both within the UK and Europe, allowing you to meet and hear directly from transport professionals and see what you’ve learned in practice.

For many of our students, the highlight of their year is the European Field Trip. This week-long trip which takes place after the summer exams and has been a fixture in the ITS calendar since 1987. The itinerary varies from year to year, but has often included Belgium, The Netherlands and Germany.

Stops en-route have included Pedestrian Centres and Docklands Transport in Rotterdam; Cycle and Traffic Calming Facilities in Delft; the Motorway Traffic Control Centre in Amsterdam; the Guided Bus System in Essen; the Wuppertal Monorail; Town Planning features in Duisburg and Dusseldorf; research talks at the University of Hasselt, and visit to the Brussels Metro.

Career opportunities

Links with industry

ITS has close working relationships with a number of organisations and many employers visit ITS each year to interview our students for graduate schemes and other vacancies. ITS also regularly circulates specific job vacancies to students.

Our students are highly sought after and have a good reputation with transport consultants, and may receive a job offer before or shortly after graduation.

The organisations that have advertised and/or recruited directly from ITS include Arup, Mott MacDonald, AECOM, Capita, Transpennine Express, Transport for London, Pell Frischmann, Leigh Fisher, JMP, Amey and Hyder among many others.

Read more about Graduate Employability at the Institute for Transport Studies.



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If you are passionate about solving the grand transport challenges of our time – with benefits for climate change, pollution, urban congestion, economic growth, social justice and energy scarcity – then this Masters will inspire and equip you to tackle these issues. Read more

If you are passionate about solving the grand transport challenges of our time – with benefits for climate change, pollution, urban congestion, economic growth, social justice and energy scarcity – then this Masters will inspire and equip you to tackle these issues.

97% of our graduates find employment in a professional or managerial role, or continue with further studies.*

Whatever your background, this course will fire your imagination and expand your horizons.

You could be a social or political scientist, a geographer, philosopher, or law graduate, or perhaps an engineering or science graduate with an interest in environmental and social issues. What’s most important is that you thrive on critical thinking and have a willingness to move outside disciplinary comfort zones. You will:

  • Study a range of modules from environmental policy and governance, shaping future transport systems, environmental science and sustainability for transport through to investigating the links between transport and climate change, the environment and economic development.
  • Develop the management skills to lead strategic reviews of transport policy.
  • Undertake strategic assessments and reviews of transport and environmental policies.
  • Be taught by internationally renowned academics from the Institute for Transport Studies and the School of Earth and Environment. Their work is developing sustainable solutions in transport and beyond.
  • Gain industry-specific skills for access to a fast expanding employment market.
  • Have a choice of modules including gaining leadership skills to effectively chair visioning workshops, stakeholder engagement events, strategy meetings, and make persuasive presentations to policy makers.

And experience what it is like to be part of a project team working across disciplinary boundaries within the transport sector. Through this, gain insights into how planning, economics, environmental science, modelling and engineering can work together to develop sustainable solutions to global challenges. This industry-inspired approach will enable you to apply your knowledge to real-world transport issues in the field.

Your colleagues will be among the best and brightest from the UK and across the globe. Together you will develop the strategic vision needed to help you design transport solutions founded on sustainable and equitable principles.

ITS – the global institute teaching the transport leaders of tomorrow.

*Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA), Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) 2015, http://www.hesa.ac.uk

We have redesigned our suites of courses following close consultation with Industry and academia.

With a strong focus on industry needs, our degrees will prepare you for employment in your chosen field. They will also address the multi-disciplinary nature of transport – enabling you to make effective decisions for clients, employers and society.

And to experience what it’s really like to work in the transport sector, collaborate with a project team of students from our other degrees through our new Transport Integrated Project module.

Research environment

The Institute for Transport Studies (ITS) was established as the UK’s first multi-disciplinary transport department, and we continue to lead the field with our research.

Our reputation allows us to invest in world-class facilities, such as the University of Leeds Driving Simulator – one of the most sophisticated in any university in the world, allowing us to research driver behaviour in controlled lab conditions. We also have access to a variety of specialist software tools including those we’ve developed in-house such as SATURN, PLUTO, DRACULA, MARS and KonSULT.

You’ll also be supported by the Sustainability Research Centre (SRC), an interdisciplinary centre for cutting-edge research in this dynamic field. SRC works with partners and funders such as Marks & Spencer and Asda to address key challenges facing businesses and governments alike.

Other Study Options

This programme is available part time, allowing you to combine study with other commitments. You can work to fund your studies, or gain a new qualification without giving up an existing job. We aim to be flexible in helping you to put together a part-time course structure that meets your academic goals while recognising the constraints on your study time.

You can also study this subject at Postgraduate Diploma level, part time or full time, or at Postgraduate Certificate level with our PGCert in Transport Studies.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Environmental Policy and Governance 15 credits
  • Environmental Science and Sustainability for Transport 15 credits
  • Shaping Future Transport Systems 15 credits
  • Transport Data Collection and Analysis 15 credits
  • Transport Dissertation 60 credits
  • Transport Integrated Project 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Sustainability in Transport MSc Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Sustainability in Transport MSc Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Postgraduate study involves a range of teaching methods, supported by independent learning. In addition to the traditional lecture and seminar formats, you’ll experience a blend of workshops, computer exercises, practical sessions, directed reading, reflective journal, student-led discussions, fieldwork and tutorials.

Assessment

Assessment is equally varied and can include coursework essays, case-study reports, group assignments, posters, presentations and exams.

Career opportunities

Links with industry

ITS has close working relationships with a number of organisations and many employers visit ITS each year to interview our students for graduate schemes and other vacancies. ITS also regularly circulates specific job vacancies to students.

Our students are highly sought after and have a good reputation with transport consultants, and may receive a job offer before or shortly after graduation.

The organisations that have advertised and/or recruited directly from ITS include Arup, Mott MacDonald, AECOM, Capita, Transpennine Express, Transport for London, Pell Frischmann, Leigh Fisher, JMP, Amey and Hyder among many others.

Read more about Graduate Employability at the Institute for Transport Studies.

Graduate destinations

A degree from ITS opens up a range of opportunities to develop a challenging and rewarding career. Transport consultancies are the largest employers of ITS graduates, but other common careers include those in government, academia, regulatory bodies, transport operators, logistics companies, not-for-profit and international agencies.

ITS graduates work across the private and public sectors. Many work abroad, whether for UK companies with overseas offices, for international organisations or for national governments.



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The Master of Science (MSc) normally takes 12-18 months of full-time study to complete. Read more

The Master of Science (MSc) normally takes 12-18 months of full-time study to complete. The degree requires 180 points, which is made up of 90 points in taught papers and a 90-point thesis (research project).  This balance of theses to taught papers may be changed subject to permission from the graduate co-ordinator in your chosen discipline.

Study a MSc at Waikato University and you will enjoy more lab and field work, more one-on-one time with top academics and access to world-class research equipment. Our great industry contacts will also mean exciting collaborations with local, national and international companies and organisations.

This is an ideal degree for students wanting to improve their career opportunities, and seeking a qualification that is potentially not so research-heavy.

This qualification is taught at a level significantly in advance of undergraduate study, providing you with the challenges and knowledge needed to prepare for a successful career.

Facilities

The University of Waikato’s School of Science is home to a suite of well-equipped, world-class laboratories.  You will have the opportunity to use complex research equipment and facilities such as NMR spectroscopyDNA sequencing and the University of Waikato Herbarium (WAIK).

The computing facilities at the University of Waikato are among the best in New Zealand, ranging from phones and tablets for mobile application development to cluster computers for massively parallel processing. Students majoring in Computer Science, Mathematics or Statistics will have 24 hour access to computer labs equipped with all the latest computer software.

Subjects

Students enrolling in an MSc via the Faculty of Science & Engineering can study Biological SciencesChemistryEarth SciencesElectronicsMaterials and ProcessingPhysicsPsychology, and Science, Technology and Environmental Education.

Students taking Computer ScienceMathematics or Statistics will enrol through the Faculty of Computing & Mathematical Sciences.

Course Structure

An MSc is normally completed over 12-18 consecutive months, although it may be possible to study for the degree on a part-time basis. Each full-time student will normally enrol in the first year of the Masters programme in a minimum of 90 points’ worth of taught papers in addition to 30 points towards their thesis. These taught papers may be assessed exclusively on coursework, examination, or a mixture of both. In the second year each student will normally enrol in the remaining research and taught papers required to complete the degree. The degree may be awarded with First Class Honours, or Second Class Honours (first division), or Second Class Honours (second division), or without Honours.

Practical experience

You will spend more time putting theory into practice in the laboratories and out in the field. Smaller class sizes in taught papers mean more one-on-one time with renowned academics.

The University of Waikato also boasts excellent industry collaborations with organisations such as NIWA, AgResearch, Plant and Food Research and Landcare Research. These strong relationships generate numerous research projects for MSc students, who are able to work on real issues with a real client.

Build a successful career

Depending on the major completed and your particular interests, graduates of this degree may find employment in a range of science-related industries.

 Career opportunities

  • Local and Regional Council
  • Crown Research Institutes
  • Energy Companies
  • Environmental Agencies
  • Government Departments
  • Biomedical/Pharmaceutical Industries
  • Private Research Companies
  • Food and Dairy Industries
  • Agriculture and Fisheries


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There is a growing industry in intelligent transport systems addressing transport problems around the world. The Transport Planning and Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) MSc will enable you to develop a systematic understanding of ITS and intelligent mobility. Read more
There is a growing industry in intelligent transport systems addressing transport problems around the world. The Transport Planning and Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) MSc will enable you to develop a systematic understanding of ITS and intelligent mobility.

This course will teach you a critical awareness of current problems in the field of Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS), informed by the latest research. You will develop a comprehensive understanding of appropriate techniques and practical approaches to the planning, management and operation of transport systems. The course is ideal for those with a background in computing, electronics or electrical engineering, numeracy or transport.

The compulsory course modules are supplemented by research seminars, site visits, engagement with local industry and visits from professional institution practitioners.

Accreditation

The course is accredited by the Joint Board of Moderators (JBM) (comprising ICE, IStructE, CIHT and IHIE), as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for students with an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng Honours degree or Accredited IEng (Full) BEng/BSc Honours degree.

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Our distance learning Procurement Regulation Postgraduate Diploma/MA has been specifically designed for professionals wishing to expand their knowledge and understanding of EU procurement law and regulation, while also placing that system within its wider international context. Read more

Our distance learning Procurement Regulation Postgraduate Diploma/MA has been specifically designed for professionals wishing to expand their knowledge and understanding of EU procurement law and regulation, while also placing that system within its wider international context. The programme is particularly suitable for lawyers in private practice or in the public sector, in house legal advisers and officials dealing with practice or policy in the procurement field as procurement specialists who wish to add further legal experience to their practical experience.

Key Benefits

  • Gives an in-depth and up-to-date understanding of the EU procurement regime in the public sector
  • Programme materials written by leading professional experts in the field
  • Can be studied anywhere in the world
  • Weekend seminars led by programme director
  • Hard copy study material with online additional support, traditional one year cohort

Description

Our Public Procurement Regulation PG Diploma is structured into three modules of 12 units. Each unit comes in the form of hard copy print and as a pdf file via the programme website. The units are designed to be largely self-contained, but recommended and further reading will be suggested. A unit will comprise text, copies of relevant Regulations, Commission Decisions and Notices, Judgments of the General Court and the Court of Justice of the European Union, practical examples, questions and model answers to test your knowledge as you progress.

On the programme website you can view and listen to seminar recordings and access further learning resources to support you in your studies. This website also offers students the opportunity to interact with each other and to post questions for the module leader.

The MA in Public Procurement Regulation in the EU and in its Global Context is only open to students who have successfully completed the Public Procurement Regulation Postgraduate Diploma.

Course format and assessment

 This is a distance learning course taught via course-specific printed matter which is despatched from October to March at fortnightly intervals. The PgDip also features two intensive residential weekend seminars (equivalent to 32 hours of contact time) at which programme leaders will lecture and organise group work where appropriate. You are expected to engage in 220 hours of self-study and will be assessed through a combination of coursework and examinations; 70 per cent of the course is assessed by examination and 30 per cent is assessed by coursework.

The follow-up MA is open to students who complete the Diploma. It involves the research for and writing of a 12000 -15000 dissertation under supervision. You are expected to spend at least 110 hours engaged in self-directed study. You are assessed exclusively by marking of your dissertation.

Career prospects

Completing this rigorous programme will you give you a competitive edge in the job market. With its practical approach you can apply your expertise immediately to your work environment. You will also have opportunities to network with professionals in your area from all over the world. Programme graduates are mostly professionals who enjoy specialisation and promotion in their existing workplace or new employment destinations. Graduates from this programme typically work for

  • Law firms in London, Brussels and worldwide
  • Public sector legal departments
  • Corporate sector legal advisors
  • European Institutions
  • European Commission
  • Competition commissions worldwide
  • Regulatory bodies worldwide
  • Private legal practice


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Studying Mathematics at postgraduate level gives you a chance to begin your own research, develop your own creativity and be part of a long tradition of people investigating analytic, geometric and algebraic ideas. Read more
Studying Mathematics at postgraduate level gives you a chance to begin your own research, develop your own creativity and be part of a long tradition of people investigating analytic, geometric and algebraic ideas.

This programme allows you to further enhance your knowledge, creativity and computational skills in core mathematical subjects and their applications giving you a competitive advantage in a wide range of mathematically based careers. The modules, which are designed and taught by internationally known researchers, are accessible, relevant, interesting and challenging.

About the School of Mathematics, Statistics and Actuarial Science (SMSAS)

The School has a strong reputation for world-class research and a well-established system of support and training, with a high level of contact between staff and research students. Postgraduate students develop analytical, communication and research skills. Developing computational skills and applying them to mathematical problems forms a significant part of the postgraduate training in the School.

The Mathematics Group at Kent ranked highly in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise. With 100% of the Applied Mathematics Group submitted, all research outputs were judged to be of international quality and 12.5% was rated 4*. For the Pure Mathematics Group, a large proportion of the outputs demonstrated international excellence.

The Mathematics Group also has an excellent track record of winning research grants from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), the Royal Society, the EU, the London Mathematical Society and the Leverhulme Trust.

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by the School of Mathematics, Statistics and Actuarial Science was ranked 25th in the UK for research power and 100% or our research was judged to be of international quality.

An impressive 92% of our research-active staff submitted to the REF and the School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Course structure

At least one modern application of mathematics is studied in-depth by each student. Mathematical computing and open-ended project work forms an integral part of the learning experience. There are opportunities for outreach and engagement with the public on mathematics.

You take eight modules in total: six from the list below; a short project module and a dissertation module. The modules concentrate on a specific topic from: analysis; applied mathematics; geometry; and algebra.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

MA961 - Mathematical Inquiry and Communication (30 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/MA961
MA962 - Geometric Integration (15 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/MA962
MA963 - Poisson Algebras and Combinatorics (15 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/MA963
MA964 - Applied Algebraic Topology (15 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/MA964
MA965 - Symmetries, Groups and Invariants (15 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/MA965
MA966 - Diagram Algebras (15 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/MA966
MA967 - Quantum Physics (15 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/MA967
MA968 - Mathematics and Music (15 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/MA968
MA969 - Applied Differential Geometry (15 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/MA969
MA970 - Nonlinear Analysis and Optimisation (15 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/MA970
Show more... https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/146/mathematics-and-its-applications#!structure

Assessment

Assessment is by closed book examinations, take-home problem assignments and computer lab assignments (depending on the module). The project and dissertation modules are assessed mainly on the reports or work you produce, but also on workshop activities during the teaching term.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide a Master’s level mathematical education of excellent quality, informed by research and scholarship
- provide an opportunity to enhance your mathematical creativity, problem-solving skills and advanced computational skills
- provide an opportunity for you to enhance your oral communication, project design and basic research skills
- provide an opportunity for you to experience and engage with a creative, research-active professional mathematical environment
- produce graduates of value to the region and nation by offering you opportunities to learn about mathematics in the context of its application.

Careers

A postgraduate degree in Mathematics is a flexible and valuable qualification that gives you a competitive advantage in a wide range of mathematically oriented careers. Our programmes enable you to develop the skills and capabilities that employers are looking for including problem-solving, independent thought, report-writing, project management, leadership skills, teamworking and good communication.

Many of our graduates have gone on to work in international organisations, the financial sector, and business. Others have found postgraduate research places at Kent and other universities.

Learn more about Kent

Visit us - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/visit/openday/pgevents.html

International Students - https://www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent/

Why study at Kent? - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

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The MArch at AUB explores the possibilities of architectural practices that conceive and articulate diverse processes of community development and transformation. Read more
The MArch at AUB explores the possibilities of architectural practices that conceive and articulate diverse processes of community development and transformation.

The “construction” of the “sites” of our interventions in the public sphere includes involvement with other institutions, governmental agencies and other actors at a local, regional, national, and global level.

Where are the options?

What is at stake?

Are there really options?

How should we choose?

The MArch at AUB program is structured around the idea of architectural intervention, interrogated in relationship to its duration and effects in and around the community where it takes place – indeed, in its potential to create community.

The notion that there is any singular definition of the architectural profession is, at least on the margins, continuously questioned. But the ‘middle’ is strong, and the very fact that a multiplicity of ‘other’ agendas and their attendant methodologies are marginalised attests to this strength.

So looking for something different and fresh in your route to becoming an architect in a changing world. The new MArch at AUB (RIBA*/ARB Part2) aims to produce: performative, projective enablers and architecture, cutting into societies deepest darkest myths; building interventions in the utopias and distopias past, present and future; and launching architectural careers and journey’s via its laboratory practice, where the body and somatic practice is at the fore.

Travel with MArch at AUB and @inspiredAUB, the arts campus and its cross disciplinary docks, on the ride of a lifetime with your new highly decorative AUB baggage. Join the eclectic global and local, MArch student body, be ready to catch a big one from the Portland Stone cliffs or disappear into the Mirkwood to live like a hobbit. The AUB MArch has the arts centre in Sway by the architect, Tony Fretton as a part of its portfolio of spaces AUB to the main campus and its multiple workshops, studios and laboratories. Although the course is new there is a fascinating history of drawing and representation. In former lives architects Michael Hopkins and Peter Cook were educated in Bournemouth with bright lights and late night inflatables on the beach. The emerging, social, political, and architectural in its many frightening forms, are being professionally dissected, compressed, crafted and beaten, by brave bodies in the embryonic laboratory practice ‘ROOM 101’, based in the Enterprise Pavilion.

From the first graduating cohort there many fascinating stories – ecological strategies from Haiti, Delhi and Wessex. They are now working and researching from the local practice and making/fabricating to teaching (on the BA Hons), to developing the ‘fablab’ in AUB’s workshop. They all came from different schools and found AUB & the MArch very welcoming and encouraging. The [email protected] broadens the architect’s range of activities, and empowers its community through its members’ ability to actually make a difference.

Ed Frith, Architect, MArch Course Leader & Prof Oren Liebermann, Dean of the Faculty of Art & Design

If you would like to discuss any aspect of this course, or details on the application process, please contact Astrid MacKellar on: or 01202 363384.

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Euroculture is an interdisciplinary master's specialization of excellence, focusing on the key challenges of contemporary Europe. Read more
Euroculture is an interdisciplinary master's specialization of excellence, focusing on the key challenges of contemporary Europe. Its strengths are a job-oriented approach and training in substantive research skills.

The master's specialization Euroculture is a unique, interdisciplinary and international programme consisting of 4 semesters (120 ECTS) and offered by a Consortium (8 European and 4 non-European universities). The status “Erasmus Mundus Master of Excellence" was granted to the programme by the European Commission in 2005 and again in 2011 thereby confirming the programme's outstanding quality. In 2015, Euroculture was, for the 4th time in a row, considered to be a "top" Master Programme by Keuzegids, an independent Dutch guide ranking university Programmes. In fact, the Keuzegids considered the Euroculture programme to be the best European Studies Master programme in the Netherlands.

The mission of the programme is to provide graduates with the following:

- a deep understanding of European identity, civil society, the ongoing European unification process in itself, its cultural and social dynamics and the consequences for its citizens and the wider world;

- the ability to identify and problematise what Europe, and the EU, represents for its citizens and for the wider world.

Why in Groningen?

Euroculture in Groningen is proud of being a founding member of the programme (1999), and of its achievements as Programme of Excellence. For three years in a row we have been selected as best European Studies Programme in the Netherlands (source: Master Keuzegids). Futhermore, the University of Groningen belongs to the global top 100 on the three most important ranking lists ('Shanghai, THE and QS World University Rankings).

The international staff of Euroculture hold doctoral degrees in a variety of disciplines, such as history, cultural studies, political science, European law, European studies and international relations. The academic and research focus in Groningen is the notion of cultural identity and its relation to European integration in all its dimensions. Concepts such as “Europeanisation” and “Citizenship” are important elements in seminars. Trans-Atlantic relations and East Asia feature prominently in Groningen too.

Groningen is also an excellent choice of residence because this university town is lively and pleasant, with about 1 out 5 inhabitants being a student. For students there are excellent facilities not only for studying (ICT, library, Placement Office, International Office), but also for sports, entertainment and leisure.

Job perspectives

Euroculture prepares graduates for professions and research careers where knowledge of contemporary Europe and the European Union institutions are of relevance.

Due to the multi- and interdisciplinary nature of the Euroculture programme, its graduates find work in a broad range of sectors where expert knowledge of present Europe and European integration processes is required. A number of our graduates have also undertaken further studies on doctoral level.

The focus of the programme is on cultural and social developments, the political process of European integration, values, citizenship and cultural identity within Europe and its correlations with the wider world. Euroculture teaches students the methods and skills required to identify the European dimensions of social problems, to critically assess and interpret information about European institutions and organisations, and to understand the cultural aspects and factors that play a key role in the process of European identity formation and integration.

Career Prospects

Euroculture alumni have found employment in the following areas/organisations:
- EU institutions
- International and national organisations (non-governmental, non-profit, foundations)
- Universities, education and research institutions
- Embassies and ministeries all over the world
- Media, journalism, publishing, libraries
- Cultural (management) organisations
- Foreign trade organisations
- Political parties, foundations and associations
- City and regional planning, local and regional cultural projects
- Centres for minorities and minority rights

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These innovative and interdisciplinary programs provide students with comprehensive knowledge in the field of mathematics, both pure and applied, focusing on three fundamental areas. Read more
These innovative and interdisciplinary programs provide students with comprehensive knowledge in the field of mathematics, both pure and applied, focusing on three fundamental areas: algebra, analysis, and probability. The programs benefit from the opportunities offered by the rich local academic environment, including the Alfred Renyi Institute of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (HAS), the Budapest University of Technology and Economics (BME) and Eotvos Lorand University (ELTE). The one-year program is suitable for students who have completed four years of undergraduate university study, while the two-year program is designed for applicants with a three-year bachelor’s degree.

Department of Mathematics and Its Applications

In close collaboration with the Alfred Renyi Institute of Mathematics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, the department enables students to expand their knowledge in mathematics and its applications through intensive course work, excellent research opportunities,
and expert supervision with outstanding scholars and institutions. Programs are taught in cooperation with professors from Hungarian
institutes as well as visiting professors from around the world.

Career Paths

Graduates pursue successful careers at universities, research institutes, corporations, banks, and governmental and EU institutions.

Scholarships

CEU is committed to attracting talented students and scholars from around the world and provides generous merit-based scholarships available to students from any country. In 2015-2016, 85% of CEU students received financial aid, ranging from tuition awards to full scholarships with stipends and housing. Learn more about available funding options at: http://www.ceu.edu/financialaid

For more information, see the contact page: http://bit.ly/2iEuKZv

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This course explores the way the Classical world has been reflected in the art, literature and culture of later periods, and how the ancient world has shaped the modern. Read more

This course explores the way the Classical world has been reflected in the art, literature and culture of later periods, and how the ancient world has shaped the modern.

It is taught in the Department of Classics, by experts in the field of Classical reception. The Department's research and teaching strengths stretch from the Aegean Bronze Age and the ancient Near East, through Greece and Rome to Byzantine and Modern Greek literature and culture, giving the programme a breadth unmatched anywhere in the world. 

The programme is interdisciplinary, and is open to students with no prior knowledge of ancient languages. 

Key benefits

  • One of the world's largest and most distinguished departments of Classics.
  • Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.
  • Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. Ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)

Description

Our MA course focuses on the way the classical world has influenced the culture of later periods, and how it continues to do so. With a strong focus on research the course is taught in the Department of Classics by experts in the field of classical reception. Our Department’s research and teaching strengths stretch from the Aegean Bronze Age and the ancient Near East, through Greece and Rome to Byzantine and Modern Greek literature and culture. This means we can offer you a breadth of expertise that is unmatched anywhere in the world. Through this advanced course of study, we will develop your literary, historical and archaeological analysis skills, and provide you with the opportunity to learn ancient and modern languages to extend these skills.

Research seminars

In the Department of Classics we run a research seminar series (which MA students are encouraged to attend), where you will learn about the current research of our academic staff and PhD students. Further the Department regularly hosts major research conferences with guest speakers from around the world. There are also University of London research seminars organized through the Institute of Classical Studies, for example in Literature, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History, where you will be able to listen to and meet leading scholars from around the world. There is also the Late Antique & Byzantine Studies seminar, which is organized by the Centre for Hellenic Studies.

Personal tutor

You will be assigned a personal tutor in the Department of Classics, who will advise you and help you decide which modules to take, and can answer any questions or concerns you may have whilst at King's.

Dissertation supervision

During your first term at King's you will need to decide on your MA dissertation subject, if you have not done so before you arrive. The dissertation can be related to work you are doing for a taught module, or it can be in a completely different area. On the basis of your chosen subject area you will be assigned a supervisor within the Department of Classics who will discuss the topic with you, and oversee your work on it.

Greek Play

Every year (since 1953), students in the Department of Classics have produced and performed a Greek play - the only production in the UK to be performed annually in the original Greek. Read more about the Greek Play (and its history) at King's: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/classics/about/greek/index.aspx

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student we will typically provide you with six to eight hours of teaching through lectures and seminars each week, and we will expect you to undertake 35 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student we will typically provide you with two to six hours of teaching through lectures and seminars each week, and we will expect you to undertake 17.5 hours of independent study.

For your dissertation, we will provide five hours of supervision, and we will expect you to undertake 575 hours of independent study.

Typically, one credit equates to typically 10 hours of work.

Assessment

We typically assess our modules through a combination of coursework and examinations, and the amount of coursework we expect you to produce will be greater for modules which are worth more credits. For your dissertation module you will write a 12,000-word thesis.

Regulating body

King’s College London is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England

Career prospects

The advanced skills that we give you have proved very popular with employers in a wide range of professions, and many of our graduates use the skills and knowledge they develop with us to pursue further research in our Department. Others go on to excel in careers in teaching, journalism, cultural management or the financial sector.



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The world’s long-term economic development depends on the existence of efficient, innovative and creative energy and resources industries. Read more

Why LLM Water Law at Dundee?

The world’s long-term economic development depends on the existence of efficient, innovative and creative energy and resources industries. These in turn rely on individuals who possess a sound grasp of their legal, economic, technical and policy backgrounds.

Natural Resources Law and Policy is at the heart of these issues and provides the best in advanced education in its field, preparing its graduates to meet the challenges posed by the evolving global economy.

This LLM is aimed at lawyers and other professionals, both in government and industry, who wish to gain an in-depth understanding of the law and practice of international business transactions and general international economic relations. The position of this programme at the Centre provides the student a unique opportunity to combine studies in general international economic and business law and practice with specialized courses in the energy and resources industries. This intensive professional and academic training, provided by internationally leading practitioners and professors in this field, leads to a distinctive and reputed advanced academic qualification based on academic excellence and professional relevance.

What's great about LLM Water Law Dundee?

Throughout its history, the Centre for Energy, Petroleum and Mineral Law and Policy as part of the Graduate School of Natural Resources Law, Policy and Management at the University of Dundee has achieved continuous growth and has established international pre-eminence in its core activities. Scholarly performance, high level academic research, strategic consultancy and top-quality executive education. Currently, we have over 500 registered postgraduate students from more than 50 countries world-wide.

Our interdisciplinary approach to teaching, research and consultancy gives us a unique perspective on how governments and businesses operate. We offer flexible courses delivered by the best in the field, devised and continually updated in line with the Centre’s unique combination of professional expertise and academic excellence.

We will teach you the practical and professional skills you need to mastermind complex commercial and financial transactions in the international workplace, and we will expose you to many varied and exciting opportunities.
The programme is focused on the core area of Water Law, and includes teaching to enable students to study law at Masters Level. Students can choose options in other areas of natural resources law, or related disciplines such as economics.

The programme utilises the global reputation of the UNESCO Centre within the University of Dundee - the Dundee UNESCO Centre for Water Law, Policy and Science is committed to the mission "water for all", and in its innovative taught programmes aims to develop a new generation of local water leaders. Its unique summer school programme is aimed at water resources experts who wish to supplement their expertise with water law and leadership courses with an international network of water resources specialists as students and faculty.

The UNESCO Centre achieved a high research rating in the 2008 RAE as part of the submission from the University's Law Unit of Assessment. The Unit finished among the top four in Scotland (out of 11), and among the top 19 out of 67 in the UK. All of its research was classified as being of an international standard.

Programme Content

The programme has both January and September starts. The core induction module, which spans a number of related courses, runs twice a year to cover both starts.

In the autumn semester (September – December) students will take National Water Law and two or three options.

In the spring semester (January-May), students will take Regulation of Water Services and two or three options.

The third core module, International Water Law, runs in a block in early summer and is also offered as a short course with a wide intake of participants from around the globe. Other options are also offered in intensive block format at this time (April – June).

Students will complete a dissertation or internship. Students starting in January may be able to undertake the internship during the summer months to enable them to complete within 12 months.

Methods of Teaching & Assessment

The Graduate School utilises a wide variety of teaching and assessment for on-campus modules. These include lectures, seminars, and workshops. Face to face teaching is supplemented by materials provided through the virtual learning environment. Assessments include examinations, individual research papers, presentations and role plays. Module handbooks supplement programme handbooks and provide detailed information on teaching schedules and reading as well as assessments. The Centre regularly welcomes guest lecturers from different disciplines to broaden the student experience and give them a more holistic perspective, regardless of the background of the individual student.

Careers Opportunities

As available water resources become scarcer, the need for their improved allocation and use becomes more pressing. The management of resources and the provision of services both require effective legal structures.
For students with a background in law or a related discipline, this programme will give them the specialisation and research ability to be attractive to a wide variety of employers including government departments, regulators, water services providers, international organisations and NGOs as well as academia or industry.
For those already working in water resources, this qualification will give them the expert knowledge and skills in law to advance their career, perhaps within a government department, a regulator, water services providers or a basin agency.

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Questions about security – what drives it and what undermines it – shape global politics. Read more
Questions about security – what drives it and what undermines it – shape global politics. Terrorism, conflict, environmental catastrophe, weapons of mass destruction and weak states are all security issues that are reflected in our media, dominate policy-making in international politics, and increasingly impinge on our daily lives.

This stream in Transnational Security Studies is an exciting new course that brings together many of the existing strengths of the Department of Politics and International Relations, including expertise in the areas of security studies, comparative politics, international law and conflict, political theory, and global politics.

The core of the course traces the security studies discipline from its traditional approaches through its evolution to include ever more transnational dynamics. You can tailor the course to your specific interests through optional units in subjects such as political violence, biopolitics, media, communication and conflict, international law of targeting, and regional international politics. You will be provided with both a firm academic foundation in the security studies discipline and a base of knowledge for careers in fields of policymaking, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and more.

This course is also offered at Postgraduate Diploma level for those who do not have the academic background necessary to begin an advanced Masters degree. The structure of the Diploma is identical except that you will not write a dissertation. If you are successful on the Diploma you may transfer to the MSc, subject to academic approval.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscpgdiptransnationalsecuritystudies.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The Department of Politics and International Relations is a young, vibrant and rapidly-rising department and was ranked in the Top 10 small politics departments in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE).

- The course is taught by world-class scholars and informed by cutting-edge research.

- The course offers an advanced grounding in security studies while allowing you to specialise in particular issues or regions of interest.

- Our international cohort of students will provide you with excellent opportunities to obtain genuinely global perspectives.

Department research and industry highlights

- The Centre for European Politics was officially launched by Lord Mandelson in September 2007, with the mission of producing research in two principal areas: the study of democracy in Europe, and Europe as an actor in world politics. Under the leadership of Co-Directors Dr Alister Miskimmon and Dr James Sloam, it has recently hosted a number of high-profile speakers, including Lord Mandelson, Professor Simon Hix (LSE), Roger Liddle (Policy Network), John Peet (The Economist), Sir Stephen Wall (former European policy advisor to Tony Blair), and David Willetts MP (Shadow Secretary of State for Innovations, Universities and Skills).
Recent funded research projects include: a European Union Committee of the Regions consultancy on EU External Relations and European Neighbourhood Policy; an EU-funded Workshop on the Review of the European Union Budget; and Teaching Democracy.

- The Centre for Global and Transnational Politics is devoted to the multi-disciplinary exploration of global and transnational processes. Led by its Co-Directors Dr Chris Rumford and Professor Sandra Halperin, its central concern is to theorise and conceptualise the substance of, and connections between and among, political processes that operate at all levels or scales: the local, national, international, transnational, and global.
The Centre recently won £54,000 from NORFACE, a partnership of European Research Councils including the ESRC, for a pan-European research network on globalisation and the transformation of Europe's borders, and £20,000 from the joint AHRC/ESRC Religion and Society programme for a research network on the normative foundations of public policy in a multi-faith society.
Dr Yasmin Khan’s recent book The Great Partition: The Making of India and Pakistan (Yale University Press) won the Royal Historical Society’s Gladstone Book Prize of 2007.

- The New Political Communication Unit’s research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Dr Ben O'Loughlin and Akil N. Awan, together with colleague Andrew Hoskins at the University of Warwick, were awarded £300,000 from the ESRC for a study of terrorist networks on the internet.
Unit Co-Director Professor Andrew Chadwick is one of the founding members of the US National Science Foundation's International Working Group on Online Consultation and Public Policymaking, a three year project focusing on how political interaction on the internet can contribute to better government policy. It is funded through part of an overall grant of $1m to the State University of New York at Albany, from the NSF Digital Government Programme. Andrew Chadwick’s recent book Internet Politics (Oxford University Press) was awarded one of the American Sociological Association Best Book Prizes in 2007.

- The Contemporary Political Theory Research Group was founded in October 2009, as a result of the development of political theory at postgraduate level and growth in academic staff numbers having created the critical mass it required. The group organizes its activities collectively, and its work focuses on issues around contemporary pluralism, liberalism, democratic theory and radical politics. It brings together staff working in contemporary Continental philosophy, normative political theory, and American pragmatism, and its postgraduate members include two students on the College’s most prestigious studentship, the Reid Award. The group also has ties to the College’s Philosophy Team and the interdepartmental Humanities and Arts Research Centre.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments related to security studies

- a sound knowledge of the texts, theories and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes and phenomena associated with particular fields of politics and international relations

- an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods within the disciplines of politics and international relations

- a solid foundation for progression to either a politics-related career or continued academic study.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different politics and international relations-related areas, including roles as officials in local government, personnel officers and higher education lecturers. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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What is the 'Master of Architecture' all about?. This Master's programme focusing on "Architecture. Resilient and Sustainable Strategies" explores architecture from a . Read more

What is the 'Master of Architecture' all about?

This Master's programme focusing on "Architecture: Resilient and Sustainable Strategies" explores architecture from a research-by-designand design-by-research perspective. Students are educated and trained in a multicultural and international context. The programme combines an academic approach with creative- experimental approach. It is characterised by a fully-integrated design methodology, providing students with solid skills in the contemporary discipline of architectural design and research.

The Master of Architecture programme is organised at both of the faculty's campuses in Brussels and Ghent, though each campus offers a different orientation:

  • Campus Brussels - Architecture: Urban Projects, Urban Cultures
  • Campus Ghent - Architecture: Resilient and Sustainable Strategies

This is an initial Master's programme and can be followed on a full-time or part-time basis. The programme consists out of a minimum of four semesters.

International

The Faculty of Architecture takes its international dimension as the basis for its own quality assessment. It positions itself squarely within the international field of qualitative academic education. The faculty's international activities are extensive and diversified: student mobility and staff exchange on a European and intercontinental level, internationally oriented programmes for incoming students, international workshops and competitions, international research projects, international internships, development cooperation, etc.

The faculty continues to build on its tradition of academic integration of teaching and research to maintain and enhance its standard of quality and international standing.

The faculty works hard to consolidate and enrich its network of cooperative associations with professionals and universities all over the world and strives to leverage this international network for students' benefit. Its international dimension is a strong catalyst for creativity and an added value to students' future professional career.

Objectives 

"The intended academic quality, is the core of the program (architecture, urban planning), i.e. academically based 'professionalism'.

The broadening of the profile focuses on basic disciplines (architecture and urban planning), however without compromising the appropriate focus on the professional profile of the architect (in multiple forms).

In the profile of master, one should obtain extreme concentration and specificity (however, no specialisation).

On the one hand, the master focuses on the content and area-specific level of the bachelor phase, and on the other hand on the acquirement of access to the professional or doctoral field (advanced masters, PhD,...).

The core competences of the master are:

  • the intellectual development and broadening of the competences acquired in the bachelor;
  • a research attitude (for solutions)
  • the specific, disciplinary knowledge (architecture, urban planning)
  • the interdisciplinary skills (also as to recognize the limits of the own scientific discipline).

The master program should guarantee the acquirement of scientific depth. The offered frontier disciplines focus on the current state of research and development within the competence field. The technical qualification to be acquired, focuses on the high quality problem solving of complex tasks.

Curriculum framework campus Ghent: Architecture: Resilient and Sustainable Strategies

At our campus in Ghent, the International Master of Science in Architecture is concerned with the current theory and practice of architecture and sustainability.

The Brundtland report (United Nations, 1987) defines sustainable development as 'development which meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs'. The United Nations in 2005 referred to the 'interdependent and mutually reinforcing pillars' of sustainable development as economic development, social development and environmental protection.

Translating these three pillars for sustainable architecture, they would entail: providing access to high quality and healthy living and working environments for all, finding ways to create socially sustainable environments at different scales and a wise use of natural resources. Technical considerations, together with more conceptual or strategic issues, are dealt with in this two-year program about architecture and sustainability.

Central in the program of the International Master of Science in Architecture is a critical reflection about architecture and its social, cultural or environmental role for society.

Based on a highly interdisciplinary learning process of integrated research and 'research by design', students are expected to determine a theoretical stance on current issues with particular emphasis on how aspects of sustainability, universal design, urban ecology and energy-efficient technologies may contribute to the development of more sustainable human settlements.

Apart from the theoretical courses, the program includes 3 design studios (during one semester) and 1 final master dissertation studio (during one year). Each semester, there is a focus on a specific attitude, related to the main theme of the programme. All studios are organised through a pool of studio groups (Academic Design Offices and Design Studios) where the teaching staff provides a series of specific themes, methods and intervention areas for the students to develop an architectural project:

Themes sem 1

  • social sustainability and architecture
  • modest heritage and suitability
  • urban emergent processes
  • architectural concept, materiality and detail

Themes sem 2 (specific focus on the city of Ghent)

  • architectural concept, materiality and detail
  • limited resources, re-use and integration
  • urban emergent processes

Themes sem 3

  • architectural materiality and detail

Themes sem 4

  • social sustainability and architecture
  • modest heritage and suitability
  • urban emergent processes
  • architectural concept, materiality and detail
  • limited resources, re-use and integration

Career perspectives

Graduates are trained to lead multidisciplinary teams of engineers, interior architects, landscape architects and artists. In addition to working as independent (self-employed) architects, our graduates also work as professionals in government agencies and international design firms. Some graduates go on to roles as researchers serving local or international governance bodies, NGO's or other institutes.



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This course involves learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of historical events and processes that shape societies. Read more
This course involves learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of historical events and processes that shape societies.

Our views of past events shape, and give meaning to the present. The research Master’s in Historical Studies brings history researchers together with literary, art and cultural experts to construct critical histories of both the past, and the present. We recognise that historical enquiry has important transformative potential not just for our ideas about the past but also for present day societies. We also recognise that to validate our interpretations, we have to look beyond our own discipline. That is why our programme has a strong international element and a connection to the other humanities. You’ll gain insight into general humanities methods and theories as well as those specific for historical studies. This will greatly benefit your own research and future contributions to scholarly and social debates.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/hlcs/historical

Europe and its worlds’

The programme welcomes students with interest in all fields of historical research, but our own research primarily focuses on Europe and ‘its worlds’, including how Europe interacts with and differs from the rest of the world. Our research examines the full range of periods from antiquity to the present day. All of our research is performed in collaboration with scientists from other fields within the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS). We are joined in thirteen themed research groups.

Why study Historical Studies at Radboud University?

- There is a strong focus on academic training in historiography methods and theory: you’ll learn how to use current conceptual tools and techniques for organising historical evidence as well as how to sift through and analyse a large number of important primary and secondary sources for your research.
- In your first year, you take several courses with students from the other HLCS research Master’s in Literary Studies, and in Art and Visual Culture. This unique construction will allow you to view your own field from the perspective of the other humanities.
- A personal tutor will guide you throughout the entire programme. He/she will give you advice on how to tailor our programme to best suit your interests, act as a sounding board for your research ideas, and help you make the right connections in the academic arena.
- You’ll receive thorough preparation for eventual PhD research, including the writing of a publishable scholarly article and a proposal for a PhD project.
- This programme strongly encourages you to go abroad for at least a semester. Students can use our connections to other universities (IRUN network) and research institutes to find a place that meet their academic interests.

Our research in this field

Any research done by students of the Master’s in Historical Studies will be supervised by a researcher at the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS) in Nijmegen. HLCS research focuses around the theme Europe and its Worlds and questions whether ‘Europe’ consists of different ‘worlds’ (in terms of culture and social conditions). Research looks at how it is addressed, how it differs from the rest of the world, and how it interacts with other parts of the world. Researchers from a variety of humanities disciplines collaborate in thirteen different thematic groups to explore the spaces, cultural practices, beliefs, texts and ideas related to Europe and its World.

- Thematic research groups
There is a historian in almost all of these thematic groups. Although all the groups could be of interest to a historical researcher, our experience is that the following generate a lot of interest among the Historical Studies students:

- The Making of War. History and Memory of Crisis, War and Recovery
This group focuses on research to critically map, describe, and evaluate the dynamic and comprehensive meaning of World War II to Europe and the world.

- Repertoires of Representation
This group studies the historical variations of political representation, articulation and presentation.

- The Ancient World
This group focuses on Greco-Roman Antiquity and its influence on later Western and Eastern cultures.

- Tourism, Travel and Text
The research of this group looks at the traveller/tourist, the act of travelling itself (the journey), and the travel destination (conservation or even creation of heritage in relation to the destinations of travel).

Master’s thesis topics in Historical Studies:
For their Master’s thesis research, students can work together with researchers from one of the HLCS research groups or choose a topic in a non-related area.
A small sample of thesis topics that you could research in this programme:
- The Pope under Pressure: Papal Propaganda during Times of Severe Crisis 1494-1549
- The Dutch Communist Party and the question of Apartheid. Analysing the CPN’s position in relation to South Africa’s Apartheid and the anti-Apartheid movement in the Netherlands
- Christian Suburbs: Conceptions of Constantinople’s Religious Topopgraphy at its Limits, 330-1204
- Dogmatic democracy. Direct elections for the European parliament debated, 1958-1961
- 'Komt voor de deur op straat'. A spatial analysis of eighteenth-century Amsterdam violence

Academia and beyond

This programme is primarily intended to prepare its students for an academic career, in particular as PhD researchers. About half of our graduates find such a position in the Netherlands or abroad. The other half also often find academic positions with research orientated duties. Examples include:
- Researcher at a cultural or scientific organisation or research centre
- Assistant of a senior researcher
- Teacher at an institution for higher education
- Policy-making official in the fields of culture and science
- Editor in the field of historical or cultural scholarship
- Staff member of a publishing company or and text agency, usually with regard to scientific, historical or cultural journals
- Curator of a cultural heritage institution or in the museological sector
- Consultant for a political party

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/hlcs/historical

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