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Masters Degrees (Islamic Philosophy)

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In the Research Master's specialisation in Philosophy of Religion you will focus on the philosophical reflection on religion in Western thought and contemporary society, as well as exploring the relation between philosophy and religion in Western and other cultural contexts. Read more

Master's specialisation in Philosophy of Religion (Research)

In the Research Master's specialisation in Philosophy of Religion you will focus on the philosophical reflection on religion in Western thought and contemporary society, as well as exploring the relation between philosophy and religion in Western and other cultural contexts.

Information for students of the Research Master

What is the relation between philosophy and religion in Western culture and in other cultural contexts? How does modern and contemporary philosophy reflect on religion? What is meant by a philosophical critique of religion? Which theories of religion have been developed? What is religious experience? The specialisation in Philosophy of Religion explores both classical questions concerning religion, such as the problem of evil, the conceptualization of faith and religious practices, and the issues of religious pluralism and (in)tolerance.

Furthermore, it focuses on contemporary philosophical reflections on religion in a (post)secular society and in a global age. In this specialisation you will study the relation between philosophy and religion in non-Western contexts – for example in the Eastern (Indian) tradition, in the African context or in an Islamic context. The specialisation thus offers a combination of a focus on a Western philosophical body of thought and a comparative global approach to philosophical reflections on religion. You will gain insight in past and present philosophical thought on a conflict-ridden phenomenon.

Key authors include Agamben, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Weber, Freud, De Certeau, Foucault, Gauchet, Said and Taylor.

http://www.ru.nl/english/education/masters/philosophy-of-religion-research/

Career prospects

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess two essential skills, namely the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate. They require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Job positions

This programme has been designed for people with the ambition to do research. Graduates tend to fall into three groups. A majority of the students continue their research within academia by applying for a doctoral programme in the Netherlands or abroad. We take particular pride in the fact that more than 75 percent of our graduates manage to obtain a PhD position within two years of graduating. A second group goes on to teach philosophy at secondary schools. And a third group enter research-related professions outside of education. Our graduates are also represented in journalism, science policy, and politics.

Our approach to this field

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess two essential skills, namely the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate. They require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Our research in this field

What makes this programme special?
This is the only research master in philosophy in the Netherlands that offers a specialisation in philosophy of religion.
The English-taught Research Master's programme in Philosophy is a two-year course that is meant for students of proven ability who wish to prepare for an academic career in philosophy. We offer the following to provide you with the best possible academic background:
- A combination of internationally acclaimed research and excellent teaching
- Research seminars in the history of philosophy, continental philosophy and analytic philosophy
- A broad range of specialisations in Philosophical Anthropology, Metaphysics, Philosophy of mind, Philosophy of language and Logic, Philosophical Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy and the History of Philosophy
- An emphasis on the training of research skills
- A personal supervisor who guides you throughout the programme
- An excellent preparation for post-graduate life by means of the specialised character of the Research Master's thesis, which is composed of a publishable article and of a PhD research proposal
- A high chance of obtaining a PhD position in the Netherlands or abroad
- An international climate.

http://www.ru.nl/english/education/masters/philosophy-of-religion-research/

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This multidisciplinary degree focuses on the politics, religions, cultures and languages of the Middle East and North Africa. Read more

This multidisciplinary degree focuses on the politics, religions, cultures and languages of the Middle East and North Africa. Current political events are covered in depth, alongside historical developments, paths towards democratisation, the role of gender dynamics and the interactions between religious authorities and civil society.

Core modules will introduce you to the complex intersections between Islam, culture and politics across the region. You’ll also choose from a range of optional modules, allowing you to explore issues such as Islam’s encounter with modernity in further depth, or to learn Arabic, Turkish or Persian from beginner level. Through your dissertation, you will carry out independent research on an aspect of the Middle East that particularly engages you.

This is a fascinating and unique opportunity to study and understand a diverse and complex region through a mix of approaches drawn from Area Studies (Middle East and North Africa), Islamic Studies and traditional disciplines including Politics, History and Law.

Specialist resources

At Leeds we have a wealth of resources to help you make the most of your studies. Our archives contain 500 Arabic manuscripts and 10,000 archaeological artefacts, ranging from Pharaonic to early Palestinian eras.

There are also extensive library resources in our world-class Brotherton Library, and our fully equipped Language Centre features digital language labs, audio-video practice booths and Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) to help you develop your language skills.

We are committed to helping you to develop skills in critical reading, academic analysis and the presentation of your ideas and research and offer students dedicated sessions on these themes.

This programme is also available to study part-time.

Course content

Core modules will lay the foundations of the programme, introducing you to research methods and bibliography to prepare you for your own research and exploring the relationship between Islam, culture and politics in the Middle East and North Africa. You’ll then choose from a wide range of optional modules, allowing you to pursue your interests.

You’ll be expected to choose at least some modules in Arabic, Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies, which means you could learn Arabic, Persian or Turkish from scratch, explore Arab drama or media or study popular revolts and democracy.

However, you can also choose from relevant modules offered by the School of Philosophy, Religion and History of Science and the School of Politics and International Studies on topics such as Middle Eastern politics, the links between religion and global development or Muslims and multiculturalism among others.

By the end of the programme in September, you’ll be able to showcase the skills and knowledge you’ve developed when you research and write a dissertation on a topic of your choice.

If you choose to study part-time, you'll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation in Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies 60 credits
  • Debating the Middle East: Islam, Politics and Culture 30 credits
  • Principles and Practices of Research 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

To help you make the most of our tutors’ expertise, we use a range of teaching and learning methods. Most of your modules will involve lectures and weekly seminars where you’ll discuss your reading and research, while language modules will involve intensive practical classes in small groups.

Assessment

Depending on the modules you choose, you may experience different forms of assessment. Usually these will include essays, exams, oral presentations, practical assessments and even seminar participation.

Career opportunities

This programme will equip you with a deeper understanding of Islamic and Middle Eastern culture, as well political awareness and potentially language skills. You’ll also develop more sophisticated skills in areas such as research, analysis, interpretation and communication which are highly valued by employers in a wide range of careers.

Opportunities are available in a range of careers within and beyond the UK with a Middle Eastern or Islamic dimension. These include journalism, teaching, NGOs and the charity sector, cultural organisations, travel and tourism, business and finance, the media, marketing and advertising and the civil, security and diplomatic services.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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The MRes degree is a research programme that includes taught modules. It is intended for anyone wishing to move beyond undergraduate work into research, while it offers the help of taught modules to develop research and related skills. Read more
The MRes degree is a research programme that includes taught modules.

It is intended for anyone wishing to move beyond undergraduate work into research, while it offers the help of taught modules to develop research and related skills.

The programme enables you to explore most aspects of Islamic Studies, including Islamic history and philosophy, and contemporary religious and political thought.

The University of Birmingham is an excellent centre for the study of religion and culture. It not only has a long tradition of specialised research in Islam and its relations with the cultural settings in which Muslims live, but it has also built up good relationships and partnerships with Birmingham's many different communities. This long tradition of scholarship and rich cultural mix makes Birmingham an ideal setting to study Islam in both its historical and contemporary forms.

As a postgraduate in this field, you will have access to one of the largest collections of books on Islam in the country, and also the unique Mingana Collection of Syriac and Arabic manuscripts.

Theology and Religion celebrated excellent Research Assessment Exercise 2014 results, being ranked second in the UK - 51% of research at the University of Birmingham for Theology and Religious Studies was top 4* rated ‘world-leading’, A further 28% was rated 3* ‘internationally excellent’.

About the School of Philosophy, Theology and Religion

The School of Philosophy, Theology and Religion offers a variety of forward-thinking postgraduate study opportunities and is home to a dynamic and friendly community of staff and students, pursuing original research on a wide range of topics.

The School is made up of the Department of Philosophy and the Department of Theology and Religion, both of which were ranked second among other departments in the country in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework exercise.

The Departments are closely linked, providing opportunities for interdisciplinary study, but have also developed links more widely, in order to explore synergies with other disciplines.

The Department of Philosophy has links with the College of Medical and Dental Sciences, the International Development Department, the Birmingham Business School, the School of Psychology and the Birmingham Law School. In addition, the Department includes the Centre for the Study of Global Ethics, which was founded in 2001 to address the practical and theoretical issues raised by globalisation. Global Ethics has natural affinities with Political Science and International Studies, as well as the Institute of Applied Social Studies.

The Department of Theology and Religion has extensive formal and informal links with a wide range of academic and religious institutions across five continents. It has also built up excellent relationships and partnerships with Birmingham’s many different faith communities; this offers an ideal context to study religion in its contemporary as well as its ancient cultural contexts. These relationships, coupled with our large international community of postgraduates, means you will be studying in a diverse, yet well-connected environment.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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The Studies in Philosophy and Religion MRes Distance Learning Programme is scheduled for a duration of one year (full-time) or three years (part-time). Read more
The Studies in Philosophy and Religion MRes Distance Learning Programme is scheduled for a duration of one year (full-time) or three years (part-time). It is tailor-made to suit your interests in consultation with the areas of expertise offered by the School. It is designed also to suit the needs of those who are unable to attend time-tabled sessions at Bangor. It comprises two parts.)

Part 1:

Students will write two essays, each of 5000 words (30 credits each). The essay titles and content will be decided in consultation with your supervisor. However, they will follow any two topics listed below. Students will have full support from a supervisor (via e-mail, telephone, Skype, or any other means that is mutually convenient).

Topic List:

Eastern Philosophy and Religion (Hinduism, Sikhism, Shinto and Confucianism
Islamic Philosophy and ethics
Religious fundamentalism
Political Philosophy (including social theory such as Marx, Weber, Rawls etc.)
Globalization (including, multiculturalism)
The Enlightenment
Democratic theory
The Philosophy of Nietzsche
Psychoanalytic Studies
Jungian Theory
Old Testament
Ethical Theory
Applied Ethics
Religious Experience
Part 2:

Part 2 is a supervised dissertation of 40,000 words (120 credits). The subject of the dissertation will be decided by you in consultation with your supervisor. It is usually expected that the subject will relate to the broad range of topics listed above.

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Research profile. The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) confirmed our continuing role as a leading programme for research and study of Islam, the Middle East, and other related subjects. Read more

Research profile

The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) confirmed our continuing role as a leading programme for research and study of Islam, the Middle East, and other related subjects. Over 70% of research activity in Area Studies (IMES and Asian Studies) was classified as world-leading and internationally excellent.

We offer expert supervision for postgraduate studies in Islam, the Middle East and related subjects. You will be studying in an environment that produces world-leading work, with staff who are conducting research of international significance.

A broad spectrum of research areas is available to you as a postgraduate student. Areas include:

  • cinema and media studies of the Middle East
  • comparative historical studies of Islam and Europe
  • cultural studies of the modern Middle East
  • diaspora studies
  • Islamic history
  • Islamic philosophy
  • modern and classical Arabic literature
  • modern and classical Persian literature
  • modern Middle Eastern history
  • Persian, Arabic and Turkish languages
  • politics of the modern Middle East
  • Shi’ism
  • Sufism
  • translation studies

We also offer opportunities for interdisciplinary study across the University.

Training and support

You will have the opportunity to broaden your research perspectives through our workshops and lectures, plus regular conferences and seminars. Inter-school collaborations are also possible, and we will encourage you to create global networks that will aid both your research and employment opportunities.

The activities of the Centre for the Advanced Study of the Arab World, and the Alwaleed Bin Talal Centre for the Study of Islam in the Contemporary World (one of a global network of six centres) will add to your graduate school experience, and bring you into frequent contact with leading researchers from beyond Edinburgh.

Facilities

Computing facilities and a student common room are available. The division's own library is also located on-site.



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Research profile. In this research area, you can pursue interdisciplinary study of Islamic thought and practice, and of historical, theological, ethical and political encounters between Christianity and Islam. Read more

Research profile

In this research area, you can pursue interdisciplinary study of Islamic thought and practice, and of historical, theological, ethical and political encounters between Christianity and Islam.

Staff research interests focus on Islamic theology (kalam), law (shari‘a and fiqh), and philosophy; Qur’an, Hadith, and Tafsir; Muslim views of Christianity and Judaism; Christian theological engagements with Islam; constructive theology and ethics from a Christian or Muslim perspective; Arab Christianity, classic and contemporary; political Islam; political theology; comparative theology; migration, religion and politics.

You can find out more and identify a potential supervisor by looking at the School’s staff profiles, which give details of research interests and publications, and email addresses.

You are encouraged to contact a potential supervisor to discuss your research project before making a formal application.

At the School of Divinity you will join a community of around 150 research students, drawn from around the world, and from a variety of religious and non-religious backgrounds.

You will study in a stimulating environment. The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranked the School’s research environment at 100% world-leading / internationally excellent, second in the UK on this front in theology and religion. This outstanding result reflects the vibrancy of the School’s research culture.

Masters by Research

If you have academic training in theology or religious studies (or another relevant subject), and would like to develop your interest with a focus on a particular area, the Masters by Research may interest you.

You can study full-time (one year) or part-time (two years). Your pattern of study can either be three supervised research essays followed by a 15,000 word dissertation, or a 30,000 word dissertation. Most students take the ‘research essays + shorter dissertation’ path. All students receive research training.

Training and support

The ethos of the Graduate School is to promote excellence in postgraduate study, within a stimulating and supportive environment. We value equality and diversity in the School community, and an academic culture that is both critical and constructive.

  • At the start of the academic year, you will be invited to Welcome Week, an intensive introduction to study and life in Edinburgh. Some events are especially for international students new to Scotland and the UK, but everything is open to all.
  • In the first weeks, the School provides a general orientation to research skills and to wider opportunities for training and support.
  • From your first days as a PhD or MPhil student, you will work one-to-one with your primary research supervisor.
  • Your progress will be tracked, through regular supervisions and milestone reviews, to ensure that you get the support you need to bring your project to fruition.
  • You will be part of the research seminars in Theology and Ethics, and in Religious Studies, to which visiting speakers are invited and to which postgraduates present work-in-progress.
  • You will be able to follow taught courses that contribute to your interests and research needs, and can also take advantage of opportunities to learn ancient and modern languages.
  • If you are a PhD student, after successful completion of your first year, you will be eligible to apply for tutoring opportunities, to gain teaching experience.

A University review (2015) commended the Graduate School for providing excellent support: responsive to student feedback; proactive in helping new postgraduates to adjust to their studies and to life in Scotland; enthusiastic and practical in promoting career development. The postgraduate student committee works closely with the School to make the research student experience the best it can be.

Facilities

The School of Divinity, one of the largest centres for the study of religion in the United Kingdom, is located in the historic setting of New College, close to Edinburgh Castle and overlooking Princes Street.

Resources for research are excellent. You can draw on the outstanding holdings of New College Library, the University of Edinburgh’s main library, and the nearby National Library of Scotland. New College Library has one of the largest theology collections in the UK, with more than a quarter of a million items and a large and rich manuscript collection. The University library exceeds 2.25 million volumes. The National Library of Scotland – a ‘legal deposit’ library like the British Library in London and the university libraries of Oxford and Cambridge – is just around the corner.

The School provides an extensive programme of weekly research seminars and special guest lectures. In addition, three research centres provide a special focus for activity: the Centre for the Study of Christian Origins; the Centre for Theology and Public Issues; the Centre for the Study of World Christianity.

You will have access to excellent study facilities, dedicated to postgraduates. PhD and MPhil students have access 24/7, and can request an allocated desk. Masters by Research students have shared study space. All areas have printing/scanning and computer facilities. The main postgraduate study wing has a kitchen. New College has an on-site cafe that is open during term time.



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The Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations offers graduate programs leading to the Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy in two fields. Read more
The Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations offers graduate programs leading to the Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy in two fields:
-Ancient Near Eastern Studies
-Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies

Courses are offered and faculty conduct research in the following areas: Egyptology, including archaeology, language, history, and religion; Mesopotamia and the Near East, including archaeology and Assyriology; Syro-Palestinian archaeology; Hebrew and Judaic studies, including Biblical and Rabbinic Hebrew, law, history, religion, and modern Hebrew literature; Aramaic (Ancient, Biblical, Targumic, and Talmudic Aramaic) and Syriac studies, including language, history, religion; Arabic studies; Islamic studies; history of the Islamic world and the modern Middle East; Islamic art; Persian studies; and Turkish studies, including Ottoman language and history.

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The Warburg Institute MA in Cultural and Intellectual History aims to equip students for interdisciplinary research in Medieval and Renaissance studies and in the reception of the classical tradition. Read more
The Warburg Institute MA in Cultural and Intellectual History aims to equip students for interdisciplinary research in Medieval and Renaissance studies and in the reception of the classical tradition. Students will become part of an international community of scholars, working in a world-famous library. They will broaden their range of knowledge to include the historically informed interpretation of images and texts, art history, philosophy, history of science, literature, and the impact of religion on society. Students will improve their knowledge of Latin, French and Italian and will acquire the library and archival skills essential for research on primary texts.

This twelve-month, full-time course is intended as an introduction to the principal elements of the classical tradition and to interdisciplinary research in cultural and intellectual history from the late Middle Ages to the early modern period. Although it is a qualification in its own right, the MA is also designed to provide training for further research at doctoral level. It is taught through classes and supervision by members of the academic staff of the Institute and by outside teachers. The teaching staff are leading professors and academics in their field who have published widely. Research strengths include: the transmission of Arabic science and philosophy to Western Europe; the later influence of classical philosophy (Aristotelianism, Platonism, Epicureanism and Stoicism); and religious nonconformism in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Europe. For further details on the research interests of teaching staff please visit the Warburg website:
http://www.warburg.sas.ac.uk/home/staff-contacts/academic-staff

Structure

Core courses (courses may vary from year to year)

Iconology: Mythological painting, allegorical figures, historical subjects, altarpiece - Dr Paul Taylor
Religion and Society - Dr Alessandro Scafi
Optional Courses (courses may vary from year to year)

Artistic Intentions 1400 - 1700 - Dr Paul Taylor
Islamic Authorities and Arabic Elements in the Renaissance – Professor Charles Burnett
Music in the Later Middle Ages and the Renaissance - Professor Charles Burnett
New Worlds, Ancient Texts: Renaissance Intellectual History and the Discovery of the Americas - Dr Philipp Nothaft
Renaissance Philosophy – Dr Guido Giglioni
Renaissance Art Literature – Dr François Quiviger
Renaissance Material Culture – Dr Rembrandt Duits and Dr François Quiviger
Sin and Sanctity in the Reformation – Professor Alastair Hamilton
All students take two compulsory core courses and two optional subjects. The core courses are taught in the first term and the optional subjects in the second term and the options available vary from year to year. In addition, there is a regular series of classes throughout the three terms on Techniques of Scholarship. Subjects dealt with include: description of manuscripts; palaeography; printing in the 15th and 16th centuries; editing a text; preparation of dissertations and photographic images. Some of these classes are held outside the Institute in locations such as the British Library or the Wellcome Library.
Reading classes in Latin, Italian and French are provided and are offered to all students. Students are also encouraged to attend the Director’s weekly seminar on Work in Progress and any of the other regular seminars held in the Institute that may be of interest to them. These at present include History of Art and Maps and Society. The third term and summer are spent in researching and writing a dissertation, under the guidance of a supervisor from the academic staff.

Assessment

The normal format for classes is a small weekly seminar, in which students usually discuss texts in their original languages. In most courses, students also give short presentations of their own research, which are not assessed. The emphasis is on helping students to acquire the skills necessary to interpret philosophical, literary and historical documents as well as works of art. Each compulsory or optional module will be assessed by means of a 4,000 word essay to be submitted on the first day of the term following that in which the module was taught. A dissertation of 18,000 – 20,000 words, on a topic agreed by the student and supervisor, has to be submitted by 30 September. The course is examined on these five pieces of written work, and on a written translation examination paper in the third term. Students are allocated a course tutor and, in addition, are encouraged to discuss their work with other members of the academic staff. Because of our relatively small cohort, students have unusually frequent contact, formal and informal, with their teachers.

Mode of study

12 months full-time only.

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Pathways. - MSc Financial Management. - MSc Financial Management (Change Management). - MSc Financial Management (Islamic Finance). Read more

Course Overview

Pathways:
- MSc Financial Management
- MSc Financial Management (Change Management)
- MSc Financial Management (Islamic Finance)
- MSc Financial Management (Strategic Management)
- MSc Financial Management (International Finance)
- MSc Financial Management (Project Management)

The popular MSc Financial Management has recently been reviewed and re-validated. The driving force behind many of the changes and improvements were comments of previous students. Students now have a far broader range of option modules (and pathways) enabling them to design a Master’s level programme that aligns more clearly with their career ambitions.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/management/courses/Pages/Financial-Management---MSc-.aspx

Course Content

The programme is based around;

4 core taught modules:
- Capital Markets & Derivatives
- Corporate Finance & Risk
- Management of Finance
- Quantitative Finance

2 skills modules:
- Research Methods
- Professional Development and Practice in Business and Management​

2 option modules:
- Behavioural Finance
- Crisis, Risk & Strategic Change Management
- Contemporary Issues in Finance , Accounting & Economics
- Delivering Successful Projects
- Finance of International Business
- Global Business Strategy
- Industrial Work Experience
- International Management: People and Operations
- International Politics
- Islamic Investment Banking Management
- Managing People and Markets across Cultures
- Principles of Islamic Finance
- Project Management Theory & Practice

A 12,000 word dissertation.

Learning & Teaching

The teaching philosophy of this programme is to deliver wherever possible each module with a multi-disciplinary teaching team, providing a more effective framework to encourage and promote an integrated understanding of the field. The role of the module leader will be to co-ordinate, and in effect oversee the delivery of content by the modular team, ensuring that learning outcomes are met.

Module teaching teams will be drawn from the course teaching team. This will not only enhance student learning but provide teaching staff with the opportunity to develop their own knowledge and understanding of other business and management disciplines. It is hoped that after a short period of time such an approach to teaching will shape and direct content in a complementary and mutually reinforcing way, allowing for the development of multi-disciplinary assignments and projects.

Assessment

The assessments for this programme are many and varied as would be expected with 6 core modules and 13 options. Within the cores you will have 3 three hour examinations, essays, reflective logs and an assessed role play exercise.

Employability & Careers

The demand for highly skilled and knowledgeable finance professionals shows no signs of abating over the coming years – and in the view of some may well increase. This demand has been instrumental in designing this flexible and challenging suite of programmes. In order to maximise employability the programme learning outcomes are geared towards supplying students with the knowledge, skills and understanding that the finance industry requires. A key component of this is our new module Professional Development and Practice in Business and Management

The programme seeks to meet individual and industry needs by developing students with higher-level cognitive skills and abilities who also possess an excellent practical understanding of "how to apply" rather than just "why it happens".

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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How did the ancient Romans view religious-political differences? How did ancient Jewish, Christian, and Muslim authorities use authoritative texts? What potential for pluralism exists in modern monotheisms and secularisms?. Read more
How did the ancient Romans view religious-political differences? How did ancient Jewish, Christian, and Muslim authorities use authoritative texts? What potential for pluralism exists in modern monotheisms and secularisms?

Tension between group solidarity and productive relations with ' others' has been part of human history for as long as evidence exists. In Europe it has played out most enduringly in relations among the monotheistic religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Today, in the face of mass migration from Muslim regions, questions of political identity and belonging remain bound up with religious affiliation. This one-year degree programme focuses on relations between Jews, Christians and Muslims in the antique world and how these relations have formed our modern society. We will explore concepts as religious pluralism, politics, and their many interfaces globally in particular.

In this track within the Master's Programme in Theology & Religious Studies, you will:
* examine the literary sources of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam in a historically informed way in order to bring critical perspectives to modern interpretations;
* identify continuing issues in Jewish, Christian, and Islamic self-definition, toleration of difference, and exclusionary or conversionist tendencies;
* map a range of ancient possibilities for coexistence or conviviality and their opposites under changing conditions.

Why Groningen?

• rated best Master's programme in Theology & Religious Studies in the Netherlands
• top 100 university
• integrated approach of religious pluralism, politics, and their many global interfaces
• focus on historical context of modern societies
• taught by internationally recognized experts in the field
• opportunity to pursue your own research interests

Job perspectives

As a graduate you can become an adviser and policymaker on interreligious issues and multicultural society. You may work in cultural organisations and companies in the public sector. In addition, you can work in the media. You can become a teacher of religion or philosophy. If you want to pursue an academic career, you can follow this track as a specialization within the research Master's programme.

Job examples

• Consulting & Policy
You are able to provide well-founded advice on interreligious issues and multicultural society. You can use this expertise in an advisory position at cultural organizations, in companies or in the public sector. Your knowledge equips you for policymaking positions in this field.

• Media & Journalism
The current debate often refers to perceived historical realities. Your expertise in the formative periods of Judaism, Christianity and Islam enables you to ask critical questions concerning modern-day claims about these religious traditions. You can use your knowledge and skills as an editor at a publishing company, broadcasting company, newspaper or news and current affairs magazine. You could also work as a freelancer.

• Education
Once you have completed this Master's programme you will have enough knowledge of the subject to become a secondary school teacher in the subject of Religious Studies and Philosophy or Social Studies. You could also opt for a position in higher vocational education, for example teaching Theology at a university of applied sciences. As you also need didactic skills as a teacher, it is advisable to do a Master's in Education after you have completed your regular Master's programme.

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The MA in Art History, Curatorship and Renaissance Culture is offered by the Warburg Institute in collaboration with the National Gallery, London. Read more
The MA in Art History, Curatorship and Renaissance Culture is offered by the Warburg Institute in collaboration with the National Gallery, London. The purpose of the programme is to provide high level linguistic, archive and research skills for a new generation of academic art historians and museum curators. The art historical and scholarly traditions of the Warburg Institute are linked to the practical experience and skills of the National Gallery to provide an academic programme which will equip students either as academic art historians with serious insight into the behind the scenes working of a great museum or as curators with the research skills necessary for high-level museum work.

This twelve-month, full-time programme provides an introduction to:

Museum knowledge, which covers all aspects of curatorship including the technical examination of paintings, connoisseurship, materials and conservation, attribution, provenance and issues relating to display.
Art history and Renaissance culture to increase students’ understanding of methods of analysing the subjects of works of art and their knowledge of Renaissance art works and the conditions in which they were commissioned, produced and enjoyed.
Current scholarship and professional practice in these areas as well as new and emerging areas of research and scholarship.
The programme will be taught through classes and supervision by members of the academic staff of the Warburg Institute and by National Gallery curatorial and archival experts. The teaching staff of the Warburg Institute are leading professors and academics in their field who have published widely and are involved with research related to the topics they teach.

Structure

All students will take three core modules and two optional modules. The core modules include language and paleography classes, which will be selected following an individual language audit for each student, and are spread over two terms. The optional subjects will vary from year to year and students must select at least one in an art historical field.

Core courses:

Art History – Iconology – Dr Paul Taylor
Language, Paleographical and Archive Skills – Various tutors for language and palaeography classes; Dr Claudia Wedepohl (The Warburg Institute) and Mr Alan Crookham (National Gallery) for archive skills
Curatorship in the National Gallery – Curatorial, conservation and scientific staff of the National Gallery, including Dr Ashok Roy, Dr Susanne Avery-Quash, Mr Larry Keith and Ms Rachel Billinge
Optional courses (two to be chosen):

Artistic Intentions 1400 - 1700 – Dr Paul Taylor
Islamic Authorities and Arabic Elements in the Renaissance – Professor Charles Burnett
Music in the Later Middle Ages and the Renaissance - Professor Charles Burnett
New Worlds, Ancient Texts: Renaissance Intellectual History and the Discovery of the Americas - Dr Philipp Nothaft
Renaissance Art Literature – Dr François Quiviger
Renaissance Philosophy – Dr Guido Giglioni
Renaissance Material Culture – Dr Rembrandt Duits and Dr François Quiviger
Sin and Sanctity in the Reformation – Professor Alastair Hamilton

Students will also be encouraged to attend the Director’s weekly seminar on Work in Progress and any of the other regular seminars held in the Institute that may be of interest to them. These at present include History of Art and Maps and Society. The third term and summer will be spent in researching and writing a dissertation, under the guidance of a supervisor from the academic staff of the Warburg Institute or a member of staff from the National Gallery.

Assessment

The usual format for classes is a weekly seminar. All students are required to submit three essays of 4,000 words, one at the beginning of the second term and the remaining two at the beginning of the third term. A dissertation of 15,000 words, on a topic agreed by the student and supervisor, has to be submitted by 30 September. The course is examined on these four pieces of written work, a catalogue entry (submitted at the end of the first term), and examinations in language, paleographical and archive skills. Students are allocated a course tutor and, in addition, are encouraged to discuss their work with other members of the staff at the Warburg Institute and the National Gallery. Because of the small numbers involved (places are limited to 12 per year), students have unusually frequent contact, formal and informal, with their teachers.

Mode of study

12 months full-time only.

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INTRODUCTION. The programme is designed for those aspiring to hold positions requiring economic analyses and a high level of economic proficiency in business, industry and government. Read more
INTRODUCTION

The programme is designed for those aspiring to hold positions requiring economic analyses and a high level of economic proficiency in business, industry and government. The programme provides its graduates with broad knowledge in a wide range of areas in economics. Students are also trained in conducting research to enhance their report writing and problem solving skills in areas related to economics necessary to be effective economic analysts.



ENTRY REQUIREMENT

A Bachelor degree with a minimum of CGPA 3.0 or equivalent and sufficient knowledge in the field of economics or in quantitative oriented fields.



PROGRAMME STRUCTURE



6 CORE COURSES (30 Credits)

–Philosophy and Methodology of Research
–Research Project
–Advanced Microeconomics
–The Malaysian Economy
–Applied Econometrics


ANY 4 OPTIONAL COURSES (12 Credits)

–Economic Development and Planning
–Applied Macroeconomics
–Money and Finance in Economic Development
–Public Economics
–International Trade and Environment
–Islamic Banking and Finance
–Issues in Economic Analysis
–Advanced International Trade
–Urban Economics
–Social Protection
–Time Series Analysis
–Applied Financial Econometrics
–Poverty and Inequality
–Institutions, Industrial Development and Economic Growth


PROGRAMME DURATION

Minimum: 2 Semesters

Maximum: 8 Semesters



LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS (For International Applicants)

Minimum TOEFL score of 550 or;

Minimum IELTS overall band score of 5.5



FEES STRUCTURE

AVERAGE FEES*

MALAYSIAN

RM 14,130.00*

INTERNATIONAL

RM 27,867.50*

*Subject to change

Facilities

The faculty is equipped with state-of-the-art facilities such as two computer teaching laboratories equipped with LCD and statistical software with a total capacity for 105 students, a student computer laboratory for 51 students and five lecture theatres.

In addition, the beautiful new building for postgraduate studies, houses 15 seminar rooms, a computer laboratory with a capacity for 54 computer workstations, 2 conference halls with a capacity of 100 persons each and 3 wireless LAN coverage (WiFi) zones within the faculty.

Indeed, FEA is one of the few premier institutions that can provide such quality, in terms of facilities.

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The Master of Development Studies equips students with knowledge and tools for understanding and researching today’s development issues. Read more
The Master of Development Studies equips students with knowledge and tools for understanding and researching today’s development issues. The coursework of this programme lays the foundation for studying development in multidisciplinary perspective, covering theoretical and practical aspects. We address contemporary challenges arising from globalization, and transition students to the dissertation portion of the program through training in research methodology. Elective courses focus on major issues in development: poverty and inequality, industrialization, the role of institutions, sustainable development, and entrepreneurship.

INTRODUCTION

The Master of Development Studies is a multidisciplinary programme that sets to provide solid grounding in development from theoretical, conceptual, historical and contemporary perspectives, as well as a good grasp of empirical research, policy analysis, and development in practice particularly applicable to development scholars, practitioners and policymakers. The programme exposes students to development theories and a wide range of topics related to development. The students are also trained to conduct research in development studies.



ENTRY REQUIREMENT

A Bachelor degree with a minimum of CGPA 3.0 or equivalent and sufficient knowledge of development studies or relevant field.



PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

CORE COURSES (24 Credits)

- Philosophy and Methodology of Research

- Research Project

- Development Theory and Practice

- Globalization and Development



OPTIONAL COURSES (A+B)



(A) AT LEAST 3 OPTIONAL COURSES (9 Credits)

- Poverty and Inequality

- Sustainable Development and Environmental Management

- Entrepreneurship and Development

- Institutions, Industrial Development and Economic Growth

- Economics of Education

- Gender and Development Issues



(B) NOT MORE THAN 3 OPTIONAL COURSES (9 Credits)

- The Malaysian Economy

- Economic Development and Planning

- Public Economics

- Islamic Banking and Finance

- Public Policy Analysis

- Social Policy and Development

- Planning Community and Development



PROGRAMME DURATION

Minimum: 2 Semesters

Maximum: 8 Semesters



LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS (For International Applicants)

Minimum TOEFL score of 550 or;

Minimum IELTS overall band score of 5.5



FEES STRUCTURE

AVERAGE FEES*

MALAYSIAN

RM 14,130.00*

INTERNATIONAL

RM 27,867.50*

*Subject to change

Facilities

The faculty is equipped with state-of-the-art facilities such as two computer teaching laboratories equipped with LCD and statistical software with a total capacity for 105 students, a student computer laboratory for 51 students and five lecture theatres.

In addition, the beautiful new building for postgraduate studies, houses 15 seminar rooms, a computer laboratory with a capacity for 54 computer workstations, 2 conference halls with a capacity of 100 persons each and 3 wireless LAN coverage (WiFi) zones within the faculty.

Indeed, FEA is one of the few premier institutions that can provide such quality, in terms of facilities.

Career Opportunity

- Government agencies ( federal, state, local and others)
- International development agencies
- Non-governmental organizations (NGOs)
- Non-profit organizations
- Educational services (universities, colleges and others)
- Policy and research bodies

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The Religious Studies graduate program offers courses of instruction leading to both the Master of Arts (M.A.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.). Read more

Program Overview

The Religious Studies graduate program offers courses of instruction leading to both the Master of Arts (M.A.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.). Studies leading to the M.A. degree are offered in the following areas of concentration: Biblical Studies; Christian Thought and Institutions; History of Religions; Islamic Studies; and Judaic Studies.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Arts
- Specialization: Religious Studies
- Subject: Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Options
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts

Modern Language Requirements

Students are required to demonstrate reading knowledge of an approved modern language (usually French, German or Italian). This requirement must be met before the end of the first year of study. Any courses taken to satisfy this requirement do not count towards the 30 credits required for the program.

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The MA by Research programme requires you to prepare a dissertation of up to 40,000 words on a topic of your choice, for which an academic staff member will provide expert supervision. Read more
The MA by Research programme requires you to prepare a dissertation of up to 40,000 words on a topic of your choice, for which an academic staff member will provide expert supervision.

The PhD, the most advanced research degree, leads to a dissertation of up to 80,000 words on a subject of your choice and under the expert supervision of an academic member of staff.

Our main areas of research expertise are in, Biblical studies, Christian theology, Islamic studies, Jewish and Holocaust studies, Pentecostal and Charismatic studies and Religion and society.

Distance learning

You can study an MA by Research or PhD programme on campus or by distance learning. Please note that if you are studying with us by distance learning, the programme includes a fully-funded annual visit to campus for each full year of your programme (every two years for part-time students).

For more information on distance learning including answers to frequently asked questions, student experiences and funding opportunities, please see our distance learning website.

At Birmingham you also have the option of studying languages, free of charge. Almost no other UK University offers you the opportunity to learn the intense graduate academic language skills which you may need to pursue your research.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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