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Masters Degrees (Islamic Art)

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The Islamic Middle East has given rise to an impressive material culture that continues in the present. This programme covers an area stretching from Islamic Spain through the Arab countries, Turkey, Iran and Central Asia in diverse historical periods. Read more
The Islamic Middle East has given rise to an impressive material culture that continues in the present. This programme covers an area stretching from Islamic Spain through the Arab countries, Turkey, Iran and Central Asia in diverse historical periods. It offers students an unmatched opportunity to study particular regions or categories of art, including Fatimid art; the architecture and urbanism of Morocco; Arab, Persian and Turkish painting; the calligraphy and illumination of the Qur'an; Mamluk art and architecture; the arts and architecture of the Ottomans in Turkey and the Balkans; and the material culture of western Iran. Archaeological issues of the Islamic Middle East are also considered.

In addition, the degree engages with trans-regional topics that extend beyond the Middle East, such as cultural and artistic relationships between the Islamic Middle East and Europe.

Students can decide to study complementary courses on non-Islamic traditions of the Middle East and/or the Islamic traditions of other regions.

The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in the art history and archaeology of the Islamic Middle East, whose ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students working in other related fields, such as Music, Film and Media in the Middle East and the wider Islamic world. They can also select from courses in other departments, taking advantage of SOAS’s unrivalled expertise in the languages, history, religions and cultures of the Middle East.

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/maaaime/

Structure

Students must complete three units (or 0.5 unit equivalent) of taught MA modules in addition to the compulsory dissertation. A minimum of two units (or equivalent) must be selected from the MA modules in the History of Art and Archaeology department related to History of Art and Architecture of the Islamic Middle East. Up to one unit (or equivalent) may be selected from the other MA modules in the department or from MA options offered by other SOAS departments. Students must complete the Dissertation in History of Art and Architecture of the Islamic Middle East (15PARC997).

Students may be allowed to study for the MA on a part-time basis. The part-time MA may be taken over two years, in which case the student takes two taught modules in the first year, and one taught module and the dissertation in the second. Alternatively, it can be taken over three years, in which case the student takes one taught module in each year. The dissertation can be written in any year, but it is strongly recommended that this be undertaken in the final year of the programme. It must be submitted in September of the year in which the student registers for it.

Teaching

Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory.

In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London.

Assessment

For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including:

Asia House
Bonhams
British Museum
Christie's Hong Kong
Design Museum
Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum
Hong Kong Museum Of Art
India Foundation For The Arts
Museum of East Asian Art
National Gallery National Museum of Singapore
People Projects Culture & Change
Schoeni Art Gallery
Sotheby's
Taiwan Embassy
The Alliance for Global Education
The British Embassy
The Chester Beatty Library
The National Museum Of Korea
The Royal Collection

Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include:

Manager of Communications
Culture Programme Coordinator
Research Assistant
Social Anthropology Lecturer
Specialist - Indian Art
Architect
Art Historian
Development Specialist
Archivist
Gallery Director Innovation Programmes Learning Manager
Creative Director
Organisational Consultant
Travel writer
Art Collector
Chinese Painting Specialist
Professor of Silk Road History
Rights and Reproductions Officer
Public Education Coordinator
Senior Curator of Photographs

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This postgraduate programme offers a unique opportunity to study the arts of Asia and the Islamic world with lectures by leading scholars in the field. Read more
This postgraduate programme offers a unique opportunity to study the arts of Asia and the Islamic world with lectures by leading scholars in the field.

The course will provide an object-based learning experience through direct access to the reserved collections of the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A) and the British Museum.

The lecture programme is supported by field trips to museums, galleries and private collections. The course is designed to train museum curators or serious collectors. It will also prepare students for work in a variety of professions in the art and the museum world and provides a pathway to the master’s degree for those with no background in the subject.

Museums and curators in Asia, and museums specialising in non-Western collections elsewhere, will find it an attractive, object-focused training opportunity for enhancing curatorial skills in the study, display and cataloguing of art objects in a fully-resourced academic environment.

Students can choose one or more in combination of the three-month modules on offer annually, which are listed below. Those who successfully complete a single module will be awarded a certificate. Students successfully completing any three of the modules below will be awarded a SOAS (University of London) accredited Postgraduate Diploma in Asian Art.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/dipasart/

The modules offered are:

- Indian Art (September - December)
- Chinese Art (January – March)
- Islamic Art (April - July)
- Japanese & Korean Art (April- July; alternate years)
- Southeast Asian Art (April – July; alternate years)

Aims

- To develop a sound visual method for analysing and documenting works of art;
- To develop visual skills through the direct examination of objects;
- To develop research skills using primary and secondary sources;
- To develop writing and communication skills: to formulate and structure an academic viewpoint and to use visual analysis to support and document this argument;
- To develop in students an understanding of certain museum skills such as the cataloguing of objects; the selection of objects for an exhibition, and putting material objects in their cultural context.

Structure

Issues and themes dealt with in weekly lectures are developed further through frequent visits to museum collections, revision sessions and seminars. Lectures are given by museum curators, university lecturers and international experts and are (generally from 10:00 to 15:30) on three and a half days a week. The weekly review sessions with course tutors involve revision, slide tests and seminars. Students have regular access to the study of objects in the reserve collections at the British Museum, the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A) and guided visits to other museums. Field trips and formal and informal tutorials are also part of the programme.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/

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IN BRIEF. Gain the essential skills required to work in Islamic banking, one of the fastest-growing sectors in the financial world. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Gain the essential skills required to work in Islamic banking, one of the fastest-growing sectors in the financial world
  • Strengthen your knowledge with modules focused on banking, finance and Islamic banking
  • Put management theory into real practice with an exciting Business Innovation Project
  • Part-time study option
  • Overseas study available
  • Work/industrial placement opportunity
  • International students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

You will gain the necessary skills and knowledge required to work in this growing and sophisticated banking and finance sector.

On completion of your programme you will be able to effectively perform relevant banking and finance tasks, including specific requirements of Islamic banking, financial products and services.

You will also learn to be effective, working independently and as part of a team, while critically evaluating and developing good practice in the planning and management of general, commercial and Islamic banking and financial products and services.

COURSE DETAILS

The programme is block delivered and there are six entry points per year.

This course has been designed to provide you with necessary skills and in-depth knowledge required to work in this growing and sophisticated Islamic banking and finance sector. Specifically the course will:

  • Provide a rigorous, academically challenging and vocationally relevant programme of postgraduate study, and provide graduates with the appropriate advanced level skills and knowledge which will enable them to contribute to the needs of the growing and sophisticated Islamic banking and finance sector.
  • Enable graduates to apply general banking requirements and the specific requirements in providing Islamic Banking and Finance products and services.
  • Equip graduates with advanced level skills and understanding necessary to effectively and efficiently perform tasks relevant to the organisation or organisations involved with Islamic banking and finance services.
  • Develop the intellectual ability to work effectively in teams and independently, to evaluate critically, think creatively and communicate effectively with respect to issues in general, commercial and Islamic banking and finance; and to recognize good practice in the analysis, planning and management of general, commercial and Islamic banking and finance products and services.
  • Develop an advanced level understanding of research methods and an effective capability of applying advanced Islamic banking and finance concepts and techniques to a wide range of general, commercial and Islamic banking and finance problems.

On successful completion of the course students will be able to:

  • Develop knowledge and critical understanding of essential components of Islamic finance theory and associated current research, and develop the capability of applying both general and Islamic financial concepts and principles to the analysis of corporate circumstances;
  • Develop the capability of critical evaluation of the impact of market behaviour on bank performance and organisational behaviour with reference to Islamic bank products and services.
  • Synthesise and critically evaluate recent and current literature on a wide range of MSc Investment and Finance theories and issues in order to develop and apply conceptual frameworks.
  • Develop and apply a strategy for the collection, analysis, critical evaluation and interpretation of data.
  • Work with others in making effective strategic and operational decisions related to the management of an enterprise in a globally competitive, diverse and dynamic environment.

TEACHING

The course is delivered in four blocks of three day intensive study periods, followed by independent study and online support through the University’s virtual learning environment, Blackboard. Each module is taken and assessed over a six week block. Teaching is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials, using a wide range of learning activities.

ASSESSMENT

Over the duration of your course a range of assessment techniques will be used.

Types of assessment include:

  • Essays
  • Assignments
  • Exams
  • Multiple choice tests
  • Online tests
  • Group reports
  • Portfolio work

The weighting between exams and coursework varies between modules and years, but exams still play a major role.

FACILITIES

Salford Business School is located at the heart of the University’s Peel campus in the newly refurbished Lady Hale Building, and the Chapman Building, offering state-of-the-art facilities for the Business School’s student learning community and just minutes from Manchester city centre. Chapman is a stylish modern space with six lecture theatres equipped with the very latest technology and large screen displays, a series of communal learning and breakout spaces, plus a Fairtrade café with panoramic views across the campus.

Lady Hale is the home to all dedicated business school student support including the school office, an employability hub, a base for the Business School society, and several open study spaces.

All University of Salford students also have access to the MediaCityUK campus including its study facilities.  MediaCityUK is home to major BBC and ITV departments and over 80 businesses across the creative and digital sectors.  It is recognised as one of the most innovative developments in Britain and is a vibrant place in which to live, work, socialise and study.



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The MA in Art History, Curatorship and Renaissance Culture is offered by the Warburg Institute in collaboration with the National Gallery, London. Read more
The MA in Art History, Curatorship and Renaissance Culture is offered by the Warburg Institute in collaboration with the National Gallery, London. The purpose of the programme is to provide high level linguistic, archive and research skills for a new generation of academic art historians and museum curators. The art historical and scholarly traditions of the Warburg Institute are linked to the practical experience and skills of the National Gallery to provide an academic programme which will equip students either as academic art historians with serious insight into the behind the scenes working of a great museum or as curators with the research skills necessary for high-level museum work.

This twelve-month, full-time programme provides an introduction to:

Museum knowledge, which covers all aspects of curatorship including the technical examination of paintings, connoisseurship, materials and conservation, attribution, provenance and issues relating to display.
Art history and Renaissance culture to increase students’ understanding of methods of analysing the subjects of works of art and their knowledge of Renaissance art works and the conditions in which they were commissioned, produced and enjoyed.
Current scholarship and professional practice in these areas as well as new and emerging areas of research and scholarship.
The programme will be taught through classes and supervision by members of the academic staff of the Warburg Institute and by National Gallery curatorial and archival experts. The teaching staff of the Warburg Institute are leading professors and academics in their field who have published widely and are involved with research related to the topics they teach.

Structure

All students will take three core modules and two optional modules. The core modules include language and paleography classes, which will be selected following an individual language audit for each student, and are spread over two terms. The optional subjects will vary from year to year and students must select at least one in an art historical field.

Core courses:

Art History – Iconology – Dr Paul Taylor
Language, Paleographical and Archive Skills – Various tutors for language and palaeography classes; Dr Claudia Wedepohl (The Warburg Institute) and Mr Alan Crookham (National Gallery) for archive skills
Curatorship in the National Gallery – Curatorial, conservation and scientific staff of the National Gallery, including Dr Ashok Roy, Dr Susanne Avery-Quash, Mr Larry Keith and Ms Rachel Billinge
Optional courses (two to be chosen):

Artistic Intentions 1400 - 1700 – Dr Paul Taylor
Islamic Authorities and Arabic Elements in the Renaissance – Professor Charles Burnett
Music in the Later Middle Ages and the Renaissance - Professor Charles Burnett
New Worlds, Ancient Texts: Renaissance Intellectual History and the Discovery of the Americas - Dr Philipp Nothaft
Renaissance Art Literature – Dr François Quiviger
Renaissance Philosophy – Dr Guido Giglioni
Renaissance Material Culture – Dr Rembrandt Duits and Dr François Quiviger
Sin and Sanctity in the Reformation – Professor Alastair Hamilton

Students will also be encouraged to attend the Director’s weekly seminar on Work in Progress and any of the other regular seminars held in the Institute that may be of interest to them. These at present include History of Art and Maps and Society. The third term and summer will be spent in researching and writing a dissertation, under the guidance of a supervisor from the academic staff of the Warburg Institute or a member of staff from the National Gallery.

Assessment

The usual format for classes is a weekly seminar. All students are required to submit three essays of 4,000 words, one at the beginning of the second term and the remaining two at the beginning of the third term. A dissertation of 15,000 words, on a topic agreed by the student and supervisor, has to be submitted by 30 September. The course is examined on these four pieces of written work, a catalogue entry (submitted at the end of the first term), and examinations in language, paleographical and archive skills. Students are allocated a course tutor and, in addition, are encouraged to discuss their work with other members of the staff at the Warburg Institute and the National Gallery. Because of the small numbers involved (places are limited to 12 per year), students have unusually frequent contact, formal and informal, with their teachers.

Mode of study

12 months full-time only.

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This MA programme studies many aspects of the world of Islam, from its early development to its modern trends. Its primary objective is to approach the study of Islam through a variety of disciplines, cultural contexts and periods. Read more
This MA programme studies many aspects of the world of Islam, from its early development to its modern trends. Its primary objective is to approach the study of Islam through a variety of disciplines, cultural contexts and periods. The programme examines Islamic tradition, law and art, as well as the place of Islam in modern politics and alongside other religions. The degree may be considered as a preparation for research or as a way of completing a liberal education.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/maislsoccult/

Structure

Candidates will take three taught courses (one major and two minor) and write a dissertation of 10,000 words. The major must be a course from List A, each of which treats subjects of general interest throughout the Islamic world.

The MA Islamic Societies and Cultures is an interdisciplinary (multi-subject) degree. Therefore applicants must choose their Major in a subject different from their Minors. Both Minors may be in the same subject, but not the same subject as the Major. Students may not take more than one language course, and may not take a language course as their Major. The subjects available are: Development Studies, Economics, Gender Studies, History, History of Art/Archaeology, Islamic Studies, Language, Law, Music and Politics. '

All courses will be taught subject to availability. Courses in relevant languages can be taken as an integral part of the MA where appropriate. This Masters degree may be considered either as a preparation for research or as a way of completing a liberal education.

When applying, applicants are asked to specify their preferred major, and asked to give alternative choices. Once enrolled, students have one week to finalise their choice of subjects and have the opportunity of sampling a variety of subjects through attending lectures etc.

MA Islamic Societies and Cultures - Programme Specification 2013/14 (msword; 92kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/maislsoccult/file91420.doc

Teaching & Learning

Students take three taught courses (one major and two minor) and write a dissertation of 10,000 words. Each course has its own series of classes and seminars, and in addition students attend general lectures and seminars organised by the Middle East Centre. In most courses there is one two-hour class each week. This may be an informal lecture followed by a discussion or a student presentation. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take. The dissertation is on an approved topic linked to one of the taught courses. For further details on the structure of the programme and the courses available, see the menu at left.

- Learning resources
SOAS library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Employment

Graduates in MA Near and Middle Eastern Studies have entered various professions after leaving the School. Some have been able to pursue careers directly related to their study area while others have made use of the general intellectual training provided by the advanced study of cultures for involvement in analysing and solving many of the problems contemporary societies now face. Among a variety of professions, career paths may include academia, charity work, community, government, NGOs, media and publishing, UN agencies SOAS Careers Services The School has a careers service available to all SOAS students while they are at the school, free of charge. This office helps with job listings, interviews during "milk rounds", putting together CVs, and even organising postgraduate study.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MA offers the students the opportunity to concentrate on the Qur'an, the Hadith and other Islamic texts, and so provides a unique training in the translation of Islamic religious material. Read more
The MA offers the students the opportunity to concentrate on the Qur'an, the Hadith and other Islamic texts, and so provides a unique training in the translation of Islamic religious material. The degree is designed to benefit academics, teachers of Islam in other institutions, translators of Islamic material into English in research centres, government departments and da'wa centres. It provides excellent research training and is a useful qualification for those who wish to progress to higher postgraduate degrees.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/maislstud/

Structure

Students take three taught units (one major, two minor) and write a 10,000 word dissertation.

Two courses, including the major, must be taken from Group A. The third unit can be from Group A or B. Normally no more than two translation items may be taken.

English language requirements - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/international/englishrequirements/

MA Islamic Studies- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 28kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/maislstud/file80798.pdf

Employment

As a postgraduate student specialising in Islamic Studies, you will gain competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, literature and culture (which can include literature, film, music, art and religion) of various parts of the Middle East.

Graduates leave SOAS not only with linguistic and cultural expertise, but also with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and management careers in both business and the public sector. These include written and oral communication skills, attention to detail, analytical and problem-solving skills, and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;

- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;

- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MA in Near and Middles Eastern Studies provides exceptional opportunities for studying this diverse and fascinating area at the postgraduate level through a variety of disciplinary approaches. Read more
The MA in Near and Middles Eastern Studies provides exceptional opportunities for studying this diverse and fascinating area at the postgraduate level through a variety of disciplinary approaches. The main emphasis of the programme is on the modern period through the courses in history, geography, politics, economics and anthropology. Some exposure is provided, however, to the pre-modern culture and society of the area through courses in religious studies, Islamic art and archaeology, and history. Courses based on Arabic are offered for those with an adequate knowledge of the language, while courses in Arabic, Hebrew, Persian and Turkish are available for those who wish to acquire or develop skills in these languages.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/nme/programmes/manmestud/

Structure

Students take three taught courses, one of which is considered a major, and complete a 10,000 word dissertation related to the major. As the emphasis in the Regional Studies programmes is on interdisciplinary study, students are required to select their three courses from more than one discipline.

The two minor courses can be taken from the same discipline (but different to that of the major) or two different ones.

Some disciplines such as politics, economics or social anthropology require an appropriate qualification (such as all or part of a first degree) if any of their courses are to be taken as the major subject.

Students who intend to register for the MA Near and Middle Eastern Studies program, but choose 3 options also available in the MA Israeli Studies program will be required to apply for MA Israeli Studies.

Teaching & Learning

Each course has its own series of classes and seminars, and in addition students attend general lectures and seminars organised by the Middle East Centre. In most courses there is one two-hour class each week. This may be an informal lecture followed by a discussion or a student presentation. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take.

The dissertation is on an approved topic linked to one of the taught courses.

Learning resources

SOAS library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in the Near and Middle Eastern studies from SOAS gives students competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, literature, history, cinema, politics, economics or law. Postgraduate students leave SOAS with the linguistic and cultural expertise needed to continue in the field of research along with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and management careers in business, public or charity sectors including written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources.

Graduates in MA Near and Middle Eastern Studies have entered various professions after leaving SOAS. Some have been able to pursue careers directly related to their study area while others have made use of the general intellectual training provided by the advanced study of cultures for involvement in analysing and solving many of the problems contemporary societies now face. Among a variety of professions, career paths may include academia, charity work, community, government, NGOs, media and publishing and UN agencies.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The end of classical antiquity in the Mediterranean and the Middle East witnessed the formation of polities, institutions and ideologies which define and continue to influence our world to the present day. Read more

The end of classical antiquity in the Mediterranean and the Middle East witnessed the formation of polities, institutions and ideologies which define and continue to influence our world to the present day.

By combining a diverse, yet cognate range of research interests, this programme offers an exceptional selection of linguistic and disciplinary expertise in the study of the late antique, Islamic and Byzantine worlds, embracing archaeology, art history, history, languages and literatures, and auxiliary disciplines such as palaeography, numismatics, and sigillography. It presently provides training in the following source languages: Greek, Latin, Arabic, and/or Hebrew.

This programme provides you with excellent preparation for graduate research in historical, archaeological, literary or art-historical topics focusing on the Mediterranean and western Asia from late antiquity into the early middle ages.

You will have access to the expertise of academics who are all passionate about their area of study. Drawn from several schools across the University and brought together in the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, the team comprises specialists in the various branches of late antique, Islamic and Byzantine studies.

Programme structure

The MSc comprises seminars, language classes and tutorials, which will include seminar discussion and debate, presentation to peers, directed and independent reading, as well as interactive language teaching. You will complete one compulsory course and select a further two language courses and an additional three options from a wide range on offer.

The compulsory course is:

  • Approaches to the Long Late Antiquity.

Option courses previously offered include those listed below. Option courses change from year to year and those available when you start your studies may be different from those shown in the list:

  • Elementary Greek (PG) 1 and Elementary Greek (PG) 2
  • Intermediate Greek (PG) 1 and Intermediate Greek (PG) 2
  • Elementary Latin (PG) 1 and Elementary Latin (PG) 2
  • Intermediate Latin (PG) 1 and Intermediate Latin (PG) 2
  • Arabic 1A and Arabic 1B for MSc LAIBS
  • Byzantine Archaeology: The archaeology of the Byzantine empire and its neighbours AD 500-850.
  • Archaeology of the Roman Economy
  • Mosques, Palaces and Gardens in the Golden Age of Islam
  • Mystical Islam
  • The Qur'an - Islam's Holy Book
  • A Topic in Late Antique and Byzantine History, e.g.: Popular Culture in Late Antiquity; The Mediterranean in the Fifth Century; Centre and Periphery in the Age of Constantine VII Porphyrogennetos
  • Constantinople: The History of a Medieval Megalopolis from Constantine the Great to Süleyman the Magnificent
  • Topics in Byzantine Literary History
  • Debating Marriage between Antiquity and the Middle Ages
  • Latin Text Seminar
  • Greek Text Seminar
  • Byzantine Text Seminar
  • Greek Palaeography
  • The Latin Manuscript

Learning outcomes

The programme emphasises acquisition of essential language skills for original research and close work with key historical and/or literary sources of evidence and grounding in the issues surrounding them.

You will gain an appreciation of the associated material cultures, including issues surrounding its recovery, survival and curation, which will prepare you for future academic research and prospective careers in aspects of museums and heritage management.

Career opportunities

Our students view the programme and a graduate degree from Edinburgh as an advanced qualification valued and respected by many employers. Those interested in long-term academic careers consider the MSc as preparation for a PhD.

The MSc provides a toolkit of transferable skills in organisation, research and analysis that will be highly prized in any field of work. It can form a stepping stone to many careers, such as further academic research, museum and art curation, literary translation or analysis, education or public heritage. Graduates of related programmes are putting their skills to use as tutors, archivists, writers and conference coordinators for employers including the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB).



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Programme description. This programme is designed for students seeking a distinctive and unique perspective on the arts of the Middle Ages. Read more

Programme description

This programme is designed for students seeking a distinctive and unique perspective on the arts of the Middle Ages. Visual culture, throughout the medieval period, is addressed from a global viewpoint.

The programme combines study of the arts and their audiences in Europe (particularly France, Italy and the Netherlands) and Early Medieval Britain and Ireland with those in non-Christian cultures (the arts of Islamic World, South Asia, Japan and China). The main focus is on issues stemming from considerations of cultural exchange and trans-regional interaction.

One example is the practice of exchanging gifts, its traditions, diplomatic significance and intellectual consequences. The programme will also consider issues concerning pilgrimage and conquest, and will address questions arising from study of the rise of global trade and travel. These embrace such topics as:

  • material exchange
  • shared artistic vocabularies
  • pilgrimage
  • literature and its uses
  • artistic and technological exchange
  • the taste of the exotic

The programme includes the possibility of taking an internship in a museum, public institution or similar organisation. It aims to:

  • introduce you to research in medieval history of art at the highest level
  • open up issues of global cultural exchange for academic debate
  • draw attention to contemporary resonances stemming from study of medieval visual culture
  • prepare students for further scholarly research, or for a career working with medieval objects, images or works of art, in museums, libraries, archives, and other collections

Programme structure

This programme is taught through a combination of small-group seminars and tutorials, one-to-one supervision and private study. You will be examined through coursework and a dissertation.

Learning outcomes

The programme seeks to inform students from three vantage points:

  • an overview of the multiple cultures active within the medieval period
  • a more specific knowledge of the various points of intersection between these cultures
  • an in-depth, expertise in of one cultural area with special emphasis on its interactions with other areas

More specifically upon completion of the course, students should have an understanding of how the relationships and connections between cultures are formed and the way in which a specific culture perceived itself, presented itself, as well as how it was perceived abroad as evidenced both in text and images.

More broadly, it is expected students will gain a more considered understanding as to the question of influence within the context of cross-cultural exchange.

Finally, students are expected to gain an understanding of the theories and methodologies relevant to the study of medieval visual culture and inter-cultural studies.

Career opportunities

Should you be considering advanced study in art history, this programme provides the perfect preparation, as you will have gained both a strong foundation in the discipline and identified a particular area of interest. This study may, in turn, lead to an academic career, or a rewarding position in the cultural heritage field.



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The MBA is an internationally recognised and respected qualification for managers. Applicants are from both the public and private sectors in the UK and abroad. Read more

Course Overview

The MBA is an internationally recognised and respected qualification for managers. Applicants are from both the public and private sectors in the UK and abroad.

The teaching programme is aimed at those who are looking to develop their careers and at 'high flyers' that need an understanding of all the major functions of business providing generalist knowledge for prospective leaders.

In addition to enhancing successful students' career prospects, the course aims to encourage independent and creative thinkers. This is done by following the UK Quality Assurance Agency guidelines in giving students a 'strong practical and professional orientation' differentiating it from other masters programmes.

All students complete seven taught modules, (five compulsory core modules and two optional modules), together with a final dissertation/project.​

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/management/courses/Pages/MBA---Master-of-Business-Administration-.aspx

​Course Content​​

The core modules are designed to expose participants to state of the art thinking in the key management disciplines and provide opportunity throughout to apply theory to real life management situations.
- Accounting for Decision-Makers
- Marketing
- Operations Management
- People and Organisations
- Strategic Management

Elective Modules:
Participants will be able to choose from a range of electives. These will include:
- Management of Finance
- Capital Markets and Derivatives
- Principles of Islamic Finance
- Islamic Investment Banking
- Managing People in a Global Context
- Developing People for Leadership and Management
- Buyer Behaviour and Relationship Marketing
- Strategic Global Marketing
- Product Development Management
- Managing the Product Development Process
- Project Management Theory and Practice
- Delivering Successful Projects

Successful completion of a combination of these subjects (with core modules and final project / dissertation) will entitle students to the award of MBA. However, students may opt to undertake a specialism, studying two subjects in the same area, for example Principles of Islamic Finance and Islamic Investment Banking; the programme offers several pathways for students wishing to have their specialisms noted, and these include:
- MBA (Finance)
- MBA (Islamic Finance)
- MBA (Human Resource Management)
- MBA (Marketing)
- MBA (Product Development Management)
- MBA (Project Management)

Final Module (40 credits):
The final, 40 credit project is a double module, completed by students after they have completed all taught modules. Whether an academic piece of research or an investigation into the launching of a business; it is designed to be an intellectually challenging piece of individual management research. It will equip successful students with the knowledge, capabilities and competences required of today's managers, in a world in which the ability to research new information is increasingly important.

​Learning & Teaching​

​Students are allocated a supervisor for their final, 40 credit module, who will provide constructive comment on their work as it develops. Students have access to online as well as standard library facilities. The entire process, from development of a draft research proposal and schedule, through selecting methods and drafting chapters, is supported by the Cardiff School of Management supervisors but managed and implemented by the student.

Assessment

Assessment is via a combination of examinations, assignments, presentations, groupwork and the final project.

Employability & Careers​

There have been developments within the School and Institution to encourage employability. The module in Core Skills in the first semester, for example, has introduced the student to the maintenance of personal records.

Careers events and a Blackboard on-line module allow students opportunities to further their knowledge. "Campus Pack" offers a student the capacity to build their e-portfolio within their online modules. This is designed with the following aims:
- Social Assignments: Empower instructors, academic technologists, and instructional designers to build and implement assignments and activities from a palette of re-usable social media tools including wikis, blogs, journals, podcasts, and templates.

- Social Network and Academic Commons: Implement a secure social network and community for instructors, students, departments, and administrators.

- e-Portfolios: Provide every individual a space and network to create, categorize, assess, and present academic and co-curricular activities with instructors, peers, advisors, or anyone in the world.

- Personal Development Plans: Personal Development Plans (PDP) facilitate the structure necessary for students to reflect upon individual learning, performance, and achievement, and map personal, educational, and career development. Institutions can easily design template profiles to meet the needs of different users and skill set groups.

The Alumni office and the MBA Team have also been developing networks, for example through social media such as Linked In. The success of these networks has been evidenced by the amount of former students currently in contact with the university about their employment, allowing current and former students to form links, and network.

The invitation to join with Merseburg University of Applied Sciences in Germany, to offer a Project Management Summer school is further evidence of the reputation now established and enhances any professional accreditation applications further. In July 2013, a tuition programme was offered, combining theory and practice and adhering to PMI global standards. This summer school opportunity not only offered the opportunity to foster partnerships in Europe alongside valuable learning experiences for students, it was centred on a live project. The project included the subdivisions of Funding, Regional Development and Visitor Centre, marketing strategy and Information systems.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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This MA covers practical and theoretical approaches to the key issues and working practices in the field of cultural heritage. Read more

This MA covers practical and theoretical approaches to the key issues and working practices in the field of cultural heritage. Students benefit from the Institute of Archaeology's emphasis on the role of heritage in today's society, from the art and archaeology collections of UCL, and from the unrivalled resources of London's museums.

About this degree

Students are introduced to theoretical issues involved in cultural heritage and develop a critical understanding of the social and political context in which the processes for managing cultural heritage operate. The flexible programme structure allows students to design a theoretically based or practically based degree depending on each individual's needs and interests.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core module (30 credits), optional modules (60 credits), an optional work placement and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules

Students are required to take the following core modules: 

  • Critical Perspectives on Cultural Heritage
  • Cultural Heritage, Globalisation and Development

Optional modules

Students then choose further options to the value of 60 credits. At least 30 credits must be taken from the list below. The remaining 30 credits may also come from this list or can be chosen from the outstanding range of Master's option choicesoffered by the UCL Institute of Archaeology

  • Antiquities and the Law
  • Archaeology and Education
  • Archaeologies of Modern Conflict
  • Archaeologies of the Modern World
  • Beyond Chiefdoms: Archaeologies of African Political Traditions
  • Cultural Memory
  • Funerary Archaeology
  • Intangible Dimensions of Museum Objects from Egypt
  • Key Topics in the Archaeology of the Americas
  • Managing Archaeological Sites
  • Managing Museums
  • Museum and Site Interpretation
  • Nature, culture and the languages of art: theories and methodologies of art interpretation
  • Social and material contexts of art: comparative approaches to art explanation
  • Themes and Debates in Islamic Archaeology and Heritage

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words (90 credits).

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practical demonstrations, site visits and guest lectures, and includes a 20-day placement in a museum or other cultural heritage organisation. Assessment is through essays, projects reports, a heritage agency report following the placement, and the dissertation.

Placement

Students have the option to undertake a 20-day voluntary placement in a museum or other cultural heritage organisation. In recent years, these placements have included organisations such as English Heritage, the National Trust, Historic Royal Palaces, ICOMOS (Paris), World Monuments Fund (Paris), UNESCO World Heritage Centre (Paris) and the Museum of London. The placement is not formally assessed. 

Tier 4 students are permitted to undertake a work placement during their programme however they must not exceed 20 hours per week (unless the placement is an integral and assessed part of the programme). This applies whether that work placement takes place at UCL or at an external institution. If you choose to undertake a placement at an external institution, you will be required to report to the department on a weekly basis so that you can continue to comply with your visa. 

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Cultural Heritage Studies MA

Careers

Recent graduates of this programme have gone on to work in policy areas and project areas for national and international organisations, such as English Heritage, the National Trust, ICOMOS and UNESCO. They have also worked in development control, consultancies (such as Atkins Global), and in museums, site interpretation and education. Many students have also gone on to further research in academic institutions around the world, such as Stanford, Athens and Leiden, or here at UCL.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Asia Department Intern, BBC Worldwide
  • Freelance Cultural Heritage International Relations Officer, Ministry of Culture and Monument Protection of Georgia
  • Research Assistant, Gold Museum
  • Researcher, World Heritage Institute for Training & Research Asia-Pacific
  • Reward Analyst, Mitie and studying MA in Cultural Heritage Studies, UCL

Employability

Graduates have a critical understanding of both the theoretical and operational aspects of heritage and its use of the past to enrich the present for the public. The interdisciplinary nature of cultural heritage studies leads to creativity and initiative. Graduates are highly motivated and articulate. They have an acute awareness of the moral and ethical issues that are inherent in cultural heritage which contributes to skilful negotiation of contested matters. These abilities are valued by employers and heritage agencies and contribute to innovative exhibitions, educational activities, public programming and policy and strategy development. The breadth of the degree widens the spectrum of employment opportunities.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study.

We are international in outlook and membership, with students and staff from over 40 countries, and involvement in field research projects around the globe.

UCL is located in central London, within walking distance of the British Museum and the British Library. The institute's outstanding archaeological library is complemented by UCL's main library, University of London Senate House and other specialist libraries.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Institute of Archaeology

73% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The Warburg Institute MA in Cultural and Intellectual History aims to equip students for interdisciplinary research in Medieval and Renaissance studies and in the reception of the classical tradition. Read more
The Warburg Institute MA in Cultural and Intellectual History aims to equip students for interdisciplinary research in Medieval and Renaissance studies and in the reception of the classical tradition. Students will become part of an international community of scholars, working in a world-famous library. They will broaden their range of knowledge to include the historically informed interpretation of images and texts, art history, philosophy, history of science, literature, and the impact of religion on society. Students will improve their knowledge of Latin, French and Italian and will acquire the library and archival skills essential for research on primary texts.

This twelve-month, full-time course is intended as an introduction to the principal elements of the classical tradition and to interdisciplinary research in cultural and intellectual history from the late Middle Ages to the early modern period. Although it is a qualification in its own right, the MA is also designed to provide training for further research at doctoral level. It is taught through classes and supervision by members of the academic staff of the Institute and by outside teachers. The teaching staff are leading professors and academics in their field who have published widely. Research strengths include: the transmission of Arabic science and philosophy to Western Europe; the later influence of classical philosophy (Aristotelianism, Platonism, Epicureanism and Stoicism); and religious nonconformism in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Europe. For further details on the research interests of teaching staff please visit the Warburg website:
http://www.warburg.sas.ac.uk/home/staff-contacts/academic-staff

Structure

Core courses (courses may vary from year to year)

Iconology: Mythological painting, allegorical figures, historical subjects, altarpiece - Dr Paul Taylor
Religion and Society - Dr Alessandro Scafi
Optional Courses (courses may vary from year to year)

Artistic Intentions 1400 - 1700 - Dr Paul Taylor
Islamic Authorities and Arabic Elements in the Renaissance – Professor Charles Burnett
Music in the Later Middle Ages and the Renaissance - Professor Charles Burnett
New Worlds, Ancient Texts: Renaissance Intellectual History and the Discovery of the Americas - Dr Philipp Nothaft
Renaissance Philosophy – Dr Guido Giglioni
Renaissance Art Literature – Dr François Quiviger
Renaissance Material Culture – Dr Rembrandt Duits and Dr François Quiviger
Sin and Sanctity in the Reformation – Professor Alastair Hamilton
All students take two compulsory core courses and two optional subjects. The core courses are taught in the first term and the optional subjects in the second term and the options available vary from year to year. In addition, there is a regular series of classes throughout the three terms on Techniques of Scholarship. Subjects dealt with include: description of manuscripts; palaeography; printing in the 15th and 16th centuries; editing a text; preparation of dissertations and photographic images. Some of these classes are held outside the Institute in locations such as the British Library or the Wellcome Library.
Reading classes in Latin, Italian and French are provided and are offered to all students. Students are also encouraged to attend the Director’s weekly seminar on Work in Progress and any of the other regular seminars held in the Institute that may be of interest to them. These at present include History of Art and Maps and Society. The third term and summer are spent in researching and writing a dissertation, under the guidance of a supervisor from the academic staff.

Assessment

The normal format for classes is a small weekly seminar, in which students usually discuss texts in their original languages. In most courses, students also give short presentations of their own research, which are not assessed. The emphasis is on helping students to acquire the skills necessary to interpret philosophical, literary and historical documents as well as works of art. Each compulsory or optional module will be assessed by means of a 4,000 word essay to be submitted on the first day of the term following that in which the module was taught. A dissertation of 18,000 – 20,000 words, on a topic agreed by the student and supervisor, has to be submitted by 30 September. The course is examined on these five pieces of written work, and on a written translation examination paper in the third term. Students are allocated a course tutor and, in addition, are encouraged to discuss their work with other members of the academic staff. Because of our relatively small cohort, students have unusually frequent contact, formal and informal, with their teachers.

Mode of study

12 months full-time only.

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The . city of Exeter.  is the perfect setting for our MA in Medieval Studies. At the University there is a wide variety of resources and you will have access to extensive holdings, audio-visual collections and some medieval manuscripts in our . Read more

The city of Exeter is the perfect setting for our MA in Medieval Studies. At the University there is a wide variety of resources and you will have access to extensive holdings, audio-visual collections and some medieval manuscripts in our Special Collections in the University library. Exeter Cathedral Library Archives and the Devon Heritage Centre, located nearby, contain further significant medieval manuscripts, documents and early printed books.

The MA Medieval Studies draws on the expertise of the Centre for Medieval Studies, which is one of the largest centres in the university. Exeter is unique in that we have a large number of specialists in medieval studies across various disciplines. Our expertise is especially strong in medieval history, archaeology, law, music, French literature, English literature, and Arab and Islamic studies. 

Modules are taken from nine different disciplines meaning the course is varied and you will be offered comprehensive training on skills needed to study the Middle Ages, including medieval languages (Latin, Old English, and medieval French) and palaeography. With such a large number of medieval studies experts and excellent links to the local and national heritage sector we are in an excellent position to help you as you further your historical knowledge whether you are planning on progressing to PhD study, pursuing a profession, or simply exploring a passion for medieval studies.

Learning resources

The University's Streatham Campus is located with excellent access to the heart of historic Exeter which has a rich cultural heritage extending back to the Roman period and boasts particularly fine evidence of its medieval past. You will benefit from access to Exeter Cathedral Library and University libraries which maintain excellent holdings relevant to medieval studies.

Modules

A range of optional modules are available which reflect the varied research interests of academic staff across the Centre for Medieval Studies. These interests range widely across the medieval period and cover Britain, Europe and the Islamic world. They also represent several disciplines, including History, Archaeology, Classics, Literature, Music, Art History, Theology and Islamic Studies.

The core module Interpreting the Middle Ages: Images, Texts and Contexts will give students an overview of these different disciplinary approaches and show how they can be applied to the study of medieval texts and objects. Other core modules are Medieval Research Skills, which introduces students to the skills needed to work with medieval sources such as palaeography and codicology, and Current Research in Medieval Studies which asks students to reflect on how academic research projects are designed and presented, and gives them guidance in developing their own dissertation projects. Students also have the option of taking Latin modules and are strongly encouraged to do so if they are considering going on to an MPhil or PhD.

The programme

- offers an excellent, interdisciplinary education in medieval studies, covering a wide range of topics and approaches across the medieval period;

- gives students the opportunity to work with the medieval sources in and around Exeter, for example at Exeter Cathedral, the Devon Heritage Centre and the University’s Special Collections;

- produces graduates who are highly competent in subject-specific, core academic, and personal and key skills that are both relevant and transferable to employment;

- encourages participation in research seminar programmes offering insights into a very wide range of research cultures and specialisms and into how academics go about designing and presenting research projects;

- offers excellent preparation for students intending to continue on to doctoral-level research with a good track record in obtaining funding for further study.

Research areas

As an MA Medieval Studies student you will be welcome to join the Centre for Medieval Studies, which brings together academic staff and Postgraduate students from a wide range of disciplines across the University’s Colleges. We are brought together by our shared interests which run from the Early Middle Ages to the early Renaissance and may include archaeology, theology, music, literature and law. We hold regular seminars and research events which, if you decide to join us at Exeter, we hope you will not only attend but become an active part of.

Research is at the heart of History and our students are encouraged to come to Departmental Research Seminars and become an active part of wider research community. Our research centres regularly hold seminars and other research events which MA students are welcome to attend.

Our current research centres include:

As well as our research centres we also have a Postgraduate Reading Group for matters medieval which brings together our Masters and PhD students to share ideas.



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IN BRIEF. Develop your knowledge and skills to manage complex financial situations at a global level. Excellent career potential and the opportunity to take a Business Innovation Project, enhancing your practical skills and experience. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Develop your knowledge and skills to manage complex financial situations at a global level
  • Excellent career potential and the opportunity to take a Business Innovation Project, enhancing your practical skills and experience
  • Choose to take a one to three-month Assessed Internship with an employer, supported by Salford Business School
  • Part-time study optionWork/industrial placement opportunity
  • International students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

This course gives you the opportunity to develop a detailed understanding of the practical applications of modern finance theories in the financial world.

You will learn from specialist staff with expertise in accounting, finance, economics and management. On completion of your course you will be able to apply your skills in areas including valuation, investment and financial decision-making, risk management and derivatives, financial instruments and markets, mergers and acquisitions, and corporate restructuring in developed and emerging markets.

You will also be able to make key financial and strategic decisions in the daily operations of any organisation. These qualities are highly prized by international corporations.

COURSE DETAILS

The programme is block delivered and there are six entry points per year.

This course has been designed to provide you with the opportunity to develop a detailed understanding of the practical applications of modern finance theories in the financial world. Specifically the course will:

  • Provide a sophisticated curriculum with a comprehensive treatment of corporate financial strategies and policies.
  • Equip students with a wide range of corporate finance tools that you can apply to a variety of practical situations, and which will enable them to contribute to the needs of the fast-paced, highly competitive corporate sector and finance industries in the global market.
  • Develop students’ ability to work on their own and with others in effectively and creatively applying knowledge of theory and practice analysis, planning and management of corporate financial strategies and policies.
  • Develop students’ financial expertise to the highest level and an effective capability of applying advanced finance theories and techniques to a wide range of corporate financial decision-making.
  • Produce graduates who will be able to place themselves favourably in either a managerial or consulting role as CFOs, credit and financial analyst, consultants, brokers, portfolio managers and agents in various corporate sectors and financial institutions.

On successful completion of the course students will be able to:

  • Develop knowledge and critical understanding of essential components of Islamic finance theory and associated current research, and develop the capability of applying both general and Islamic financial concepts and principles to the analysis of corporate circumstances;
  • Develop the capability of critical evaluation of the impact of market behaviour on bank performance and organisational behaviour with reference to Islamic bank products and services.
  • Synthesise and critically evaluate recent and current literature on a wide range of MSc Investment and Finance theories and issues in order to develop and apply conceptual frameworks.
  • Develop and apply a strategy for the collection, analysis, critical evaluation and interpretation of data.
  • Work with others in making effective strategic and operational decisions related to the management of an enterprise in a globally competitive, diverse and dynamic environment.

TEACHING

The course is currently delivered in four blocks of three-day intensive study periods, followed by independent study and online support through the University’s virtual learning environment, Blackboard. Each module is taken and assessed over a six week block. 

From September 2017, this delivery format will change. Students will continue to study a single module for a 6 week period. Face to face teaching will be delivered on campus for two half days each week. In addition, you will attend the taught element of the Business Innovation Programme each Wednesday afternoon during the 6 week blocks, with independent study completed in your own time through Blackboard.  Individual student timetables will be provided during induction week.

Teaching is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials, using a wide range of learning activities.

ASSESSMENT

Over the duration of your course a range of assessment techniques will be used. Types of assessment include; essays, assignments, exams, multiple choice tests, online tests, group reports, and portfolio work. The weighting between exams and coursework varies between modules and years, but exams still play a major role.

EMPLOYABILITY

Recent Salford Business School graduates have gained employment with leading companies including:

  • Ernst & Young
  • Dixons Group plc
  • British Airways
  • Cooperative Insurance Services
  • BMW
  • American Express
  • BBC
  • Citibank
  • Ladbrokes
  • Numberica
  • Office of the Legal Services Ombudsman
  • KPMG
  • PricewaterhouseCoopers
  • Premier Travel Inn
  • BUPA
  • Thomson Holidays
  • BT
  • DTS Logistics
  • Greater Manchester Police
  • The NHS

FACILITIES

Salford Business School is located at the heart of the University’s Peel campus in the newly refurbished Lady Hale Building, and the Chapman Building, offering state-of-the-art facilities for the Business School’s student learning community and just minutes from Manchester city centre. Chapman is a stylish modern space with six lecture theatres equipped with the very latest technology and large screen displays, a series of communal learning and breakout spaces, plus a Fairtrade café with panoramic views across the campus.

Lady Hale is the home to all dedicated business school student support including the school office, an employability hub, a base for the Business School society, and several open study spaces.

All University of Salford students also have access to the MediaCityUK campus including its study facilities.  MediaCityUK is home to major BBC and ITV departments and over 80 businesses across the creative and digital sectors.  It is recognised as one of the most innovative developments in Britain and is a vibrant place in which to live, work, socialise and study.



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This MA equips students with the skills necessary for advanced medieval and renaissance scholarship. A wide range of historical, literary, palaeographical, art historical and archaeological modules enables students to explore the aspects of medieval and renaissance culture in which they are interested. Read more

This MA equips students with the skills necessary for advanced medieval and renaissance scholarship. A wide range of historical, literary, palaeographical, art historical and archaeological modules enables students to explore the aspects of medieval and renaissance culture in which they are interested.

About this degree

This MA provides exceptional opportunities to master medieval and renaissance languages and to acquire manuscript expertise working with original manuscripts; key skills for those who want to go on to original research. Students with primary interests in many different areas ‒ linguistic, historical, literary or archaeological ‒ will be able to build on and extend their expertise and skills.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of 30 credits of core language modules, optional modules (90 credits), and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Old and Middle English
  • Medieval Latin (Beginners)
  • Medieval Latin (Intermediate)
  • Medieval French
  • Old and Middle French
  • Medieval Italian
  • Medieval German
  • Classical Hebrew
  • Rabbinic Hebrew
  • Introduction to Old Norse

Optional modules

Up to 90 credits of options drawn from the following:

  • Identity and Power in Medieval Europe, AD 500-1300
  • Magic in the Middle Ages
  • Writing History in Europe, c. 900-1200
  • A Global History of the Middle Ages?
  • Russsian Monarchy: Court Ritual and Political Ideas 1498-1917
  • Science and Medicine across Medieval Worlds
  • Reframing the Renaissance
  • Forging the Early Modern
  • Unstitching the Early Modern: Archival and Book Skills
  • Web 0.1: Early Modern Information Culture c. 1470-1750
  • Confessional Cultures in the Dutch Republic and England, c. 1500-c. 1700
  • Seeing Through Materials: Matter, Vision and Transformation in the Renaissance
  • Sex and the Body in Early Modern Europe
  • Men on the Moon: Cosmic Voyages in the Early Modern Period
  • Metamorphosis: The Limits of the Human
  • Wolfram von Eschenbach's "Parzival"
  • Legendary Histories (Medieval French Literature)
  • The Transformation of the Roman Mediterranean
  • Themes and Debates in Islamic Archaeology and Heritage

This list is indicative only; the modules available are subject to change each year.

Dissertation/research project

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of up to 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and classes. Several modules include site visits to institutions, notably the British Library, the Warburg Institute, the National Archives and the Institute of Historical Research. Assessment is through unseen examination, long essays, coursework and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Medieval and Renaissance Studies MA

Careers

Recent destinations of recent graduates of this programme include: funded PhDs at UCL, Universities of Oxford, St Andrews, Cambridge, Durham, Cardiff, Lancaster, and UEA; the British Library: Cataloguer; Reuters: News Assistant; Ministry of Trade Industry and Tourism: Government Advisor.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Curatorial and Art Intern, Swiss Institute
  • Policy and Communications Officer, Caritas
  • Project Assistant, British Library
  • GDL (Graduate Diploma in Law), BPP University
  • PhD in Medieval Studies, University of Leeds

Employability

The MARS degree allows students to develop an enviable range of skills. This programme not only provides an outstanding foundation for those hoping to undertake PhD research and pursue an academic career but is also popular with students wishing to go into journalism, the civil service, business, museum and heritage and the education sector. Debates, small group seminars and tutorials help students to acquire strong presentation and negotiation skills for their future career. Likewise the analytical and research skills gained by students on this programme are highly valued by employers from a range of industries.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The departments contributing to this degree - History; English; the School of European Languages, Culture and Society; History of Art - enjoy outstanding international reputations for research and teaching.

We are strongly committed to the intellectual development of all our students; if you come to UCL, you will receive individual supervision from leading researchers in their fields.

Located in Bloomsbury, we are just a few minutes' walk away from the exceptional resources of the British Library, the British Museum and the research institutes of the University of London, including the Warburg and the Institute of Historical Research.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: History

82% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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