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Masters Degrees (Ireland)

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Project Objectives. To measure competitive balance in the All Ireland Senior GAA Football Championship from 1997-2017. To test the uncertainty of outcome hypothesis in a non- professional sporting organisation using the All Ireland Senior GAA Football Championship. Read more

Project Objectives

  1. To measure competitive balance in the All Ireland Senior GAA Football Championship from 1997-2017
  2. To test the uncertainty of outcome hypothesis in a non- professional sporting organisation using the All Ireland Senior GAA Football Championship
  3. To document ‘grass roots’ experiences from Carlow GAA on competitive balance and the All Ireland Senior GAA Football Championship
  4. To make recommendations to support competitive balance in the All Ireland Senior GAA Football Championship

Methodology proposed

The methodology proposed for this study will be a mixed methods approach using three stages. Stage one of the project will measure competitive balance using data sourced on County Match statistics for The All Ireland Senior GAA Football Championship extracted from the sporting sections of National newspapers accessible through the Lexis library database. An intertemporal approach will be used from 1997-2017. Lorenz curves will be used to measure competitive balance as these are a standard measure, to date, of competitive balance in the sports economics literature.

Stage two will test the ‘uncertainty of outcome hypothesis’ that fan interest varies with competitive balance of the All Ireland Senior GAA Football Championship using regression analysis to test the relationship between competitive balance and match attendance.

Stage three will be a series of meetings at ‘grass roots’ level with Carlow GAA to document experiences at club and county level of competitive balance and the All Ireland Senior GAA Football Championship.

Expected outcomes: (e.g. deliverables & strategic impacts)

The expected outcome from this research is one potentially publishable research paper. Competitive balance and the uncertainty of outcome hypothesis is an area of great interest in sports economics. Applying these concepts to the operation of the GAA, a unique Sporting Association, is a new departure in the published literature. The project is of strategic value to the GAA itself as it could assist future rule creation governing Championship Football. The project will also develop research in the Sports area of the Department as recommended by the Programmatic Review Group in 2016.



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A growing body of research calls for the recognition of the complex, multi-faceted and gender-specific nature of homelessness (Barrow and Lawinski, 2009; Mayock and Sheridan, 2012; Mayock et al, 2015a; Savage, 2016). Read more

A growing body of research calls for the recognition of the complex, multi-faceted and gender-specific nature of homelessness (Barrow and Lawinski, 2009; Mayock and Sheridan, 2012; Mayock et al, 2015a; Savage, 2016). This project will apply a gender lens to the issue of housing and homelessness in Ireland in order to:

  • evaluate if and how contemporary housing legislation and policies (e.g. the Housing Act, 2009; Rebuilding Ireland, 2016) in Ireland reflect and respond to the specific needs and realities of women at risk of and experiencing homelessness
  • examine how contemporary housing policies impact on the provision of services for women experiencing homelessness
  • distinguish between the experiences of women with and without children with respect to the provision of homeless and housing services.

Methodology proposed

The following qualitative research methods will be employed:

  • a discourse analysis of relevant housing policy
  • semi -structured interviews with housing service providers and advocacy organisations
  • semi -structured interviews with women accessing homeless services

Expected outcomes: (e.g. deliverables & strategic impacts)

  • Article in a social policy/gender studies journal (e.g. Critical Social Policy)
  • Conference presentation at Social Care Ireland
  • Policy recommendations on gender-sensitive housing policies


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Project Objectives. Address the gap in empirical knowledge and understanding of the concept of Employee Engagement (EE) in relation to SMEs in Ireland. Read more

Project Objectives

  • Address the gap in empirical knowledge and understanding of the concept of Employee Engagement (EE) in relation to SMEs in Ireland.
  • Gather empirical data which would allow for development of recommendations and guidelines that ensure SMEs benefit from integrating Employee Engagement, for the long-term benefit, in their business plans.

Methodology proposed

The proposed methodology is deductive approach to research. The research design will primarily use qualitative data collection methods to achieve research objectives and gain a deeper understanding of the concept in SMEs in Ireland.

Expected outcomes: (e.g. deliverables & strategic impacts)

Deliverables and dissemination:

  • A written report (Master’s thesis)
  • Opportunity to present research findings at conferences focused on SMEs and their long-term development
  • Potential for publication in International peer-reviewed journal
  • Recommendations to SMEs on how to integrate Employee engagement to their business Plans

Strategic Impact:

  • There is currently a gap in empirical knowledge and understanding of the concept of EE in relation to SMEs generally. This research would provide research evidence from Ireland and address this research gap.
  • Network of research and industry collaborative partnership through this project will increase the existing collaborative capabilities of ITC Business department and profile.
  • Application of research findings in industry will provide further research opportunities allowing for increased research activity.


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Summary. The LLM Gender, Conflict and Human Rights draws on the established research excellence of the Transitional Justice Institute to deliver a world-leading masters programme in the field. Read more

Summary

The LLM Gender, Conflict and Human Rights draws on the established research excellence of the Transitional Justice Institute to deliver a world-leading masters programme in the field.

This programme has been developed to enable students to:

  • Gain a systematic understanding, in-depth knowledge and critical awareness of the differential experiences of women and men of human rights norms and institutions, especially in conflict and post-conflict situations;
  • Understand foundational concepts in gender theory and their application to human rights, international law and transitional justice;
  • Gain knowledge and skills in carrying out research projects from design to write-up;
  • Enhance skills in critically appraising published and commissioned research;
  • Develop skills highly relevant to legal practice, and to gender policy, research and advocacy roles in the voluntary, public and private sectors in the UK, Ireland and beyond;
  • Successful completion may also open up a range of further study and research options.

About

The Transitional Justice Institute in Northern Ireland is uniquely placed to deliver an effective and stimulating programme of study in this area. Key highlights of the programme include:

  • Opportunity to undertake an LLM programme with a specific focus on gender and transitional justice – the only LLM programme of its type in the UK or Ireland;
  • Teaching is delivered by active researchers in the TJI, many of whom have received international recognition for their work;
  • Gain unique insights into the differential legal protection of human rights of women and men in transitional contexts, while studying in a society currently in a process of transition;
  • Take advantage of the opportunities to specialise in identified areas e.g. human rights, transitional justice, peace and conflict research in divided societies;
  • Enhance the skills you need for working with gender and human rights in a range of sectors;
  • Internship opportunities with a range of organizations. In previous years students have secured internships with the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission, Disability Action (Centre on Human Rights), Human Rights Consortium, Law Centre (NI) and Northern Ireland Council for Ethnic Minorities (NICEM), all based in Belfast;
  • Extensive events programme (TJI Seminar Series, International Conferences) and distinguished Visiting Scholars programme.
  • Excellent library facilities on campus. Students also have sole access to a dedicated LLM computer suite;
  • Fully equipped LLM teaching rooms with integrated audio visual and video conferencing facilities.

Attendance

Attendance is compulsory for successful completion of the LLM. Modules are delivered through weekly half-day classes or fortnightly full-day classes.

Work placement / study abroad

The Transitional Justice Institute works closely with a range of human rights organisations that regularly offer internship opportunities to our LLM students – including the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission, Human Rights Consortium, Law Centre (NI) and Northern Ireland Council for Ethnic Minorities (NICEM).

Career options

Successful completion of the LLM

Previous graduates have gone onto positions in the local human rights sector and public sector in Northern Ireland, to legal practice in areas related to the LLM and to PhD research. Further, previous graduates have secured work in the United Nations and in international non-governmental organisations.



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Summary. The LLM in Access to Justice (A2J) is a distinct and unique clinical legal education course in Northern Ireland and on the island of Ireland, there being no comparable courses at undergraduate or postgraduate level. Read more

Summary

The LLM in Access to Justice (A2J) is a distinct and unique clinical legal education course in Northern Ireland and on the island of Ireland, there being no comparable courses at undergraduate or postgraduate level. The course gives students the opportunity to develop legal advice and advocacy skills by allowing them to represent appellants in Industrial and Social Security Tribunals. Students will also have the opportunity to engage their interest in the provision of legal services more generally as they are required to develop and manage the ‘Ulster University Law Clinic’.

The function of the course is to supplement the existing range of legal service providers by focusing on, and meeting, ‘unmet legal need’ in the fields of employment law and social security law. In doing so, students are tasked to analyze ‘unmet legal need’, the availability and consumption of legal services and reflect on wider issues of access to justice, ‘equality of arms’, and dispute resolution.

Attendance

Students are expected to attend all classes associated with the programme and be punctual and regular in attendance. In semester one, students will undertake taught modules in Social Security Law and Policy, Employment Law, Tribunal Representation and Alternative Dispute Resolution. Student will also begin clinical work placement with the Legal Support Project within the Law Centre (NI) in the area of Social Security and induction to the Ulster Law Clinic. In Semester 2 & 3, Students will be based at the Ulster Law Clinic and/or clinical work placement with the Legal Support Project for the Clinical Legal Practice module where they will provide advice and representation to users of the Law Clinic. Students will also undertake the taught module Housing Law and attend classes in the Dissertation module.

Work placement / study abroad

Student clinicans will have placement as volunteers with our placement partner at the pro-bono Legal Support Project at Law Centre (NI). Students will undertake training and will providing specialist legal advice and representation on social security cases.

Students can also engage in placement through collaboration with the Legal Support Officer at Citizens Advice Regional Office. Students would focus on providing support in Social Security Commissioner’s cases.

Students will undertake employment law cases through the Ulster Law Clinic.

Academic profile

The Clinic staff have recieved recognition through a variety of awards. The Course Team received the Distinguished Team Teaching Award in December 2014 from Ulster University, as well as Learning and Teaching Awards 2014 Course/School Team of the Year in the UUSU awards. Dr Eugene McNamee was the recipient of the US-UK Fulbright Public Sector Award 2014 - Scholar at Fordham Law School, NYC, 2015. Dr Esther McGuinness was runner up in the highly prestigious Law Teacher of the Year Award OUP.

Clinic staff continue to engage in leading research and justice innovations related to practical implications of, and solutions to, access to justice problems. The Clinic was awarded funding by the Legal Education Foundation to analyse the role of university law clinics in the UK in delivering access to justice. Dr Gráinne McKeever received funding from the British Academy/Leverhulme to understand how court litigants participate in court hearings. The Nuffield Foundation has awarded Dr Gráinne McKeever and Dr John McCord, in partnership with the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission, to conduct a human rights analysis of the impact of litigants in person (LIPs) on the Northern Ireland court system. Ciaran White has engaged in research to review the access to justice barriers arising for deaf clients attending consultations with private solicitors in Northern Ireland.

Career options

You will develop skills highly relevant to legal practice, and to policy, research and advocacy roles in the voluntary, public and private sectors in the UK, Ireland and beyond. Successful completion may also open up a range of further study and research options.

The LLM A2J allows you to develop the analytical skills prized by employers in a wide range of career pathways within the United Kingdom, Ireland and internationally. Students obtain experience in all aspects of legal practice, from client-handling and case-related research, to advocacy and representation, as well as developing and managing a working Law Clinic. The degree is relevant to legal practice and policy, and to research and advocacy roles in the voluntary, public and private sectors. Successful completion also opens up a range of further study and research options.

We are proud to state that all our graduates to date have have transitioned into employment, practice or further academic study. The connections created by the referral network have generated opportunities for our graduates in the form of trainee solicitor positions with one of the members of our referral network, Sullivans Law, for example. Graduates have also been employed as research interns in the Law Society of Northern Ireland for the last two years. Other students have taken up funded PhDs examining issues and concepts arising from their LLM studies, and continued working across the legal advice field.



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On this programme you’ll gain an advanced knowledge of many aspects of modern Ireland, together with the research skills you’d need to take your work further. Read more
On this programme you’ll gain an advanced knowledge of many aspects of modern Ireland, together with the research skills you’d need to take your work further.

The Diploma and MA programmes share four compulsory modules taught by experts in early Irish history, politics, Irish language, history, cultural geography, literature, drama and women’s history.

All modules are taught in small-group seminar format, with each requiring two pieces of assessed coursework. For an MA you’ll need to research and write a dissertation of 20,000 words (60 credits).

The programme’s available one year full-time, or part-time over two years.

Why Institute of Irish Studies?

An important and influential Institute.

The Institute has played a significant part in Ireland’s recent history. The Director, Professor Marianne Elliott OBE, FBA was a major player in the Northern Ireland peace process and the achievements of the Institute have been recognised in the award of a £5million Tony Blair Chair in Irish Studies.

Links with the Irish community.

Historically, the city of Liverpool has always had strong links with the north and south of Ireland. It has long been the hub of Irish migration and you will be in an ideal position to experience living in a multicultural society with a distinctive Irish component. There are excellent links between the Institute and the Liverpool Irish community providing a rich seam to be mined for research purposes as well as opportunities for students to get involved in voluntary work.

Friendly and supportive.

The Institute is based in a fine Regency house in Abercromby Square, on the main University campus where all staff foster a particularly friendly and supportive atmosphere for students.

Renowned speakers.

The high external esteem of the Institute is reflected in the calibre of public lecturers it regularly attracts. In recent years, speakers have included President Michael D. Higgins, President Mary McAleese, former Irish President Mary Robinson, Roddy Doyle, Seamus Heaney, John Hume, Peter Mandelson, US Senator George Mitchell, Paul Muldoon, Tom Paulin, Fintan O’Toole, Jonathan Powell, Dr John Reid, the late David Ervine, the late Dr Mo Mowlam, Peter Robinson and David Trimble. The Institute also hosts events for the Liverpool Irish Festival every October and these have included lectures by the authors Blake Morrison and Patrick McCabe, the filmmaker Peter Lennon and the Keeper of Antiquities of the National Museum of Ireland Dr Eamonn Kelly.

Career prospects

Our programmes aim not only to provide an in-depth understanding of Ireland but also to provide students with key transferable skills, such as presentation skills and opportunities for networking with businesses, voluntary organisations and leading members of the Irish Studies academic community. The MA programmes have dedicated skills modules designed to equip students with key employment skills for a range of sectors such as questionnaire design, interviewing techniques and textual and data analysis. Former postgraduates have gone on to further study as well as a wide range of successful careers in areas such as teaching (at both university and secondary level), journalism, research and museum work. As Ciaran O’Neill, who completed a PhD in 2010 and the current Government of Ireland Postdoctoral Fellow at Hertford College, Oxford, highlights: ‘I came to Liverpool in 2006 to begin a PhD part-time at the Institute of Irish Studies. While there I won external full-time funding from the National University of Ireland which enabled me to complete my doctorate in 2010 before taking up a post-doctoral position at Oxford two weeks later. The years I spent at the Institute were among the best in my life both professionally and personally. What I will remember most is a tight-knit community of warm and friendly staff who excel in their own disciplines, a hard-working and vibrant post-grad community and a lively and engaged student body. In short, the Institute is a fantastic place to study, to research and to grow and develop as an academic.’

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Project Objectives. To develop a studio to afford enterprises time to explore creatively within a dynamic peer group. To critically review the needs of enterprises with the aim of streamlining the process to innovation. Read more

Project Objectives

  • To develop a studio to afford enterprises time to explore creatively within a dynamic peer group.
  • To critically review the needs of enterprises with the aim of streamlining the process to innovation
  • To develop a methodology that enhances a multi layered offering into a bespoke approach for regional enterprises.
  • To develop interdisciplinary research in ITC
  • To develop links with potential regional research centres internationally

Methodology proposed

This research is envisaged to be predominantly applied in its nature and project driven (Action Research). It will be focused on a fixed

space, working alongside ERIC’s initiative of ‘the future studio’.

The researcher will work alongside mentors and enterprises developing case studies on various methods and approaches.

The use or design methodologies like prototyping, iteration and conceptualisation will be used to explore variations of the process.

This research will also be aligned with leading research in this field and be informed by international best practice.

Expected outcomes: (e.g. deliverables & strategic impacts)

  • A methodology to enhance the development of enterprise in the South East region of Ireland
  • Investigate opportunities for delivery of research findings at an International Conference or Publication of research paper in International peer reviewed journal
  • Recommendations for further research opportunities
  • Network of research and industry collaborative partners
  • The postgraduate will present their research through public exhibition or peer review defence

Strategic Impact

  • The network of research and industry collaborative partners developed through this research project will increase the collaborati ve capabilities of designCORE.
  • Publications, peer review and conferences enhance designCORE, ERIC and ITC’s status of an internationally recognised provider of interdisciplinary research.
  • Create opportunities of commercialisation of a methodology beyond the master’s research project and development of a movement in the region.
  • Recommendations for further research opportunities allow for increased interdisciplinary research activity in ITC


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The aims of this project are to. Determine the capacity for feedstock production within a suitable catchment area for a cooperative type scenario. Read more

The aims of this project are to:

  1. Determine the capacity for feedstock production within a suitable catchment area for a cooperative type scenario.
  2. Determine the optimum mix of the available feedstocks to maximise methane yield, including the use of fermentation enhancers. It is expected that this project will give an indication of the potential for community based bio-methane production in the South East of Ireland.

Further information

These projects are funded under the President’s Research Fellowship Programme of the Institute, with the college fees and research materials and consumables covered. A small student stipend will also be provided. The successful candidates will work in the enviroCORE, which is the Institute’s environmental research centre, in a team of research supervisors and postgraduate students.

Applicants should have a primary honours degree (Level 8) in an appropriate discipline (Biosciences, Microbiology, Genetics, Biology, Bioinformatics, Zoology, Environmental Science etc.). They must also hold a minimum of a Second Class Honours Grade 1 (2.1) undergraduate degree. The successful candidates are expected start in the postgraduate positions no later than September 2018.

To apply for a President’s Research Fellowship Scholarship, please email with the title(s) of the project being applied for, a CV and a statement (c.500 words) as to why this project is of interest to you. If applying for more than one research project, please list them in your order of preference.

Closing Date: Monday 5th June 2018



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The applicability of. Council Directive 93/13/EEC of 5 April 1993 on unfair terms in consumer contracts. in mortgage enforcement proceedings in Ireland. Read more

The applicability of Council Directive 93/13/EEC of 5 April 1993 on unfair terms in consumer contracts in mortgage enforcement proceedings in Ireland.

Project Objectives

To determine whether, under Directive 93/13 (“the directive”), the Irish courts have been assessing, of their own motion, whether a contractual term falling within the scope of the directive is unfair, thereby addressing the imbalance which exists between the mortgagor and mortgagee; and to determine whether an applicant in mortgage enforcement proceedings can rely upon Irish legislation, the common law rules of contract and rules of procedure, to secure possession of a mortgaged property in cases where the directive is applicable.

Methodology proposed

Qualitative research:

interviews with applicants and respondents in mortgage enforcement proceedings in relation to their knowledge of the applicability of the directive in respect of the proceedings in question and the extent to which their legal advisers and the courts/masters have been willing to entertain submissions based on the directive.

Quantitative research:

analysis of court reports and Law reports, and a statistical analysis of the numbers and types of cases before the courts/masters in mortgage enforcement proceedings where the directive has been cited (and in cases where it has not, why not) and the role the directive played in determining the outcome of the proceedings.

Expected outcomes: (e.g. deliverables & strategic impacts)

Outcome:

to produce a comprehensive body of knowledge on (i) the efficacy of the directive in mortgage enforcement proceedings, (ii) the extent to which its potential effect is understood by applicants and respondents, and, (iii) the type of mortgage agreements which may be successfully challenged by respondents in enforcement proceedings, in particular those where the court has assessed, as it must under the directive, whether the mortgagee, dealing fairly and equitably with the mortgagor, could reasonably assume that the mortgagor would have agreed to such a term in individual contract negotiations.

Impact:

this research may result in disseminating to consumers, legal advisers, financial institutions, and governmental authorities the role that the directive can play in ensuring that the interests of the weaker party, i.e., mortgagor, are protected in enforcement proceedings.



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Project Objectives. To measure the number of SMEs by business sector in the South East region from 2007-2017 and their contribution to the region’s local economy in terms of employment. Read more

Project Objectives

  1. To measure the number of SMEs by business sector in the South East region from 2007-2017 and their contribution to the region’s local economy in terms of employment.
  2. To document the extent that regional SMEs have internationalised their business and to investigate the opportunities and barriers to SME internationalisation.
  3. To analyse existing regional, national and European supports to assist SME internalisation in the South East.
  4. To make recommendations to assist regional SMEs grow their business through internationalisation in order to develop the region economically.

Methodology proposed

The methodology employed for this study will be a mixed methods approach broken into two stages. In Stage 1 the study will use SME data from Local Enterprise Boards in the South East and Enterprise Ireland to measure the number of SMEs by business sector in the South East. A survey will be designed, piloted and administered to regional SMEs with the aim of examining the extent, method and outcomes of their internationalisation, if any, to date. In Stage 2, those SMEs who have internationalised their business as documented in Stage 1 will be invited to participate in a focus group meeting to investigate their experience of internationalisation and existing supports in place to assist SMEs with internationalisation. The study will use this primary data to make recommendations to assist our regional SMEs further grow their business through internationalisation and aid regional economic development into the future.

Expected outcomes: (e.g. deliverables & strategic impacts)

Expected outcomes from this research is one potentially publishable research paper. The project is of regional strategic value as its recommendations will assist economic development of the South East region.



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The MA in Irish Studies at Queen’s provides students with an unrivalled opportunity to examine Ireland in its global contexts. Read more

The MA in Irish Studies at Queen’s provides students with an unrivalled opportunity to examine Ireland in its global contexts. With options from Literature, History, Politics, Archaeology, Anthropology, and Sociology the MA allows students to pursue challenging cross-disciplinary themes such as heritage and identities, language and arts, peace and conflict, reflecting the rich cultural legacy of Ireland at home and across the world. Students will explore the possibilities and opportunities in inter-disciplinary work in one of the world’s leading centres of Irish Studies research. Our new core interdisciplinary module on ‘Belfast: Place, Identity and Memory in a Contested City' introduces students to debates in Irish Studies through the case study of Belfast in its historical, cultural, political and social aspects. We will guide students in choosing Irish-related options to meet their particular interests and provide appropriate research training to undertake a research dissertation on their chosen subject.

Course Details

The MA is arranged into thematically-focused groups of modules to include culture, art and literature, political identity, conflict, politics and human rights. Students will take a number of compulsory and optional modules. One of the modules in the first semester must be a research methods course.

Some options may require that particular methods courses be taken or the student to have a particular academic background. The dissertation may be supervised by Institute staff or, subject to the agreement of the Head of School, by members of co-operating academic departments.

A wide variety of modules is available, arranged in thematic and conceptual groups. Current thematic areas include:

  • Ireland: Communities, Identities and Conflict
  • Ireland: Culture, Tradition and Heritage
  • Ireland: History and Politics
  • Ireland: Literature, Language and Art
  • Ireland: Peoples and Place

For detailed programme information please see the Irish Studies Gateway section on the School website.

Assessment and Feedback

Taught modules are assessed by a combination of examinations, written language assignments and creative practice. Students who have reached a pass in these will submit a dissertation (not exceeding 15,000 words) or a practice as research project, which will include a critical reflection of approximately 3,500 words.

Career Prospects

Students of the Institute of Irish Studies go on to pursue careers not only as scholars, but also in the media, in the heritage sector and in business.

Queen's postgraduates reap exceptional benefits. Unique initiatives, such as Degree Plus and Researcher Plus bolster our commitment to employability, while innovative leadership and executive programmes alongside sterling integration with business experts helps our students gain key leadership positions both nationally and internationally

Queen's postgraduates reap exceptional benefits. Unique initiatives, such as Degree Plus and Researcher Plus bolster our commitment to employability, while innovative leadership and executive programmes alongside sterling integration with business experts helps our students gain key leadership positions both nationally and internationally.



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The MA in German Language and Culture in Europe is a new jointly taught programme by German Studies experts at both Mary Immaculate College and the University of Limerick. Read more
The MA in German Language and Culture in Europe is a new jointly taught programme by German Studies experts at both Mary Immaculate College and the University of Limerick. The design of the course responds to the demand for plurilingual European citizens and reflects Ireland’s increasing integration into a constantly changing European Union in which Germany represents a crucial economic, political and cultural force. By positioning German culture firmly within an EU and broader European context, the programme explores its relationship with Europe, the cultural dimensions of the European integration process and the inter-relationship of German and neighbouring cultures. Alongside comparative cultural knowledge the programme intends to provide graduates with high-level language competence in order to equip them with both the linguistic and conceptual skills to operate in an increasingly multicultural environment in Ireland and abroad and function effectively as cultural mediators between Ireland and the German-speaking countries. Designed to prepare students for leadership roles in cross-cultural contexts both within Ireland and for the EU, this programme is also attractive to existing and future teachers of German in secondary schools, where a progressive Europeanisation of the curriculum will be one of the features of educational reforms, and to students interested in evolving employment prospects in the tourism sector or multi-national companies.

The programme will enable students to:
• Analyse and interpret German-language culture within a broader European context, including the inter-relationship between Ireland and Germany, Switzerland, Austria
• Handle a wide range of communicative situations in the foreign language and communicate in oral and written German with a high degree of accuracy and confidence
• Function as plurilingual European citizens with both the linguistic and conceptual skills to operate in a future increasingly multi-cultural environment in Ireland and abroad and function effectively as cultural mediators between Ireland and the German-speaking countries
• Fulfil leadership roles in cross-cultural contexts
• Conceptualise larger research projects (e.g. in preparation for further study towards a PhD degree) and participate in a broader intellectual community of postgraduate research and learning.

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Study petroleum and subsurface geoscience in Ireland and benefit from a modern interdisciplinary training delivered by leading researchers and industry specialists at University College Dublin. Read more

Study petroleum and subsurface geoscience in Ireland and benefit from a modern interdisciplinary training delivered by leading researchers and industry specialists at University College Dublin.

UCD School of Earth Sciences provides a one-year full-time Petroleum Geoscience MSc. The course offers bright and motivated geoscience graduates a vocational training in the range of technical fields associated with hydrocarbon exploration and production, as a prelude to a career in the petroleum industry or to further studies at PhD level.

 

The UCD training experience:

·        Covers all aspects of exploration, appraisal and development geoscience from pore to basin scale.

·        Involves substantial field-based instruction (23 days) in classic outcrop locations including the Clare Basin, Ireland; Bristol Channel, UK; Pyrenees, Spain.

·        Provides first-hand experience of typical industry workflows, experience with key industry software and a dedicated workstation for each student during the course.

·        Involves problem-based learning drawing on a wide range of geophysical, subsurface, outcrop and ‘behind-outcrop’ datasets.

·        Includes a three-month applied research project and possible industry placement.

 Scholarships Available

Students accepted on to the course can apply for the Woodside Energy Masters Scholarship in Petroleum Geoscience (€15,000) and MSc Scholarship Opportunities in Petroleum-Related Courses from the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment (up to €12,000). Please see here for further details.

Career opportunities

Graduates from the course will be equipped with all the necessary technical and transferable skills for a career in the petroleum industry or further studies at PhD level. Past students have found employment with exploration and production companies (including Shell, Petronas and Providence). Ireland is an EU country, and has a 24-month stay-back option allowing non-EU MSc graduates to remain in Ireland, working or seeking employment, for two years following graduation.

Course Content

Semester 1 covers modules in Petroleum Systems, Basin Analysis and Modelling, Seismic Techniques, Petrophysics, Depositional Systems and Structural Geology.

Semester 2 then focusses on Exploration Geology and Production Geoscience with team-based exercises mimicking industry asset-team projects. Geological field excursions are a key component of the course with three trips to see classic outcrops of the Clare Basin (western Ireland), Bristol Channel and Wessex Basins (southern England) and the Ebro Basin (Pyrenees, Spain).

During the final semester students undertake a three-month independent research project on an exploration or development related theme with opportunities for summer internships working on company data. 

 

Staff

The course builds on significant in-house research expertise in frontier exploration, rift and hyper-extended basin evolution, reservoir sedimentology, geophysical imaging techniques, fault analysis and reservoir and fluid flow modelling. Teaching is delivered by highly experienced academic staff, many of who have previously worked within industry and are recognised international leaders in a variety of petroleum geoscience disciplines.

 

UCD School of Earth Sciences

The UCD School of Earth Sciences has an internationally recognised reputation for excellence in teaching and research. It is the lead participant and host for the Irish Centre for Research in Applied Geosciences (iCRAG) which conducts research in hydrocarbons, geophysics, 3D modelling and marine geoscience, as well as in geochemistry, geophysics, groundwater and raw materials.

Founded in 1854, University College Dublin is Ireland’s Global University with 235,000 alumni across 165 countries. The university is ranked number 1 in Ireland for Earth & Marine Sciences (QS World University Subject Rankings 2017‌). 

 

How to Apply?

Application can be made via the UCD webpage here. There is a rolling deadline for this course until such time as all places have been filled; therefore early application is advised. Course entry will generally require a minimum 2.1 Honours degree or equivalent in Geology, Geoscience, Earth Science, Geophysics or a cognate discipline but relevant industrial experience will also be taken into account.

Click here to visit the MSc Petroleum Geoscience page on the University College Dublin website to find out more and apply!



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To identify and critique how positive relationships with children in the EY are supported and nurtured. To identify good practice and make recommendations arising out of the project findings. Read more
  • To identify and critique how positive relationships with children in the EY are supported and nurtured
  • To identify good practice and make recommendations arising out of the project findings.

Methodology proposed

  • Identify & critique relevant literature
  • Survey
  • Interviews with pedagogical leaders, managers, key workers and parents
  • Focus groups
  • Observation of key worker interactions (with relevant ethical approval)

Expected outcomes: (e.g. deliverables & strategic impacts)

Custom and practice in early years’ settings has tended to place the practitioner as educational manager or carer of a small group of children. The key person approach seeks to create a triangle of trust that the educator and parents build to support the child in the EY setting. (Elfer, 2007)

In line with our Strategic Plan (2014-18) this project has the potential of serving the local Early Years community by identifying good local practice. Dissemination of the recommendations and the outcomes could for the basis for critical reflective engagement CPD opportunities to be hosted by the Department.

This research project will also increase the research profile of the Dept. and contribute to the newly validated Master of Arts in Leadership in Early Childhood Education and Care.



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This well established and popular 'dual award' programme is designed to meet the needs of accounting graduates who wish to pursue a career as an Irish Chartered Accountant. Read more

This well established and popular 'dual award' programme is designed to meet the needs of accounting graduates who wish to pursue a career as an Irish Chartered Accountant. It is an academically challenging one-year taught programme which encompasses both professional and conceptual material, enabling accounting graduates to study for a master's award and at the same time gain exemptions from professional examinations of Chartered Accountants Ireland. It is one of the leading programmes of its kind in Ireland and is the result of close collaboration with CAI, and the in-depth experience and expertise of the course team.

It is an aim of the programme to develop the high level of skills, understanding and leadership capability considered necessary for embarking on a career as a Chartered Accountant, and to obtain a deeper understanding of the contemporary problems and issues faced by accounting and business professionals. The master's dissertation element of the programme will enable students to develop their research and analytical skills further by completing a piece of primary research.

A highly desirable feature of the programme is the level of sponsorship provided by employers. Students being sponsored on the programme receive payment of tuition fees, generous book allowances and in some instances loans and laptops.

Recent employers and sponsors of graduates include BDO, Deloitte, EY, FPM, KPMG and PwC.

Attendance

Over the course of one academic year, lectures and seminars are scheduled during the University working day, and typically spread over four days per week during each semester. Typically 16 contact hours per week with the remainder of the time allocated to independent study.

Career options

Employment prospects for students completing this programme are excellent, with typically close to 100% of students securing training contracts with Chartered Accountancy firms.

The programme is highly regarded by employers, with many of the large and medium sized chartered accountancy firms sponsoring students on the programme. See Fees & Funding.

On successful completion of the programme, students not only gain a postgraduate qualification but also full CAP2 exemptions. With pass rates typically at 100%, students only have to complete the final FAE examinations in order to qualify as a Chartered Accountant.

The goal of the programme is to produce high-calibre graduates who will progress quickly through their professional training and advance to senior management positions within the accountancy profession.

Career opportunities for Chartered Accountants have never been better. Currently, two thirds of CAI members are working in industry, business or finance. Many leading companies in Ireland have a Chartered Accountant as their Financial Director or Chief Executive. A third of members are currently working in practice. International recognition brings global mobility for members with over 3,500 members working outside Ireland (e.g. Australia, USA, Canada, Caribbean).

Professional recognition

Chartered Accountants Ireland  

Accredited by Chartered Accountants Ireland for the purpose of exemption from some professional exams.



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