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Masters Degrees (Ip Law)

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In today’s business world, intellectual property law wields ever-increasing influence. Due to the importance this intangible asset has acquired, it is now more imperative than ever to study the ways in which derivative works, brands, patents and industrial designs are protected and regulated. Read more
In today’s business world, intellectual property law wields ever-increasing influence. Due to the importance this intangible asset has acquired, it is now more imperative than ever to study the ways in which derivative works, brands, patents and industrial designs are protected and regulated.

The Master Degree in Market & IP LAW taught by the UIC Barcelona gives you the chance to study Law, Economics and Business. The Master’s programme covers regulations in competition, consumer affairs and advertising, as well the operation and regulation of e-commerce and the information society. You will study specific cases of market industries, including energy systems, telecommunications and products subject to special regulation, such as pharmaceuticals and foods.

This master’s degree is ideally suited for professionals seeking to work in business consulting.

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This general LLM programme is the ideal choice for students wishing to expose themselves to diverse areas of advanced legal scholarship. Read more

Programme description

This general LLM programme is the ideal choice for students wishing to expose themselves to diverse areas of advanced legal scholarship.

Edinburgh Law School offers a very wide range of specialist courses, many taught by internationally recognised experts in their fields.

At present, key areas of research and teaching include:

international law
commercial and corporate law
criminal law
international economic law
international banking and finance
medical ethics
criminology
intellectual property
information technology law
European law
private law
comparative law
human rights
public law.

This allows students on the general LLM to take courses which make up a diverse and challenging curriculum and through which they will be able to develop a broad expertise in cutting-edge legal scholarship.

Programme structure

The programme structure for 2017/18 is currently being finalised. You will take a total of 120 credits in taught courses, 60 in each semester, which may include the following:

Commercial Law

Choose a maximum of 40 credits:

Company Law (40 credits, full year course)
Contract Law in Europe (40 credits, full year course)
The Law of International Trade (40 credits, full year course)
Corporation Law and Economics (20 credits, semester 1)
International Commercial Arbitration (20 credits, semester 1)
Principles of Corporate Finance Law (20 credits, semester 1)
The Law of Secured Finance (20 credits, semester 1)
Comparative Corporate Governance (20 credits, semester 2)
Corporate Social Responsibility and the Law (20 credits, semester 2)
European Labour Law (20 credits, semester 2)
Insolvency Law (20 credits, semester 2)
Principles of Insurance Law (20 credits, semester 2)

Criminal Law and Evidence

Choose a maximum of 60 credits:

General Principles of Criminal Law (20 credits, semester 1)
Current Issues in Criminal Law (20 credits, semester 2)
Sexual Offending and the Law (20 credits, semester 2)

Criminology

Choose a maximum of 60 credits:

Criminological Research Methods (40 credits, full year course)
Theoretical Criminology (20 credits, semester 1)
Criminal Justice and Penal Process (20 credits, semester 1)
Global Crime and Insecurity (20 credits, semester 1)
Cybercrime (20 credits, semester 2)
Mental Health and Crime (20 credits, semester 2)
Responding to Global Crime and Insecurity (20 credits, semester 2)
Surveillance and Security (20 credits, semester 2)

EU Law

Choose a maximum of 60 credits:

EU Competition Law (40 credits, full year course)
EU Constitutional Law (20 credits, semester 1)
EU Fundamental Rights Law (20 credits, semester 2)

IP, Media and Technology Law

Choose a maximum of 40 credits:

Intellectual Property Law 1: Copyright and Related Rights (20 credits, semester 1)
International Intellectual Property System (20 credits, semester 1)
The Legal Challenges of Information Technologies (20 credits, semester 1)
Robotics and the Law (20 credits, semester 1)
Contemporary Issues in the Law and Policy of e-Commerce, the Digital Economy and International Information Governance (20 credits, semester 2)
Data Protection and Information Privacy (20 credits, semester 2)
Information: Control and Power (20 credits, semester 2)
Intellectual Property - Law and Society (20 credits, semester 2)
International and European Media Law (20 credits, semester 2)
Law and New Technologies: Artificial Intelligence, Risk and the Law (20 credits, semester 2)
Law of E-Commerce (20 credits, semester 2)
Managing Intellectual Property (20 credits, semester 2)

International Law

Choose a maximum of 40 credits:

Fundamental Issues in International Law (40 credits, full year course)
International Criminal Law (40 credits, full year course)
International Environmental Law (40 credits, full year course)
WTO Law (40 credits, full year course)
History and Theory of International Law (20 credits, semester 1)
International Climate Change Law (20 credits, semester 1)
International Human Rights Law (20 credits, semester 1)
International Investment Law (20 credits, semester 1)
International Law of the Sea (20 credits, semester 1)
Advanced Issues in International Economic Law (20 credits, semester 2)
Diplomatic Law (20 credits, semester 2)
EU Climate Change and Energy Law (20 credits, semester 2)
Inter-State Conflict and Humanitarian Law (20 credits, semester 2)

Legal History and Legal Theory

Choose a maximum of 60 credits:

Traditions of Legal Inquiry (20 credits, semester 1)
Reasoning with Precedent (20 credits, semester 1)
Law and the Enlightenment (20 credits, semester 2)
The Anatomy of Public Law (20 credits, semester 2)

Medical Law

Choose a maximum of 60 credits:

Fundamental Issues in Medical Jurisprudence (20 credits, semester 1)
Risk and Regulation: Health and the Environment (20 credits, semester 1)
Contemporary Issues in Medical Jurisprudence (20 credits, semester 2)
Life Sciences, Society and Law (10 credits, semester 2)
Medical Negligence (10 credits, semester 2)

Private Law

Choose a maximum of 60 credits:

Comparative Property Law (20 credits, semester 1)
Delict and Tort (20 credits, semester 1)
Principles of International Tax Law (20 credits, semester 1)
Comparative and International Trust Law (20 credits, semester 2)
EUCOTAX Wintercourse (20 credits, semester 2)
Family Law in Comparative Perspectives (20 credits, semester 2)
International Private Law: Jurisdiction and Enforcement of Judgments (20 credits, semester 2)
Principles of European Tax Law (20 credits, semester 2)

Public Law

Choose a maximum of 60 credits:

Human Rights and Conflict Resolution (20 credits, semester 2)
Human Rights Law in Europe (20 credits, semester 2)
The Anatomy of Public Law (20 credits, semester 2)

Learning outcomes

By the end of this programme, you should have acquired a more sophisticated understanding of your chosen subjects, including the diverse functions of law in contemporary society, differing approaches to the subject and a greater familiarity with research materials and methods.

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Degree. Master of Laws (LL.M.). Specialization. European and Transnational Law of Intellectual Property and Information Technology. Read more

Key points

Degree: Master of Laws (LL.M.).

Specialization: European and Transnational Law of Intellectual Property and Information Technology.

Language of instruction: English.

Duration: 1 year (1 October to 30 September).

Workload: 60 ECTS credits.

Admission requirements: bachelor's degree plus 1 year of professional experience.

Tuition fee: 7,800 euros; early applicants 7,200 euros.

Application deadline: 30 June.

Maximum number of participants: 30.

Overview

The LL.M. in European and Transnational Intellectual Property and Information Technology Law (LIPIT) is a postgraduate program directed at providing the in-depth understanding of legal issues arising from the creation and use of literary or artistic works, mechanical or scientific inventions, digital information, and other intangible assets. It covers a wide variety of subjects, including copyright, patents, trademarks, telecommunications, electronic commerce, information security, and data protection.

Because it is more and more common for transactions with intellectual property and information technology products to transcend national boundaries, this LL.M. Program is conceived as distinctly international and comparative in nature. Solutions from various legal systems are often presented when examining modern problems of the IP and IT law, and cases spreading over two or more countries are regularly discussed and analyzed. One consequence of such an approach is that this Program is suitable for lawyers and other professionals from different countries, rather than being limited to one particular jurisdiction.

Besides the Program's international character, strong emphasis is placed on establishing the direct link to practice. Many classes are taught by experienced attorneys and other practitioners. In lectures and seminars, legal issues are examined largely through analyzing real court cases, identifying concrete common problems and searching for effective solutions to them. Through hands-on workshops and projects, newly acquired knowledge is further enhanced and developed into readily applicable practical skills.

Target group

The main target group of this LL.M. Program is lawyers working or wishing to work with creative and innovative industries. The Program is designed to expand their expertise in the IP and IT law by focusing on issues and aspects that are usually not included in a regular legal studies curriculum, for example the cross-border enforcement of rights stemming from the IP and IT law.

Since the branches of IP and IT Law lie at the intersection of the law with technology, science and arts, the Program is also open to engineers, computer scientists, media managers, and other professionals seeking to enhance their understanding of legal regulation, policies, and mechanisms of protection in the fields of intellectual property and information technology. As a result, Program participants can benefit from exchanging opinions, engaging in group projects and other forms of cooperation with graduates of other disciplines, which helps them to better understand different angles and perspectives of the topics they study.

Besides the variety of academic and professional backgrounds, we also strive to achieve diverse geographic representation in the selection of each year's Program participants. Such diversity enriches classroom discussions and collaborative activities by ensuring the exchange and application of ideas and approaches from various legal systems and cultural environments.

Program duration

Your studies at the LIPIT Program will normally take around one year (from October to September). During this time, you will have to obtain 60 ECTS credits, including 20 credits for a completion of a master's thesis. If your total post-secondary education lasted less than 4 years, you might be required to earn more credits in order to be awarded the LL.M. degree. In this case, our educational adviser will help you to work out an individual study plan that will allow you to earn the required credits without exceeding the normal Program duration.

Program language

Considering the international makeup of the Program, English has been chosen as its language of instruction. Therefore, in order to be admitted to the Program, applicants will have to demonstrate that their English language skills are sufficient for the purposes of higher education.

Though knowledge of German language is not a pre-requisite for admission, it is certainly very useful for managing everyday life and studies in Germany. Therefore, we encourage our international students to learn some German before the beginning of the Program and to take advantage of numerous language learning opportunities offered by the University of Göttingen while studying here. Specifically, students can attend all the courses offered by the University's language center (ZESS) free of charge.

Curriculum

In order to gain your LL.M. degree, you will have to obtain at least 60 ECTS credits. 20 credits will be awarded for the completion of the individual master's module, which involves the preparation and writing of a master's thesis. The remaining 40 ECTS credits can be obtained by completing a sufficient number of group study modules, each of which equals to at least 5 ECTS credits. The list of modules can vary slightly from year to year, but the examples below generally provide a good idea of the available modules:

Fundamentals of Intellectual Property Law
Fundamentals of Information Technology Law
Advanced Intellectual Property Law
Advanced Information Technology Law
E-Commerce Law
Competition Law
Data Protection Law
Media and Telecommunications Law
Information Technology and Legal Informatics
Economic Foundations of IP and IT Law
International and Comparative IP and IT Law
Transnational Enforcement of IP and IT Law

Why study in Göttingen?

The University of Göttingen is constantly ranked among the best German higher education institutions in various national and international university rankings. Since its foundation in 1737, it has provided excellent study and research opportunities to students and scholars from all over the world, including more than 40 Nobel Prize winners. Besides the instruction and guidance from prominent professors and other experts, Göttingen students benefit from the access to first-class study facilities, for example Göttingen State and University Library, which is one of the largest libraries in Germany, containing around 8 million items and providing access to numerous legal and other scholarly databases.

Göttingen University's Faculty of Law enjoys excellent reputation for teaching, research, and professional development. Throughout the centuries of its existence, it has been renowned for advancing the legal science and offering outstanding legal training by eminent jurists like Johann Stephan Pütter or Rudolf von Jhering. Consequently, Göttingen has always been a very attractive place for those wishing to study law, including some famous historic figures like Otto von Bismarck or Wilhelm von Humboldt.

A number of attractive features make studying law in Göttingen especially rewarding. For example, legal education here has a strong link to practice, offering classes not only by professors, but also by practicing attorneys and other practitioners. In addition, many professors are also active outside the academia, for example as legal advisers, members of legislative commissions or judges of highest courts.

Another appealing aspect of Göttingen Law Faculty is its internationality. As well as hosting students from all over the world and providing numerous exchange opportunities, the Faculty also offers classes by visiting professors from other countries and is involved in continuous international cooperation through various dedicated bodies like German-Chinese Legal Science Institute or European Academy of Law and ICT.

Further advantages for law students in Göttingen derive from the wide variety of specialized institutes and other specialization clusters, which ensure that numerous legal subjects can be studied from multiple perspectives and in all their aspects. For example, the Institute of Business Law lets the students of IP and IT law benefit from the combined expertise of Professor Körber, a well-known expert on telecommunication law, competition law and law of search engines; Professor Spindler, the author of popular commentaries and monographs on e-commerce, electronic media, open source and other topics; Professor Wiebe, renowned for his works on ICT law, unfair competition, copyright and data protection; as well as other specialists in these and related areas. Professors Körber, Spindler and Wiebe are also involved in numerous legal policy development activities in Germany, Europe and beyond. These professors were actively engaged in establishing the LIPIT Program and currently they make up its Academic Board.

In addition to lectures and seminars by well-known experts in their fields, students can take advantage of various conferences, workshops, and study trips organized or co-organized by the Faculty or individual professors. For example, students can participate in the yearly International Research Forum on Law and ICT/IP, Göttingen IT Law Forum, and the Summer School of European IP and ICT Law.

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The LLM Intellectual Property Law will give you a thorough understanding of the law concerning intellectual property and patents in modern business. Read more
The LLM Intellectual Property Law will give you a thorough understanding of the law concerning intellectual property and patents in modern business.

Our intellectual property (IP) experts will take you through the economic, social and philosophical aspects of IP law development and encourage you to critically analyse the current legal framework. You will gain advanced knowledge in IP law and concomitant policy, and learn about national and international grant, enforcement and defence of intellectual property rights on a multi-jurisdictional basis.

With research expertise in important industry sectors such as life sciences, healthcare, communications and information technology, our teaching staff offer strong links to the wider IP profession. Contentious issues in intellectual property are connected to developments in high-tech sectors as well as the arts and popular culture, so the course has appeal to a wide range of backgrounds and IP-related careers.

Special features

Our award-winning careers service offers you all year round dedicated postgraduate support including employability sessions, and advice for those aspiring to a PhD and career in academia.

Teaching and learning

We use various teaching methods across the course to enable you to participate in debate and hone the analytical and reasoning skills vital to legal and business professionals.

Coursework and assessment

Most course units are assessed by standard methods - either one unseen written examination, or one coursework essay, or a combination of these two methods of assessment. The assessment method of each individual course unit is listed in the course unit description.

This LLM has a compulsory research component, in which students have the option of choosing either to submit two research papers of 7,000-8,000 words each (and each of the value of 30 credits) or writing a 14,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits). If students choose the option of submitting two research papers, the first research paper must be within the area of a semester one course unit that you have chosen, and the second research paper must be within the area of a semester two course unit that you have chosen. The research element of the course is supported by weekly research methodology lectures delivered throughout semesters one and two designed to improve students' legal writing and research skills. For specialised streams, dissertation topic must be within those streams while for general LLM dissertation topics must be within one of the elective units chosen by the student.

Career opportunities

This master's course offers training for a professional career in IP law in a range of industries, such as life sciences, healthcare, communications and information technology sectors. It also allows the development of research skills for those wishing to pursue an academic career in IP law.

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Intellectual Property Law has become an interdisciplinary field comprised of law, engineering, medical science, economics, and numerous other fields. Read more

Overview

Intellectual Property Law has become an interdisciplinary field comprised of law, engineering, medical science, economics, and numerous other fields. The MSc in Management of Intellectual Property explores the foundations of this area of law with relation to patents, trade marks and the other core areas within this field.

This Masters of Science is primarily aimed at science and engineering graduates who wish to pursue a career as patent or trade mark attorneys, though it is also open to graduates from all academic backgrounds who wish to study Intellectual Property (IP) at postgraduate level.

There is continued need for expertise in intellectual property law and management in industry, commerce and the innovative and creative industries, and this MSc gives you the opportunity to study IP to a high level. The programme offers a professional stream (for science and technology graduates), and a business stream, available to graduates from all fields looking to expand their knowledge of the application and management of IP.

Professional stream
The professional stream is directed towards graduates (primarily sciences and other technical industries, but also from all other backgrounds) seeking qualification as patent and trade mark attorneys.

Business stream
Students on the business stream will gain profound knowledge of the law and its operation with a view to working in areas such as the press and media, the entertainment industry, the internet and software industries, or the luxury goods industries. Further sectors where knowledge in Intellectual Property and related areas is seen as a particular advantage include governments, international organisations, universities or non-governmental institutions.

This programme will:
◦Give you a choice of two streams to suit your background; a professional stream for science and engineering graduates, and a business stream for graduates of other disciplines.
◦Offer science and engineering graduates the opportunity to gain professional exemptions from Chartered Institute of Patent Attorneys (CIPA) and Institute of Trade Mark Attorneys (ITMA).

What is Intellectual Property (IP) law?

Intellectual Property Law has become an interdisciplinary field comprising law, engineering, medical science, economics, and numerous other fields. This programme teaches the foundations of this area of law with relation to patents, trademarks and the other core areas within this field.

Why study Intellectual Property law?

The MSc Management of Intellectual Property programme was developed as we recognised the increasingly important role of intellectual property in our modern economy. There is an emerging need in industry, in commerce and in those professions concerned with intellectual property law, for science and technology graduates who have studied intellectual property law to a high level. In industry, particularly in small and medium-sized firms involved in research and development, where there is no in-house lawyer or patent agent, there is often a need for an intermediary between the firms and the external lawyer or patent agent for example; or for an executive to handle the inward or outward licensing of technology, to negotiate research and development contracts (where ownership of intellectual property is usually central to the bargaining) or generally to have a basic knowledge of current developments in the field of business law (eg. contract law, product liability law) insofar as these may relate to the firm's present or future activities.

With the introduction of the new business stream we also offer a distinct avenue for graduates from all backgrounds to gain valuable knowledge of intellectual property.

Structure of the MSc in Management of Intellectual Property

Classes usually commence mid-September with examinations in May/June. Courses are taught during the day at Queen Mary University of London campuses and usually take place between 9.00am and 5.00pm.

There is an initial Basic English Law examination which takes place two weeks after the start of the programme. Students then select which stream they wish to undertake.

Compulsory modules:

◦Study project (45 credits)
◦Basic principles of English law, evidence and practice (non-credit bearing but all students must pass this module at the start of the programme)

All students require 180 credits in total.

Professional stream students have core modules plus one free choice half module of 22.5 credits. In addition to this, professional stream students also sit two additional papers to gain exemption from the foundation papers of CIPA and ITMA, both papers must be passed to gain the exemption for either institution.

Business stream students have a free choice of 135 credits (three full modules or six half modules, or a combination of the two.)

All students are required to study the core subject units: Patent law, Copyright and designs law, Law of trade marks and unfair competition, Competition law, and Basic principles of English law, evidence and practice in term one. Occasional additional second semester options may be available.

]]Modules:]]

Read the full module descriptions on the QMUL web site.

Modules which run annually:
◦The law of copyright and design I (Compulsory for Professional stream)
◦The law of patents I and II (Compulsory for Professional stream)
◦Trade mark law I and II (Compulsory for Professional Stream
◦Study Project (Core Module for all students)
◦The law of competition I
◦Media law
◦Trade mark law I
◦The law of patents I
◦Intellectual property in food, biotechnology and agriculture
◦Intellectual property in the United States.

Modules which may run but cannot be guaranteed:
◦Competition law and licensing I and II
◦The law of copyright and design I and I
◦Information technology law
◦Intellectual property transactions
◦Licensing practice.

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The Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL), also sometimes referred to as the Common Professional Examination, (CPE), is a programme for non-law graduates, or those with equivalent qualifications, wishing to either enter the legal profession or work in law-relevant employment. Read more
The Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL), also sometimes referred to as the Common Professional Examination, (CPE), is a programme for non-law graduates, or those with equivalent qualifications, wishing to either enter the legal profession or work in law-relevant employment. No prior knowledge of law is required.

Key Features of Graduate Diploma in Law

The Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) is a full-time, 36-week, intensive course designed to facilitate the acquisition of sound legal knowledge in those areas of law which are known as the Foundations of Law plus one additional area of law.

- The Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) course is preceded by a two-week period of directed reading on the English Legal System and the principles of legal scholarship (no attendance required, home study)
- Teaching of the Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) course commences with an induction period which includes a short block of lectures and seminars concentrating on the English Legal System, the acquisition of legal skills, and European Union Law
- The foundation subjects of Contract, Tort, Public Law, Equity & Trusts, Land Law and Criminal Law are taught by means of a series of lectures and compulsory seminars spanning two teaching blocks during the Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) course;
- A further legal subject is studied by means of a supervised research project;
- Class contact averages 16 hours per week. Students on the the Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) course should expect to spend a minimum of 40 hours per week, attending classes and undertaking private study.

What next after the Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL)

In order to qualify as a solicitor or barrister you will have to complete the vocational stage of training. The School of Law at Swansea offer both a full-time and part-time, Legal Practice Course (LPC), successful completion of which satisfies the requirements of the Solicitors Regulation Authority. (For more information on our LPC, contact Michaela Leyshon, LPC Admissions Tutor at ).

For intending barristers, visit the Bar Standards Board at http://www.barcouncil.org.uk/careers/students/

Information on Swansea University Careers and Employability Service can be found here: http://www.swan.ac.uk/careers/

Career Prospects

Non-law graduates are being welcomed into the legal profession at an increasing rate, as they are perceived as bringing a fresh perspective to the practice of law, and now make up approximately 50% of all new lawyers. Successful completion of the Swansea Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL), which is accredited by the SRA, Bar and ILEX satisfies all of the academic requirements for admission to the vocational stage of training as a solicitor, barrister or legal executive.

UK qualified lawyers have the opportunity to not only work in local and nationally based firms and chambers, public bodies and businesses but also in legal environments around the world.

In addition, the Swansea Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) is also relevant to those wishing to enhance their job prospects in areas such as business management, the probation service, forensic psychology, trading standards, politics, human resource management, education to name a few.

Student Quote

“I completed the Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) at Swansea University in 2010. I wanted to gain practical legal experience before continuing my studies, so found a position as a paralegal at a local high street firm. Whilst the work was interesting and challenging, I knew I wanted to work for a larger commercial firm. I moved to London and began applying for training contracts whilst working as a paralegal in Herbert Smith. I was lucky enough to be offered a contract with Edwards Wildman, a small city firm which combines a small trainee intake with top quality work and high calibre clients.

Before beginning my training I worked in-house for a start-up technology company to acquire a further diversity of experience. The position allowed me to gain valuable exposure to IP work, which is an area of law I am particularly interested in.I am currently in my first seat in the Commercial Litigation department which so far has been interesting and varied. I am enjoying my training contract and look forward to the next two years”.

Isabel Roszkowski, Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL)

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The LLM in Intellectual Property Law programme allows students to study introductory and advanced intellectual property (IP) and technology law and to scrutinise the policies affecting intellectual property and technology law under the guidance of leading scholars in the field. Read more
The LLM in Intellectual Property Law programme allows students to study introductory and advanced intellectual property (IP) and technology law and to scrutinise the policies affecting intellectual property and technology law under the guidance of leading scholars in the field. Students will be able to study a wide range of topics from the protection of inventions, products, trade marks, creative works and designs to the global policy surrounding the law.


Modules:


To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Intellectual Property Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.

◦ QLLM025 E-Commerce Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM076 Media Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM095 Intellectual Property and the Creative Industries (45 credits)
◦ QLLM145 Intellectual Property in Business (45 credits)
◦ QLLM162 Intellectual Property Taxation (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM178 Competition Law, Intellectual Property and Innovation (45 credits)
◦ QLLM308 Civil Enforcement of Intellectual Property (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM309 Criminal Enforcement of Intellectual Property (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM328 Digital Intellectual Property Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM329 Informational Technology Transactions (sem 2)
◦ QLLM330 Comparative Copyright Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM331 International Copyright: International Treaties and Cross-Border Litigation (sem 1)
◦ QLLM332 Comparative Law of Patents and Trade Secrets (sem 1)
◦ QLLM333 International Law of Patents and Related Rights (sem 2)
◦ QLLM334 Licensing Intellectual Property (sem 1)
◦ QLLM335 Intellectual Property and Fashion: Art and Design (sem 1)
◦ QLLM336 Intellectual Property and Fashion: Business and Law (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM337 Design and Intellectual Property: EU and US
◦ QLLM338 International and Comparative Law of Unfair Competition (sem 1)
◦ QLLM339 The Law of Registered Trade Marks (sem 2)
◦ QLLM340 Global Intellectual Property: Fundamental Principles (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM341 Global Intellectual Property: Technology and Policy (sem 2)
◦ QLLM342 Interactive Entertainment and Intellectual Property Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM343 Interactive Entertainment Law: Contracts and Regulation (sem 2)
◦ QLLM344 The Law of Film (sem 1)
◦ QLLM345 The Business of Film (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM346 EU Copyright Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM347 The Law of Geographical Indications (GIs) (sem 2)
◦ QLLM348 Music Industry Contracts (sem 2)
◦ QLLM349 Transnational Mooting (sem 1)
◦ QLLM389 Copyright and Trademark in China (sem 1)
◦ QLLM390 Patent and Design in China (sem 2)
◦ QLLM400 United States Energy Law, Regulation and Policy (sem 1)

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This programme is designed to equip students with a comprehensive and specialist education in a range of areas within International Intellectual Property Law. Read more
This programme is designed to equip students with a comprehensive and specialist education in a range of areas within International Intellectual Property Law. The course will enable students to master the basic principles of the four main ‘pillars’ of IP Law, namely, Copyright, Patents, Trade marks and Industrial Designs. The four main components of IP Law will be examined from three distinct perspectives: domestic (UK), EU and International (global treaties/conventions) and will encompass analysis of legislation, case law (common law and civil law) and specific legal concepts. Where possible, comparative analysis will be carried out as between for example, specific EU IP Law developments and those of third country States e.g. India, Pakistan and China. In addition, certain third countries with well-developed, mature IP systems (e.g. the U.S., Canada and Australia) will be examined for a comparative assessment. The distinct themes of how the Internet has brought about new thinking in the IP world and, possible overlapping forms of IP protection (e.g. copyright and patent protection of computer software) will be examined.

Through carefully designed course work and varied teaching approaches, students from both a common law and civil law background will acquire the intellectual open-ness, technical expertise and critical thinking abilities that are necessary for effectiveness in a globalising world. The programme will equip students to respond effectively to the wide range of intellectual and professional challenges facing contemporary intellectual property lawyers. The LLM in International Intellectual Property Law will equip them to deal with both case work and policy making.

Employment Opportunities
Employment opportunities for graduates of the programme will include work with international law firms, patent and trade mark attorneys, local Intellectual Property Offices (e.g. the UK Intellectual Property Office, Chinese Patent and Trade Mark Office and the Office of the Controller General of Patents, Designs and Trade Marks in India),international organisations such as the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO), World Trade Organisation (WTO) and the United Nations and specialist bodies within the EU e.g. the Office for the Harmonisation of the Internal Market (OHIM) and the European Patent Office (EPO). Directorate-General Internal Market and Services of the European Commission deals with IP matters and is also a potential employer. Other potential employers include international courts and tribunals, think tanks and research centres (e.g. the specialist Max Planck Institute for Intellectual Property and Competition Law (Munich), non-governmental organisations and government (eg. Ministries of Justice; Business, Innovation and Skills and; Foreign Affairs). Having taken one of our programmes, there will, of course, also be possibilities for academically inclined students to pursue careers in teaching and research.

Compulsory Modules:

Legal Research Methods
Intellectual Property Law
Data Protection Law
Dissertation on any topic within International Intellectual Property Law
Optional Modules (choose 4)

International Criminal Law
International Human Rights Law
Children’s Rights in Domestic and International Law
European Human Rights Law
EU Internal Markets Law
Competition Law
Global Trade Law
Comparative Corporate Governance
International Banking Law
International Commercial Arbitration
International Law of Armed Conflict
Dealing with the Legacies of the Past
Structure
January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Teaching will mostly be seminar-based which will promote group and individual interaction, which also ensures that every individual student is encouraged to contribute to discussions. Seminar-based teaching enables lecturers and students to discuss issues and investigate topics in greater depth, and develops critical thinking and solution-based learning skills in students; whilst also allowing the course teachers to monitor closely each individual’s progress. Emphasis will be placed on the use of virtual learning through the mechanism of the Blackboard computer-assisted learning system and databases such as Westlaw and LexisNexis. Throughout all modules, comparative elements with other legal systems will be emphasised.

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The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) at Queen Mary offers a programme of online distance learning that leads to the award of a University of London LLM in Computer and Communications Law. Read more

M3S3 (minimum - two years; part-time)

The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) at Queen Mary offers a programme of online distance learning that leads to the award of a University of London LLM in Computer and Communications Law.

The programme draws on our established teaching and research expertise in IT law, e-commerce law, communications law, computer law and media law.

Law as a subject is particularly suitable for online learning in that it is primarily text-based, so delivery of teaching materials is not restricted by bandwidth limitations. Most of the relevant materials for computer and communications law are available in digital format from databases such as Lexis and Westlaw to which you gain access through your Queen Mary Student account. We use a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) as a platform to deliver clear course structures, teaching materials and to create interactive courses. Your e-learning experience is enhanced by tutorials using discussion boards, blog postings and live chat for class discussions and question and answer sessions. We have designed the course to allow as much interaction and feedback between students and tutors as possible. Your understanding will be deepened by discussing your reading with fellow students and your course tutor and carrying out short tasks related to the course. We also use audio and audio-visual presentations. You will not need to have access to a local law library, a basic internet connection and browser is all that is needed to do the course.

Your degree certificate will make no distinction between the LLM Computer and Communications Law studied by presence in London and the LLM studied by Distance Learning.

Programme

Structure
You can study Computer and Communications Law to Postgraduate Certificate, Diploma or LLM level, by distance learning.

You will need to gain 180 credits for the LLM, which can be completed as follows:
◦six taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as three 10,000-word dissertations, (or one 20,000-word dissertation in addition to one 10,000-word dissertation), or
◦eight taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as two 10,000-word dissertations, (or, with approval, one 20,000-word dissertation)

Distance learning
Increasingly we all face more pressures in our business lives and finding the time to attend courses can be very difficult. Distance learning is the solution to your training needs; it allows you the full benefits of studying for a recognised UK university qualification whilst still in full-time employment using this freedom and flexibility to your advantage.

You can set the pace at which you learn and decide when, where and how long you want to study for.

This programme is delivered via our web-based virtual learning environment (VLE). All written assignments are submitted through the e-learning system. You are encouraged to interact with teaching staff and other students in online discussion forums, join group activities and be part of the student community.

Modules and Dissertations
The year is divided into three four-month terms, with a selection of modules and dissertations being offered each term.
◦Taught modules (15 credits)
◦Each module requires around seven and a half hours of work a week over one term. Each module will consist of assessed tasks, a module essay and final assessment exercise (take-home exam

◦Dissertations – topic of your own choice
◦10000 dissertations (30 credits) – taken over two consecutive terms
◦20000 dissertation (60 credits) – taken over four consecutive terms

◦Research seminar paper/presentation (optional) (15 credits) (January – May)
◦This involves a 30 minute presentation at the residential weekend on a topic of your choice agreed with your supervisor followed by the submission of a 5000 word essay during the May – August term.

During each term a selection of three to four modules from the list below will be offered. Modules are usually offered on a two year cycle. The terms are as follows:
◦Autumn Session: From the beginning of September until December
◦Spring Session: Beginning of January until April
◦Summer Session: Beginning of May until August

Modules
◦CCDM008 Online Banking and Financial Services
◦CCDM009 Computer Crime
◦CCDM010 Online Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM011 IT Outsourcing
◦CCDM013 Advanced IP Issues: Protection of Computer Software
◦CCDM014 Privacy and Data Protection Law
◦CCDM015 Advanced IP Issues: Digital Rights Management
◦CCDM016 Intellectual Property: Foundation
◦CCDM018 Internet Content Regulation
◦CCDM019 Information Security and the Law
◦CCDM020 Internet Jurisdictional Issues and Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM021 European Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM025 Mergers and Acquisitions in the ICT Sector
◦CCDM026 International Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM027 E-Commerce Law
◦CCDM028 Online Media Regulation
◦CCDM029 Taxation and Electronic Commerce
◦CCDM031 Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law
◦CCDM037 Broadcasting Regulation
◦CCDM038 Regulation of Cross-Border Online Gambling
◦CCDM039 Internet Governance
◦CCDM040 Online Trademarks
◦CCDM043 Cloud Computing

Application Dates

You can start the LLM in Computer and Communications Law programme in either the autumn term or the spring term. You should return your completed application forms two months before the start of term. For example, for an autumn start you will need to return your forms by mid-July and for a spring start you will need to return your forms by the beginning of November.

As this is a distance learning programme, we understand that applicants may live overseas or outside London. To comply with official admissions procedures if you are made an offer all applicants will be expected to submit by post (courier) or in person certified copies of qualifications which were up-loaded when making an online application.

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The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) offers a programme of online distance learning courses that leads to the award of a Queen Mary University of London, Postgraduate Diploma in Computer and Communications Law. Read more

M3DL - (Minimum - two years; part-time)

The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) offers a programme of online distance learning courses that leads to the award of a Queen Mary University of London, Postgraduate Diploma in Computer and Communications Law.

The programme draws on the established strengths of the Centre for Commercial Law Studies (CCLS) in computer, e-commerce, internet, communications law, media law and associated topics.

Law as a subject is particularly suitable for online learning in that it is primarily text-based, so delivery of teaching materials is not restricted by bandwidth limitations. Most materials for Computer and Communications Law are available in digital format from databases such as Lexis and Westlaw to which you gain access through your Queen Mary Student account. We use a virtual learning environment (VLE) as a platform to deliver clear course structures, teaching materials and to create interactive courses. Your e-learning experience is enhanced by tutorials using discussion boards, blog postings and live chat for class discussions and question and answer sessions. We have designed the courses to allow for as much interaction and feedback between students and tutors as possible. Your understanding will be deepened by discussing your reading with fellow students and your course tutor and carrying out short tasks related to the module. We also use audio and audio-visual presentations. You will not be required to have access to a local law library, a basic internet connection and browser is all that is needed to do the programme.

Your degree certificate will make no distinction between the Postgraduate Diploma studied by presence in London and the Postgraduate Diploma studied by distance learning.

Programme

The programme must be completed within a minimum of two years, and a maximum of six years. The diploma requires the successful completion of 120 credits which can be completed as follows:

◦eight taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation), or
◦six taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as one 10,000-word dissertation
If you choose to continue to the LLM, you will need to complete 180 credits, which can be completed as follows:
◦six taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as three 10,000-word dissertations, (or one 20,000-word dissertation in addition to one 10,000-word dissertation), or
◦eight taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as two 10,000-word dissertations, (or, with approval, one 20,000-word dissertation)

Modules and Dissertation

The year is divided into three four-month terms, with a selection of modules and dissertations being offered each term.

◦Taught modules (15 credits)
◦Each module requires around seven and a half hours of work a week over one term. Each module will consist of assessed tasks, a module essay and final assessment exercise (take-home exam).

◦Dissertations – topic of your own choice.
◦10000 dissertations (30 credits) – taken over two consecutive terms.
◦20000 dissertation (60 credits) – taken over four consecutive terms.

◦Research seminar paper/presentation (optional) (15 credits) (January – May)
◦This involves a 30 minute presentation at the residential weekend on a topic of your choice agreed with your supervisor followed by the submission of a 5000 word essay during the May – August term.

During each term a selection of three to four modules from the list below will be offered. Modules are usually offered on a two year cycle. The terms are as follows:
◦Autumn Session: From the beginning of September until December
◦Spring Session: Beginning of January until April
◦Summer Session: Beginning of May until August

Modules
◦CCDM008 Online Banking and Financial Services
◦CCDM009 Computer Crime
◦CCDM010 Online Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM011 IT Outsourcing
◦CCDM013 Advanced IP Issues: Protection of Computer Software
◦CCDM014 Privacy and Data Protection Law
◦CCDM015 Advanced IP Issues: Digital Rights Management
◦CCDM016 Intellectual Property: Foundation
◦CCDM018 Internet Content Regulation
◦CCDM019 Information Security and the Law
◦CCDM020 Internet Jurisdictional Issues and Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM021 European Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM025 Mergers and Acquisitions in the ICT Sector
◦CCDM026 International Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM027 E-Commerce Law
◦CCDM028 Online Media Regulation
◦CCDM029 Taxation and Electronic Commerce
◦CCDM031 Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law
◦CCDM037 Broadcasting Regulation
◦CCDM038 Regulation of Cross-Border Online Gambling
◦CCDM039 Internet Governance
◦CCDM040 Online Trademarks
◦CCDM043 Cloud Computing

Application Dates

You can start the programme in either the autumn term or the spring term. You should return your completed application forms two months before the start of term. For example, for an autumn start you will need to return your forms by mid-July and for a spring start you will need to return your forms by the beginning of November.

As this is a distance learning programme, we understand that applicants may live overseas or outside London. To comply with official admissions procedures if you are made an offer all applicants will be expected to submit by post (courier) or in person certified copies of qualifications which were up-loaded when making an online application.

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This programme aims to promote advanced knowledge and understanding of the relationships between law, technology, commerce and society in the widest possible sense. Read more

Programme description

This programme aims to promote advanced knowledge and understanding of the relationships between law, technology, commerce and society in the widest possible sense.

It explores the role of law in responding to, regulating and promoting, new and emerging technologies, and also emphasises the role of technology in supporting and guiding legal and judicial processes.

The focus of the degree is on the international nature of the subject matter and each course offers a comparative analysis of current legal developments.

Programme structure

This programme offers a range of courses from the fields of technology, communications, IP and medical law with an international perspective, giving you the option to tailor the programme to suit your needs and interests.

The programme structure for 2017/18 is currently being finalised. You will take a total of 120 credits in taught courses, 60 in each semester, which may include the following:

Communications, Networks and the Law
The Legal Challenges of Information Technologies
Robotics and the Law
Contemporary Issues in the Law and Policy of e-Commerce, the Digital Economy and International Information Governance
Data Protection and Information Privacy
Information: Control and Power
International and European Media Law
Law and New Technologies: Artificial Intelligence, Risk and the Law
Law of E-Commerce
Intellectual Property Law 1: Copyright and Related Rights
International Intellectual Property System
Intellectual Property Law 2: Industrial Property
Intellectual Property – Law and Society
Managing Intellectual Property
Fundamental Issues in Medical Jurisprudence
Risk and Regulation: Health and the Environment
Contemporary Issues in Medical Jurisprudence
Life Sciences, Society and Law*
Medical Negligence*

*These courses are co-requisite.

You will also complete a 10,000 word dissertation worth 60 credits.

Learning outcomes

Having completed the programme, students will emerge with an understanding of technology-related law and technology support for legal processes, not just in their legal but also their commercial, social, ethical and cultural contexts.

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The MA Law by Research is an ideal choice for you, if you want to undertake in-depth and individually supervised research on a topic of your own choice. Read more
The MA Law by Research is an ideal choice for you, if you want to undertake in-depth and individually supervised research on a topic of your own choice. It is ideal if you are aiming to proceed to doctoral study, or if you wish to enhance your career prospects by developing expertise in a specific area of law, and improve your research and writing skills. The ability to undertake a major piece of research is a transferable skill which is relevant to many different kinds of employment.

The programme accommodates practical and traditional approaches, as well as theoretical and inter-disciplinary. Though the emphasis is on one-to-one supervision, the MA Law by Research can extend into many areas. The Department of Law has well-known strengths in many areas of law including criminal law, human rights and public international law. Students interested in commercial areas of law, including arbitration, banking and finance, tax, intellectual property, IT and communications law can also apply to draw on the expertise of the Centre for Commercial Law Studies (CCLS). View the law staff list to see the full range of expertise within the School.

This programme will:
◦Offer you the choice to really specialise in an area of your choosing.
◦Give you a solid foundation if your aim is PhD study.
◦Give you research skills and methodologies.

Core modules

◦Research project (20,000-word dissertation)
◦Research methods module

The research methods module will expose you to a broad range of theoretical and practical approaches to legal research. This module will be taught through one two-hour seminar each week. In the first-term the programme covers theoretical topics including ethics and law, law and economics, systems theory, liberal theory, and critical theory. In the second term, the programme has a methods focus and covers areas such as research interviews, literature review and historical research methods. These second-term seminars will, so far as is possible, be tailored to the dissertations of enrolled students.

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The UK, EU & US Copyright Law programme provides tuition from one of Europe’s leading centres in European Law and is studied on a distance learning basis, thereby avoiding crucial time spent away from your place of work. Read more
The UK, EU & US Copyright Law programme provides tuition from one of Europe’s leading centres in European Law and is studied on a distance learning basis, thereby avoiding crucial time spent away from your place of work.

The programme aims to provide the professional with an in-depth and up-to-date knowledge of the general principles of copyright law, mainly focusing on the law in the United Kingdom, the principles of United States copyright law and the major ‘copyright’ Directives of the European Community.

Studied on a distance learning basis, the course allows you to avoid crucial time spent away from your place of work and provides the professional with an in-depth and up-to-date knowledge.

Gain a competitive advantage in today's difficult market, by increasing your skills and applying your new knowledge to your work immediately - gain a respected qualification and fulfill up to 100% of your annual CPD requirements at the same time!

Benefit from a highly relevant programme that will:

• Introduce the main international copyright conventions in the field

• Deal with rights in literary, dramatic, musical and artistic works, films, sound recordings, broadcasts, cable programmes, computer programs and databases, performers’ rights and publishers’ rights

• Cover both theoretical aspects and questions which arise in practice, in particular concerning infringement and available remedies

• Include a unit devoted to the French and German laws on author’s rights and related rights

• Examine thoroughly United States Copyright Law

• Conclude with the main challenges in the field of copyright

Find out more on the syllabus:
http://www.informadl.com/FKW12388FAMB

What did previous students think of the programme?

"“A well thought out and challenging course taught by a good range of academics and practitioners” R. McInnes, BBC Scotland

“The course provided a comprehensive overview of the various copyright systems and tools to analyse and understand copyright
issues in the workplace” A. Laine-Forrest, Dorling Kindersley

“An excellent outlook of copyright law on an international basis and the course materials are a quick, effective reference material in examining clients’ challenges” O. Agaba, Jackson ETTI & EDU

“Great for all IP lawyers and very useful in practice” S. Petosevic, Petosevic Group

Who is the course for?

This programme is attended by Lawyers in Private Practice, In-House Legal Advisers, Senior Licensing Officers, Business Affairs Executives, Contracts Managers, Rights Executives, Trade Mark Specialists.

Countries represented include: Australia, Belgium, China, France, Greece, Hong Kong, Italy, Ireland, Japan, The Netherlands, Russia, The Sudan and the UK.

Some of the organisations who have been represented:

EMI Music * MCPS-PRS Alliance * AEPI-Hellenic Society for the Protection of Intellectual Property * PPL/VPL * Berwin Leighton Paisner * UK Intellectual Property Office * Samarts Network * British Geological Survey * Finers Stephens Innocent * Reynolds Porter Chamberlain * Getronics UK Limited * F. R. Kelly & Co * BBC * The Copyright Licensing Authority Limited * EUMESTAT * NISA Global Entertainment (Pty) Ltd * S J Berwin * Universal International Music * Business Software Alliance * Victoria & Albert Museum * ITV * Imation Europe * Music Publishers Association * OVC Media * British Film Institute * PACT * Turner Broadcasting * Shed Productions * Sheridans * Reuters * Random House Group GMBH * Richards Butler * IFPI * Universal Pictures * CCEA * Design & Artists Copyright Society * EMAP * The Simkins Partnership

Why study by distance learning?

Increasingly we all face more pressures in our business lives and finding the time to attend courses can be very difficult. Distance learning is the solution to your training needs; it allows you the full benefits of studying for a recognised UK university qualification whilst still in full-time employment using this freedom and flexibility to your advantage.

You can set the pace at which you learn and decide when, where and how long you want to study for.

One of the most beneficial factors of distance learning study is that you can apply your learning, knowledge, skills and expertise to your work straight away and help to further your career.

Why study with King's College London?

King’s College London is one of the top 20 universities in the world and the fourth oldest in England. It has an outstanding reputation for providing world-class teaching and has a particularly distinguished reputation in law.

This programme is run by The Centre of European Law, The Dickson Poon School of Law, which is one of the world’s leading centres of European law. The Centre has a fine tradition of teaching and research in all areas of European Union law and celebrated its 40th anniversary in 2014. The Centre enjoys a reputation of excellence for its distinguished programme of public events and for its postgraduate education and was the UK law school ranked top for world-leading research in the 2014 official Research Excellence Framework.

Find out more today:
http://www.informadl.com/FKW12388FAMB

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As economic life is affected by globalisation, it is important for successful business law professionals to have extensive knowledge of international business law. Read more
As economic life is affected by globalisation, it is important for successful business law professionals to have extensive knowledge of international business law. The MDP in International Business Law (IBL) is a two-year research-oriented Master´s programme where you will become an internationally-oriented business law professional well-qualified for a career in legal practice and academia.

In the IBL programme you will be able to:
-Increase and deepen your knowledge and understanding of business law, including contract law, company law, IP law, competition law and commercial dispute resolution.
-Further develop your analytical, legal argumentation and communications skills.
-Develop research skills and business law knowledge in order to continue your studies in a PhD programme.
-Study in an international and multicultural environment with students and staff from all over the world.
-Network with potential employers and other potential future colleagues in the field of international business law.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

The MDP in International Business Law offers you the possibility to learn more about business related subjects such as contract and consumer law, commercial law (including company law, securities markets law, competition law and IP law) and commercial dispute resolution from an international point of view.

In the IBL programme you will learn by participating in lecture courses and case study courses as well as by writing seminar papers, presenting your work and completing a research seminar while writing your Master’s thesis. Depending on the courses you take, you will either be studying more independently or you will be involved in group work.

In addition to regular courses and seminars, you have the possibility to participate in Moot Court Competition or Helsinki Law Clinic courses to gain practical experience, network and meet potential employers. We encourage you to seize career opportunities already during your studies. Especially during your second year the year-long research seminar is conducted in such a way that you can work or do an internship during the semesters.

Programme Structure

The scope of the master´s programme is 120 credits (ECTS) to be completed in two academic years. The programme comprises compulsory and optional studies, seminars and research work including a Master’s thesis. In the first year you will concentrate on compulsory and optional studies, and in the second year you will write your thesis and take more optional studies. You can also include an internship and a student exchange period as part of your degree.

Career Prospects

Upon graduation you will be an internationally oriented business law professional who is well-qualified for careers in legal practice (such as law firms and corporate legal departments) as well as legal academia. You will have diverse career opportunities both in Finland and abroad. In Finland, for example, law firms have started to recruit students who have completed the MDP in International Business Law. In general, the employment situation for lawyers – especially in the field of business law – is very good.

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The LLM in Intellectual Property Law enables you to study the fundamental principles behind the laws of intellectual property. Read more

Programme description

The LLM in Intellectual Property Law enables you to study the fundamental principles behind the laws of intellectual property.

The programme aims to provide you with an advanced knowledge of substantive intellectual property law, and of the place and role of intellectual property within domestic, regional and international contexts.

This programme enables you to develop a fully rounded understanding of intellectual property rights, their role in society and the impact of intellectual property (IP) on global economics and development.

The programme aims to equip students with an advanced knowledge and understanding of IP law within an international, European and domestic (UK) context.

The programme covers all the major IP rights, including copyright, designs, trade marks, and patents as well as confidentiality, passing off, database rights and other IP protection.

The programme also addresses global policy-making and the framework of international treaties that govern intellectual property law, as well as consideration of IP rights in their social, cultural and commercial contexts.

Online learning

Our distance learning programmes are delivered through eSCRIPT, our flexible online learning environment.

Through eSCRIPT you will access learning materials and interact with your tutor and fellow students. eSCRIPT is accessible through the internet from any computer. A fast connection is an advantage, but you do not need any special equipment, applications or plug-ins to use it.

We aim to provide challenging, research-led teaching with students benefiting from the expertise of a multidisciplinary team of tutors and the results of innovative cross-cutting research of the highest quality.

Programme structure

You must complete a total of six courses (120 credit points), four of which must be core IP law courses, and complete a dissertation (60 credit points) over your chosen period of study.

Core courses:

Intellectual Property Law - Copyright and Related Rights
Intellectual Property Law - Industrial Property
International Intellectual Property Law
Legal Aspects of Managing Intellectual Property
Detailed course descriptions

Learning outcomes

The subjects of the degree are intended to equip you with both an advanced knowledge of substantive intellectual property law and of the place and role of intellectual property within a domestic, regional and international context, laying a foundation for a specialised dissertation.

By the end of your studies you will have acquired a high level of knowledge in the field of intellectual property law, a sophisticated awareness of the problems in the area and of the differing approaches to their solution.

Career opportunities

Graduates of our online distance learning programmes progress to a range of careers in law and related legal fields, including work in local and international firms, government legal departments, other public institutions, international organisations and in academia.

The programmes are also an ideal platform for advanced research.

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