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Masters Degrees (Investigative)

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The MSc Investigative & Forensic Psychology is a one year, full-time postgraduate programme. It is accredited by the British Psychological Society and recognised as the first step towards status as a Chartered Forensic Psychologist in the UK for students who have Graduate Basis for Chartership. Read more
The MSc Investigative & Forensic Psychology is a one year, full-time postgraduate programme. It is accredited by the British Psychological Society and recognised as the first step towards status as a Chartered Forensic Psychologist in the UK for students who have Graduate Basis for Chartership. The course is also recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as a Research Methods MSc and students taking this course are eligible for the ESRC 1 + 3 studentships.

The MSc provides students with a high quality, balanced postgraduate programme of research and academic knowledge including, awareness of professional, legal and ethical issues, and practical, communication and dissemination skills in Investigative and Forensic Psychology. The programme takes a three-tiered approach.

Students begin with structured sessions on conceptual and theoretical issues (including aggression, sexual violence and deviance, decision-making, leadership and stress, memory, communication and persuasion, and the psychology of crowd dynamics).

They then appreciate how these and related issues can be applied to forensic practice and its legal context (in terms of crime reduction and intervention studies; investigative procedures, forensic interviewing, court processes and proceedings, assessment, custody and rehabilitation).

Finally, they gain skills in communicating knowledge and conducting relevant research on case assessments of individuals and organisations

Why Choose Investigative and Forensic Psychology?

- This course is unique in that it is the only MSc accredited course of its type in a Russell Group University. It is viewed worldwide by many to be the home of Investigative Psychology
- The number and calibre of external practitioners whom deliver key understanding of real life applications, makes the MSc Investigative and Forensic Psychology distinct from any other.
- The University of Liverpool has the largest representation of psychologists in Europe, who are research active on Law Enforcement projects.
- High quality teaching and a strong focus on employability skills mean that our students have gone on to be some of the most successful individuals in the field.
- The MSc Investigative and Forensic Psychology is renowned worldwide and attracts a large number of International students and visiting speakers each year. In an increasingly global world it is important to raise awareness of the role cultural factors play in psychological functioning and how these may differ from the findings of mainstream Western research.
- This MSc Investigative and Forensic Psychology was the first course of its type to receive five commendations by the British Psychological Society.

Key Facts

Research Assessment Exercise 2008
Targeting our key areas of interest we've systematically enhanced our research base, culture and infrastructure, whilst building internationally influential groups.

Our work is theoretically robust and problem and policy focused, with a research agenda that's socially relevant and postgraduate teaching that's truly research-led.

Why School of Psychology?

Breadth and choice

Reflecting our main research strengths, we offer two one-year, full-time, taught Masters (MSc) programmes in:

Investigative and Forensic Psychology
Research Methods in Psychology.
For details of all MRes/MPhil/PhD and MD opportunities in the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, see the Research course list at http://www.liv.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/research/

Professionally recognised

The Investigative and Forensic Psychology course is recognised by the Division of Forensic Psychology (DFP, British Psychological Society) and counts towards Chartered Forensic Status.

Innovative research

As home to the Centre for Investigative Psychology, we continue to stretch the boundaries of psychological inquiry with innovative research activity.

We've highly active, internationally renowned research groups and, in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (2008), 80% of our research activity was rated as of international standard.

Our partners

Our partners include local hospitals and schools, the Regional Neurological and Neurosurgical NHS Trust, Prison Psychology departments, national and international Police Forces and associated Law Enforcement Agencies. There are also close links with other University departments in the Faculty of Science and Engineering, the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, and the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences; in particular, Clinical Psychology, Neuroscience, and Human Anatomy. Numerous collaborations exist between members of staff and their colleagues in other academic institutions both nationally and internationally.

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City’s pioneering MA in Investigative Journalism will provide you with essential basic skills, combined with innovative and in-depth research and investigation techniques. Read more
City’s pioneering MA in Investigative Journalism will provide you with essential basic skills, combined with innovative and in-depth research and investigation techniques.

Who is it for?

This course is suitable for students with a firm grounding in an Arts subject, looking to specialise in the area of investigative journalism, with a view to starting a career in this field. You will have a keen interest in the media, specifically this area of journalism.

Objectives

You will learn advanced research skills, including computer-assisted reporting to analyse data to find stories, and the effective use of public records and databases. The course provides case studies of high-profile investigations and will help you develop the skills needed to investigate issues of public concern, miscarriages of justice and companies, organisations and individuals within an ethical framework.

The course also offers you the opportunity to complete an investigation and to learn practical multi-media skills including television as well as print. This course moves swiftly from basic journalism to fully-fledged investigative journalism provided by leading investigative journalists, including David Leigh, former Investigations Editor of The Guardian, and award-winning Freedom of Information expert, Heather Brooke. The course is practical and encourages you to develop and practice your real-world journalistic skills and techniques. Covering both print and broadcast investigative journalism, the course is ideal as a first stepping stone into a career as an in-depth researcher and journalist.

Students and graduates of this course have worked as interns at the Bureau of Investigative Journalism, based at City, University of London.

Placements

Work placements are an integral part of all Journalism MA courses, giving you the chance to put your learning into practice and, more importantly, make contacts in the industry. You are encouraged to seek work experience while you study on this course.

Academic facilities

You will gain practical skills in our state-of-the-art digital television studio, digital editing suites, radio studios and broadcast newsrooms.

In 2014 we completed a £12m development projects for our Journalism facilities. These facilities were developed in consultation with experts from the BBC and ITN, and were praised by the BJTC. Our facilities include:
-A television studio: enabling simultaneous multi-media broadcast and a major expansion in the number of news and current affairs programmes produced.
-Four radio studios: enabling an increase in output and the potential to explore a permanent radio station.
-Two radio broadcast newsrooms: high-tech facilities that enable you to learn how to produce a radio programme.
-Two digital newsrooms: impressive modern facilities that enable you to learn the skills required to produce newspapers, magazines and websites.
-Two TV editing and production newsrooms: state-of-the-art facilities that enable you to learn about TV production.

Teaching and learning

Some modules are taught in lecture theatres, such as Journalism and Society 1 and Media Law, but most are small-group workshops that allow you to develop your journalistic skills and knowledge with the support of our expert academics.

You will receive tutoring from some of the industry’s most experienced journalists and editors.

Our students have the option of taking part in a Teeline shorthand course alongside their studies. This costs £100 (refundable if you reach 100 words per minute) and runs across two terms.

Assessment

All MA Journalism courses at City are practical, hands-on courses designed for aspiring journalists. As a result, much of your coursework will be journalistic assignments that you produce to deadline, as you would in a real news organisation.

Modules

Topics on the MA in Investigative Journalism range from business and financial journalism to investigations into individuals, organisations and corporations to miscarriages of justice. You will also be taught the basic essential skills required by the media industry such as producing news and feature material, interviewing, production, law, structure of government and ethics.

Core modules
-Journalism Portfolio (30 credits)
-Editorial Production (30 credits)
-Ethics, Rules and Standards (30 credits)
-Final Project (30 credits)
-Investigative Reporting (30 credits)
-UK Media Law (15 credits)
-Political Headlines (15 credits)

Career prospects

This course aims to prepare you for a first job in any form of journalism, including newspapers, magazines, online and the broadcast media. Investigative Journalism graduates will be especially valued in jobs which require rigorous, in-depth and advanced research and investigative skills.

Graduates of this MA are now working at organisations including:
-Bloomberg TV
-Bureau of Investigative Journalism
-CNN
-Health Service Journal
-ITN
-Mobile News
-October Films
-Property Week
-The Art Newspaper
-The Financial Times
-The Guardian
-The Spectator
-The Telegraph
-The Times (graduate trainee scheme)

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Investigative journalism is at a crossroads in theory and practice. Crises of ethics and funding have brought profound changes to the nature of long form journalism, the ways in which it is produced and the institutions that invest in it. Read more
Investigative journalism is at a crossroads in theory and practice. Crises of ethics and funding have brought profound changes to the nature of long form journalism, the ways in which it is produced and the institutions that invest in it. This innovative MA brings together leading practitioners and institutions to deliver advanced training in emergent investigative newsgathering and publishing skills applicable to a range of professional contexts, within and beyond journalism. At the same time, the degree introduces students to critical accounts of the the media's watchdog function and journalism's evolving social role.

In partnership with the Centre of Investigative Journalism (which provides bespoke training workshops for the degree's core courses) and Google (which has provided funding assistance for scholarships), this MA addresses new challenges whilst also reflecting the constants that underpin investigative journalism ethics and storytelling. Above all, it presents an opportunity to both study and do investigative journalism, under the guidance of award-winning journalists and experienced academics.

Guest lecture profiles

You will be taught by a mix of academics, writers, investigative journalists, editors and bloggers, including:

Ewen MacAskill

Ewen is The Guardian's defence and intelligence correspondent. In 2013 he was among the first journalists to meet NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden and, as a result of his reporting on global surveillance, he was named co-recipient of the 2013 George Polk Award. The same reporting also contributed to the prestigious Pulitzer Prize for Public Service, awarded jointly to The Guardian and the Washington Post in 2014. Ewen was featured prominently in Laura Poitras' Oscar-winning documentary Citizenfour and he will be portrayed by British actor Tom Wilkinson in the upcoming biopic Snowden, directed by Oliver Stone.

Iain Overton

Iain is Director of Policy and Investigations for the London-based charity Action on Armed Violence. As well as a writer, Iain is also an investigative journalist and documentary maker who has won a number of awards, including 2 Amnesty Media Awards, a Peabody Award and a BAFTA Scotland. In 1998 he was appointed senior producer of BBC Current Affairs and in 2009 he became the founding editor of the Bureau of Investigative Journalism where he produced a number of high-profile documentaries, including Iraq War Logs based on the military intelligence files leaked by Chelsea Manning.

Siobhan Sinnerton

Siobhan is a Commissioning Editor for News and Current Affairs at Channel 4, before which she spent 4 years at the award-winning Quicksilver Productions. Two of those were as Series Editor on Unreported World, Channel 4’s flagship foreign affairs strand and as an executive producer on Dispatches and First Cut. Previously, Siobhan was a producer-director on both Unreported World and Dispatches and worked at ITV/Granada making a wide range of documentaries and current affairs.

Eliot Higgins (AKA 'Brown Moses')

Eliot is a renowned citizen journalist and blogger, known for using open sources and social media to investigate international conflicts. He first gained mainstream media attention by identifying weapons in uploaded videos from the Syrian conflict. At the time, Eliot was an unemployed finance and admin worker who spent his days taking care of his child at home. He has since won praise from human rights groups and journalists from around the world and has been profiled by The Guardian, The Independent, The Huffington Post and The New Yorker magazine, as well as the subject of television features run by Channel 4 and CNN International. In 2014 he started a new website, Bellingcat, which mobilises citizen journalists to investigate current events using open data.

Dr Justin Schlosberg

Justin is Lecturer in Journalism and Media at Birkbeck and programme director for the MA Investigative Reporting. His research takes a critical look at mainstream media coverage of a number of national security controversies, including alleged corruption in the British arms trade, the death of intelligence whistleblower David Kelly, and the release of diplomatic cables by Wikileaks. His forthcoming book Media Ownership and Agenda Control: The Hidden Limits of the Information Age will be published by Routledge in 2016.

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This exciting new programme focuses on the practical skills of investigative journalism, and is ideally suited to established professionals who wish to develop their skillset or change careers, as well as students progressing from undergraduate study. Read more

About the course

This exciting new programme focuses on the practical skills of investigative journalism, and is ideally suited to established professionals who wish to develop their skillset or change careers, as well as students progressing from undergraduate study.

The MA equips graduates with a wide range of specialist skills and competencies, which range from filming, editing and storytelling, to newsgathering, dealing with complex data and running real world investigations. The programme will provide you with the tools you need to produce commercially viable television investigations targeted at national and international audiences. The content of this course is endorsed by and has been developed with Channel 4, meaning you are assured of the highest quality teaching by expert academics, including professional journalists from a variety of disciplines with strong track records in industry and experience in helping students and trainees embark on successful careers.

As part of the degree, you will be expected to devise, pitch and manage investigations, in consultation with some the UK’s leading providers. We have a 20 year track record of launching graduates into the highly competitive world of journalism, with graduates now working for both local and national organisations like the BBC, Mail Online, top news agencies, national and international magazines and related careers such as PR and corporate communications. This is a specialist course designed to give you a specific skill set which will be directly relevant to a career in investigative journalism.

During the course you will have the opportunity to produce your own, professional standard programme to a quality where it can be pitched to major networks as your final project.

The next available start date for this course is September 2017.

Reasons to Study:

• Course developed in collaboration with Channel 4
professional endorsement from industry ensures high quality teaching by expert academics and professional journalists

• Designed with input from Industry leaders
this specialist course is designed to provide you with the skills, knowledge and contacts you need to embark on a successful career in investigative journalism

• Work on live briefs
produce your own professional programme to pitch to major broadcasters or elsewhere

• First in the UK for media research
our Media Discourse group and The Centre for Cinema and Television History (CATH) informs teaching on the course allowing students to gain expertise into the subject area. DMU’s research in media was recognised as first in the UK for research output in the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014

• Work on live briefs
produce your own professional programme to pitch to major broadcasters or elsewhere

• More than 20 years’ experience of teaching journalism
our teaching staff have many years of industry experience which you can draw upon to develop skills and expertise that are relevant for a career in Journalism

• Excellent graduate prospects
this course will equip graduates for a successful career in Investigative Journalism, in national television as well as working for national and international news agencies and roles in PR and corporate communications

Course Structure

Modules

The programme modules include:
- Investigative Journalism – Skills and Theory
- Introduction to Practical Investigative Journalism
- Investigative Journalism – Global Perspectives
- Advanced Practical Investigative Journalism
- Final project

Teaching and assessment

You will experience a wide range of teaching styles and environments, from traditional lectures and seminars to intensive skills workshops, news days and studio work. As a postgraduate student, you will be increasingly responsible for developing your own professional practice and working with other course members to produce pieces of journalism.

You will be working collaboratively with undergraduate students and other postgraduate students from our portfolio of related journalism courses including on events.

This is an intensive programme and you should be aware that full-time engagement will be expected throughout.

There will be a diverse range of assessments, including traditional essays, presentations, case studies, phase tests and reports as well as continuous assessment of professional practice. These culminate in your final project or dissertation.

Contact and learning hours

You will normally attend at least 12 hours of timetabled taught sessions per week. As part of this, you will be expected to produce substantial amounts of journalism outside of class.

To find out more

To learn more about this course and DMU, visit our website:
Postgraduate open days: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/open-evenings/postgraduate-open-days.aspx

Applying for a postgraduate course:
http://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/entry-criteria-and-how-to-apply/entry-criteria-and-how-to-apply.aspx

Funding for postgraduate students
http://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/postgraduate-funding-2017-18/postgraduate-funding-2017-18.aspx

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The current reforms to investigative practice are the most radical in modern history. This Masters programme allows you to develop and enhance professional practice in leading and managing investigations. Read more
The current reforms to investigative practice are the most radical in modern history. This Masters programme allows you to develop and enhance professional practice in leading and managing investigations.

Course overview

This programme provides you with the opportunity to study leadership and management theories in the context of work-based investigative practice. The programme reflects upon current problems and future potential solutions within investigative practice and will equip you with the ability to contribute towards the future success of investigation.

This unique programme provides you with the opportunity to develop and expand your knowledge and understanding of investigations within a professional practice context whilst building your knowledge of management theory that can be practically applied to solving investigation related problems.

Our academic team and professional experts will work with you to develop knowledge, confidence and ability to deal with strategic considerations within your career and equip you to make sound and rational decisions within this complex area of investigation.
This programme will empower you to direct your own course of study, whilst working with academic tutors and professional leads. The programme is flexible enabling you to complete the course over two (minimum) years.

By the end of the course you will have a highly relevant Masters qualification. It will help you take a leading role in today’s evolving investigative processes and, through a process of critical reflection upon your current skills and advanced knowledge, empower your personal development and contribution to your organisation.

Course content

The content of the modules blend key areas of investigative management so that you gain a solid appreciation of the role and value of professional leadership and management in investigation.

Modules on this course include:
-Advanced Critical Thinking and Applied Research Skills (20 Credits)
-Professional Leadership and Decision-Making in Investigation (40 Credits)
-Advanced Investigative Management Project (60 Credits)
-Investigative Management Dissertation (60 Credits)

Teaching and assessment

We use a variety of teaching and learning methods including lectures, workshops, and self-study. Assessment methods include coursework, research plan and the Masters dissertation.

Facilities & location

Sunderland has excellent facilities that have been boosted by multi-million pound developments.

Course location
This course is based on the banks of the River Wear at the Sir Tom Cowie Campus at St Peter’s.

Software and technology
The University has invested in specialist software packages that facilitate rigorous social science. They include NVivo, which allows deep levels of analysis of large volumes of data, and SPSS for surveys and data mining. We also make full use of e-learning resources and our virtual learning environment.

University Library Services
We’ve got thousands of books and e-books on social science topics, with many more titles available through the inter-library loan service. Our web-based ‘Discover’ search tool enables you remote access to online journals, articles and e-books – whenever and wherever you happen to be studying.

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The post-graduate awards in Criminal and Investigative Psychology (CIP) offer students the opportunity to learn about the new theoretical research and policy intervention for CIP. Read more
The post-graduate awards in Criminal and Investigative Psychology (CIP) offer students the opportunity to learn about the new theoretical research and policy intervention for CIP. It allows students to engage directly with the research and with professionals in the area whilst giving a firm understanding and basis for analysis of CIP.

The programme brings together theory, research and practice to equip students with a background across the main criminal investigative approaches and across a wide range of areas of practice. The programme is delivered by experienced forensic academic psychologists with visiting speakers from investigative centres and the civil service.

This programme applies psychological theories about criminal behaviour to investigative issues. The topics included in the programme are for the most part dictated by what issues investigators contend with, and how they function on a daily basis. Therefore, students will be introduced to the underlying skills that investigating psychologists use in making decisions, interviewing and case formulation, together with related theories and research evidence.

The proposed programme will offer students interested in criminal and investigative psychology an opportunity to explore the issues associated with defining and blending between the core activities of psychology and investigations. It will provide students the opportunity to clarify the necessary ethical and boundary considerations.

The programme offers students eight modules including Applied Criminological and Investigative Psychology, Criminal Psychology, Critical Perspectives on Terrorism; Critical Perspectives on Counter-terrorism; and, Transnational Organised Crime, Cyber Criminology and two research methods modules.

The programme has a strong practical focus with assessment based on the application of criminal theory through discussion, presentations and written assignments.

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Unlike other courses which focus on offender assessment and rehabilitation, this new course will examine the theoretical and investigative aspects of forensic psychology, tracking the criminal justice process from the crime scene to the court room. Read more
Unlike other courses which focus on offender assessment and rehabilitation, this new course will examine the theoretical and investigative aspects of forensic psychology, tracking the criminal justice process from the crime scene to the court room. It is an exceptionally hands-on, practical course, using our unique on-campus Crime Scene Training Centre together with Psychology Testing Suites with the latest eye-tracking and face-processing equipment.

As well as the underlying theories regarding the psychology of investigations and considering areas such as how face processing can assist identification of individuals, you will explore different offence types - sexual offending, murder and violent crime, group offending (including terrorism, hooliganism and rioting), and different forms of cyber-crime (e.g. hacktivism and on-line sexual abuse).

You’ll be expected to investigate and scrutinise violent mocked-up crime scenes to provide written and verbal evidence, learning how to present expert witness testimony in a mock court.

You will evaluate victims, witnesses, suspects and offenders, environment, geography and time, working with practitioners who create fieldwork, case studies and exercises based on their real experiences.

Guest speakers sharing their knowledge will be an integral feature of the course, as will Terri Cole, the course leader's own experiences as a Behavioural Investigative Adviser and Serious Crime Analyst. Terri worked for a number of years with police forces providing offender profiling, crime scene assessment and offence linkage advice in relation to serious sexual offences and murder. She brings her expertise and experience together to focus on crime scene behaviour and how psychology can assist investigations on this new course.

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Our MSc course in Investigative Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences brings together the research expertise in vision from The University of Manchester and Manchester Royal Eye Hospital. Read more
Our MSc course in Investigative Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences brings together the research expertise in vision from The University of Manchester and Manchester Royal Eye Hospital.

This course will provide you with a firm grounding in the knowledge needed to pursue a higher degree and to conduct high quality research in ophthalmology, optometry or vision sciences. It also gives an opportunity for vision-related professionals to advance their knowledge of the scientific foundations of ophthalmology and vision sciences.

The course is aimed at optometrists, ophthalmologists, orthoptists and nurses from the UK and overseas. It is suitable for:
-Individuals who are considering undertaking a research degree in the vision sciences
-Those interested in professional development
-Those interested in conducting research as part of their clinical training
-Ophthalmologists wishing to expand and extend their training into specialist areas
-Optometrists considering a career in the hospital eye service

Teaching and learning

The course has two different pathways:
1. Six taught units (15 credits each) and a project dissertation (90) credits.
2. Four taught units (15 credits each), a literature review (30 credits) and a dissertation (90 credits).

The six units are Research Methods, Cornea, Contact Lens, Vascular Disease, Macular Degeneration and Glaucoma.

In each of the units, learning will be based on a series of formal lectures on topics relating to ocular disease and treatments, and a series of more informal tutorials on current research. You will receive copies of presentations and direction to relevant literature for personal study.

Many projects have led to peer reviewed publications in the ophthalmic literature. Recent titles include the following:
-Optical coherence tomography measures of the retinal nerve fibre layer
-Development of a model cell assay to investigate the cellular processing of ARB mutant bestrophin-1
-Risk factors for late presentation of patients with primary open angle glaucoma
-Molecular analysis of autosomal recessive retinal dystrophies
-In vivo analysis of the wettability of silicon hydrogel contact lenses
-Can corneal densitometry be used to assess the treatment outcome after corneal transplantation
-A contact lens based technique delivering cultured stem cells onto the human corneal surface
-The use of corneal imaging to assessing treatment outcomes of LASIK and LASEK
-Addressing the physiological cues needed for trans-differentiation of dental pulp stem cells into limbal stem cells

Coursework and assessment

Assessment is via:
-Written examinations in January and May
-Coursework set during the taught units
-A research project dissertation

Career opportunities

This course is aimed at optometrists, ophthalmologists, orthoptists and nurses from the UK and overseas.

It is considered suitable for:
-Individuals interested in vision sciences
-Those interested in conducting research as part of their clinical training
-Optometrists considering a career in the hospital eye service
-Those interested in an academic career in ophthalmology/optometry/vision sciences
-Optometrists interested in professional development

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Good leaders are sought and valued by all organisations. This programme is aimed at senior managers in the private and public sectors (with a minimum of three years of leadership and management experience) and officers in the military. Read more

Why take this course?

Good leaders are sought and valued by all organisations. This programme is aimed at senior managers in the private and public sectors (with a minimum of three years of leadership and management experience) and officers in the military.

You will be able to benefit from our flexible structure and delivery allowing you to tailor your studies to meet your professional development needs and succeed as influential managers.

There are direct entry routes for officers of the Armed Forces based on rank and experience, for more information visit the Accredited Prior Experience and Learning web pages. The University of Portsmouth is an ELC approved supplier.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Gain a thorough grounding in how to manage people alongside the skills to be a confident leader
Make an effective contribution to your workplace, as well as improve your career prospects
Tap in to our Library’s vast selection of electronic resources, which can be accessed from anywhere with an internet connection

What opportunities might it lead to?

On successful completion you can apply to become a member of the Institute of Leadership and Management (ILM) or the Chartered Management Institute (CMI).

Module Details

The induction dates for this course are 14, 15, 16 September 2016 or 11, 12, 13 January 2017.

Our teaching is structured around the National Occupational Management and Leadership Standards, which specify six standards: Managing Self and Personal Skills; Providing Direction; Facilitating Change; Working with People; Using Resources, and Achieving Results. Many organisations recognise these standards as a valuable framework for developing competencies and designing development programmes. Having previously studied six work-based learning units, this stage prepares and supports you in planning, implementing and reporting a substantial piece of investigative work that will develop your academic and research capabilities.

Here are the units you will study:

Research Methods: This unit prepares participants to carry out research by introducing them to investigative methods based on primary and secondary research.
Investigative Report: This is a substantial piece of investigative work based on primary and secondary research. The topic can be from any area of leadership and management which is of academic and practice-based interest.

Programme Assessment

Learning is self-directed, flexible and supported by University tutors and employers. You will not attend formal lectures, but you can attend the many seminars and presentations held at the University which are open to the public.

For the research aspect of the course there are two elements of assessment using the literature to develop your research capabilities. The Investigative Project is similar to a dissertation, requiring in-depth research into a specific topic within the field of leadership and management.

Student Destinations

Effective leadership and management make a major difference in today’s organisations by inspiring people to perform and by improving results. Management and leadership skills are highly valued in all sorts of organisations.

This course will develop your ability to provide strategic direction in order to achieve significant goals within your organisation. It can also enhance your career prospects and act as a springboard to other dynamic and rewarding managerial roles.

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By taking this course you will study the following module Forensic Psychology module plus modules from Criminology. Investigative and Legal Processes in Forensic Psychology. Read more
By taking this course you will study the following module Forensic Psychology module plus modules from Criminology:

Investigative and Legal Processes in Forensic Psychology
This module covers a range of theoretical and applied topics regarding investigative and judicial processes. For example, psychological principles may be applied to investigative approaches to interviewing, detecting deception, bearing false witness, offender profiling, case linkage, eyewitness memory, jury behaviour and decision-making, examining the state of mind and assessment, and expert psychological testimony (ethics, code of practice, report writing and practice). By taking this approach the student develops a critical understanding of pertinent stages in the investigative process where psychology may be used to improve interviewing strategies, as in the employment of the cognitive interview to assist in the improvement of witnesses' memory recall. This course then develops upon the investigative knowledge base provided by encouraging students to identify areas within the courtroom process where psychological techniques could be utilised. Thus, students are taken on an analytical and evaluative journey of the key criminal justice processes of the investigation and presentation of evidence in cases.

For information on the Criminology side of the course, please view the Criminology page: http://www.kingston.ac.uk/postgraduate-course/criminology-ma/

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Study Policing and Criminal Investigation at LJMU and work with crime victims and witnesses to enhance your knowledge and key skills in this area. Read more
Study Policing and Criminal Investigation at LJMU and work with crime victims and witnesses to enhance your knowledge and key skills in this area.

-Commences January 2017
-Explore investigative issues to gain the knowledge and practical skills to operate as a crime investigator in serious and complex cases
-Consider the links between investigation, forensics and psychology
-Work with crime victims and witnesses
-Ideal for serving officers and those about to embark on their policing or academic career
-Excellent employment opportunities in policing/investigative work, private investigation and with bodies such as Trading Standards and the Inland Revenue
-A valuable foundation for progression to PhD

The MSc Policing and Criminal Investigation combines supervised independent research with specialist training in research methods and academic skills, while also helping students become aware of emerging approaches currently practiced in the discipline.
​Over the course of the programme you will be introduced to key developments in policing studies and given the skills necessary to produce a successful postgraduate research project. You will work individually with a supervisor throughout the year, as well as taking part in taught modules with fellow Policing Studies students and/or students from other disciplines/Faculties. In addition, you will be part of the wider research activities of the Liverpool Centre for Advanced Policing Studies.

You will receive specialist supervision and study within a diverse community of fellow researchers. Staff are active in a wide range of fields including: Crime Prevention, GIS, People Trafficking, Public Order, Mental Health, Multi Agency and Partnership Working in the Public Sector, Computer Crime, Investigation, Terrorism and Counter-terrorism, Port Security, Risk Management and Education.

What you will study on this degree

Please see guidance below on core modules:

Policing in Context

Gain insights into current policing, community safety and criminal justice priorities by exploring different perspectives that relate to policing, regulatory processes, professional values and ethics

Advanced Research Skills

In preparation for your dissertation, this module introduces key epistemological and methodological issues that impact upon research into crime, security, community safety and criminal justice

Advanced Investigation Skills

Examine the administrative difficulties posited during a criminal investigation and the importance of investigative ethics

Forensic and Medicolegal Death

Discover core foundational concepts of criminal investigations, enabling you to understand, explain, analyse and evaluate causes, sustainment and consequences of processing a death scene

Forensic Cognition

Critically explore why offenders commit acts of sexual and physical violence by examining influential theories that have been developed to aid in investigating sexual/violent offences

Investigative Interviewing

Examine current practices, techniques and applications of police interviewing by being exposed to comparative international techniques in interviewing, interpretation of verbal and physical behaviour, causes of denial, deception and defensiveness

Dissertation

Analyse and interpret an issue in your chosen field

​Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled 'What you will study' is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Academic Framework reviews are conducted by LJMU from time to time to ensure that academic standards continue to be maintained.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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Forensic psychology is an expanding field. It interfaces with other disciplines such as clinical, social and cognitive psychology, as well as criminology and law in order to address issues of major concern to the justice system, organisations, individuals and society. Read more

Why take this course?

Forensic psychology is an expanding field. It interfaces with other disciplines such as clinical, social and cognitive psychology, as well as criminology and law in order to address issues of major concern to the justice system, organisations, individuals and society.

This is a unique course informed by research at the forefront of the field, with many opportunities to get involved with ongoing projects within the Department.

Applications for this course close 15 January 2016 to be considered for interview on 23 or 25 February and close 15 February 2016 to be considered for interview on 22 and 24 March.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Be taught by the largest group of actively researching academics at the cutting edge of forensic psychology research in the UK
Put your investigative techniques to the test in our Forensic Interviewing Suite
Benefit from our connections with a variety of custodial establishments including adult male and women's prisons, young offenders' institutions and secure hospitals

What opportunities might it lead to?

Accredited by the BPS, our Master’s degree is recognised as providing an important step towards eventual chartered status as a forensic psychologist. It aims to provide you with a systematic knowledge and understanding of forensic psychology, in accordance with the academic requirements of the Division of Forensic Psychology (DFP), the British Psychological Society (BPS) for accredited courses and eventual progression to autonomous practice.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Working in prisons
Probation work
The police force
Social work
Health services
The courts
Academia
Private practice

Module Details

The course content is structured to reflect developments and priorities in the field of forensic psychology and is kept under constant review to keep it up-to-date.

Here are the units you will study:

Theory into Practice: Foundations of Professional Competence in Forensic Psychology: This unit provides a foundation for working as a scientist-practitioner. From an early introduction to concepts of reflective practice, personal development and core skills relevant to completing the course, it moves to encouraging an awareness of factors involved in criminal behaviour and their implications. The focus is on the application and development of skills in analysis and less on the learning of facts and theories. In the second part of the unit, the focus moves to tasks and challenges that forensic psychologists encounter in applied settings. Some, such as the design and evaluation of training for other personnel or consultancy skills, are of major relevance to Stage 2 of the system for progression to chartered status that usually follows the course. Others such as countering manipulation, stress and managing aggression can be crucial to survival as well as effectiveness as a practitioner.

Assessment and Interventions with Offenders: This unit is concerned with providing an understanding of the theoretical and empirical underpinnings, contents and methods of current and widely-used approaches to assessment (including risk assessment) and interventions with offenders. These approaches are linked and provide a framework for the organisation and evaluation of information, particularly in relation to efficient, useful and accurate formulation and what works in the delivery of interventions. It will build upon knowledge of factors related to criminal behaviour with a focus on effective approaches and context-related factors in the understanding and management of offenders in a variety of settings.

Empirical Research Project for Forensic Psychology: For this unit you will undertake a complete piece of empirical research in an area of forensic psychology that you find particularly interesting. It provides an opportunity to develop and integrate a range of skills and areas of knowledge including creative formulations, problem-solving, ethics, handling interpersonal demands, use of IT and analytical techniques, and writing to a publishable standard.

Investigative Psychology and the Legal Process: This focuses on the contribution made by psychology in the context of forensic investigations and the role of psychologists in criminal and civil law proceedings. It is concerned with the application of psychological research and theory in an effort to critique (and improve) practice in criminal and civil justice systems as an applied context for testing the validity and efficacy of psychological theories and innovative practice derived from these theories. Topics cover relevant procedural information to ensure you appreciate investigative, judicial and custodial processes, and the role of psychologists within these frameworks. Theory and research relevant to applied cognitive and social psychology are presented to inform an understanding of eyewitness recall and recognition memory (and memory errors), effective protocols for testing/probing witness memory, detecting deception and juror decision making.

Research Methods and Data Analysis: This unit is designed to provide a familiarity with psychological research methods and data analysis commensurate with understanding and conducting research at the postgraduate and professional level. Specific methodologies and issues of relevance to specific research areas are addressed within a perspective that emphasises creative problem-solving.

Programme Assessment

We give high priority to integrating our research activities with your teaching programme. This ensures that you learn about the most important and current issues in forensic psychology that effect real-life practice.

Teaching usually takes the form of lectures and small tutorial groups, together with practical sessions in our labs and studios.

We assess you in a variety of ways throughout the course. Here’s how:

Written examinations
Briefing reports and essays
Oral presentations
The giving of expert testimony
A research dissertation

Student Destinations

The work of forensic psychologists is varied. Depending on where practitioners work, it can range from criminal investigations to organisational change, from work with offenders to work with staff who work with offenders, and from matters of civil justice such as child access to operational emergencies such as hostage incidents.

Accredited by the BPS, our Master’s degree is recognised as providing the next important step towards eventual chartered status as a forensic psychologist. Following successful completion of this course, you will usually go on to do a minimum of two years full-time supervised practice in an employment setting.

Roles our graduates have taken on include:

Clinical psychologist
Forensic psychologist
Educational psychologist
Counsellor
Health planning analyst

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This one-year full-time programme will give you the psychological knowledge and research skills needed to pursue doctoral level studies in psychology and to enhance your psychology career. Read more
This one-year full-time programme will give you the psychological knowledge and research skills needed to pursue doctoral level studies in psychology and to enhance your psychology career.

Academic staff within the School of Psychology, together with occasional visiting speakers, teach a valuable set of modules in practical research skills such as project management, quantitative and qualitative research, and statistics.

There's also a major, supervised empirical study component and a research dissertation to submit.

Key Facts

Research Assessment Exercise 2008
Targeting our key areas of interest we've systematically enhanced our research base, culture and infrastructure, whilst building internationally influential groups.

Our work is theoretically robust and problem and policy focused, with a research agenda that's socially relevant and postgraduate teaching that's truly research-led.

Why School of Psychology?

Breadth and choice

Reflecting our main research strengths, we offer two one-year, full-time, taught Masters (MSc) programmes in:

Investigative and Forensic Psychology
Research Methods in Psychology.

For details of all MRes/MPhil/PhD and MD opportunities in the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, see the Research course list at http://www.liv.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/research/

Professionally recognised

The Investigative and Forensic Psychology course is recognised by the Division of Forensic Psychology (DFP, British Psychological Society) and counts towards Chartered Forensic Status.

Innovative research

As home to the Centre for Investigative Psychology, we continue to stretch the boundaries of psychological inquiry with innovative research activity.

We've highly active, internationally renowned research groups and, in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (2008), 80% of our research activity was rated as of international standard.

Our partners

Our partners include local hospitals and schools, the Regional Neurological and Neurosurgical NHS Trust, Prison Psychology departments, national and international Police Forces and associated Law Enforcement Agencies. There are also close links with other University departments in the Faculty of Science and Engineering, the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, and the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences; in particular, Clinical Psychology, Neuroscience, and Human Anatomy. Numerous collaborations exist between members of staff and their colleagues in other academic institutions both nationally and internationally.

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The MSc Criminology and Criminal Psychology programme provides students with the conceptual knowledge and skills to open up diverse career paths. Read more
The MSc Criminology and Criminal Psychology programme provides students with the conceptual knowledge and skills to open up diverse career paths. Core courses will enable you to develop an understanding of the concepts, theories, methods and principles central to criminology and the skills to apply these in the forensic and legal area. Optional courses build on this core grounding and enable you to develop an empirical insight in an area of your choice, culminating in a research project.

This approach provides you with knowledge of the changing nature of psychology, law and criminology, and professional applications. It will also develop your ability to relate theory to practice in a way that provides more informed solutions to problems, and opportunities in the workplace. There is a valuable research grounding and a broad coverage of criminological, forensic and psychological approaches to crime and criminality.

Please note that this programme does not provide British Psychological Society accreditation or recognition. This is because the programme is a criminology programme with a strand of specialist criminal / investigative / forensic psychology and is not a postgraduate psychology degree programme. The MSc Criminology & Criminal Psychology programme meets the British Criminology Society benchmarks for postgraduate taught courses.

From time-to-time we update our programmes to reflect changes in knowledge and industry standards, so the programme structure, mode and the courses and course structure can be subject to change from what is listed below. The availability of option courses also varies from year-to-year according to student preference, staff availability and may, for some courses, also depend on a student's academic performance. Until the academic term immediately prior to the academic term in which an option is listed to run, we are not able to guarantee that an option listed will be available. In addition, please note that some courses may only be open to certain students and may also involve an application process which may include successfully passing a selection process to take the course. For these reasons, the structure (i.e. the mode(s), the courses and the course structure) of the programme shown in this information is shown for illustrative purposes only.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/crim/crimpsych

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Criminal Investigative Psychology (15 credits)
Psychology, Development and Crime (15 credits)
Comparative Criminological Research (30 credits)
Crime Theory (30 credits)
Criminology Postgraduate Dissertation Project (60 credits)

Students are required to choose 30 credits from this list of options.

Child and Adolescent Psychology in Practice (30 credits)
Current issues in Child and Adolescent Psychology (30 credits)
Contemporary Issues in Criminology (30 credits)
Crime, Terrorism and the State (30 credits)

Part time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Psychology, Development and Crime (15 credits)
Crime Theory (30 credits)

- Year 2:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Criminal Investigative Psychology (15 credits)
Comparative Criminological Research (30 credits)
Criminology Postgraduate Dissertation Project (60 credits)

Students are required to choose 30 credits from this list of options.

Child and Adolescent Psychology in Practice (30 credits)
Current issues in Child and Adolescent Psychology (30 credits)
Contemporary Issues in Criminology (30 credits)
Crime, Terrorism and the State (30 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Career opportunities

This programme encompasses criminological, legal, forensic and psychological approaches. It will appeal to those with a broad interest in criminology and criminal psychological issues, including those whose future employment is likely to involve public, private and/ or non-governmental criminological or criminal justice work or applied criminal/legal/forensic psychological work in the UK or internationally. It is relevant to careers in local government, European and international institutions, and national and international nongovernmental organisations. It will also appeal to those wishing to prepare for a research degree in humanities and social sciences.

Teaching and assessment

The programme employs a range of innovative teaching and learning methods. Lectures and seminars are dynamic and interactive. Teaching and learning activities may include:

- Role play
- Real-world problem solving
- Speed debates
- Presentations
- Project supervision
- Work-based placements and tutorials.

Where possible and depending on the courses studied, one or more field trip (please note that any field trip will be a day-time trip only, not an overnight or multi-day trip).

Assessment of learning is usually based on a mixture of examination and coursework and can include presentations/group work, the submission of essays and the sitting of examinations.

Further information

If you would like more information on this programme, please contact us at .

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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This course will provide you with an advanced understanding of the theoretical and applied issues in forensic psychology. Our scientist-practitioner approach equips you with the skills and knowledge needed to pursue a career in forensic psychology practice. Read more
This course will provide you with an advanced understanding of the theoretical and applied issues in forensic psychology. Our scientist-practitioner approach equips you with the skills and knowledge needed to pursue a career in forensic psychology practice.

The MSc in Forensic Psychology offers comprehensive professional training in forensic psychology. You will gain an in-depth experience of offending and victim pathways, as well as the investigative process. Through the use of a structured framework, you will also study theory and conduct research relating to forensic psychology practice. The course has two different routes:

Forensic Psychology, MSc (Accredited)
This route is fully accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS), thereby accounting for Stage 1 of the Qualification in Forensic Psychology. Students enrolling on this route must have a first degree in psychology providing Graduate Basis for Chartership (GBC) with the BPS. We will attempt to provide you with a placement within local forensic units (ie HM Prison Service, NHS, Police, or the Forensic Interview Laboratory within the School of Psychology), however, this is not always guaranteed for all students.

Forensic Psychology, MSc (Non-accredited)
This route is not accredited by the BPS and therefore does not fulfil Stage 1 of the BPS qualification in Forensic Psychology. If a student on this non-accredited route wanted to progress onto Stage 2 of the Qualification in Forensic Psychology in the future, they would need to go back and complete the necessary conversion programme to give them the requisite GBC with the BPS.

This route is aimed primarily at those students who do not possess a first degree in psychology providing GBC with the BPS, but whose degree covers research methods and statistics relevant to psychology (eg a joint or combined honours degree which includes psychology, or an international psychology degree that does not confer GBC with the BPS). Other qualifications/experience may be acceptable and will be considered by the Programme Director (eg mental health specialists, police officers, prison officers).

No placements will be provided on this route (with the exception of the Forensic Interview Laboratory within the School of Psychology - space permitting). You are, however, free to gain access to your own placement.

Northumbria Police are proud to support this course and to be working in collaboration with the School of Psychology at Newcastle University.

You will develop your understanding of forensic psychology in a multi-disciplinary and professional context. We promote collaborative teaching and research through our strong links with UK forensic psychology practitioners, including Her Majesty's Prison Service, the National Health Service (NHS) and Police.

You will gain demonstrable, advanced knowledge and critical understanding in:
-Theories and professional issues of forensic psychology
-The breadth and depth of forensic psychology
-The role of psychology within the legal system (civil and criminal)
-The National Offender Management system
-Legislation under which forensic psychologists work
-Investigative psychology and forensic interviewing
-Investigative process from pre-trial/conviction to through/after-care and restorative justice
-Legal, ethical and contextual issues in the evaluation of research and practice
-Debating and using evidence from appropriate literature
-Legal processes

You will also gain professional skills in:
-Writing parole board and analytical reports
-Developing forensic case formulations
-Independent learning
-Project planning
-Problem solving
-Time management
-Teamwork
-Reflection

Your specialist skills and knowledge will be developed through a combination of:
-Written reports
-Reflective journals
-Interview guides
-Oral presentations

Facilities

The School of Psychology provides high quality facilities to all our students, researchers and staff. We are located in the Ridley Building where you will have access to a postgraduate resources room with networked computers and printer.

Accreditation

This course has been accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS). The accreditation shows that the course meets the standards set by the BPS.

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