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The MSc Psychological Sciences conversion course provides a post-graduate qualification enabling students from a range of backgrounds to gain Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership in Psychology of the British Psychological Society (BPS). Read more

About the course

The MSc Psychological Sciences conversion course provides a post-graduate qualification enabling students from a range of backgrounds to gain Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership in Psychology of the British Psychological Society (BPS).

Moreover, the conversion course provides a sound knowledge of the diverse approaches to the study of behaviour encompassed within the core areas of psychology. Finally, the course emphasises the development of transferable knowledge, analytic expertise and research skills, which will be useful across the diverse areas of employment that attract psychology graduates and as a basis for further advanced study within the discipline (e.g. PhD, ClinPsyD, DEdPsy).

Aims

Psychology is defined as the study of mind and behaviour. Psychology is simultaneously a biological science and a social science, providing an exceptionally broad range of conceptual perspectives and empirical skills that will enable students to compete effectively in the workforce upon graduation.

The programme aims to provide students with:

Coverage of all of the requirements for Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership in Psychology within the British Psychological Society (BPS).

A comprehensive understanding, and critical awareness, of how the theories, methods, and research findings of psychology draw upon and contribute to the natural sciences and the social sciences alike.

A comprehensive and systematic understanding of knowledge, and a critical awareness of current issues relating to important concepts, theoretical issues, research findings, historical issues, recent advances, and research methods in psychology.

Comprehensive knowledge and systematic understanding of relevant concepts, theoretical issues, research findings, recent advances, and research methods in biological psychology, cognitive psychology, developmental psychology, individual differences, and social psychology that are critical for research in psychology.

The opportunity to acquire comprehensive knowledge and systematic understanding of a particular topic in psychology and to conduct an original empirical research project in that area.

The opportunity to acquire important transferable, advanced research skills (e.g. research design, data analysis, report preparation).

Course Content

Compulsory modules:

Conceptual and Historical Issues in Psychology
Developmental Psychology
Individual Differences
Social Psychology
Statistics in Psychology
Dissertation
Biological Psychology
Cognitive Psychology
Research Methods in Psychology
Psychology Research Methods in Practice
Research Methods
Biological and Cognitive Psychology

Typical Dissertations

The dissertation is an empirical report (maximum 12,000 words) that enables students to:
Integrate elements of their learning from different parts of the programme
Demonstrate their accumulated knowledge and systematic understanding of a topic
Show an ability to interpret primary source material
Develop an innovative approach to the subject
Work independently of others, consistent with BPS guidelines.

Teaching

Lectures and seminars provide students with in-depth knowledge of historical and contemporary perspectives in psychology.

Formative and summative essays provide reflection on historical and contemporary perspectives in psychology.

Statistics assignments, written research methods tests and laboratory reports will ensure proficiency in analytical skills - required to design research and interpret results.

Statistics assignment and lab reports will provide critical evaluation of the results of empirical research in psychology.

Formative summative essays, exams, and the dissertation will develop effective and critical written communication skills.

Individual meetings between students and dissertation supervisors will enable students to:

(a) Acquire knowledge concerning major theories and results of empirical studies that are relevant to the dissertation topic (including an understanding of the larger, real-world context within which the dissertation topic can be located); and

(b) Develop, analyse, and interpret theory-derived, testable hypotheses (and, perhaps, research questions) concerning links among the constructs to be studied in the dissertation.

Effective and critical written communication will be achieved via formative summative essays, exams, and the dissertation.

Assessment

Coursework essays – demonstration of systematic understanding, critical analysis, and written communication skills.

Examinations – demonstration of comprehensive understanding and written communication skills.

Quantitative reports – ability to analyse and interpret empirical evidence.

Oral presentations – demonstration of knowledge and understanding, critical analysis and oral communication skills.

Dissertation – ability to plan, critically review, execute and communicate an advanced piece of research.

Deadlines are distributed through the year, allowing time for constructive feedback.

Special Features

The MSc Psychological Sciences conversion course will provide a Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) in Psychology, as conferred by the British Psychological Society (BPS). This is an entry requirement for all postgraduate training programmes leading to chartered status and the vast majority of postgraduate programmes accredited by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) for registration as a practitioner psychologist.

There is a focus during the programme on developing students' sound knowledge of research methods and statistics - highly desirable skills in many areas of potential employment and so fundamental to the value added by the degree.

A wide range of options are available for students to pursue their own particular research interests (culminating in the dissertation) within the discipline.

Accreditation

BSc Psychology courses accredited by The British Psychological Society
The BSc Psychological Sciences programme at Brunel is accredited by The British Psychological Society.

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MA Chinese-English Translation and Interpreting should interest you if you want to build your language proficiency in Chinese and English and further develop the translation and interpreting techniques that are required by employers. Read more
MA Chinese-English Translation and Interpreting should interest you if you want to build your language proficiency in Chinese and English and further develop the translation and interpreting techniques that are required by employers.

Building on our internationally recognised expertise in the teaching of practical foreign language skills, our course offers written translation, oral interpreting and film and video subtitling in a single programme. By the end of your studies, you will have developed the practical language and key skills necessary for employment in professional translation, interpreting and subtitling.

Our course will build on the knowledge and skills you acquired in your previous studies, and is unique in the emphasis it places on hands-on training. With the help of native speakers, you learn how to use your language skills to translate, interpret and subtitle effectively, using the latest industry-standard software, in a culturally sensitive way.

You cover topics including:
-Bilateral, consecutive and simultaneous interpreting
-Technologies of translation
-Effective note-taking
-Written translation
-Subtitling

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014), placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and among the top 150 departments on the planet (QS World University Rankings 2016).

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

This course can also be studied up to a PGDip level, for more information, view this web-page: http://www.essex.ac.uk/courses/details.aspx?mastercourse=PG00480&subgroup=2

Our expert staff

Our staff are internationally renowned. Their books dominate the reading lists at other universities. All our language teachers are native or bilingual speakers, we maintain excellent student-staff ratios, and we integrate language learning with linguistics wherever there is synergy.

Our lecturers on the MA (Dan Chen, Nan Zhao and Yanxi Wu) are professional interpreters and translators experienced in training students in the necessary skills for professional practice.

Specialist facilities

-Our new interpreting lab provides 10 booths to interpret conferences with up to 20 interpreters
-Use our lecture theatre equipped with five interpreting booths, and the capacity to interpret lectures of up to 350 people – we are the only university in the UK with such facilities
-We regularly use two multimedia language teaching labs equipped with top-of-the-range computers integrating audio-visual projectors and large screens
-Use specialist software such as SDL Trados Studio 2014 and MemoQ for technical translation, Avidanet Live and Black Box for Interpreting and WinCaps Qu4ntum for Subtitling
-Use our professional recording studios to video record a small audience or for presentations
-Attend our exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost

Your future

Our course directly leads to a career in translation, interpreting and subtitling, in the media, business and tourism between the English-speaking world and China.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Example structure

-Business Interpreting I
-Consecutive Interpreting III
-Principles of Translation and Interpreting
-Simultaneous Interpreting III (optional)
-Subtitling: Principles and Practice
-Specialised Translation
-Written Translation II
-Dissertation
-Simultaneous Interpreting II
-Technologies of Translation II and Post Editing (optional)

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What is the Master of Chemistry all about?. The overall aim of the Master of Chemistry programme is to train students to . Read more

What is the Master of Chemistry all about?

The overall aim of the Master of Chemistry programme is to train students to conduct research in an academic or industrial setting.

Students apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired by identifying a research question, situating it in its proper chemical and social context and designing a study that addresses this research question.

This is an initial Master's programme and can be followed on a full-time or part-time basis.

Structure

The full programme comprises 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System), including 18 ECTS for compulsory courses and 54 ECTS for electives. In addition, students develop advanced practical skills in an internship at KU Leuven to the value of 18 ECTS, while the remaining 30 ECTS are allocated to the Master’s thesis.

There are five majors to choose from:

  • Quantum Chemistry and Physical Chemistry.
  • Molecular Design and Synthesis.
  • Molecular Imaging and Photonics.
  • Polymer Chemistry and Materials.
  • Biochemistry, Molecular and Structural Biology

Department

The Department of Chemistry consists of five divisions, all of which conduct high quality research embedded in well-established collaborations with other universities, research institutes and companies around the world. Its academic staff is committed to excellence in teaching and research. Although the department's primary goal is to obtain insight into the composition, structure and properties of chemical compounds and the design, synthesis and development of new (bio)molecular materials, this knowledge often leads to applications with important economic or societal benefits.

The department aims to develop and maintain leading, internationally renowned research programmes dedicated to solving fundamental and applied problems in the fields of:

  • the design, synthesis and characterisation of new compounds (organic-inorganic, polymers).
  • the simulation of the properties and reactivity of (bio)molecules, polymers and clusters by quantum chemical and molecular modelling methods.
  • the determination of the chemical and physical properties of (bio)molecules, and polymers on the molecular as well as on the material level by spectroscopy, microscopy and other characterisation tools as related to their structure.

Objectives

Knowledge and understanding

  • has extensive knowledge and understanding of a number of chemical fields of expertise and at least one advanced or specialized chemical topic;
  • can acquire autonomously chemical insights and methods;
  • has advanced theoretical and practical knowledge of methods of specialised chemical synthesis and characterisation.

Research

  • knows to organize and carry out original chemical research;
  • can delineate a research topic, postulate a research question and revise this question in the course of the research;
  • can select and apply autonomously proper experimental and theoretical methods;
  • can find, use and interpret with intent specialized literature.

Acquire, use and form an opinion about information

  • has insight in the strategies of acquiring and using knowledge that are central to the domain of the exact sciences;
  • can acquire, adapt, interpret and evaluate quantitatively information and data;
  • can adapt and interpret research results in a multidisciplinary context, position it in the international context and report about this;
  • can apply his knowledge, understanding and problem solving capacities in a broader context;
  • can critically evaluate complex problems in the field of chemistry and formulate scientifically sound solutions.

Communication and social skills

  • can express verbally and in written form the results of research for a group of people of experts and laymen;
  • can take a scientific viewpoint and defend it for a public of fellow students, lecturers and specialist;
  • can function in a heterogeneous environments and teams;
  • has English communication skills;
  • can be in the lead and run a team;
  • can work autonomously.

Motivation and attitudes

  • is open to complementary input from other disciplines;
  • can take responsibility for and give direction to his personal professional development;
  • has professional behavior;
  • can autonomously function and contribute to research.

Employment

  • has competency that gives access to the PhD study and to employment in chemical and various other fields.

Career perspectives

The Master of Science in Chemistry offers a wide range of specialisations and, as such, many career options are available to our graduates. More than half of our alumni work in industry, while others work in academia or other research institutes.

Within industry, graduates can opt for a technical, a commercial, or research-oriented career. Since the chemical industry is also a major industrial sector throughout Europe and the rest of the world, employment opportunities are enhanced by obtaining a PhD. A few examples of professional domains where chemists are needed include industry (chemistry, petrochemistry, medical sector, pharmaceutical industry, agrochemistry, food industry etc.), government or public administration, and research institutes.



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Study Sport and Clinical Biomechanics in the world-leading School of Sport and Exercise Science at Liverpool John Moores University. Read more
Study Sport and Clinical Biomechanics in the world-leading School of Sport and Exercise Science at Liverpool John Moores University. This Masters degree features extensive training in lab-based skills plus analysis of contemporary issues.

•Course available to study full time (1 year) and part time (2-3 years)
•Developed by world-leading researchers from our pioneering School of Sport and Exercise Science
•Modules complement the specific expertise of the biomechanics staff and include: clinical gait analysis and virtual rehabilitation, muscle and tendon mechanics and biomechanical assessment and injury prevention
•Access to state-of-the-art biomechanics laboratories in the award-winning Tom Reilly Building, including the Movement Function Research Laboratory
•Exciting career opportunities in clinical or sports biomechanics and/or academic and professional development
•Ideal for physiotherapists who wish to deepen their biomechanical expertise

Study under the guidance of world-leaders in biomechanics and take your own knowledge into our state-of-the-art facilities. We welcome applications from those interested in the movement and mechanism of the human body, and dedicated to the application and advancement of this field of study.

Biomechanics is the study of the mechanical functioning of the biological system. This course applies biomechanical knowledge in both a sporting and clinical context.

The curriculum is research-led with a number of core modules being directly informed by the current research activity of staff. Extensive training is provided in laboratory-based skills and in the interpretation of biomechanical findings and there is comprehensive coverage of contemporary issues in biomechanics.

The course is taught through a mixture of lectures, seminars, tutorial support, practical sessions and workshops which encourage critical, reflective engagement with a range of theoretical and applied topics.

You will also be exposed to a wide range of research questions in biomechanics and learn how to critically appraise and interpret the literature. The diversity of assessment methods, including written coursework and oral viva assessment, are innovative and well received by students.

Please see guidance below on core and option modules for further information on what you will study.
Technical Training in Biomechanics: provides technical training in laboratory techniques appropriate to sport and clinical biomechanics. It will enable you to develop laboratory skills including 2D, and 3D motion analysis, force analysis and biomechanical modelling so that you can collect and interpret biomechanical measurement and protocols to benchmark standards. The topic is taught in the laboratories in a hands-on, interactive manner.

Research Methods: provides mastery and expertise in quantitative research strategies, methods and techniques, specifically focussed on quantitative data so that you can undertake postgraduate research. It aims to encourage critical understanding of how quantitative data should be handled and analysed using a variety of approaches. The module enables you to develop critical analysis of statistical concepts and procedures, trains you to use statistical analysis software and extend your knowledge of the experimental and research design process.

Current Issues in Biomechanics: develops and extends your opportunity to investigate issues of current importance in Biomechanics. You will be presented with a variety of cutting-edge research topics in biomechanics applied to sport, exercise and clinical applications. You will need to read up-to-date literature in the appropriate fields and to evaluate past and current directions. Laboratory content will involve using measurement skills developed in the Technical Training module to replicate an experimental study from the literature.

Muscle-tendon mechanics: introduces the main biomechanical characteristics of human muscles and tendons and the implications for human movement, performance and biomechanical testing. The mechanical parameters and behaviour of these tissues of the human body in-vivo will also be examined in response to chronic loading and disuse to understand basic, musculoskeletal mechanisms and adaptations underpinning changes in whole-body function and performance.

Biomechanical assessment in sport and exercise: provides the conceptual and practical knowledge base that develops and extends understanding of biomechanical assessment. With continuous developments of equipment, software, and knowledge, there is a growing need for biomechanical assessment in sport and exercise. This has a role both in performance evaluation, in injury prevention, and in injury rehabilitation. You will be exposed to a large variety of tools, each time first gaining a better understanding of the theoretical framework that justifies the use of such tool.

Clinical Movement Analysis: provides the conceptual and practical knowledge base that develops and extends your understanding of clinical movement analysis. You will learn how to interpret gait analysis results in a clinical context through exposure to the current literature, specialised methods, and clinical case studies. You will also be exposed to the latest research developments in the unique area of virtual rehabilitation.

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled ‘What you will study’ is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Academic Framework reviews are conducted by LJMU from time to time to ensure that academic standards continue to be maintained. A review is currently in progress and will be operational for the academic year 2016/2017. Final details of this programme’s designated core and option modules will be made available on LJMU’s website as soon as possible and prior to formal enrolment for the academic year 2016/2017.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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Northern England has an extraordinary diversity of landscapes and geological features, and as the largest county, Yorkshire preserves a large proportion of them. Read more
Northern England has an extraordinary diversity of landscapes and geological features, and as the largest county, Yorkshire preserves a large proportion of them. From the rugged North York Moors and the limestone pavements of the Yorkshire Dales to the coalfields of South Yorkshire and the shifting coastlines of Holderness, it is in many respects a microcosm of the region.

In The Geology of Yorkshire and Northern England, students will obtain a regional geological understanding with which to interpret larger-scale Earth processes and structures. The programme will provide students with training in advanced palaeoenvironmental analysis and science communication skills. Students will also assess Yorkshire and Northern England's importance to current controversies in Earth sciences, from fracking to climate change, and acquire an understanding of the region's vital role in the history of geology.

This is a part-time Postgraduate Diploma delivered wholly online in a fully supported learning environment. The programme starts in late September/early October each academic year, and places are limited to ensure a constructive atmosphere for discussions. Students can exit with a Postgraduate Certificate after successful completion of the first year if their circumstances change.

Overview

The programme will aim to:
-Introduce the key tenets and sub-disciplines of geology, focussing particularly on the geological evolution of northern England
-Provide students with a holistic understanding of the geological origins and history of Yorkshire and northern England
-Introduce students to field and laboratory geological analysis, and the skills and techniques required to interpret geological features accurately
-Describe the main geological units present in Yorkshire, their composition, distribution and formation
-Explore the geological history of Yorkshire and its global significance in the development of Earth Sciences
-Examine and interpret the Palaeozoic and Mesozoic geology of Yorkshire
-Explain the scientific importance of Yorkshire's rocks, and the role they have played in our understanding of the evolution of the Earth.
-Further develop students' palaeoecological and palaeoenvironmental interpretation skills
-Examine the Cenozoic and recent geological history of Yorkshire
-Provide students with an understanding of human interactions with, and exploitation of, the geological resources and landscapes of Yorkshire and northern England
-Further develop students’ knowledge of Yorkshire's role in the evolution of global geological hypotheses

Structure

This part-time two-year programme will comprise six 20-credit modules:
Year One
-Origins – the Development of Geology in Northern England
-Dales and Vales – the Palaeozoic of Yorkshire and Northern England
-Moors and Coast – the Mesozoic of Yorkshire and Northern England

Year Two
-Advanced Palaeoenvironmental Analysis
-Fire and Ice – the Cenozoic of Yorkshire and Northern England
-People and Landscape - The Human Geology of Yorkshire and Northern England

Students will be required to complete all these modules in the first instance, though additional modules may be added in the future to accommodate future programme growth and offer a broader learning experience.

It is anticipated that assessments will comprise a balance of short and long critical essays, laboratory-based projects and project work.

Online Study

Our approach to e-learning is distinctive and may be different from your general perceptions about online study:
-Flexible, fully supported, modular delivery
-Taught exclusively online
-Two stages: Certificate and Diploma. Each stage typically takes 12 months
-Comprises six distinct modules
-Part-time study (approximately 15 hours per week) allows participants to structure their learning around the other life circumstances

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The course is intended for all those interested in promoting health and well-being. The course can be done in two ways. First there is the full-time course where the taught component and the Dissertation need to be completed within 1 year. Read more
The course is intended for all those interested in promoting health and well-being.

The course can be done in two ways. First there is the full-time course where the taught component and the Dissertation need to be completed within 1 year. The second option is to study part-time where the taught component is run over 2 years and the Dissertation is completed by the end of year 3.

Compulsory modules:

The 80 credits of taught core modules (which are compulsory) are:

Social and Behavioural Sciences (10 credits)
Principles and Practices of Public Health and Health Promotion (20 credits)
Health Economics (20 credits)
Research Methods (20 credits)
Epidemiology (10 credits)
Optional modules:

40 credits are also chosen from a selection of optional modules which include:

Public Health Nutrition (20 credits)
Accountability in Health & Social Care (20 credits)
Leadership, Quality, Innovation & Change (20 credits)
Work-Based Learning (20 credits)
Promoting Mental Health and Well-Being (20 credits)
If you wish to achieve your MSc you will also need to successfully complete a Research Dissertation (60 credits).

Programme philosophy
As the course is intended for those interested in promoting health and well-being, it has been developed in collaboration with practitioners and specialists in the field of public health and health promotion in the UK. The programme is aimed at multi-agency, multi-disciplinary and multi-professional UK and international students. This programme provides opportunity for students of public health and health promotion to develop their skills to manage change, lead public health programmes, and to work with individuals, groups and communities. The programme aims to develop people who:

Have Public Health and Health Promotion knowledge and skills
Understand the inter‑relationships between the factors that influence health
Can critically analyse and reflect on public health and health promotion theory, research and practice
Can present evidence on the basis of underpinning theory and understanding
Have the necessary skills, motivation and commitment to engage in lifelong learning and continuing professional development.
Postgraduate students are recognised as individuals possessing substantial knowledge and experience; their contributions are of value, and can enhance the learning experiences of the other students.

Intended programme outcomes
The course provides opportunities for students to achieve and demonstrate the following learning outcomes.

Knowledge and understanding

Students will gain knowledge and understanding of:

Social and behavioural sciences: the social, psychological, political and cultural influences affecting health promotion and public health policy and practice.
Health economics: the key concepts of scarcity, choice and opportunity cost in health economics.
Research: quantitative and qualitative research, their approaches to scientific inquiry, their methodologies and related methods.
Epidemiology: epidemiological principles and research to inform public health and health promotion.
Principles and practice of public health promotion: the theory and practice of health promotion within the new public health agenda.
Subject Specific Skills

Students will have opportunities to:

Develop surveillance and assessment skills relating to the population’s health and well-being.
Critically understand the skills needed for promoting and protecting the population’s health and well-being.
Develop strategic qualities to improve health and well-being.
Develop skills in working with, and for, communities to improve health and well-being.
Promote people’s equality, diversity and rights.
Ethically manage self, people and resources to improve health and well-being.
Conduct and/or interpret health promotion and public health research.
Cognitive (thinking) Skills

Students will have the ability to:

Recognise, critically analyse, and apply theories, paradigms, concepts and principles of public health and health promotion.
Critically understand research and development.
Analyse, synthesise, and apply information logically and critically.
Reflect and utilise reflection to enhance self-awareness, knowledge and skills.
Key Skills

Students will be able to:

Critically analyse knowledge from relevant sources to develop and present coherent arguments.
Communicate clearly, concisely, and confidently in spoken and written formats.
Plan, perform and report on public health and health promotion data with due regard to ethical issues.
Use and interpret evidence critically.
Develop the capacity for independent learning and effective utilisation of available resources.
Use IT skills, effectively utilising computing and word processing facilities, electronic databases and Blackboard.

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Graduate students will find the programme of substantial use in developing their knowledge and skills base for bridge analysis, design and management. Read more

Graduate students will find the programme of substantial use in developing their knowledge and skills base for bridge analysis, design and management.

The programme also offers the opportunity for practising bridge engineers to update their knowledge of current design and assessment codes and guidelines, become familiar with developments in new techniques for the design, construction and management of bridges.

The Bridge Engineering programme encompasses a wide range of modules addressing the whole life-analysis of bridge structures from design to end-of-life.

Optional modules from some of our other study streams are also offered, covering structural engineering, geotechnical engineering, water engineering, construction management, and infrastructure engineering and management.

Graduates are highly employable and may progress to relevant specialist PhD or EngD research programmes in the field.

Programme structure

This programme is studied over either one year (full-time) or between two and five years (part-time or distance learning). It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation project.

This degree is accredited as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng(Hons) or an Accredited IEng (Full) BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Bridge Engineering Group Modules

Structural Engineering Group Modules

Geotechnical Engineering Group Modules

Construction Management Group Modules

Infrastructure Engineering and Management Group Modules

Water and Environmental Engineering Group Modules

Dissertation

Educational aims of the programme

The programme aims to provide graduates with:

  • A comprehensive understanding of engineering mechanics for bridge analysis
  • The ability to select and apply the most appropriate analysis methodology for problems in bridge engineering including advanced and new methods
  • The ability to design bridge structures in a variety of construction materials
  • A working knowledge of the key UK and European standards and codes of practice associated with the design, analysis and construction of bridge structures and the ability to interpret and apply these to both familiar and unfamiliar problems
  • The necessary technical further learning towards fulfilling the educational base for the professional qualification of Chartered Engineer

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding

  • A knowledge and understanding of the key UK and European standards and codes of practice relating to bridge engineering
  • The ability to interpret and apply the appropriate UK and European standards and codes of practiceto bridge design for both familiar and unfamiliar situations
  • A knowledge and understanding of the construction of different types of bridge structures using different types of materials (e.g. concrete and steel)
  • A knowledge and understanding of the common and less common materials used in bridge engineering
  • A comprehensive understanding of the principles of engineering mechanics underpinning bridge engineering
  • The ability to critically evaluate bridge engineering concepts
  • The ability to apply the appropriate analysis methodologies to common bridge engineering problems as well as unfamiliar problems
  • The ability to understand the limitations of bridge analysis methods
  • A knowledge and understanding to work with information that may be uncertain or incomplete
  • A Knowledge and understanding of sustainable development related to bridges
  • The awareness of the commercial, social and environmental impacts associated with bridges
  • An awareness and ability to make general evaluations of risk associated with the design and construction of bridge structures including health and safety, environmental and commercial risk
  • A critical awareness of new developments in the field of bridge engineering

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • The ability to tackle problems familiar or otherwise which have uncertain or incomplete data (A,B)
  • The ability to generate innovative bridge designs (B)
  • The ability to use theory or experimental research to improve design and/or analysis
  • The ability to apply fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
  • Synthesis and critical appraisal of the thoughts of others;

Professional practical skills

  • The awareness of professional and ethical conduct
  • A Knowledge and understanding of bridge engineering in a commercial/business context
  • Ability to use computer software to assist towards bridge analysis
  • Ability to produce a high quality report
  • Ability of carry out technical oral presentations

Key / transferable skills

  • Communicate engineering design, concepts, analysis and data in a clear and effective manner
  • Collect and analyse research data
  • Time and resource management planning

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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You can access six study streams on this Masters programme. Bridge Engineering. Construction Management. Geotechnical Engineering. Read more

You can access six study streams on this Masters programme:

  • Bridge Engineering
  • Construction Management
  • Geotechnical Engineering
  • Structural Engineering
  • Water Engineering and Environmental Engineering
  • Infrastructure Engineering and Management

As well as supporting the career development of Civil Engineering graduates, this programme provides the necessary further learning for engineers working in the construction industry who hold related first degrees such as engineering geology or construction management.

It is also designed to update the technical skills of practising engineers engaged in the planning, design, construction and operation of civil-engineering works.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time / distance learning for between two to five academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

This degree is accredited as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng(Hons) or an Accredited IEng (Full) BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Structural Engineering Group Modules

Bridge Engineering Group Modules

Geotechnical Engineering Group Modules

Construction Management Group Modules

Infrastructure Engineering Group Modules

Water and Environmental Engineering Group Modules

Dissertation

Educational aims of the programme

  • The Civil Engineering programme aims to provide graduate engineers with:
  • Advanced capabilities and in-depth knowledge in a range of specialised aspects of civil engineering
  • It is also designed to update the technical skills of practising engineers engaged in the planning, design, construction and operation of civil engineering works and to contribute to a personal professional development programme
  • A working knowledge of some of the UK and European standards and codes of practice associated with the design, analysis and construction of civil engineering structures and the ability to interpret and apply these to both familiar and unfamiliar problems
  • The necessary further learning towards fulfilling the educational base for the professional qualification of Chartered Engineer in both a technical or non-technical capacity dependent upon module selection

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding

  • The mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in civil engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of multi-disciplinary open ended engineering problems
  • The properties, behaviour and use of relevant materials
  • The management techniques which may be used to achieve civil engineering objectives within that context
  • Some of the roles of management techniques and codes of practice in design
  • The principles and implementation of some advanced design and management techniques specific to civil engineering
  • Mathematical and computer models relevant to civil engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
  • The role of the professional engineer in society, including health, safety, environmental, sustainability, ethical issues and risk assessment within civil engineering
  • The wider multidisciplinary engineering context and its underlying principles
  • Developing technologies related to civil engineering and the ability to develop an ability to synthesize and critically appraise some of them
  • The framework of relevant requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety, and risk issues (an awareness of)
  • The advanced design processes and methodologies and the ability to adapt them in open ended situations.

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • Analyse and solve problems
  • Think strategically
  • Synthesis of complex sets of information
  • Understand the changing nature of knowledge and practice in the management of culturally diverse construction environments
  • Select and transfer knowledge and methods from other sectors to construction-based organisation
  • Produce sound designs to meet specified requirements such as Eurocodes, deploying commercial software packages as appropriate
  • Dynthesis and critical appraisal of the thoughts of others

Professional practical skills

  • Awareness of professional and ethical conduct
  • Extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and apply its solution using computer based engineering tools where appropriate
  • Evaluate and integrate information and processes in project work
  • Present information orally to others
  • Show a capability to act decisively in a coordinated way using theory, better practice and harness this to experience
  • Use concepts and theories to make engineering judgments in the absence of complete data
  • Observe, record and interpret data using appropriate statistical methods and to present results in appropriate forms for the civil engineering industry

Key / transferable skills

  • Communicate engineering design, concepts, analysis and data in a clear and effective manner 
  • Collect and analyse research data 
  • Time and resource management planning

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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In the first semester of the programme, graduates from a range of backgrounds are brought up-to-speed on core knowledge in engineering, biology and research practice. Read more

In the first semester of the programme, graduates from a range of backgrounds are brought up-to-speed on core knowledge in engineering, biology and research practice.

This is followed by specialist modules in the second semester on human movement analysis, prostheses, implants, physiological measurements and rehabilitation, as well as numerous computer methods applied across the discipline.

The course makes use of different approaches to teaching, including traditional lectures and tutorials, off-site visits to museums and hospitals, and lab work (particularly in the Human Movement and Instrumentation modules).

The core lecturing team is supplemented by leading figures from hospitals and industry.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a research project.

All modules are taught on the University main campus, with the exception of visits to the health care industry (e.g. commercial companies and NHS hospitals).

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Educational aims of the programme

The course aims:

  • To educate engineering, physical science, life science, medical and paramedical graduates in the broad base of knowledge required for a Biomedical Engineering career in industry, healthcare or research in the United Kingdom, Europe and the rest of the world
  • To underpin the knowledge base with a wide range of practical sessions including laboratory/experimental work and applied visits to expert health care facilities and biomedical engineering industry
  • To develop skills in critical review and evaluation of the current approaches in biomedical engineering
  • To build on these through an MSc research project in which further experimental, analytical, computational, and/or design skills will be acquired

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding

  • Demonstrate breadth and depth of awareness and understanding of issues at the forefront of Biomedical Engineering
  • Demonstrate broad knowledge in Human Biology, Instrumentation, Biomechanics, and Professional and Research skills
  • Demonstrate specialist knowledge in Implants, Motion analysis and rehabilitation, and Medical signals
  • Understand how to apply engineering principles to conceptually challenging (bio)medical problems
  • Appreciate the limitations in the current understanding of clinical problems and inherent in adopted solutions
  • Understand routes/requirements for personal development in biomedical engineering including state registration
  • Understand key elements of the concept of ethics and patient-professional relationships, recognise, analyse and respond to the complex ethical issues

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • Evaluate a wide range of applied engineering and clinical measurement and assessment tools
  • Design and implement a personal research project; this includes an ability to accurately assess/report on own/others work with justification and relate them to existing knowledge structures and methodologies, showing insight and understanding of alternative points of view
  • Carry out such research in a flexible, effective and productive manner, optimising use of available support, supervisory and equipment resources, demonstrating understanding of the complex underlying issues
  • Apply appropriate theory and quantitative methods to analyse problems

Professional practical skills

  • Make effective and accurate use of referencing across a range of different types of sources in line with standard conventions
  • Use/ apply basic and applied instrumentation hardware and software
  • Correctly use anthropometric measurement equipment and interpret results in the clinical context
  • Use/apply fundamental statistical analysis tools
  • Use advanced movement analysis hardware and software and interpret results in the clinical context
  • Use advanced finite element packages and other engineering software for computer simulation
  • Program in a high-level programming language and use built-in functions to tackle a range of problems
  • Use further specialist skills (laboratory-experimental, analytical, and computational) developed through the personal research project

Key / transferable skills

  • Identify, select, plan for, use and evaluate ICT applications and strategies to enhance the achievement of aims and desired outcomes
  • Undertake independent review, and research and development projects
  • Communicate effectively between engineering, scientific and clinical disciplines
  • Prepare relevant, clear project reports and presentations, selecting and adapting the appropriate format and style to convey information, attitudes and ideas to an appropriate standard and in such a way as to enhance understanding and engagement by academic/ professional audiences

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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This course is aimed at graduates who wish to acquire the knowledge and ability to understand, interpret and utilise financial information in decision making within organisations. Read more
This course is aimed at graduates who wish to acquire the knowledge and ability to understand, interpret and utilise financial information in decision making within organisations. This course is designed to prepare students who do not have background in accounting and finance for careers in business and financial management. It will also help those with accounting and finance background to explore the subject area in varied perspectives. The knowledge gained on this course will allow graduates to understand and interpret financial data.

About the course

This course provides an opportunity to study a body of academic knowledge that can be applied in a managerial context. In doing so, it will help expand your intellectual ability and develop higher level analytical skills so that any problems you encounter in your future career can be critically examined using an accounting and finance perspective.

Why choose this course?

-Study a course to provide you with the relevant skills to pursue a career in business with an accounting and finance focus
-Benefit from the skills, knowledge and industry experience of our academic staff
-Develop a fluency in finance to support your career in a broad range of areas

Careers

Graduates of this programme are ideally placed to follow careers in accountancy or in the financial services sector.
In previous years, students have progressed to work for companies such as KPMG and Deloitte, with typical job roles including Financial Analyst or Chartered Accountant.

Teaching methods

We offer a varied programme of teaching that includes facilitated seminars, practical workshops, web-based learning, case study analysis and traditional lectures. We also provide sessions by visiting staff, practitioners and consultants to give a varied perspective of the topics covered.

You will be assessed through a variety of coursework including presentations, reports and projects. You will also be required to complete a dissertation and will be supported by a dissertation supervisor.

Structure

Core Modules
-Accounting for Business Decisions
-Effective Governance and Accountability
-Professional and Research Skills for Financial Managers

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This is a Master's degree by research, in which the sole requirement is a dissertation. It is suitable for those who have a strong background in this field, or who have research experience. Read more
This is a Master's degree by research, in which the sole requirement is a dissertation. It is suitable for those who have a strong background in this field, or who have research experience. It is expected that the topic of research will fall within one of the areas supported by the Division.

An MPhil in Biological Anthropological Science may be obtained after one year of research on an approved subject within the field of Biological Anthropology, and includes an oral examination of the thesis and the general field of knowledge in which it falls. The dissertation topics are decided between the student and the supervisor, and assistance is provided on elements of methodology and analysis, as well as with the written presentation.

The thesis must satisfy the examiners that the candidate can design and carry out investigations, assess and interpret the results obtained, and place the work in the wider perspective of the subject. This course begins in October, with submission of the thesis by the end of August.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hsbampbas

Learning Outcomes

Prepare students for research at the doctoral level and to equip students to be future leaders in Applied Biological Anthropology and allied fields around the world.

Assessment

All students will write a thesis of not more than 35,000 words in length, exclusive of tables, footnotes, bibliography, and appendices, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculty of Human, Social, and Political Science. The examination shall include an oral examination on the thesis and on the general field of knowledge within which it falls. The thesis shall provide evidence to satisfy the Examiners that a candidate can design and carry out investigations, assess and interpret the results obtained, and place the work in the wider perspectives of the subject. The thesis and examination form the sole assessment for the degree.

Continuing

MPhil students are registered for one year only. Those who hope to read for a PhD at Cambridge immediately after the MPhil will need to obtain support from a potential supervisor. This need not be the same person who supervises your MPhil thesis. But you will need to work hard to let the potential PhD supervisor see substantive work that you have written, in addition to your draft thesis proposal, at an early stage in the academic year. Once you have applied for the PhD a definite decision will be taken after your performance in the MPhil can be fully assessed; the Committee wil set conditions for your related to the entry requirements of the PhD. If you do not achieve these targets it is unlikely you wil be able to continue to reads towards a PhD.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Opportuniites for relevant funding on application.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MA Bilingualism and Multilingualism is a unique postgraduate qualification offered through distance learning provision, being the first degree of its kind offered in Europe and part of the University’s mission to contribute to the range of initiatives in the field of language planning and bilingual/ multilingual development, both in Wales and elsewhere. Read more
The MA Bilingualism and Multilingualism is a unique postgraduate qualification offered through distance learning provision, being the first degree of its kind offered in Europe and part of the University’s mission to contribute to the range of initiatives in the field of language planning and bilingual/ multilingual development, both in Wales and elsewhere.

Course Overview

The MA Bilingualism and Multilingualism takes full advantage of the rich linguistic experience offered by Wales’ own bilingual context, as well as University of Wales Trinity Saint David's long-established expertise within this field as part of an extended network of institutions across Europe where bilingualism, multilingualism and language planning is an everyday phenomenon.

The degree offers modules which encompass a range of aspects on bilingualism and language planning in Wales and internationally. Different pathways are offered to meet the professional demands of a variety of careers in the field of bilingualism. It consists of five modules in Part One and a dissertation of 15,000 words in Part Two.

In Part One students may choose from a range of modules according to their personal professional or vocational needs, including:
-Introduction to Bilingualism
-Societal Bilingualism (political aspects of language vitality)
-Cognitive Aspects of Bilingualism
-Models of Bilingual Teaching
-Language Planning Essentials
-Research Methodology

Students will choose their own research subjects for the dissertation in Part Two based on aspects of the modules studied previously in Part One and agreed in advance with the Programme Director. It is intended that students will be given the opportunity to conduct in-depth research in a field of study which will promote their professional development.

Although the modular structure of the postgraduate degree allows students to study a single module, on the successful completion of three modules students will be eligible to exit the course with a Postgraduate Certificate in Bilingualism and Multilingualism, and a Postgraduate Diploma in Bilingualism and Multilingualism on the completion of five modules. Students wishing to progress to the MA in Bilingualism and Multilingualism would undertake an additional dissertation.

Modules

A summary of the aims of individual modules:
-CYAD-7015: Introduction to Bilingualism
-CYAD-7002: Societal Bilingualism
-CYAD-7007: Research Methodology
-CYAD-7008: Cognitive Aspects of Bilingualism
-CYAD-7009: Development of Bilingual Education in Wales
-CYAD-7010: Models of Bilingual Teaching
-CYAD-7012: Language Planning Essentials

Key Features

The MA Bilingualism and Multilingualism takes full advantage of the rich linguistic experience offered by Wales’ own bilingual context, as well as University of Wales Trinity Saint David’s long-established expertise within this field. The University is part of an extended network of institutions across Europe where bilingualism, multilingualism and language planning is an everyday phenomenon.

The programme aims to:
-Provide students with various aspects of bilingualism and multilingualism, both in Wales and in international contexts
-Develop students’ ability to critically analyse the various factors involved in the study of bilingualism/ multilingualism and to relate those factors to national and international contexts
-Equip students for various vocations involved with bilingualism/ multilingualism and enable them to apply basic principles, together with knowledge, understanding and subject-based skills, to their daily vocational needs
-Introduce students to the most relevant research and thinking in the field which forms the basis for the most recent theories and learning
-Develop students’ transferable skills and enable them to research, interpret and critically evaluate
-Develop students’ cognitive skills including their ability to reason, to critically analyse, as well as to think creatively in appraising any current policies in the field of bilingualism/ multilingualism and to propose improvements

The programme will focus on various aspects of bilingualism and language planning relevant to a range of professional and vocational posts in order to extend and deepen knowledge, understanding and skills in specific fields. The professional / vocational skills related to this programme will enable students to:
-Rise to the challenge which faces individuals in the field of bilingualism / multilingualism and language planning
-Undertake projects concerned with various aspects in the field
-Undertake individual and team research to promote linguistic plans and strategies
-Analyse and interpret data concerned with various developments
-Exhibit proficiency in the use of ICT in presentations and in communication

Students are given an opportunity to undertake field studies occasionally (eg in Scotland and Ireland) in order to study language revitalization projects and, when geographically convenient, to attend national and international conferences on bilingualism and language planning.

The advantage of the MA Bilingualism and Multilingualism to students is the flexibility which allows them to gain the necessary knowledge and skills through distance learning, by studying part-time or full-time and with the assistance of technology and the reading materials provided.

One can study as few as two modules per year and spread the cost over the period of study. By now, the course is studied by students in Wales and in various parts of the world including, for example, Italy, Switzerland, Czechoslovakia, Cyprus, Greece and Mongolia.

Assessment

A range of assessment methods are adopted in order to enable students to illustrate their knowledge and skills in relation to learning outcomes, including:
-Written assignments
-Presentations (adapted for distance learning purposes)
-Extended essays

Assessment methods are adopted on the basis of their appropriateness for ensuring that students can show that they have achieved the learning outcomes which are explicit in every module and on which the assessment criteria are based.

At the start of every module students are provided with:
-The assignment(s) for the assessment of the module and the weighting for each assignment
-A list of the criteria used to mark an assignment or presentation
-Further guidance in relation to the requirements of the set tasks and dates for presentation

Following the completion of an assignment, each student will receive:
-A formal report containing an assessment of the individual criteria on which the final mark was based, and feedback containing comments on how to improve as part of a formative process
-An opportunity to discuss the assignment with a tutor if necessary

Every assignment is assessed internally by a second-marker and by an external examiner.

Career Opportunities

The University has excellent resources, thus enabling us to offer a range of modules available to suit professional developmental needs and personal interests. The degree has a broad focus which is suitable for a range of professional fields and aims to equip students with the information and skills to work confidently in the field of bilingualism / multilingualism and language planning. The course offers a range of experiences and would appeal to anyone involved in the development of the use of language in modern society, including:
-Language Officers
-Policy Makers & Government Officers
-Language Planners
-Teachers & Trainers
-Translators
-Youth/ Community Workers
-Those currently working in adult education in various countries
-Those developing learning opportunities in both youth and adult contexts

The MA degree offers opportunities to progress to undertake subsequent research for a PhD.

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-You are interested in a challenging and stimulating career in conference interpreting. -You want personalised training from practising conference interpreters who are accredited by the European Union and the United Nations. Read more
-You are interested in a challenging and stimulating career in conference interpreting
-You want personalised training from practising conference interpreters who are accredited by the European Union and the United Nations
-You are looking for a course that is recognised and supported by key employers such as the European Commission and the European Parliament
-You want to benefit from four additional weeks of advanced simultaneous training after your final summer exams, which are specifically designed to prepare you for the profession
-You want to train and practice in state-of-the-art facilities using professional interpreting equipment

The MA in Conference Interpreting (MACINT) is designed to equip you with the knowledge and advanced interpreting skills required for a career in conference interpreting. All our interpreting trainers are practising conference interpreters in language combinations that reflect market demands. Most trainers are also AIIC members. For a detailed list of regular and visiting trainers and their professional backgrounds, please visit: http://www.alc.manchester.ac.uk/translation-and-intercultural-studies/about/people/external-trainers/

The programme offers simultaneous and consecutive interpreting training in five languages - French, German, Spanish, Russian and Chinese. These are key languages in international organisations such as the UN and EU and are also in demand on the freelance market.

The MA Conference Interpreting can be studied over one year (full-time) or two years (part-time). Part-time study is strongly supported and is actively facilitated in the timetabling of teaching hours for the MA, wherever possible. We also offer a Postgraduate Diploma (PG Dip) in Conference Interpreting for students who do not wish to complete a professional portfolio or research dissertation.

As a prospective student, you will offer one of two profiles, reflecting the two distinct profiles of practising conference interpreters:

-Profile 1: You have English as your native language (A language) and two passive foreign languages (C languages). You will be trained in consecutive and simultaneous interpreting out of both C languages into your A language

-Profile 2: You have Russian, Chinese, French, German or Spanish as your native language (A language) and English as an active foreign language (B language) or English as your A language and one of the five languages mentioned as your B. You will be trained in both types of interpreting in both directions (i.e. B-A and A-B)

Aims

-To equip students with the knowledge and advanced interpreting skills for a career in conference interpreting
-To provide specialist training in consecutive and simultaneous interpreting
-To provide a gradual transition into the professional world through practical, real-life interpreting tasks
-To provide guidance on professional conduct and ethics
-To enable students to reflect critically on their own and others' interpreting practice
-To equip students for further study and research

Teaching and learning

The MACINT degree is devised to train students with aptitude for Conference Interpreting in an intensive and highly individualised manner.

Contact hours with our trainers will involve a mixture of seminars with students studying all six languages on the MACINT degree (English, Chinese, French, German, Russian and Spanish) and language-specific tutorials focusing on your particular language combination. In the Professional Development for Conference Interpreters unit, students will also have the opportunity to work as part of a team of interpreters at a number of simulated multilingual conferences. Class sizes are small which allows for intensive contact with teaching staff.

Students are taught in separate classes for language tutorials covering each direction in which they interpret, for example, an interpreter working with French>
In addition to class contact hours, e-learning provision provides students with the support and feedback required between classes, as well as allowing them the possibility for tracking their progress. Guided self-study sessions in small groups are an essential part of the MACINT degree. These sessions also nurture peer assessment and feedback skills.

Career opportunities

The MA in Conference Interpreting at Manchester is recognised as a qualifying course for students wishing to be admitted for tests to work as simultaneous interpreters at international organisations, such as the UN and the EU. Some of our interpreter trainers have themselves helped to assess candidates for exams at international organisations, so we have a clear idea of what is required. Our own final exam marking criteria reflect those in use at international organisations.

The MA also prepares students for work as interpreters on the private market, i.e. in settings beyond international organisations. This can involve interpreting for businesses, think tanks, national and regional governments, NGOs, trade unions, legal firms and more. Our trainers have experience of working both in international organisations and on the private market so are well-placed to prepare students for all markets.

We maintain close links with key employers, giving students the opportunity to gain experience and receive external feedback on their performances during their training. For example, we have regular visits from senior staff interpreters at the European Commission. Some of our students have had opportunities to volunteer locally, for example our Chinese interpreting students volunteered during the recent visit of President Xi Jinping to Manchester.

The supply of English mother tongue interpreters is expected to fall further over coming years, due to the decline of language-learning in the UK. This will in turn increase the opportunities available for those native speakers who do have the necessary skills to work as simultaneous interpreters.

On the private market, all interpreters are increasingly expected to be able to interpret reliably into (as well as from) English. But employers cannot be expected to pay professional rates for second-rate English. The language immersion and opportunities for feedback that come with studying in small-group sessions, at a reputable UK-based course can help to develop the command of idiom and register, giving you the necessary edge on the job market.

A postgraduate qualification in Conference Interpreting also provides students with highly developed research, analytical and summarizing skills, excellent public speaking skills and an advanced understanding of mediation between cultures and languages. These transferable skills can be used in a variety of different job profiles.

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This MA is one of the most wide-ranging programmes of its kind, offering a rich variety of modules on the region, ranging from the premodern period to the 21st century, from Russia and Poland to the Czech Republic and Croatia, and from film and philosophy to literature and cultural studies. Read more
This MA is one of the most wide-ranging programmes of its kind, offering a rich variety of modules on the region, ranging from the premodern period to the 21st century, from Russia and Poland to the Czech Republic and Croatia, and from film and philosophy to literature and cultural studies.

Degree information

Students develop an advanced knowledge and understanding of aspects of Russian and/or East European literature and culture, including art, film, philosophy, and linguistics. They gain key research skills, enabling them to solve problems of conflicting sources or interpretations, locate primary and secondary materials, and use research aids and resources effectively.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (30 credits), optional modules (90 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core module
-Literary and Cultural Theory

Optional modules - up to 90 credits of optional modules. Subject to approval, optional courses up to the value of 30 credits may be taken from other SSEES MA Programmes or from other UCL MA Programmes.
-All Quiet on the Eastern Front: Culture, Politics and Everyday Life in Central and Eastern Europe
-Beyond Stereotypes: The Jews in Polish Culture
-Introduction to Hermeneutics: How to Read and Interpret Texts
-Contemporary Cultural Studies: Between Post-Communism & Post-Modernism
-Freedom Death and Love: Polish Fiction 1918–2005 (language prerequisite)
-How to Read/Interpret Texts: Introduction to Hermeneutics
-Literatures of Rupture: Modernism in Russia and Eastern Europe
-The 19th-Century Russian Novel
-The Reflecting Screen: Russian and Soviet Cinema in its Cultural Context, 1896 to the Present
-The Self and the World: Theoretical Approaches to Travel Writing
-Language Modules
-Russian Monarchy: Court Ritual and Political Ideas, 1498-1917
-Comparative Literary Studies
-Translation Studies
-Comparative Literature Modules

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project, which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, presentations, film viewings and private study. Students are assessed by a variety of methods, including unseen examinations, long essays, course work and the research dissertation.

Careers

With their specialist knowledge and language skills, SSEES Master's graduates can be found in business, finance, the media, international agencies, charities, diplomacy, international security organisations, the law, and academe. Some of our graduates advise the Russian, Polish, American, and other governments, and the European Commission.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-PhD Russian Literature, University College London (UCL)
-Publishing Assistant, Sheldrake Press
-Language Producer, Unspecified Language Production Company
-Freelance Translator, Self-Employed Translator
-Business Consultant, Grit 3 Group and studying MA Russian and East European Literature and Culture, University College London (UCL)

Employability
Students who have successfully completed the programme have progressed to further academic research on the region, or have obtained employment in such organisations as the European Parliament and the Ministry of Defence, as well as roles in business, think tanks, NGOs, or similar, both in Britain and abroad. Networking is facilitated by two major collaborations led by SSEES: CEELBAS and the International Master's (IMESS). Scholarships, internship opportunities and excellent links with other universities in the region provide further benefits.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES) is a world-leading specialist institutions, and the largest national centre in the UK, for the study of central, Eastern and south-east Europe and Russia.

Located on the edge of Bloomsbury, SSEES offers an ideal location for scholars. The British Library, British Museum, University of London Library and other similar research centres are all close by.

The SSEES Library is unequalled in Britain for the depth and breadth of its collections, the majority of which are on open access in the SSEES building.

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Develop high-level interpreting and translation skills on this challenging programme, where you’ll use state-of-the-art technology to gain the knowledge base and practical skills to succeed in the language services industry. Read more

Develop high-level interpreting and translation skills on this challenging programme, where you’ll use state-of-the-art technology to gain the knowledge base and practical skills to succeed in the language services industry.

You’ll gain essential skills in interpreting, active listening and note-taking, then practice specialised consecutive and simultaneous interpreting in our conference suites. This bidirectional programme enables you to interpret between English and one other language. You can choose from optional modules on topics such as genre analysis and machine translation, or specialised translation in your chosen language pair.

Contracted practitioners and leading academics come together in our Centre for Translation Studies. Recommended by the International Association of Conference Interpreters (AIIC), this exciting programme will prepare you to succeed in a competitive sector.

Centre for Translation Studies

We have excellent facilities and resources to support your studies. Our conference suites are equipped with single and double interpreter booths, and a video link to practice remote interpreting. If you choose to study translation, the Electronic Resources and Information Centre (ERIC) will be the centre of your translation work, complete with 59 high-spec PCs and a wide range of specialist software for translation and subtitling.

The Centre for Translation Studies benefits from close links with organisations such as the Institute for Translation and Interpreting as well as the EU and UN (in Geneva and Vienna). This programme is regulated by a Memorandum of Understanding between the University and the Directorate General for Interpretation and Conferences of the European Parliament – a testament to our success in training conference interpreters.

It’s a great opportunity to prepare for a career in the language services industry in a city that’s full of cultural and linguistic diversity.

Accreditation

The University of Leeds is recommended by AIIC (International Association of Conference Interpreters) for its interpreting training.

Course content

This programme focuses entirely on conference interpreting. Unlike the MA, translation modules are entirely optional and you don’t have to complete a summer project. Because this is the bidirectional version of the course, you’ll train to interpret both ways between one foreign language and English. We don’t offer training in any combination of languages that doesn’t include your first language.

In your first semester you’ll begin to develop your interpreting skills and be able to choose from optional modules on specialised translation, or topics related to our tutors’ research interests like public speaking and genre analysis in translation.

You’ll build on this in the following semester, when you’ll practice your skills in simultaneous and consecutive and bilateral interpreting.

Please see our admissions web pages for a list of available language pairs.

Course structure

Year 1 Compulsory modules

  • English as a Retour Interpreting Language 30 credits 

For more information on typical modules, read Conference Interpreting - Bidirectional PGDip in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Our interpreting trainers are practicing professionals with experience of working in international organisations, as well as on the private market. We use a range of teaching and learning methods to help you benefit from their expertise including workshops, lectures, seminars, practicals and other supervised practice. Independent study is also an important part of the programme.

Assessment

We use different forms of assessment, depending on the types of modules you choose. Normally these will include essays, assignments and reports as well as exams, in-course oral assessment and occasionally case studies. Translation modules will also include translation tests.

Career opportunities

Postgraduate qualifications from the Centre for Translation Studies are prestigious and respected. They equip you with valuable skills to succeed in a thriving and competitive industry, as well as advanced communication, research, IT and analytical skills.

Graduates from our interpreting programmes are working in some of the world’s leading government bodies, media organisations, NGOs, private companies and international political organisations. These include the BBC, UN, EU, World Bank, World Trade Organization, SAP and translation companies such as thebigword and SDL.

Careers support

We work alongside you to support you in developing and then achieving your career goals. You’ll discuss your customised personal development plan with your personal tutor.

In addition you’ll have the chance to attend our Research and Professionalisation Talks by visiting speakers, many of whom are currently practicing translators, interpreters, project managers and subtitlers for some of the world’s largest organisations.

Read more about Graduate Destinations



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