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Masters Degrees (International Security And Terrorism)

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This exciting programme exposes students to issues in international security as well as the specialised field of terrorism. Read more
This exciting programme exposes students to issues in international security as well as the specialised field of terrorism. The course investigates international security and terrorism since the ending of the Cold War, whilst making clear how the issues raised are embedded within the broader field of international relations. The course emphasises three elements: the theoretical underpinnings of the study of international security and terrorism, the main empirical problems of security and terrorism in the present age and the opportunity to study security and terrorism issues in detailed optional modules.

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This course uniquely combines the study of terrorism with counter-terrorism, intelligence and international security. It takes an inter- and cross-disciplinary approach, drawing upon politics, history and sociology. Read more
This course uniquely combines the study of terrorism with counter-terrorism, intelligence and international security. It takes an inter- and cross-disciplinary approach, drawing upon politics, history and sociology.

Our staff have research expertise in terrorism, intelligence and security, and the programme director, Prof Christian Kaunert, holds the Jean Monnet Chair in EU Justice & Home Affairs Policy.

What is so good about this course?

This course is all about choice, and tailoring your study to match your needs. You apply to MLitt International Security, and can choose a specialist pathway to suit your interests; your choice dictates your core module, and you select an additional three optional modules. Choose from:

Terrorism
Human Rights
Drugs and Organised Crime
International Relations
European Union
Russia
South Asia
Middle East

You then graduate in a named degree, for example, MLitt International Security: Terrorism.

Who should study this course?

The programme is suitable for people who want to pursue a careers in the security services or in international relations, who have previously studied International Relations or a related subject.

Language Learning

If you need to acquire or improve your foreign language skills to enhance your postgraduate studies, (e.g. to read texts in a native language), you can enrol on a Languages for All course free of charge.

Degree Combinations

International Security: Drugs and Organised Crime MLitt
International Security: European Union MLitt
International Security: Human Rights MLitt
International Security: International Relations MLitt
International Security: Middle East MLitt
International Security: Russia MLitt
International Security: South Asia MLitt
International Security: Terrorism MLitt

Teaching & Assessment

- How you will be taught

The taught part of the course is delivered September - December and January - March. The dissertation is undertaken between April & August. This is the same for students whether they start in Janary or September.

All the core teaching is conducted 5.30-7.30pm to allow attendance by part-time and full-time students alike. Other classes are scheduled for the mutual convenience of staff and students.

A variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, seminars and presentations.

- How you will be assessed

By assessed coursework, examination and dissertation.

What you will study

Each pathway has its own core module (see below), which you must study.

You then choose three more modules from amongst the remainder, all modules are worth 30 credits.

You also undertake the Politics dissertation is worth 60 credits.

- MLitt International Security

Core module: International Security

- MLitt International Security: Terrorism

Core module: Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism in Europe

- MLitt International Security: Human Rights

Core module: Human Rights in International Relations

- MLitt International Security: Drugs and Organised Crime

Core module: International Security of Drugs & Organised Crime

- MLitt International Security: International Relations

Core module: Explaining and Understanding International Politics

- MLitt International Security: European Union

Core module: European Union Security

- MLitt International Security: Russia

Core module: Russian Politics & Security

- MLitt International Security: South Asia

Core module: Politics & Security in South Asia

- MLitt International Security: Middle East

Core module: The Middle East & Terrorism

Employability

Graduates from the MLitt International Security have a wide range of career options. The knowledge and research skills gained are an excellent basis for working in the civil service, journalism, the police and armed forces, politics, policy research (think tanks, research institutes), intergovernmental organisations, and non-governmental organisations. Graduates will be equipped to pursue careers in international organisations such as the United Nations, the European Union, or as government advisers. The distinctive interdisciplinary features and distinctive opportunity to combine theory with practice will be of great benefit to graduates.

This Masters degree is an excellent basis for undertaking further postgraduate study in International Security or International Politics, such as a PhD, with a view to a full-time career in academia or research.

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This course, with many pathways, aims to provide students with an in depth understanding of terrorism and political violence, counter-terrorism and intelligence pertaining to modern security issues such as responses to terrorism, responses to the use of force and violence generally. Read more
This course, with many pathways, aims to provide students with an in depth understanding of terrorism and political violence, counter-terrorism and intelligence pertaining to modern security issues such as responses to terrorism, responses to the use of force and violence generally. It will engage with both the war on terror, but also the response to terrorism, militarily, as well as in the intelligence world.

Why study International Security at Dundee?

This course uniquely combines the study of terrorism with counter-terrorism, intelligence and international security. It takes an inter- and cross-disciplinary approach, drawing upon politics, history and sociology. Our staff have research expertise in terrorism, intelligence and security, and the programme director, Prof Christian Kaunert, holds the Jean Monnet Chair in EU Justice & Home Affairs Policy.

[What's so good about International Security at Dundee?]]
This course is all about choice, and tailoring your study to match your needs. You apply to MLitt International Security, and can choose a specialist pathway to suit your interests; your choice dictates your core module, and you select an additional three optional modules.

Choose from:
Terrorism
Human Rights
Drugs and Organised Crime
International Relations
European Union
Russia
South Asia
Middle East

You then graduate in a named degree, for example, MLitt International Security: Terrorism.

Who should study this course?

The programme is suitable for people who want to pursue a careers in the security services or in international relations, who have previously studied International Relations or a related subject.

Teaching & Assessment

The teaching team are based in Politics at Dundee, in the School of Humanities. Politics is big enough to have a real international presence, but is still small and intimate enough to offer a friendly and responsive home for students from all backgrounds. This is more than a mere claim - independent surveys consistently rate Politics at Dundee as among the best-received programmes in the country.

The course starts in September or January, each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis or 24 months on a part time basis.

How you will be taught

The taught part of the course is delivered September - December and January - March. The dissertation is undertaken between April & August. This is the same for students whether they start in January or September. All the core teaching is conducted 5.30-7.30pm to allow attendance by part-time and full-time students alike. Other classes are scheduled for the mutual convenience of staff and students.

A variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, seminars and presentations.

What you will study

Each pathway has its own core module (see below), which you must study.

You then choose three more modules from amongst the remainder, all modules are worth 30 credits.

You also undertake the Politics dissertation is worth 60 credits.

MLitt International Security

Core module: International Security

MLitt International Security: Terrorism

Core module: Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism in Europe

MLitt International Security: Human Rights

Core module: Human Rights in International Relations

MLitt International Security: Drugs and Organised Crime

Core module: International Security of Drugs & Organised Crime

MLitt International Security: International Relations

Core module: Explaining and Understanding International Politics

MLitt International Security: European Union

Core module: European Union Security

MLitt International Security: Russia

Core module: Russian Politics & Security

MLitt International Security: South Asia

Core module: Politics & Security in South Asia

MLitt International Security: Middle East

Core module: The Middle East & Terrorism

How you will be assessed

By assessed coursework, examination and dissertation.

Careers

Graduates from the MLitt International Security have a wide range of career options. The knowledge and research skills gained are an excellent basis for working in the civil service, journalism, the police and armed forces, politics, policy research (think tanks, research institutes), intergovernmental organisations, and non-governmental organisations. Graduates will be equipped to pursue careers in international organisations such as the United Nations, the European Union, or as government advisers. The distinctive interdisciplinary features and distinctive opportunity to combine theory with practice will be of great benefit to graduates.

This Masters degree is an excellent basis for undertaking further postgraduate study in International Security or International Politics, such as a PhD, with a view to a full-time career in academia or research.

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Security and the maintenance and promotion of security are key issues in international law and international relations. Read more

Why study International Law & Security at Dundee?

Security and the maintenance and promotion of security are key issues in international law and international relations. There are many career opportunities in these areas ranging from employment with an intergovernmental organisation such as the United Nations, to employment in an international court or tribunal, to advising government and securing a role in the military. If you intend to pursue such a career, then you will need a good understanding of why and how the international community and individual states are to respond to threats to international security. For this, you will need to understand the context in which decisions are made. international law and international relations provide that context.

Our MLitt in International Law & Security provides an overview of concepts and themes relating to the study of international security in the contemporary world, from a legal as well as an international relations point of view. It introduces both traditional and 'new' approaches to defining and conceptualising security and considers the impact of International Relations theories upon the subject. It also examines key issues such as war, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, the privatisation of warfare, energy security and environmental degradation.

Our course will equip you with the necessary analytical tools to understand and evaluate all aspects of security in the contemporary world. The issues outlined above lie at the heart of our course, which provides an opportunity to gain a deep understanding of the interactions of law and international relations and the way they combine to shape the responses of states to threats to security. The course also provides an opportunity to understand how those responses in turn shape international law and international relations.

What's so good about International Law & Security at Dundee?

The University of Dundee runs two parallel masters degree in International Law & Security: MLitt International Law & Security for graduates in International Relations or similar subjects, and LLM International Law & Security for Law graduates.

Each degree has one core module, and you will also be able to choose specialist option modules from the same list. You will also research and write a dissertation in your chosen area of interest, or work on a research project with integrated internship.

Internship opportunity:
The opportunity to undertake an approved internship as a part the programme of studies is an exciting innovation in this area of study which will enable students to gain a unique insight into the application of the materials addressed in taught modules and to gain valuable experience to add to their CV.

How you will be taught

The course starts in September or January, each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis or 24 months on a part time basis. A variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, independent research, seminars and presentations.

What you will study

The course is made up of two International Relations modules and two Law modules which are delivered during our two teaching semesters (Sep-Dec and Jan-Apr), and detailed below.

During the summer vacation students normally write a dissertation.

All students take the Law week-long induction in January, plus the first half of the module Legal Research Skills(including the first assessment), usually in your first semester, but can be deferred to your second semester if you don't select any first semester Law modules. You also take the non-credit bearing generic skills training seminars offered by the Humanities.

First Semester (Jan-Apr)

International Security (core module), plus one other taught 30-credit modules (from the list below).

Summer period (May-Aug)

Politics Dissertation (60 credits)

Second Semester (Sep-Dec)

Two taught 30-credit modules (from the list below).

Part time study

For part-time students the taught modules will be spread out over two years instead of one in a similar format as above, and the Dissertation or Research Project (with integrated internship) will be undertaken during the summer period of the second year of study.

Typical optional modules available

Individual Criminal Liability in International Criminal Law
Transnational Crime and Counter Terrorism
International Dispute Resolution
UN Human Rights Law
Regional Human Rights Systems
Global Human Rights: Traditions & Inspirations
Critical Studies on Terrorism
The Middle East and Terrorism
State Terror
Strategic Intelligence Studies
International Security of Drugs & Organised Crime
Human Rights in International Relations
Russian Politics & Security
Politics and Security in South Asia
Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism in Europe
Geopolitics of Natural Resources
Governing and Securing Cyber Space
European Union Security
Explaining and Understanding International Politics

How you will be assessed

By assessed coursework, examination and dissertation (or research project report).

Careers

Graduates from this degree are likely to pursue careers with international organisations such as the United Nations, the European Union, or institutions such as the International Court of Justice. You will also be well placed to pursue a career as a government adviser. Graduates from our Politics & International Relations degrees have successfully pursued careers in politics and diplomacy.

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Since the Al-Qaeda attacks on the United States in September 2001, there has been a dramatic shift in the nature, study and practices of global politics. Read more
Since the Al-Qaeda attacks on the United States in September 2001, there has been a dramatic shift in the nature, study and practices of global politics. Against a background of intensifying economic, political, cultural and military globalisation, there is now a heightened awareness of terrorism and international crime as threats to global security.

The Terrorism, International Crime and Global Security MA degree identifies the features of these respective threats and explores the challenges to national and global governance, human rights and ethics, criminality and regionalism. This course examines the character of these contemporary global threats, considers specific case studies, and contributes to the debate over how to respond intellectually and in practical policy to these major threats to global security in the post-9/11 world.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

-Provides learners with an integrated security perspective
-Combines traditional militarised security concerns with contemporary threats of terrorism, international crime, and non-traditional security
-Provides the opportunity to develop the necessary analytical tools to critically explore the global security environment of the new century
-Among the first course of its kind to offer an integrated approach to studying the increasingly prevalent themes of terrorism, international crime and global security
-You will obtain a critical awareness of the complex and inter-connected diplomatic, legal and economic dimensions of these threats, as well as an understanding of counter-terrorist and counter-crime policies, strategies and operational responses at local, national and global levels

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

This dynamic and innovative course is aimed at both UK and international students and offers the opportunity to be studied on a full-time and part-time basis. Field trips are an integral part of the course, which will include visits to EU agencies and international NGOs.

The Terrorism, International Crime and Global Security MA degree course is among the first of its kind to offer an integrated approach to studying terrorism, international crime and global security. UK and International Competitive internships will be offered to the most motivated students.

The course comprises three mandatory topics designed to establish the core agenda of the course in terrorism, international crime and global security, and six core-option subjects from which you must study at least two.

The topics included in the course are delivered as interactive and multimedia workshops. They blend case studies, practical illustrations and theoretical analysis. Each session is designed to encourage interaction and debate. This concept is equally applicable to the numerous extra-curricular activities organised to complement the subjects.

Within all sessions, we draw on our own research experience and this ensures some lively debates and reassurance that there is no ‘right way’ of undertaking research. The course team ensures that you have extensive tutorial access to discuss your relationship with the course’s subject matter and their own intellectual development and to provide structure to their studies.

The key themes of this Masters degree are addressed in courses three core subjects:
-International organized crime
-International terrorism
-Threats to global security

You then have the opportunity to supplement these compulsory subjects with optional units, broadening your understanding of the concept of global security. Typical choices include:
-Counter crime and terrorism (study trip)
-Governance for security in the developing world
-Post-colonial African politics
-Gender and international human rights
-Case study: analysing primary sources
-Trafficking in human beings

In parallel to studying the above subjects, students also design, research and write a 15,000 word Masters dissertation addressing a topic of their own choice.

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

The MA in Terrorism, International Crime and Global Security is designed for those seeking to put current security debates into some sort of academic context. In terms of career advancement, the course offers generic skills and professional development that have seen past graduates go on to jobs within:
-International NGOs
-Civil service
-Private sector
-Management
-Journalism

In this sense, the degree is not designed to promote any one specific vocation. However, the issues studied would be of particular interest to those wishing to start, or advance, a career in:
-The armed forces
-The police force
-International agencies such as the United Nations or the European Union
-Other international NGOs

GLOBAL LEADERS PROGRAMME

To prepare students for the challenges of the global employment market and to strengthen and develop their broader personal and professional skills Coventry University has developed a unique Global Leaders Programme.

The objectives of the programme, in which postgraduate and eligible undergraduate students can participate, is to provide practical career workshops and enable participants to experience different business cultures.

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The 36-credit M.S. in National Security Affairs and International Relations in the Department of History and Political Science is designed to provide students with theoretical, research, and applied skills in the emerging academic field of national security affairs. Read more

The 36-credit M.S. in National Security Affairs and International Relations in the Department of History and Political Science is designed to provide students with theoretical, research, and applied skills in the emerging academic field of national security affairs. Students in this program will build a core understanding of critical issues informing the field of national security today, including the assessment and analysis of the threat of terrorism in the US and beyond and the analysis of intelligence collection. The M.S. in National Security Affairs and International Relations is offered online worldwide.

National security affairs is one of the fastest growing professions with positions open in the public sector in the federal, state and local governments and in the private sector. This program is designed for professionals in the field seeking career advancement, those who aspire to enter the field, individuals in related professions, and those retired from the military and government seeking consulting and other positions. Examples of potential students include personnel in the military, federal, state and local governments, law enforcement, corporations, and academia, as well as recent college graduates.

The program consists of a core of 7 courses (21 credits). Pedagogically, the program core focuses on building the critical analytical skills graduates need to succeed professionally and academically in the field of national security affairs. The ability to critically analyze intelligence information and global security issues, interpret historical and contemporary issues informing the field, and perform textual analyses, defines the program core's most important learning outcomes. 

M.S. in National Security Affairs and International Relations in the Department of History and Political Science is designed to provide students with theoretical, research, and applied skills in the emerging academic field of national security affairs. Students in this program will build a core understanding of critical issues informing the field of national security today, including the assessment and analysis of the threat of terrorism in the U.S. and beyond, and the analysis of intelligence collection. Students will also develop a deep understanding of the international context in which U.S. national security issues are shaped.

The program consists of a core of 7 courses (21 credits). Pedagogically, the program core focuses on building the critical analytical skills graduates need to succeed professionally and academically in the field of national security affairs. The ability to critically analyze intelligence information and global security issues, interpret historical and contemporary issues informing the field, and perform textual analyses, defines the program core's most important learning outcomes.

Following completion of the program core, students must complete 15 credits of coursework from the list of available electives. The majority of the elective offerings were developed specifically for the national security and international relations program, with a small number drawn from closely related fields. The elective list contains both courses that emphasize domestic security and courses that have a broader international focus, resulting in sufficient breadth of subject matter to allow students to tailor their choices around particular academic or professional interests.

Students interested in Cyber Security can choose to take a specific concentration in this area. Students who choose this option must complete 9 credits from the Cyber Security concentration and 6 credits from the elective list. Before choosing this option, students must secure permission from the Department of History and Political Science. After a consultation, it will be determined whether the student can enter the Cyber Security concentration, or if additional foundation courses will be required in order to enter and successfully complete the concentration.

Core Courses (21 credits)

  • NSAM 5001 - Current Issues in National Security (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5003 - National Intelligence Collection and Analysis: Theory and Practice (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5004 - Border Protection and Military Issue (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5005 - Research and Evaluation in National Security Affairs (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5010 - US Foreign Policy and National Security (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5014 - Ethical Issues in National Security (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5016 - International Relations: Theory and Practice (3 credits)

Electives (15 credits)

  • NSAM 5002 - Terrorists and Terrorism: Theory and Practice (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5015 - Civil Liberties and National Security (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5020 - International Law and Institutions (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5030 - American Government and Domestic Security (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5040 - Cyber Conflict and Statecraft (3 credits)
  • DEM 5090 - Weapons of Mass Threat and Communicable Diseases (3 credits)
  • MHS 5314 - Bioterrorism and Weapons of Mass Destruction (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5502 - Directed Readings in National Security Affairs (3 credits)
  • NSAM 5650 - Economic Statecraft in National Security Affairs (3 credits)
  • NSAM 6130 - Practicum/Internship (3 credits)
  • NSAM 6690 - Special Topics in National Security Affairs and International Relations (3 credits)
  • NSAM 6700 - Directed Thesis in National Security Affairs and International Relations (6 credits)

Optional Cyber Security Concentration

  • MMIS 0683 - Fundamentals of Security Technologies (3 credits)
  • MMIS 0684 - Information Security Management (3 credits)
  • MMIS 0685 - Information Security Governance (3 credits)
  • MMIS 0686 - Information Systems Auditing (3 credits)
  • MMIS 0687 - Information Security Project (3 credits)

Practicum

In addition to successfully completing all course work, students must pass a tabletop examination to be awarded the M.S. in National Security Affairs and International Relations. When a student has completed all coursework, has maintained a minimum of 3.0 GPA with no "incomplete" grades, and is a "student in good standing" with no disciplinary actions pending or disciplinary tasks to complete, the student will be eligible to take the tabletop examination. The tabletop exam is an assessment of the student's ability to integrate the knowledge and skills gained through course work.The exam tests the student's written ability to critically analyze and apply conflict assessment, theory, and research methodology to hypothetical conflict situations. The exam also tests knowledge of material specific to the academic curriculum.



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International Security, a specialization of the master International Relations, is aimed at issues of power politics and international order, peace and war, and strategy and diplomacy. Read more
International Security, a specialization of the master International Relations, is aimed at issues of power politics and international order, peace and war, and strategy and diplomacy. Its main focus is the phenomenon of, and theoretical reflection on, 'violence' in its broader context.

Traditionally, attention for warfare and political violence, i.e. military security, has dominated the study of International Security. They still form the central issues. But especially after the Cold War other concerns occupy the agenda, such as environmental security (about climate change or industrial hazards), societal security (about group identities) and economic security (about welfare and development). These different types of concerns have their own meaning when studying the causes of violent conflict, its prevention and management, and conflict resolution and reconciliation.

Methodologically, the study of International Security has profited from the so-called constructivist turn in International Relations. In addition to traditional analyses new approaches have emerged, most notably Critical Security Studies, the Copenhagen School, and the Risk Society approach.

Why in Groningen?

The Master's specialization International Security: (a) pays attention to the theoretical developments as well as the dimensions of the contemporary security agenda; (b) offers a research-led and policy-oriented curriculum taught by a committed staff; (c) includes a career-oriented internship that prepares graduates for the labour market; and (d) provides an excellent preparation for positions at a broad variety of security-oriented and conflict-management related institutions.

Job perspectives

The Master's specialization is broad in scope and gives students a solid foundation in international relations. There is consequently a wide range of employment opportunities for International Relations graduates. The most obvious profession is a policy advisor, but you could also become a researcher, lobbyist, diplomat, or PR officer. You can work in international business, non-profit or government organizations, in the media, and at a university or a private research institute.

Research International Security

The chairgroup International Security Studies (ISS) is part of the Department of IRIO. The six permanent staff members and over 10 PhD students all contribute to the Faculty's research theme Conflict Studies. This is done at various levels of abstraction, focusing on various issue-areas and on various political contexts.

At the theoretical level the chairgroup aims to contribute to a better understanding of conceptualizations of security in time and space. How have academic debates in security studies evolved and how do they relate to security policies? This implies a focus on securitization theory, regional security complex theory, strategic studies, critical security studies and peace research.
In terms of issue-areas the group presently studies developments in military & defence policies, terrorism, peace making, peace building &peace keeping - including security sector reform -, societal security in relation to social identities and state formation, and finally securitization in energy, food, and health policies.
In terms of political contexts, the group focuses on institutional and regional settings in which security policies are shaped and implemented. Developments in Intergovernmental Organizations are studied - notably, in the European Union, NATO and the United Nations Security Council, and also in Non-Governmental Organizations in close cooperation with the research projects related to the Network on Humanitarian Action. The chairgroup has regional expertise about security politics in Europe (including Turkey), the Middle East, parts of Sub-Sahara Africa, and China.

The chairgroup brings much of its research interests together in the specialization International Security of the MA degree program IRIO.

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Why Surrey?. Our programme gives you the opportunity to delve into one of three specialist areas of International Relations. Read more

Why Surrey?

Our programme gives you the opportunity to delve into one of three specialist areas of International Relations.

You will master key skills in political science that enable you to explore the links between local, national and international structures, and critically evaluate key contemporary debates in the field of international relations.

Programme overview

The MSc International Relations programme is offered via two pathways. The International Relations pathway examines key issues in the contemporary international system and processes of global governance.

Secondly, the innovative International Intervention pathway deepens your understanding of this complex area and includes a placement option, allowing you to spend three months working in international politics.

There are a set of common compulsory modules for all pathways, in addition to two compulsory modules for your chosen pathway, and three optional modules from a range of international or European politics topics.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year, until a total of eight is reached. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation or placement.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Career prospects

Our MSc programme in International Relations is a great stepping stone in your career development, whatever your plans.

Through its assessed, three-month placement, the International Intervention pathway offers an excellent opportunity to enhance a wide range of transferable skills and build personal networks which will significantly enhance your employment opportunities upon graduation.

Students from the School have gone on to a wide range of employment choices. These include working for international organisations, national and local government, lobby groups and non-governmental organisations, as well as private businesses and media organisations.

We also offer doctoral supervision in a wide range of political subjects for talented students who wish to continue their studies.

Educational aims of the programme

The programme aims to:

  • Enable students to understand and evaluate contemporary debates in the study of international relations, concerning global governance and/or terrorism and security and international intervention
  • Deepen students’ knowledge of theoretical aspects of international relations, including theoretical developments in the sub-fields of terrorism and security and international intervention
  • Enable students to develop their knowledge and understanding in at least three sub-fields of international politics: students take three programme compulsory modules, two pathway compulsory modules specific to their pathway (International Relations, International Intervention), and two further modules from a list of optional modules particular to their pathway
  • Provide students, with the opportunity, through the International Intervention pathway, to spend three months working in a field related to their degree (this will not only provide students with new insights into International Intervention but will also develop a broad array of transferable skills – such skills include self-management and development; managing tasks; communicating effectively and clearly; working with and relating to others; the application of specialist knowledge; the application of initiative and reflecting on one’s own learning outcomes)

Programme learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

Upon completion of the programme, students will have:

  • Critical knowledge of contemporary debates in the study of international politics, particularly in relation to the international system and global governance, differing forms of intervention in response to poverty, humanitarian crisis, abuses of human rights, state failure and armed conflict
  • In-depth understanding of international structures of governance and their impact on regional, national and local structures; and of theories of international relations
  • Detailed knowledge and understanding within at least two sub-fields of international politics, for example development and humanitarian assistance; peace-making; peace-keeping and peace- building; use of international legal institutions and processes; and coercive military intervention to secure regime change
  • Understanding of processes of knowledge creation and contestation within international politics
  • Understanding of techniques of research and enquiry and their application to the study of politics

Intellectual / cognitive skills

Students will be able to:

  • Gather, organise and deploy evidence and information from a range of different sources
  • Analyse and synthesise a wide range of material in verbal and numerical formats
  • Deal with complex issues systematically and creatively
  • Make sound judgements on the basis of incomplete evidence
  • Demonstrate self-direction and originality in solving problems and analysing evidence
  • Construct reasoned argument
  • Apply theoretical frameworks to empirical analysis

Professional practical skills

Students will gain the ability to:

  • Make appropriate use of information and communications technology
  • Carry out an advanced literature search
  • Form effective arguments
  • Organise own workload to meet deadlines
  • Formulate research questions
  • Design and conduct a research project, selecting appropriate methods of data collection and analysis
  • Design and pilot questionnaires
  • Design and conduct interviews
  • Use software packages to analyse qualitative and quantitative data
  • Present research findings orally and in writing

Key / transferable skills

Students will have the skills to:

  • Communicate and present ideas effectively
  • Reason critically
  • Use information and communication technology for the retrieval and presentation of material
  • Organise and plan their own work
  • Adopt a proactive approach to problem-solving
  • Collaborate with others to achieve common goals
  • Deploy a range of relevant research skills
  • Make decisions in complex situations
  • Take responsibility for their own learning

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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Your programme of study. International Relations and International Law give you a wider access to employment within international development and trade, plus government and political areas. Read more

Your programme of study

International Relations and International Law give you a wider access to employment within international development and trade, plus government and political areas.  

If you want to enjoy a career within international relations you may be looking at positions within policy making within government and the civil service within foreign affairs. You can also go into the defence area, development and human rights. A lot of graduates choose to go into advocacy, research and project management from this degree working for NGOs. Some others follow careers in regional and global institutions such as the EU or UN and others go into the armed forces or international media working as journalists and reporters. Other careers our graduates have followed have been in international risk management and international corporations in trade and finance. The postgraduate degree can make a real difference in terms of having a postgraduate qualification to allow you to continue on your career path or change careers.

The programme gives you engagement with key issues in contemporary International Relations including development and political economy, critical and human security, gender, identity and human rights and more. You learn the debates about globalisation, international institutions, international development and global political economy. This includes culture and identity, citizenship and stabilisation of power. The programme gives you an interdisciplinary perspective on global governance and law including areas such as; technology, economics, history, geography, sociology, criminology, diplomacy, international security, finance, human rights and more. Additional modules within international law mean you have a great range of knowledge and employment options in an advisory role.

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

  • Theories and Concepts in International Relations
  • International Law
  • Critical Legal Thinking and Scholarship

Semester 2

  • International Humanitarian Law

Optional

  • Latin America: Security Conditions and Challenges
  • Global Security Issues
  • Terrorism and Counter Terrorism
  • International Human Rights Law
  • The use of Force in International Law

Semester 3

  • Dissertation in International Relations

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • You are taught by experts from the School of Social Science and School of Law (ranked top 10 in the UK (Good University Guide 2018)
  • You can attend research seminars organised by the Centre for Sustainable International Development, Centre for Global Security and  Governance and New Europe Centre.
  • You are encouraged to provide live consultancy work within one of the School of Law's public projects including Lawyers Without Borders, 
  • Casus Omissus (Aberdeen Law Project) and others. This will really help you apply your skills and give you confidence within actual practice.

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • Full Time or Part Time
  • 12 Months or 24 Months
  • September

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees:

  • International
  • Scotland and EU
  • Other UK

Find out more from the programme page

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page and the latest postgraduate opportunities

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

  • Your Accommodation
  • Campus Facilities
  • Aberdeen City
  • Student Support
  • Clubs and Societies

Find out more about https://abdn.ac.uk/study/student-life" target="_blank">living in Aberdeen and living costs 



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Explore the multi-faceted subject of international security and gain fresh and leading perspectives, working with internationally renowned academics. Read more

Explore the multi-faceted subject of international security and gain fresh and leading perspectives, working with internationally renowned academics.

International security has evolved enormously in the last 15 years, with terrorism, human and drug trafficking and territorial and sovereignty disputes adding an extra layer of complexity to the traditional security challenges of states.

This course offers a distinctive focus on security issues, looking at politics and policy-making in the contemporary international arena, and the role of Europe and the European Union within it.

You'll gain a deep insight into the diverse dimensions of international security, unpacking the practices and challenges of different governments and organisations and exploring how these relate to research and policy-making.

Studying this at Bath provides a unique opportunity to work with internationally renowned experts who are leading the debate on both traditional and non-traditional security issues.

With expertise across a wide spectrum of topics - including borders in South East Asia, the American drone strikes in Pakistan, biological and chemical weapons, rising powers and global governance - you'll gain new perspectives on this complex subject area.

You'll leave with:

  • an in-depth understanding of the new international security environment of the post Cold War era
  • detailed knowledge of the theories and methods underpinning international security
  • the ability to analyse current security challenges and practices and the impact of those on research and policy-making
  • a strong foundation for an international career in administration, diplomacy, research and policy-making

This course is for students with a degree in an appropriate subject, such as public policy, government, international affairs, international relations, history or sociology. It's also suitable for professionals who want to specialise in security issues, whether you're working in an NGO, government or the private sector, or other relevant fields such as commerce, industry and teaching.

Course structure

This course lasts 1 year. Occasionally we make changes to our programmes in response to, for example, feedback from students, developments in research and the field of studies, and the requirements of accrediting bodies. You will be advised of any significant changes to the advertised programme, in accordance with our Terms and Conditions.

Units

Compulsory course units

These compulsory units are currently being studied by our students, or are proposed new units.

Semester 1

Semester 2

Summer

Optional course units

These optional units are currently being studied by our students, or are proposed new units.

Learning and assessment

Learning

  • Lectures
  • Online resources
  • Practical sessions
  • Seminars
  • Tutorials
  • Workshops

Assessment

  • Attendance
  • Coursework
  • Dissertation
  • Essay
  • Oral assessment
  • Practical work
  • Seminar
  • Other


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This programme surveys the new security challenges confronting societies in an era of economic, social and political globalization, and provides a thorough grounding in the academic study of international politics. Read more
This programme surveys the new security challenges confronting societies in an era of economic, social and political globalization, and provides a thorough grounding in the academic study of international politics.

Why study International Politics & Security at Dundee?

This course offers a comprehensive analysis of international and global political issues. It focuses on some of the most contentious areas of international politics, including transatlantic relations, the future of the European Union and the re-emergence of Russia as a global political force. It also provides a thorough grounding in the academic study of international politics, focusing on the theoretical approaches and methods of analysis that constitute the bedrock of any serious postgraduate research in this field.

This course is a pathway on the MLitt in Humanities with Specialisation programme.

What's so good about International Politics & Security at Dundee?

While politics at Dundee is big enough to have a real international presence, it is still small and intimate enough to offer a friendly and responsive home for students from all backgrounds. This is more than a mere claim - independent surveys consistently rate politics at Dundee as among the best-received programmes in the country.

The Centre for International Politics and Security hosts a regular series of research seminars, featuring invited speakers from a range of academic and governmental institutions. Two internationally recognised scholarly journals are edited by our politics staff: 'The Journal of Transatlantic Studies' and 'Perspectives on European Politics and Society'.

Who should study this course?

The programme is suitable for students who want a springboard for a career related to international politics or who wish to continue postgraduate study in this subject area.

How you will be taught

All the core teaching is conducted 5.30-7.30pm to allow attendance by part-time and full-time students alike. Other classes are scheduled for the mutual convenience of staff and students. A variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, seminars and presentations.

What you will study

The course is taught via a range of core and optional modules, the typical list is given below.

Core modules:
Explaining and Understanding International Politics
International Security
Optional modules allow students to specialise, a typical choice includes:

International Security of Drugs & Organised Crime
Russian Politics & Security
European Union Security
The Middle East and Terrorism
Politics and Security in South Asia
Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism in Europe
Human Rights in International Relations
The EU and China in the International Arena
All students must attempt the Politics dissertation.

Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed.

How you will be assessed

By assessed coursework, examination and dissertation.

Careers

Graduates from the MLitt International Politics and Security have a wide range of career options. The knowledge and research skills gained in this programme would be an excellent basis for working in government, political parties, or the civil service. The focus of the programme on global issues and affairs provide a strong basis for pursuing a career in international political contexts, such as the European Union or the United Nations. Alternatively, the programme can be a stepping stone for work in civil society, such as charities, environmental organizations or other international non-profit organizations. Graduates can also put their communication, research and analytical skills to work in a range of careers in the public or private sectors, including education, finance or the media.

The Masters programme is an excellent basis for undertaking further postgraduate study in International Politics, such as a PhD, with a view to a full-time career in academia or research.

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Our world is shaped by big questions about global justice, war, peace, social movements, and inter-state relations. The Master of International Relations enables you to deal critically and analytically with such questions, providing a window into the dynamic world of 21st century politics. Read more
Our world is shaped by big questions about global justice, war, peace, social movements, and inter-state relations. The Master of International Relations enables you to deal critically and analytically with such questions, providing a window into the dynamic world of 21st century politics.

The course explores the security, ethical, legal and economic dimensions of international relations. You will examine key issues in foreign policy, world order, European studies, crisis management and terrorism, as well as the gender, development, migration and governance aspects of global politics. We offer four specialisations:

- Governance and security
- International diplomacy and trade
- Political violence and counter-terrorism
- General international relations studies

The Master of International Relations will help you make sense of the complexity of global politics and economics by giving you the analytical perspectives and skills to see both the 'bigger picture' and detailed aspects of specific issues, with a solid intellectual grounding in key debates, historical events and political institutions.

You will be taught by leading experts in their respective fields, who have strong networks with a number of international and local organisations. This ensures that you will be exposed to the very latest advances in international relations.

The course also provides opportunities to study and attend field schools abroad, and to develop research interests in a number of areas. You will have the opportunity to take advantage of Monash's global presence, with campuses in South Africa, Malaysia, China, and Italy. And our internship program enables you to build practical experience as well as valuable professional networks in Australia and overseas.

These active research links shape our curriculum and ensure its relevance to provide you with the best employment and research opportunities. Our graduates have gone on to a broad range of occupations and have, for example, been employed by the United Nations, the Australian Government, and non-governmental organisations such as the International Red Cross.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/international-relations-a6010?domestic=true

Overview

Please select a specialisation for more details:

General studies in international relations
General international relations studies enables you to tailor your unit choices to suit your own interests or needs while addressing the fundamental debates framing global politics. By selecting across the range of specialisations, you will be able to examine key issues in foreign policy, international and comparative governance, world order and security, human rights, European studies, crisis management, diplomacy and trade, or terrorism.

Governance and security
The Governance and security specialisation will broaden your understanding of how power, authority, and participation are managed within and amongst states, as well as of challenges to this domestically and internationally. You will focus on the practical applications of governance, institutions and the rule of law, and how this works in the contemporary global environment.

International diplomacy and trade
The International diplomacy and trade specialisation will advance your knowledge across international trade, diplomacy, and international law. It is designed for people at the start of their careers as well as people working in the field who want to develop their careers in international public policy, NGOs and government departments such as the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

Political violence and counter-terrorism
The Political violence and counter-terrorism specialisation provides students with a critical engagement with manifestations of political violence, as well as the ideologies and conditions that give rise to political violence. Focus is on understanding terrorism and political extremism, the conditions associated with preventing and combating political violence, and the impacts of these activities on democratic and civil liberties.

Course Structure

The course is structured in three parts. Part A. Foundations for advanced international relations studies, Part B. Core Master's study and Part C. Advanced expertise. All students complete Part B. Depending upon prior qualifications, you may receive credit for Part A or Part C or a combination of the two.

[Note that if you are eligible for credit for prior studies you may elect not to receive the credit.]

PART A. Foundations for advanced international relations studies
These studies will introduce you to International relations studies at advanced undergraduate or graduate level. They are intended for students whose previous qualification is not in a cognate field.

PART B. Core Master's core study
These studies draw on best practices within the broad realm of international relations practice and research exploring the security, ethical, and economic dimensions of international relations. You will have opportunities to examine key issues in foreign policy, world order, European studies, crisis management, and terrorism.

PART C. Advanced expertise
The focus of these studies is professional or scholarly work that can contribute to a portfolio of professional development. You have two options.

The first option is a program of coursework study where you select the units to suit your own interests. This option includes the opportunity to undertake an internship in the field.

The second option is a 24 point research thesis. Students wishing to use this Masters course as a pathway to a higher degree by research should take this second option.Students admitted to the course, who have a recognised honours degree in a cognate discipline including humanities or social sciences, will receive credit for Part C, however, should they wish to complete a 24 point research project as part of the course they should consult with the course coordinator.

Partner with another course

Double degree courses allow you to study towards two different degrees at the same time, and graduate with two separate qualifications. And because a required subject in one course can count as an elective in the other, our double degrees take up to two years less than if you studied for the two degrees separately.

International Relations and Journalism - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/international-relations-and-journalism-a6011?domestic=true

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/arts

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/international-relations-a6010?domestic=true#making-the-application

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International Security (IS) is a field of study concerned with questions about war and peace, life and death, safety and survival. Read more

International Security (IS) is a field of study concerned with questions about war and peace, life and death, safety and survival. Traditionally its terrain has focused on concerns about the stability of the states’ system, the use of force, nuclear proliferation, military strategy, intelligence and the distribution of resources. Today, however, concerns about climate change, migration, poverty, health, privatisation, organised crime and international terrorism are also on the agenda. The MA in International Security at the University of Warwick is one of the most comprehensive international security graduate programmes in the country taught by staff at the cutting edge of international security research.

Programme content

The MA core module ‘Concepts and Theories of International Security’ provides a comprehensive grounding in the main theoretical approaches within the field of international security, using these to explore the most pressing issues on the international security agenda . Through emphasising the engagement between ‘traditional’ and ‘critical’ approaches to security the module is designed to foster critical and reflective thinking by encouraging students to ask more fundamental questions about international security such as:

  • What does security mean?
  • Whose security are we talking about?
  • Which issues should be considered security issues?
  • What role does security play in contemporary political life?
  • Can security be achieved, and how, in both practical and philosophical terms?

Students on the MA in International Security are in turn able to choose from a broad range of cutting edge modules with a diverse thematic and geographic focus. PAIS has further supported students on the MA programme to organise a series of Graduate Conferences on International Security, while the Department also regularly hosts high profile speakers and organises public debates through its International Security research group.



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This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11. Read more
This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11.

At the dawn of a third millennium, the pace of integration among the world’s regions and populations is breathtaking. Powerful forces – the emergence of transnational economies, the lightning speed of global communications, and the movement of peoples, cultures and ideas into new settings – are reshaping notions of citizenship, society and community.

At the same time, however, older religious hatreds, sectarian violence and new fundamentalisms are recasting existing states and disintegrating individual, national and international notions of security. Such dynamics demand that we rethink why we are and where we are today, but also reconsider historical interpretations of past change within and among the world’s regions. To understand the global condition requires a thorough and sensitive understanding of diverse interests, ethnicities and cultures. The purpose of this new postgraduate award in International Relations (IR) is to foster within students a global perspective and encourage a multicultural awareness of contemporary problems.

Why study with us?

IR is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. It is not so much a single discipline; rather it is a study of a particular type of behaviour whose comprehension requires the insight and methods of a number of disciplines. Although your MA is set within a strong political and sociological framework, the course is enhanced through the support of Law, History, and American Studies.

IR provides an opportunity to engage with and adapt to changing international, national and regional realities post 9/11. The security implications of the events of 9/11, and the impact of global developments on everyday lives, are present in the public mind as never before. The Palestinian question, western intervention and civil war in Iraq, nuclear proliferation, international crime and terrorism are just some of the recurrent themes that have taken on a new urgency and demand our attention.

IR develops critical awareness, conceptual understanding, sound research methods, and originality in the application of knowledge. Your MA will provide you with an appropriate set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-changing’ global context. Current social, political and economic globalisation demonstrates the inexorable importance of the ‘international’ and the increased relevance of this knowledge dimension at both academic and practice levels.

Course content

International Relations is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. Students undertaking the course will come from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds and it is not assumed that all students will have similar abilities or skills. It is not our aim to encourage further specialisation along the line of a student’s first degree but rather to complement existing knowledge and build upon transferable capabilities. Overall this is a unique opportunity for graduates both with and without International Relations training to study at a very high level for a postgraduate degree with global relevance.

Our aim is to foster a set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-shrinking’ global society. This goal is to provide a rigorous and intellectually challenging foundation in approaches to the study and practice of international relations while developing an understanding and sensitivity to key issues in diverse areas of the modern world. The MA offers an exciting opportunity for graduates to develop their understanding of international affairs both theoretically and through their own or others’ experience.

Course modules (16/17)

-International Relations Theory: Great Debates, New Directions
-Major Organisations in the International Order
-Methodology and Research Design in International Relations
-The Peoples’ Republic of China: Foreign Policy Dilemmas
-European Integration
-America after 9/11
-The Politics of Latin American Development
-The International Politics of the Post-Soviet Space
-The Politics of Sub-Saharan Africa
-Politics of International Communications
-Dissertation
-The International Relations of the Pacific Rim
-The Political Economy of East African Development
-Comparative Transnational Criminology
-European and International Human Rights
-National Security, Terrorism and The Rule of Law
-Political Economies of International Development
-The Politics of Aid

Methods of Learning

The Master’s award in International Relations is designed to provide a rounded education and broadly based qualification for UK graduates and equivalently qualified foreign students, particularly those who lack an international dimension through their previous study. It is awarded after completion of a mixture of taught courses and a programme of research. The MA lasts at least one year (if taken full time, two years part time), and is to be taken by persons with honours degrees (or equivalent achievement). Also on offer (and commensurate with this standard of education) are advanced short courses leading to Postgraduate Certificates and Postgraduate Diplomas in IR.

In common with all universities, certain elements of the course are compulsory and other elements chosen. To be awarded the MA in International Relations each student must achieve 180 credits at Master’s level (here called CATS (Credit Accumulation and Transfer Scheme)). This includes 40 CATS of compulsory modules in International Theory, 20 CATS of compulsory methodology and research training, and a 60 CATS compulsory dissertation of between 15,000 and 20,000 words. Compulsory modules define the intellectual basis of IR as a multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary subject while providing a firm foundation in theoretical issues and debates. They also develop the cognitive skills for specialist study and the practical skills for research. You gain the remaining 60 CATS through a wide choice of designated modules. All modules build upon the research and teaching expertise of individual tutors, and cover a wide range of themes in diverse areas of the globe – not just North America and Western Europe but the Middle East, Latin America, China and the Pacific Rim among others. A key aim is to develop a sensitivity and awareness of varied geo-political settings while comprehending the impact of change upon states, societies and individuals. Students are taught to discuss international problems to a high standard while applying the ways of analysis adopted by IR scholars to a range of issues.

We hope all candidates might be encouraged and enthused to achieve the MA. Yet we also recognise that some students may prefer to study in ‘stages’ – funds or time permitting. This is why we provide a named Postgraduate Certificate and a named Postgraduate Diploma. A Postgraduate Diploma in International Relations is available if students successfully complete 120 CATS points but do not complete the 60 CATS dissertation. Alternatively, there is the opportunity to achieve a Postgraduate Certificate in International Relations by successfully gaining 60 CATS points including 40 CATS of IR theory but excluding 20 CATS of methodology/research and of course the 60 CATS dissertation module.

All of this gives you, the student, the added flexibility of opting in or out of awards as personal or financial circumstance change. It gives the added incentive of an identifiable and quantifiable award at each stage of study while consistently encouraging and widening your participation in postgraduate enterprise. This strategy also enables an individual to complete their study within a timescale suitable to their own specific needs. Multiple points of entry (February and September) over a one or two year cycle further facilitate this.

Schedule

At Master’s level study, we aim to encourage student-led debates and exchange of ideas. Modules will typically alternate fortnightly between classes on campus and online learning activities. Each module incorporates a variety of teaching methods in class, including workshops, student presentations and discussions of primary and secondary materials (such as film, images, documentary sources and online resources). Online learning activities include online seminars, discussion boards, podcasts and blogs.

Full-time students get six hours of timetabled contact per week, part-time students have three hours. This does not include individual tutorials or dissertation supervision.

Independent study and assessment time equate to approximately 18 hours per week full time or nine hours part time.

Assessments

Your MA in International Relations is assessed through a variety of types of coursework and the dissertation. Assessment items include essays, literature reviews, presentations and research reports. There are no examinations. All coursework reflects the high level of intellectual demands associated with a taught MA and has the aim of developing a range of oral and written skills. You need to be prepared to commit yourself to substantial reading and thought for successful completion of an MA. This time includes preparation for assignments, seminars and the dissertation element.

Although teaching strategies vary according to individual modules, considerable emphasis is placed upon student-based learning in order to foster effective critical participation and discussion as overall course objectives. This means lectures and tutor-led teaching provide overviews of major theories and themes but the seminar or workshop is where learning is consolidated, exemplified and used in more student-centred contexts.

Modules typically make use of current case study material, video teaching media as well as practical exercises and the more traditional lecture and seminar activities. Tutorials are very important in facilitating and directing the learning of cognitive skills on a personal basis – by working within the context of your individual needs, appropriate goals can be set, for example, in relation to essay preparation and feedback.

At each stage you are encouraged to plan and organise your own learning. This allows greater time to be spent on critical evaluation – so reinforcing and extending your learning experience. Mixed methods of teaching and learning are utilised in seminars to achieve aims and outcomes, including tutor input, structural discussions, small group work, presentations, guided reading of designated course material, and wider reading appropriate to Master’s level. Student-led presentations and small group work develop your transferable skills and enhance your capacity for critical reflection. The academic essay has a central function in every module in allowing you to engage with and reflect upon the key skills required to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in IR. Coursework for all modules, but particularly in methods modules, allows students to acquire skills that they will then use in the dissertation.

Facilities and Special Features

-Strong staff expertise.
-Enthusiastic teaching team providing a supportive atmosphere for research.
-The core modules consider classic texts and the very latest thinking on international theory.
-Focus on the study of distinct global regions not just Europe, North America or the West.
-All students are assigned a personal tutor and will be encouraged to form study groups with colleagues.
-Guest speakers are a feature of this MA.
-Students will find the course team warm and approachable.

Careers

Previous students have used our MA in a variety of ways. It can be a bridge to further study – with several former students having gone on to do a PhD. As a prestigious qualification, it can enhance career opportunities in a wide range of occupations, for example, teachers have used the course to gain curriculum knowledge and career progression. Many students take the course purely because they have enjoyed History as a degree or as a personal interest and wish to pursue the subject further.

Progression to a taught postgraduate course is a path chosen by those wishing to further their careers, those intending to pursue further research and those who seek principally to satisfy their own intellectual interests. Successful completion will lead to the award of MA. This will complement a candidate’s existing qualifications. Additionally, it is envisaged that the programme’s breadth and depth will provide you with a suitable background for careers in public and private sectors where there is a need for international expertise.

The award of MA demonstrates an intellectual flexibility and high level of analytical, written and verbal skills. Increasingly, employers are looking for graduates with skills and knowledge which are not found (or perceived by employers to be found) among many recent graduates. This MA will give you, the graduate, a distinctive product in a highly competitive and expanding graduate employment market. Employers report that a person with a background in International Relations is more likely to find a career in the rapidly changing international environment than a person with another form of postgraduate qualification.

The MA IR thus aims to provide you with a suitable foundation for careers in both private and public sectors where there is a need for international sensitivity. Students wishing to engage in later doctoral research (where we have capacity) or in careers within voluntary organisations, civil and diplomatic service, international organisations, research posts or journalism will particularly benefit from it. We now have excellent links with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Members of European Parliament and representatives from the United Nations, as well as a number of pressure groups.

In sum, our core purpose is to nurture not only a robust intellectual flexibility but also the high levels of analytical, written and verbal skills attractive to employers from globally focused agencies and business. Our aim is to provide you with an excellent background and competitive edge for further study or a wide variety of careers in an ever-expanding job market.

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This course covers the central foundations of the contemporary discipline of International Relations which has grown beyond the traditional concern with inter-state relations. Read more
This course covers the central foundations of the contemporary discipline of International Relations which has grown beyond the traditional concern with inter-state relations.

The International Studies (International Relations) masters course provides specialised training in the key theories and concepts of advanced International Studies, including the application of these to real world cases and issues, culminating in autonomous learning and independent study in the form of a dissertation.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international-studies-international-relations/

Why choose this course?

- Access to a dynamic, supportive and rapidly growing community of scholars undertaking internationally recognised research in international studies, and the opportunity to be part of a research-active group and attend a rich programme of research seminars with presentations from high-profile external guest speakers.

- A reputation for excellence in teaching with strong links between course content and the work of our research-active academic staff.

- It covers the central foundations of the contemporary study of International Relations which has grown beyond the traditional concern with inter-state relations. Also provides a range of specialist modules that allow you to focus on particular areas of interest.

- Links with International NGOs, many of whom are based in Oxford, such as Oxfam and Rights and Accountability in Development (RAID).

- Excellent learning resources both at Brookes and through Oxford's Bodleian Library as well as the extensive use of e-learning facilities to complement your time in the classroom.

- A four-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague gives students first-hand experience of how important international institutions, such as NATO and the EU, work. The cost of the trip is included in fees.

Teaching and learning

Research is fundamental to the International Studies programme and you will be taught by a team of research-active scholars who are all specialists and publish in their areas of expertise. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects.

Diverse teaching methods are employed including lectures, tutor/group-led seminars, analysis of case studies, group work presentations, individual presentations, and individual and small group tutorials.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is conducted through a variety of assignments linked to the expected learning outcomes. Assignments will include essays, presentations, projects, reports and the dissertation. These will be spread over the year to provide constant feedback and assessment. One of the compulsory modules is also partially assessed by a written exam.

Field trips

You are required to go on a four-day study trip to Brussels and The Hague. The trip takes place just before the start of Semester 2 (in late January) and starts with visits to key institutions of the European Union and NATO. Then its moves to The Hague to visit a range of international organisations, including the International Criminal Court and the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which was awarded the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize. This study trip provides you with first-hand experience of how these important international institutions work. The cost of the trip is included in the course fees.

How this course helps you develop

Oxford has much to offer scholars of international studies and as one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, with conferences, seminars and forums taking place across a range of related topics within the University and within the city of Oxford.

Careers

The programme will appeal to students who have a broad interest in international affairs, and to those whose future work is likely to involve the public sphere in an international and global context. It is relevant to careers in media and general management, as well as in the civil service, intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. It will also appeal to those wanting to progress to a research degree.

“Knowledge of issues such as international development, global gender and employment and civil society would be extremely beneficial to any potential employee or volunteer…”
Helen Saunders, Opportunity International

Since Oxfam was founded in the city in the 1940s, Oxford has attracted a diverse range of voluntary organisations and now has one of the highest concentrations of non-governmental organisations outside London, making it the perfect place to begin a career in the third sector.

- Professional advice
Staff working in the Oxford Brookes Careers and Employment Centre can help you to make the most of the transferable skills that employers are looking for. During your time here you will have the opportunity to attend student employability workshops, job fairs and employer presentations. In addition a dedicated workshop is held for all students on the taught postgraduate programme. This provides specific support and advice about the career opportunities afforded by studying International Studies.

- Progression to PhD
Research is fundamental to the Department and is reflected in our strong research profile. A significant number of our students choose to pursue a career in academia and the programme is an excellent foundation for those wanting to proceed to do a PhD.

Research highlights

The programme is taught by a truly international team of leading scholars from across the globe. Our vibrant research culture is driven by a thriving and collaborative community of academic staff and doctoral students.

Staff involved in teaching on the programme have, in recent years, been awarded a number of Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) grants.

Dr Michael Lister co-led a project entitled 'Anti-Terrorism, Citizenship and Security in the UK', which examined the extent to which citizens of the United Kingdom feel that their security has been enhanced (or even diminished) by contemporary anti-terrorism measures.

Findings from Dr Mikko Kuisma’s ESRC-funded research project called 'Welfare State Practices and the Constitution of the Citizen: Nordic Models of Capitalism in an Age of Globalisation' have been published in a number of outlets including Policy Network, a leading international progressive politics think tank.

Dr Stephen Hurt was successful in a bid to the ESRC Research Seminars Competition together with colleagues from the Universities of Birmingham, Sheffield and Warwick, Chatham House and the Institute for Public Policy Research. The focus of the series is British policy to Africa and in particular the legacies of attempts by successive Labour administrations to transform this and the impact more recently of a Conservative-led coalition government operating in a context of financial austerity. The series will conclude with a parliamentary briefing at the House of Commons, hosted by the Africa All Party Parliamentary Group.

Meanwhile, Dr Rico Isaacs has conducted research funded by the British Academy into the effectiveness of Election Observation Missions (EOMs) in ensuring freer and fairer elections in the former Soviet Union. EOMs have been central to the Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe’s (OSCE) strategy to promote democracy in former Soviet states.

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