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Masters Degrees (International Relations And Politics)

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Among graduate courses in international relations and politics at British universities, the Cambridge MPhil in International Relations and Politics is distinctive in its multidisciplinary approach and breadth. Read more
Among graduate courses in international relations and politics at British universities, the Cambridge MPhil in International Relations and Politics is distinctive in its multidisciplinary approach and breadth. Teaching takes the form of lectures and seminars in theory, politics, history, economics, law, security and various regional and area studies, as well as individual thesis supervision. The taught part of the course aims to familiarize you with the range and variety of disciplines required for a thorough critical understanding of the field in all its complexity and of the means and methods that have been devised to understand it better.

The programme is suitable both for students who have just completed their first degree and for mature students from, for example, industry, teaching, the civil service or the armed forces.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hspimpirp

Course detail

The fields of study for the one-year course of study in International Relations and Politics currently consist of the following:

- Comparative Politics of Western Europe
- Politics of Africa
- Comparative Politics of Religion
- Middle East and North Africa
- International Relations Theory
- International Organization
- International Security
- International Political Economy
- International Constitutional Law
- Globalization and Development (from the Centre of Development Studies)
- Urban Governance and Development (from the Centre of Development Studies)
- Research Methods

This list is subject to change.

Candidates take three courses without restriction as to field of study, and write a 20 -25,000 word dissertation over 10 months. In addition, there is a research-methods and thesis writing training element. Candidates may seek a special subject designation if the majority of their work has fallen within one field of study (e.g. European Studies, International Politics etc.)

The department is looking to attract between 60-70 highly qualified candidates for the MPhil programme each academic year.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course participants will have:

- Developed a critical view of the contribution made by the subject of International Relations, and its related disciplines, to social science more broadly conceived and to practice.
- An in-depth knowledge of specific subjects and themes in Politics
- Have become familiar with some of the main themes of the contemporary analysis of International Relations and Politics.
- Have tested their ability to produce a piece of advanced scholarship in conformity with the scientific methods, research techniques, standards of argument and accepted style of presentation of an academic discipline. They will thus be prepared to continue, if necessary, with research at the doctoral level.

Format

Such knowledge and understanding are developed through the lectures and seminars associated with the various course options, of which students study three; and by writing three mandatory practice essays, one for each of their chosen taught course options, in preparation for the examinations or course essays. Research skills are developed through a research methods course offered by POLIS and quantitative methods modules taught through the Social Sciences Research Methods Course (SSRMC). These research skills are assessed through an essay in which students reflect on specific methods relevant to their dissertation research .

Assessment

The dissertation is an important element of the MPhil. The examination process and criteria for assessment are accordingly more stringent than on many Master’s programmes. In particular, there is a requirement for originality, which must be met either by research using primary sources (documents, interviews, official publications, or the like) and/or by developing a fresh approach to an existing debate or literature. This supports the general aim of the dissertation, which is to develop advanced skills of research and expression.

Each student is required to submit an original thesis on an approved topic of between 20,000 and 25,000 words in length.

Examination of individual course-options will be EITHER by a three-hour invigilated examination OR a 5000 word long research paper.

Continuing

MPhil students are registered as ‘MPhil one-year only’. Those who hope to read for a PhD at Cambridge immediately after the MPhil will need to obtain support from a potential supervisor. This need not be the same person who supervises your MPhil thesis. However, in view of the early deadlines, you will need to work extra hard to let the potential PhD supervisor see substantial work that you have written, in addition to your draft thesis proposal, at an early stage in the academic year.

Once you have applied for the PhD a definite decision will only be taken once your performance in the MPhil can be fully assessed. That is to say, the Committee will set conditions for you related to the entry requirements of the PhD - one of which is a distinction in the MPhil. If you do not achieve these targets, it is unlikely that you can continue to read towards a PhD at POLIS.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Funded by the Cambridge Trust and the Potter Foundation, there is a studentship available for one student from Africa on the MPhil in International Relations and Politics course in 2016-17.

Applicants who are interested in studying an aspect of Anglo-American Relations or US foreign policy should also be aware of the following sources of funds run out of Magdalene College; The Donner Scholarship, The Halper Bursary , The Roosevelt Scholarship.

The Gabrielle Sacconaghi Bacon Scholarship is available to applicants in 2016-17 who are either final year students at McGill who are currently enrolled in the International Relations Programme; or alumni of the Page Programme (House of Commons or Senate) in Canada. Further information, including the criteria and how to apply, is available through Hughes Hall.

Those wishing to be considered for the limited funding opportunities available should take note of the early deadlines.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Our programme gives you the opportunity to delve into one of three specialist areas of International Relations. Read more
Our programme gives you the opportunity to delve into one of three specialist areas of International Relations.

You will master key skills in political science that enable you to explore the links between local, national and international structures, and critically evaluate key contemporary debates in the field of international relations.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The MSc International Relations programme is offered via two pathways. The International Relations pathway examines key issues in the contemporary international system and processes of global governance.

Secondly, the innovative International Intervention pathway deepens your understanding of this complex area and includes a placement option, allowing you to spend three months working in international politics.

There are a set of common compulsory modules for all pathways, in addition to two compulsory modules for your chosen pathway, and three optional modules from a range of international or European politics topics.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year, until a total of eight is reached. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation or placement. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Introduction to Research
-Research in Practice
-Theories of International Relations
-Dissertation
-Placement
-Key Issues in International Relations
-Politics of International Intervention I
-Politics of International Intervention II
-Global Governance
-Critical Studies on Security and Terrorism
-International Political Economy
-International Security and Defence
-European Social Dimension
-EU External Relations
-EU and Neighbourhood
-International Trade
-Extractive Industries and Society: Problems and Policies
-Extractive Industries and Society: Case Studies
-Environmental Management, Development and Sustainability
-EU Counter-Terrorism Law
-International Human Rights Law
-Law of international organizations
-Law of Armed Conflict Optional
-Institutional Architecture of EU

CAREER PROSPECTS

Our MSc programme in International Relations is a great stepping stone in your career development, whatever your plans.

Through its assessed, three-month placement, the International Intervention pathway offers an excellent opportunity to enhance a wide range of transferable skills and build personal networks which will significantly enhance your employment opportunities upon graduation.

Students from the School have gone on to a wide range of employment choices. These include working for international organisations, national and local government, lobby groups and non-governmental organisations, as well as private businesses and media organisations.

We also offer doctoral supervision in a wide range of political subjects for talented students who wish to continue their studies.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The programme aims to:
-Enable students to understand and evaluate contemporary debates in the study of international relations, concerning global governance and/or terrorism and security and international intervention
-Deepen students’ knowledge of theoretical aspects of international relations, including theoretical developments in the sub-fields of terrorism and security and international intervention
-Enable students to develop their knowledge and understanding in at least three sub-fields of international politics: students take three programme compulsory modules, two pathway compulsory modules specific to their pathway (International Relations, International Intervention, Terrorism and Security), and two further modules from a list of optional modules particular to their pathway
-Provide students, with the opportunity, through the International Intervention pathway, to spend three months working in a field related to their degree (this will not only provide students with new insights into International Intervention but will also develop a broad array of transferable skills – such skills include self-management and development; managing tasks; communicating effectively and clearly; working with and relating to others; the application of specialist knowledge; the application of initiative and reflecting on one’s own learning outcomes)

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

Knowledge and understanding
-Critical knowledge of contemporary debates in the study of international politics, particularly in relation to the international system and global governance, differing forms of intervention in response to poverty, humanitarian crisis, abuses of human rights, state failure and armed conflict
-In-depth understanding of international structures of governance and their impact on regional, national and local structures; and of theories of international relations
-Detailed knowledge and understanding within at least two sub-fields of international politics, for example development and humanitarian assistance; peace-making; peace-keeping and peace- building; use of international legal institutions and processes; and coercive military intervention to secure regime change
-Understanding of processes of knowledge creation and contestation within international politics
-Understanding of techniques of research and enquiry and their application to the study of politics

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Gather, organise and deploy evidence and information from a range of different sources
-Analyse and synthesise a wide range of material in verbal and numerical formats
-Deal with complex issues systematically and creatively
-Make sound judgements on the basis of incomplete evidence
-Demonstrate self-direction and originality in solving problems and analysing evidence
-Construct reasoned argument
-Apply theoretical frameworks to empirical analysis

Professional practical skills
-Make appropriate use of information and communications technology
-Carry out an advanced literature search
-Form effective arguments
-Organise own workload to meet deadlines
-Formulate research questions
-Design and conduct a research project, selecting appropriate methods of data collection and analysis
-Design and pilot questionnaires
-Design and conduct interviews
-Use software packages to analyse qualitative and quantitative data
-Present research findings orally and in writing

Key / transferable skills
-Communicate and present ideas effectively
-Reason critically
-Use information and communication technology for the retrieval and presentation of material
-Organise and plan their own work
-Adopt a proactive approach to problem-solving
-Collaborate with others to achieve common goals
-Deploy a range of relevant research skills
-Make decisions in complex situations
-Take responsibility for their own learning

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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The MA in International Relations and European Politics provides students with. - A unique postgraduate experience designed to train graduates pursuing international careers in administration, diplomacy, policy formation and research. Read more

Overview

The MA in International Relations and European Politics provides students with:

- A unique postgraduate experience designed to train graduates pursuing international careers in administration, diplomacy, policy formation and research
- The opportunity to study in an internationally diverse postgraduate community
- An enthusiastic and approachable teaching team who are internationally renowned experts in their research fields
- A clear geographical perspective to international relations and a solid analytical framework in a unique blend of theory and empirical analysis
- Insight into contemporary international relations and the dimensions of political interactions.

The programme explores contemporary European politics and societies. It has a distinctive focus on European policies and policy making. You will study the interplay of multi-level governance between European and national institutions.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/programmes/ma-in-inte-rela-euro-poli/

Programme structure

The Masters in International Relations and European Politics (MIREP) may be taken full-time (one year) or part-time and includes PG Certificate and PG Diploma qualifications.

The first semester comprises an advanced introduction to the core elements of the field of International Relations.

The second semester encourages the student to focus on the department’s key strengths in conflict and security, European studies, politics and society.

Students prepare a dissertation during the final three months of the programme, drawing on core ideas in undertaking a more sustained piece of research on a question that they themselves identify.

Examples of themes for dissertations include peace resolution in the Balkans, the EU’s external action agency, EU-China relations, international intervention and the ‘right-to-protect’, eco-politics and sustainability, ethnic belonging and desecuritization, bio-terrorism, and counter-terrorist policies.

Core units:

- International relations theories
- Comparative European Politics
- Scopes & methods of politics & international relations
- Masters dissertation

Optional units:

- The politics of sustainability: environmental security & international relations
- Resilience & national security
- The politics of migration
- Memory culture – memory politics
- Europe in global politics
- Multilevel governance & multi-layered citizenship in Europe
- Social modernisation & the transformation of democracy
- European security
- Foreign policy analysis
- Comparative European social policy
- International organisations in world politics
- Global governance
- Britain and Europe

View programme catalogue (http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/2015-2016/pl/pl-proglist-pg.html#A) for further information about units.

Learning and teaching

Our programmes are modular, consisting of self-contained units, taught and assessed on a semester basis. As you progress through each semester and successfully pass the examinations, you will receive credit for the units, thus providing you with a clear indication of your academic progress.

Teaching takes the form of lectures, classes and seminars. Lectures are quite formal, whereas classes and seminars involve interaction between the lecturer and a small number of students for study skills and discussion.

Methods of assessment

Assessment consists of a combination of coursework essays, class exercises, projects, oral presentations and examinations.

We also place strong emphasis on developing presentation and discussion/communication skills which, in many units, is part of the assessed work.

Careers

Graduates from our MA in International Relations and European Politics acquire broad knowledge about politics and policy-making in the contemporary international arena and about the role of Europe and the European Union within it, as well as essential skills to apply this knowledge in a wide variety of professional contexts. They are well-equipped to pursue successful careers in international organisations, multinational corporations, public bodies and think tanks.

Particularly outstanding candidates with an interest in academia can also proceed to doctoral research.

About the department

The Department of Politics, Languages & International Studies (PoLIS) is one of the largest departments in the University.

Many staff are leading scholars in their field and are involved in a wide range of research activities, including collaborative projects at both national and international levels.

International and industrial links:

- Our department has links with 22 Erasmus partner institutions, as well as universities in Russia and Mexico.
- Research students regularly engage in fieldwork abroad, especially in the countries of the European Union, but also in Russia, Latin America and the United States.
- Students on the Euromasters programme study at two or three different sites in either Europe or the USA.
- In the case of the MA Interpreting & Translating and the MA Translation & Professional Language Skills, a number of work placements in Western Europe are made available to students in the language services of international organisations, government departments and commercial enterprises.

Our research

Experts from our department are publishing regularly in the most highly ranked international journals.

Our academic expertise and research activities are organised into three broad Research Clusters:

- Conflict, Security & International Order
- Governance, Citizenship & Policy
- Memory, History & Identity

International collaboration:
Many staff are internationally leading scholars in their field. We are involved in a wide range of research activities, including collaborative projects at both national and international levels.

Projects are funded by a variety of bodies such as:

- Economics & Social Research Council (ESRC)
- European Commission Framework Programme
- Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC)

Stimulating cutting edge research:
Our diversity and the disciplinary mix of political science, political theory, policy analysis, social anthropology, political sociology and others make for a very stimulating environment for students to develop their own research projects.

The integration of our research community is further enhanced through the International Relations & European Politics (IREP) postgraduate group.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/hss/graduate-school/taught-programmes/how-to-apply/

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study International Relations at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study International Relations at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in International Relations aims to open your mind and extend your skills.

Key Features of MA in International Relations

This MA in International Relations offers advanced research in International Relations, providing students with a detailed understanding of the international system, key issues, the crucial actors, and alternative ways of analysing and interpreting the subject.

With an appreciation of the global dynamics at work, you then have the opportunity to specialise in examining one specific area of the world: the Asia-Pacific.

The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

International Relations graduates have careers in Government and Politics, UN organisations, the Foreign Office and Diplomatic Corps, Humanitarian organisations, International business, media and PR.

The Extended MA (EMA) in International Relations is a 240-credit postgraduate qualification that is equivalent to 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) and is thus a recognised Masters qualification throughout the European Union. The EMA is a standard UK MA plus an additional 60 credits (30 ECTS) and this additional coursework is undertaken in one semester at a partner institution overseas. The EMA is therefore not only an EU recognised postgraduate qualification it also adds a study abroad experience thus enhancing the qualification’s employability credentials.

The partner institution for EMA International Relations is The Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University. Founded in 1997, the Bush School is ranked in the top 12 percent of the 266 graduate public affairs schools in the USA, according to rankings published in U.S. News & World Report. Located in College Station, Texas, the School’s programmes are housed in the Robert H. and Judy Ley Allen Building, which is part of the George Bush Presidential Library Center on the West Campus of Texas A&M. This location affords students access to the archival holdings of the George Bush Presidential Library and Museum, invitation to numerous events hosted by the George Bush Foundation at the Annenberg Presidential Conference Center, and inclusion in the many activities of the Texas A&M community. Texas A&M is the sixth-largest university in the USA with 50,000 students. It holds membership in the prestigious Association of American Universities, one of only 61 institutions with this distinction.

Modules

Modules on the International Relations programme typically include:

• Approaches to International Relations
• International Security in the Asia Pacific
• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism
• Governance: From State Formation to Global Governance
• Critical Security
• War, Identity and Society
• Violence, Conflict and Development
• Civil Society and International Development
• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
• War, Technology and Culture
• State of Africa
• War in Space

Who should Apply?

Students interested in International Relations, from a politics, international relations, development studies, law, humanities, social science, International Business or related background. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to International Relations.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for International Relations graduates. MA degree holders in International Relations may move on to doctoral study or enter employment sectors such as the diplomatic corps, the armed forces, intelligence and risk analysis, relief and humanitarian organisations, law and finance, government and politics and international business.

Research Interests

The following research groups at Swansea provide a distinct international and multi-disciplinary forum for the advancement of the
study of International Relations including:

• International Relations & Security
• Cultural Political Economy
• Policy and Governance
• Development Studies
• International Communication

Regular research seminars and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and
Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Student Quote

“The lecturers and other staff members of the International Relations Department are exceptional, they are friendly, helpful and understanding and they provide clarity and support. The range of modules available to MA students in International Relations is second to none; they are not only interesting and enjoyable but also highly academic and insightful. Study facilities are world class. The library and Information centre has rich collections of research materials; there is a dedicated Arts and Humanities Postgraduate study room and also a computer room with an unlimited access to the internet. Studying for an MA in International Relations at Swansea University is an amazing experience and one that I shall never forget. The teaching and non-teaching staff of the Department of International Relations are the best. I shall continue to enjoy this friendliness and understanding from the Department in the foreseeable future because, I have decided to study a PhD after the MA.”

Felix Oko. International Relations, MA

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study International Relations at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study International Relations at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in International Relations aims to open your mind and extend your skills.

Key Features of MA in International Relations

This MA in International Relations offers advanced research in International Relations, providing students with a detailed understanding of the international system, key issues, the crucial actors, and alternative ways of analysing and interpreting the subject.

With an appreciation of the global dynamics at work, you then have the opportunity to specialise in examining one specific area of the world: the Asia-Pacific.

The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

International Relations graduates have careers in Government and Politics, UN organisations, the Foreign Office and Diplomatic Corps, Humanitarian organisations, International business, media and PR.

The full-time International Relations course structure is split across the year with three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. Students study four compulsory modules, the research process module and one optional module. The dissertation is written on a specialist research topic of the student's choosing.

Modules

Modules on the International Relations programme typically include:

• Approaches to International Relations
• International Security in the Asia Pacific
• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism
• Governance: From State Formation to Global Governance
• Critical Security
• War, Identity and Society
• Violence, Conflict and Development
• Civil Society and International Development
• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
• War, Technology and Culture
• State of Africa
• War in Space

Who should Apply?

Students interested in International Relations, from a politics, international relations, development studies, law, humanities, social science, International Business or related background. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to International Relations.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for International Relations graduates. MA degree holders in International Relations may move on to doctoral study or enter employment sectors such as the diplomatic corps, the armed forces, intelligence and risk analysis, relief and humanitarian organisations, law and finance, government and politics and international business.

Research Interests

The following research groups at Swansea provide a distinct international and multi-disciplinary forum for the advancement of the
study of International Relations including:

• International Relations & Security
• Cultural Political Economy
• Policy and Governance
• Development Studies
• International Communication

Regular research seminars and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and
Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Student Quote

“The lecturers and other staff members of the International Relations Department are exceptional, they are friendly, helpful and understanding and they provide clarity and support. The range of modules available to MA students in International Relations is second to none; they are not only interesting and enjoyable but also highly academic and insightful. Study facilities are world class. The library and Information centre has rich collections of research materials; there is a dedicated Arts and Humanities Postgraduate study room and also a computer room with an unlimited access to the internet. Studying for an MA in International Relations at Swansea University is an amazing experience and one that I shall never forget. The teaching and non-teaching staff of the Department of International Relations are the best. I shall continue to enjoy this friendliness and understanding from the Department in the foreseeable future because, I have decided to study a PhD after the MA.”

Felix Oko. International Relations, MA

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This distinctive programme offers an in-depth analysis of this vital region, delivered by an expert academic team. Read more
This distinctive programme offers an in-depth analysis of this vital region, delivered by an expert academic team. You’ll directly address the complex nature of the politics and international relations of the Middle East to gain an oversight of internal dimensions of the region and their links with regional and extra-regional relations.

Covering a range of approaches from Politics, Comparative Politics and International Relations, it addresses the security, economic, identity and political dynamics of the region. The programme will be of interest to you if you’re wishing to study these issues in more depth and to make comparisons across the region.

You’ll benefit from our specific expertise and research interests in a diverse range of areas relating to the Middle East - with particular focus on security issues, regional relations and the interest of the outside powers in the Middle East, as well as our in-depth research and experience in specific sub-regional areas.

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This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11. Read more
This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11.

At the dawn of a third millennium, the pace of integration among the world’s regions and populations is breathtaking. Powerful forces – the emergence of transnational economies, the lightning speed of global communications, and the movement of peoples, cultures and ideas into new settings – are reshaping notions of citizenship, society and community.

At the same time, however, older religious hatreds, sectarian violence and new fundamentalisms are recasting existing states and disintegrating individual, national and international notions of security. Such dynamics demand that we rethink why we are and where we are today, but also reconsider historical interpretations of past change within and among the world’s regions. To understand the global condition requires a thorough and sensitive understanding of diverse interests, ethnicities and cultures. The purpose of this new postgraduate award in International Relations (IR) is to foster within students a global perspective and encourage a multicultural awareness of contemporary problems.

Why study with us?

IR is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. It is not so much a single discipline; rather it is a study of a particular type of behaviour whose comprehension requires the insight and methods of a number of disciplines. Although your MA is set within a strong political and sociological framework, the course is enhanced through the support of Law, History, and American Studies.

IR provides an opportunity to engage with and adapt to changing international, national and regional realities post 9/11. The security implications of the events of 9/11, and the impact of global developments on everyday lives, are present in the public mind as never before. The Palestinian question, western intervention and civil war in Iraq, nuclear proliferation, international crime and terrorism are just some of the recurrent themes that have taken on a new urgency and demand our attention.

IR develops critical awareness, conceptual understanding, sound research methods, and originality in the application of knowledge. Your MA will provide you with an appropriate set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-changing’ global context. Current social, political and economic globalisation demonstrates the inexorable importance of the ‘international’ and the increased relevance of this knowledge dimension at both academic and practice levels.

Course content

International Relations is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. Students undertaking the course will come from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds and it is not assumed that all students will have similar abilities or skills. It is not our aim to encourage further specialisation along the line of a student’s first degree but rather to complement existing knowledge and build upon transferable capabilities. Overall this is a unique opportunity for graduates both with and without International Relations training to study at a very high level for a postgraduate degree with global relevance.

Our aim is to foster a set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-shrinking’ global society. This goal is to provide a rigorous and intellectually challenging foundation in approaches to the study and practice of international relations while developing an understanding and sensitivity to key issues in diverse areas of the modern world. The MA offers an exciting opportunity for graduates to develop their understanding of international affairs both theoretically and through their own or others’ experience.

Course modules (16/17)

-International Relations Theory: Great Debates, New Directions
-Major Organisations in the International Order
-Methodology and Research Design in International Relations
-The Peoples’ Republic of China: Foreign Policy Dilemmas
-European Integration
-America after 9/11
-The Politics of Latin American Development
-The International Politics of the Post-Soviet Space
-The Politics of Sub-Saharan Africa
-Politics of International Communications
-Dissertation
-The International Relations of the Pacific Rim
-The Political Economy of East African Development
-Comparative Transnational Criminology
-European and International Human Rights
-National Security, Terrorism and The Rule of Law
-Political Economies of International Development
-The Politics of Aid

Methods of Learning

The Master’s award in International Relations is designed to provide a rounded education and broadly based qualification for UK graduates and equivalently qualified foreign students, particularly those who lack an international dimension through their previous study. It is awarded after completion of a mixture of taught courses and a programme of research. The MA lasts at least one year (if taken full time, two years part time), and is to be taken by persons with honours degrees (or equivalent achievement). Also on offer (and commensurate with this standard of education) are advanced short courses leading to Postgraduate Certificates and Postgraduate Diplomas in IR.

In common with all universities, certain elements of the course are compulsory and other elements chosen. To be awarded the MA in International Relations each student must achieve 180 credits at Master’s level (here called CATS (Credit Accumulation and Transfer Scheme)). This includes 40 CATS of compulsory modules in International Theory, 20 CATS of compulsory methodology and research training, and a 60 CATS compulsory dissertation of between 15,000 and 20,000 words. Compulsory modules define the intellectual basis of IR as a multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary subject while providing a firm foundation in theoretical issues and debates. They also develop the cognitive skills for specialist study and the practical skills for research. You gain the remaining 60 CATS through a wide choice of designated modules. All modules build upon the research and teaching expertise of individual tutors, and cover a wide range of themes in diverse areas of the globe – not just North America and Western Europe but the Middle East, Latin America, China and the Pacific Rim among others. A key aim is to develop a sensitivity and awareness of varied geo-political settings while comprehending the impact of change upon states, societies and individuals. Students are taught to discuss international problems to a high standard while applying the ways of analysis adopted by IR scholars to a range of issues.

We hope all candidates might be encouraged and enthused to achieve the MA. Yet we also recognise that some students may prefer to study in ‘stages’ – funds or time permitting. This is why we provide a named Postgraduate Certificate and a named Postgraduate Diploma. A Postgraduate Diploma in International Relations is available if students successfully complete 120 CATS points but do not complete the 60 CATS dissertation. Alternatively, there is the opportunity to achieve a Postgraduate Certificate in International Relations by successfully gaining 60 CATS points including 40 CATS of IR theory but excluding 20 CATS of methodology/research and of course the 60 CATS dissertation module.

All of this gives you, the student, the added flexibility of opting in or out of awards as personal or financial circumstance change. It gives the added incentive of an identifiable and quantifiable award at each stage of study while consistently encouraging and widening your participation in postgraduate enterprise. This strategy also enables an individual to complete their study within a timescale suitable to their own specific needs. Multiple points of entry (February and September) over a one or two year cycle further facilitate this.

Schedule

At Master’s level study, we aim to encourage student-led debates and exchange of ideas. Modules will typically alternate fortnightly between classes on campus and online learning activities. Each module incorporates a variety of teaching methods in class, including workshops, student presentations and discussions of primary and secondary materials (such as film, images, documentary sources and online resources). Online learning activities include online seminars, discussion boards, podcasts and blogs.

Full-time students get six hours of timetabled contact per week, part-time students have three hours. This does not include individual tutorials or dissertation supervision.

Independent study and assessment time equate to approximately 18 hours per week full time or nine hours part time.

Assessments

Your MA in International Relations is assessed through a variety of types of coursework and the dissertation. Assessment items include essays, literature reviews, presentations and research reports. There are no examinations. All coursework reflects the high level of intellectual demands associated with a taught MA and has the aim of developing a range of oral and written skills. You need to be prepared to commit yourself to substantial reading and thought for successful completion of an MA. This time includes preparation for assignments, seminars and the dissertation element.

Although teaching strategies vary according to individual modules, considerable emphasis is placed upon student-based learning in order to foster effective critical participation and discussion as overall course objectives. This means lectures and tutor-led teaching provide overviews of major theories and themes but the seminar or workshop is where learning is consolidated, exemplified and used in more student-centred contexts.

Modules typically make use of current case study material, video teaching media as well as practical exercises and the more traditional lecture and seminar activities. Tutorials are very important in facilitating and directing the learning of cognitive skills on a personal basis – by working within the context of your individual needs, appropriate goals can be set, for example, in relation to essay preparation and feedback.

At each stage you are encouraged to plan and organise your own learning. This allows greater time to be spent on critical evaluation – so reinforcing and extending your learning experience. Mixed methods of teaching and learning are utilised in seminars to achieve aims and outcomes, including tutor input, structural discussions, small group work, presentations, guided reading of designated course material, and wider reading appropriate to Master’s level. Student-led presentations and small group work develop your transferable skills and enhance your capacity for critical reflection. The academic essay has a central function in every module in allowing you to engage with and reflect upon the key skills required to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in IR. Coursework for all modules, but particularly in methods modules, allows students to acquire skills that they will then use in the dissertation.

Facilities and Special Features

-Strong staff expertise.
-Enthusiastic teaching team providing a supportive atmosphere for research.
-The core modules consider classic texts and the very latest thinking on international theory.
-Focus on the study of distinct global regions not just Europe, North America or the West.
-All students are assigned a personal tutor and will be encouraged to form study groups with colleagues.
-Guest speakers are a feature of this MA.
-Students will find the course team warm and approachable.

Careers

Previous students have used our MA in a variety of ways. It can be a bridge to further study – with several former students having gone on to do a PhD. As a prestigious qualification, it can enhance career opportunities in a wide range of occupations, for example, teachers have used the course to gain curriculum knowledge and career progression. Many students take the course purely because they have enjoyed History as a degree or as a personal interest and wish to pursue the subject further.

Progression to a taught postgraduate course is a path chosen by those wishing to further their careers, those intending to pursue further research and those who seek principally to satisfy their own intellectual interests. Successful completion will lead to the award of MA. This will complement a candidate’s existing qualifications. Additionally, it is envisaged that the programme’s breadth and depth will provide you with a suitable background for careers in public and private sectors where there is a need for international expertise.

The award of MA demonstrates an intellectual flexibility and high level of analytical, written and verbal skills. Increasingly, employers are looking for graduates with skills and knowledge which are not found (or perceived by employers to be found) among many recent graduates. This MA will give you, the graduate, a distinctive product in a highly competitive and expanding graduate employment market. Employers report that a person with a background in International Relations is more likely to find a career in the rapidly changing international environment than a person with another form of postgraduate qualification.

The MA IR thus aims to provide you with a suitable foundation for careers in both private and public sectors where there is a need for international sensitivity. Students wishing to engage in later doctoral research (where we have capacity) or in careers within voluntary organisations, civil and diplomatic service, international organisations, research posts or journalism will particularly benefit from it. We now have excellent links with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Members of European Parliament and representatives from the United Nations, as well as a number of pressure groups.

In sum, our core purpose is to nurture not only a robust intellectual flexibility but also the high levels of analytical, written and verbal skills attractive to employers from globally focused agencies and business. Our aim is to provide you with an excellent background and competitive edge for further study or a wide variety of careers in an ever-expanding job market.

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Getting to grips with the ever-changing shifts of international politics can be daunting. Our MSc in International Relations introduces you to the fundamental principles of global interaction, and refining your knowledge within specialist classes. Read more
Getting to grips with the ever-changing shifts of international politics can be daunting. Our MSc in International Relations introduces you to the fundamental principles of global interaction, and refining your knowledge within specialist classes. You will learn in a systematic and engaging way about the origins, evolution and multifaceted character of the international political system, before turning to the Security Studies specialism, providing specialist insights on power, influence and governance within key national, regional and international structures.

A fascinating and relevant degree supported in 2017 by a competitively-awarded Jean Monnet Studentship (£2000) as well as the possibility of in-house internships. CCCU graduates are well placed to specialise in careers connected to key areas of international relations, enhanced with expertise in security.

Visit the website https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/international-relations.aspx

Course detail

Through a combination of core and specialist modules, the MSc in International Relations is constructed around a series of modules that will help you analyse the multifaceted origins, evolution and conflictual development of the international political system. You will explore the analytical application of a range of the core theories and contemporary concepts that make up the canon of International Relations. You will interrogate the relative merits and shortcomings of ideologies, political, economic and socio-cultural philosophies, structures of power, and systems of governance across in order to better understand the global political system.

Suitability

The new MSc in International Relations offered at Canterbury Christ Church University is established upon a firm foundation of research­led teaching, using innovative and blended learning methods, expertise driven insights, and a clear commitment to guiding and supporting all facets of graduate student development. Our International Relations programmes will provide you with the opportunity to gain comprehensive conceptual knowledge of the prime structures and interconnections that make up international relations, and an indispensable practical understanding of national, institutional, legal, political, economic and socio­cultural actors of the global community.

The 2017 MSc in International Relations is offered with a specialism in Security Studies, allowing you to gain an especially strong understanding of the role of power and influence, the distribution of authority and governance within national, regional and international modes of security, and the principles driving the narratives and practices of security. Offered both full and part-time, CCCU’s innovative MSc in International Relations will help you tackle the ‘big issues’ in international politics with confidence and curiosity, equipping you for career paths in local, national, and international arenas thanks to innovative modules and a ‘calling card’ thesis.

Content

• Faculty Research Module (40 Credits)
• Advanced Research in Politics and International Relations (20 Credits)
• Critical Issues: Shifting Perspectives (20 Credits)
• Contemporary Security (20 Credits)
• Security in the Digital Age (20 Credits)
• Dissertation: Assessing Security Studies (60 Credits)

Format

Modules on International Relations (as well as the Security Studies specialism) are comprised of formal lectures on key themes of IR, security and globalisation, and interactive seminars that explore global actors, structures, and policies, making use of a robust range of teaching and learning styles to deconstruct this complex and fast changing subject area. Based on nationally recognized, award winning teaching styles, graduate classes are engaging and interactive, ranging from simulation games that reflect the actual workings of an international institution or a given security actor, to negotiation-based group work, as well as the analysis of key international policy texts, treaties or conventions, In addition, students are encouraged to produce work in the form of briefing notes, blogs and pieces of advocacy, all focusing on contemporary challenges to the international structure, ensuring that students completing the MSc in International Relation graduate with an advanced knowledge of their chosen area through the most contemporary pedagogic styles.

Assessment

Students of the MSc in International Relations will be assessed through a range of methods, including essays, briefing notes, book reviews, portfolios, individual and group oral presentations, action research, political role play, simulations, standard examinations, as well as a sustained piece of academic work in the form of a thesis, all of which take account of two key inter­dependent aspects:

What can I do next?

An MSc in International Relations will provide you with an exceptionally wide knowledge base, allowing you to command both the organising principles and nuanced specifics of the contemporary regional, international and global structure. This innovative, relevant and marketable degree will ensure you with a refined understanding of international relations as a whole, as well as the role and application of your Security Studies specialism. In order to complete this demanding degree, you will be able to thoroughly and expertly use a wide range of sources and forms of information to critically assess the contemporary international structure, its various distributions of power and influence, and ensuing forms of authority and governance within national, regional and international modes.

You will also be able to demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the numerous forms of security, from the canon of securitisation studies to myriad practical examples of political, economic, social and even cultural security implicit in the concept of a world that is increasingly interdependent and yet predisposed to enduring state structures. As such, you will emerge with an enduring understanding of both the contemporary international structure, in terms of its various distributions of power, wealth and interactive mechanisms of governance, from traditional sovereign units to international level structures.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

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The MA in International Relations provides students with. - A unique postgraduate experience designed to train graduates pursuing international careers in administration, diplomacy, policy formation and research. Read more

Overview

The MA in International Relations provides students with:

- A unique postgraduate experience designed to train graduates pursuing international careers in administration, diplomacy, policy formation and research
- The opportunity to study in an internationally diverse postgraduate community
- An enthusiastic and approachable teaching team who are internationally renowned experts in their research fields
- A clear geographical perspective to international relations and a solid analytical framework in a unique blend of theory and empirical analysis
- Insight into contemporary international relations and the dimensions of political interactions.

The programme offers a distinctive focus on security issues, with academic expertise in both international security and European homeland security. You will gain an insight into the interplay of international power, order and institutions.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/programmes/ma-in-inte-rela/

Programme structure

The Masters in International Relations (MAIR) may be taken full-time (one year) or part-time and includes PG Certificate and PG Diploma qualifications.

The first semester comprises an advanced introduction to the core elements of the field of International Relations.

The second semester encourages the student to focus on the department’s key strengths in conflict and security, European studies, and politics and society.

Students prepare a dissertation during the final three months of the programme, drawing on core ideas in undertaking a more sustained piece of research on a question that they themselves identify.

Examples of themes for dissertations include peace resolution in the Balkans, the EU’s external action agency, EU-China relations, international intervention and the ‘right-to-protect’, eco-politics and sustainability, ethnic belonging and desecuritization, bio-terrorism, and counter-terrorist policies.

Core units:

- International relations theories
- Scopes & methods of politics & international relations
- Foreign policy making & analysis
- International organisations in world politics
- International relations Masters dissertation

Optional units:

- Comparative European politics
- International security: theories and concepts
- Memory culture – memory politics
- Governance, security and development in East and South East Asia
- Organised Crime in Europe: threats and challenges
- International security: the contemporary agenda
- Britain and Europe
- International relations of South and Central Asia
- Economic foreign policy and the international trade regime
- Theories of conflict and conflict resolution

View programme catalogue (http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/2015-2016/pl/pl-proglist-pg.html#E) for further information about units.

Learning and teaching

Our programmes are modular, consisting of self-contained units, taught and assessed on a semester basis. As you progress through each semester and successfully pass the examinations, you will receive credit for the units, thus providing you with a clear indication of your academic progress.

Teaching takes the form of lectures, classes and seminars. Lectures are quite formal, whereas classes and seminars involve interaction between the lecturer and a small number of students for study skills and discussion.

Methods of assessment

Assessment consists of a combination of coursework essays, class exercises, projects and oral presentations.

We also place strong emphasis on developing presentation and discussion/communication skills, which in many units is part of the assessed work.

Careers

Graduates from our MA International Relations acquire broad knowledge about politics and policy-making in contemporary Europe and the role of Europe as a global player, as well as essential skills to apply this knowledge in a wide variety of professional contexts. They are well-equipped to pursue successful careers in international organisations, multinational corporations, public bodies and think tanks.

Particularly outstanding candidates with an interest in academia can also proceed to doctoral research.

About the department

The Department of Politics, Languages & International Studies (PoLIS) (http://www.bath.ac.uk/polis/) is one of the largest departments in the University.

Many staff are leading scholars in their field and are involved in a wide range of research activities, including collaborative projects at both national and international levels.

International and industrial links:

- Our department has links with 22 Erasmus partner institutions, as well as universities in Russia and Mexico.

- Research students regularly engage in fieldwork abroad, especially in the countries of the European Union, but also in Russia, Latin America and the United States.

- Students on the Euromasters programme study at two or three different sites in either Europe or the USA.

- In the case of the MA Interpreting & Translating and the MA Translation & Professional Language Skills, a number of work placements in Western Europe are made available to students in the language services of international organisations, government departments and commercial enterprises.

Our research

Experts from our department are publishing regularly in the most highly ranked international journals.

Our academic expertise and research activities are organised into three broad Research Clusters:

- Conflict, Security & International Order
- Governance, Citizenship & Policy
- Memory, History & Identity

- International collaboration:
Many staff are internationally leading scholars in their field. We are involved in a wide range of research activities, including collaborative projects at both national and international levels.

Projects are funded by a variety of bodies such as:

- Economics & Social Research Council (ESRC)
- European Commission Framework Programme
- Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC)

Stimulating cutting edge research:
Our diversity and the disciplinary mix of political science, political theory, policy analysis, social anthropology, political sociology and others make for a very stimulating environment for students to develop their own research projects.

The integration of our research community is further enhanced through the International Relations & European Politics (IREP) postgraduate group.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/hss/graduate-school/taught-programmes/how-to-apply/

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International Relations as a discipline is almost a century old. About its origins different interpretations exist, but in general IR emerged in response to the consequences of power politics in Europe, culminating in the First World War, and in response to specific research questions within Political Science. Read more
International Relations as a discipline is almost a century old. About its origins different interpretations exist, but in general IR emerged in response to the consequences of power politics in Europe, culminating in the First World War, and in response to specific research questions within Political Science. IR in Europe started as an interdisciplinary project, IR in Groningen still follows this tradition.

International Relations and International Organization, a specialization of the Master International Relations, offers a comprehensive study in theory and practice. Theretofore, IRIO uses a 'self-service' model. Besides the mandatory course on advanced theory and the master thesis, you can select from specialized capita and research seminars in four essential areas of Internationals Relations: International Security, International Political Economy, European Integration, Global Governance and East Asian Studies. Moreover, to prepare for an international career you can organize an internship at a public or private organization in the field of international relations, where you can apply your knowledge and skills in a 'real-time' environment.

Why in Groningen?

The Master's specialization IRIO offers: (a) flexibility in the selection of courses, enabling students to design a study programme tailored to their needs and interests; (b) a research-led and policy-oriented curriculum taught by a committed staff; (c) reserves room for a career-oriented internship that excellently prepares graduates for the labour market and (d) provides an excellent preparation for a variety of positions related to the broad field of international relations.

Job perspectives

The Master's specialization is broad in scope and gives students a solid foundation in international relations. There is consequently a wide range of employment opportunities for International Relations graduates. The most obvious profession is a policy advisor, but you could also become a researcher, lobbyist, diplomat, or PR officer. You can work in international business, non-profit or government organizations, in the media, and at a university or a private research institute.

Research International Relations and International Organization

Research conducted within the Department of International Relations and International Organization takes mostly place within the context of one of the four other specializations: Global Governance, International Security, European Integration and International Political Economy. We kindly direct you to those sites to get an impression of the research activities of the Department. In addition, you are invited to click on the link below to access an article published by staff of the Department.

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The University of Bristol LLM in International Law and International Relations is an exciting programme for students looking to pursue a career in international non-governmental organisations, government departments and international firms, or as international consultants. Read more
The University of Bristol LLM in International Law and International Relations is an exciting programme for students looking to pursue a career in international non-governmental organisations, government departments and international firms, or as international consultants.

It is a specialist programme that enables you to combine units provided by both the Law School and the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies to create an exceptional programme of study. The LLM in International Law and International Relations encourages an integrated theoretical and interdisciplinary approach to issues of international regulation and governance, so you can build a deep understanding of how one discipline informs the other. The programme covers the general methods, scope and theories of international law and international relations and allows for further specialisation within these broad fields.

We have a large and vibrant international community and University of Bristol LLM students benefit from small class sizes taught by world-leading experts.

Programme structure

Taught component
Students will choose two 30-credit Law School units from the following list:
-General Principles of International Law (compulsory for students with no prior international law training)
-Migration Law and Policy – International, European and Human Rights Dimensions
-International Dispute Settlement
-International Commercial Arbitration
-International Commercial Litigation
-International Law VI: International Law and Human Rights
-International Law of the Sea
-International Law and the Use of Force
-World Trade Law

Students will also study three 20-credit units in the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies. These are:
-Theories of International Relations (mandatory)
-Either International Security
OR
-International Political Economy
-An open choice from a range of optional units from teaching block two, such as Foreign Policy Analysis; Conflict, Security and Development; or Global Civil Society

Please note that unit choices are subject to change depending on staff availability.

Dissertation component
Students will also complete a 10,000-15,000 word, 60-credit dissertation, supervised either in the Law School or in the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies. In consultation with the programme director and based on their proposed area of specialisation, students have the choice to take the dissertation in either school, with a supervisory decision being made in December.

Careers

This programme provides a strong foundation for a broad range of careers that involve an international law and international relations perspective, such as international arbitration. Graduates may act as lawyers (if their first degree is in law), as researchers in international and European organisations (eg the United Nations, European Commission), or in the diplomatic service. Graduates may also work for NGOs and other agencies, and some go on to further study or research at the University of Bristol or elsewhere.

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Our world is shaped by big questions about global justice, war, peace, social movements, and inter-state relations. The Master of International Relations enables you to deal critically and analytically with such questions, providing a window into the dynamic world of 21st century politics. Read more
Our world is shaped by big questions about global justice, war, peace, social movements, and inter-state relations. The Master of International Relations enables you to deal critically and analytically with such questions, providing a window into the dynamic world of 21st century politics.

The course explores the security, ethical, legal and economic dimensions of international relations. You will examine key issues in foreign policy, world order, European studies, crisis management and terrorism, as well as the gender, development, migration and governance aspects of global politics. We offer four specialisations:

- Governance and security
- International diplomacy and trade
- Political violence and counter-terrorism
- General international relations studies

The Master of International Relations will help you make sense of the complexity of global politics and economics by giving you the analytical perspectives and skills to see both the 'bigger picture' and detailed aspects of specific issues, with a solid intellectual grounding in key debates, historical events and political institutions.

You will be taught by leading experts in their respective fields, who have strong networks with a number of international and local organisations. This ensures that you will be exposed to the very latest advances in international relations.

The course also provides opportunities to study and attend field schools abroad, and to develop research interests in a number of areas. You will have the opportunity to take advantage of Monash's global presence, with campuses in South Africa, Malaysia, China, and Italy. And our internship program enables you to build practical experience as well as valuable professional networks in Australia and overseas.

These active research links shape our curriculum and ensure its relevance to provide you with the best employment and research opportunities. Our graduates have gone on to a broad range of occupations and have, for example, been employed by the United Nations, the Australian Government, and non-governmental organisations such as the International Red Cross.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/international-relations-a6010?domestic=true

Overview

Please select a specialisation for more details:

General studies in international relations
General international relations studies enables you to tailor your unit choices to suit your own interests or needs while addressing the fundamental debates framing global politics. By selecting across the range of specialisations, you will be able to examine key issues in foreign policy, international and comparative governance, world order and security, human rights, European studies, crisis management, diplomacy and trade, or terrorism.

Governance and security
The Governance and security specialisation will broaden your understanding of how power, authority, and participation are managed within and amongst states, as well as of challenges to this domestically and internationally. You will focus on the practical applications of governance, institutions and the rule of law, and how this works in the contemporary global environment.

International diplomacy and trade
The International diplomacy and trade specialisation will advance your knowledge across international trade, diplomacy, and international law. It is designed for people at the start of their careers as well as people working in the field who want to develop their careers in international public policy, NGOs and government departments such as the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

Political violence and counter-terrorism
The Political violence and counter-terrorism specialisation provides students with a critical engagement with manifestations of political violence, as well as the ideologies and conditions that give rise to political violence. Focus is on understanding terrorism and political extremism, the conditions associated with preventing and combating political violence, and the impacts of these activities on democratic and civil liberties.

Course Structure

The course is structured in three parts. Part A. Foundations for advanced international relations studies, Part B. Core Master's study and Part C. Advanced expertise. All students complete Part B. Depending upon prior qualifications, you may receive credit for Part A or Part C or a combination of the two.

[Note that if you are eligible for credit for prior studies you may elect not to receive the credit.]

PART A. Foundations for advanced international relations studies
These studies will introduce you to International relations studies at advanced undergraduate or graduate level. They are intended for students whose previous qualification is not in a cognate field.

PART B. Core Master's core study
These studies draw on best practices within the broad realm of international relations practice and research exploring the security, ethical, and economic dimensions of international relations. You will have opportunities to examine key issues in foreign policy, world order, European studies, crisis management, and terrorism.

PART C. Advanced expertise
The focus of these studies is professional or scholarly work that can contribute to a portfolio of professional development. You have two options.

The first option is a program of coursework study where you select the units to suit your own interests. This option includes the opportunity to undertake an internship in the field.

The second option is a 24 point research thesis. Students wishing to use this Masters course as a pathway to a higher degree by research should take this second option.Students admitted to the course, who have a recognised honours degree in a cognate discipline including humanities or social sciences, will receive credit for Part C, however, should they wish to complete a 24 point research project as part of the course they should consult with the course coordinator.

Partner with another course

Double degree courses allow you to study towards two different degrees at the same time, and graduate with two separate qualifications. And because a required subject in one course can count as an elective in the other, our double degrees take up to two years less than if you studied for the two degrees separately.

International Relations and Journalism - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/international-relations-and-journalism-a6011?domestic=true

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/arts

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/international-relations-a6010?domestic=true#making-the-application

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Our MSc in Politics provides an advanced grounding in contemporary political science, focusing on empirical and normative democratic theory, political institutions, public policy and citizenship across different political systems and diverse social contexts.The MSc brings together many of the existing strengths of the department in different parts of the world. Read more
Our MSc in Politics provides an advanced grounding in contemporary political science, focusing on empirical and normative democratic theory, political institutions, public policy and citizenship across different political systems and diverse social contexts.The MSc brings together many of the existing strengths of the department in different parts of the world.

The programme can be tailored to specific regional interests through option courses in West Europe and North America, East Europe, Africa, India, and the Middle East. The degree will provide you with a firm academic foundation in the study of comparative politics and a base of knowledge for careers in fields such as policymaking, development, and NGOs.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscpolitics.aspx

Why choose this course?

- the Department of Politics and International Relations is a young, vibrant and rapidly-rising department and was ranked in the Top 10 small politics departments in the latest Research Assessment Exercise (RAE, 2008)

- the course is taught by world-class scholars and informed by cutting-edge research

- offers an advanced grounding in international public policy while allowing you to specialise in particular issues or regions of interest.

- taught by academics, current and retired public policy practitioners

- our international cohort of students will provide you with excellent opportunities to obtain genuinely global perspectives.

Department research and industry highlights

- The Centre for European Politics was officially launched by Lord Mandelson in September 2007, with the mission of producing research in two principal areas: the study of democracy in Europe, and Europe as an actor in world politics. Under the leadership of Co-Directors Dr Alsiter Miskimmon and Dr James Sloam, it has hosted a number of high-profile speakers, including Lord Mandelson, Professor Simon Hix (LSE), Roger Liddle (Policy Network), John Peet (The Economist), Sir Stephen Wall (former European policy advisor to Tony Blair), David Willets MP (Shadow Secretary of State for Innovations, Universities and Skills) and Dr Vince Cable. Recent funded research projects include: a European Union Committee of the Regions consultancy on EU External Relations and European Neighbourhood Policy; an EU-funded Workshop on the Review of the European Union Budget; and Teaching Democracy. Recent publications include, Bendetto and Milio (eds) European Union budget reform: institutions, policy and economic crisis (Palgrave, 2012) and James Sloam, 'New Voice, Less Equal: the Civic and political Engagement of Young People in the United States and Europe', Comparative Political Studies 2012.

- The Centre for Global and Transnational Politics is devoted to the multi-disciplinary exploration of global and transnational processes. Led by its Co-Directors Professor Chris Rumford and Professor Sandra Halperin, its central concern is to theorise and conceptualise the substance of, and connections between and among, political processes that operate at all levels or scales: the local, national, international, transnational, and global. Professor Rumford and Professor Halperin edit the Routledge Series in Global and Transnational Politics and host the Global Studies Association and a BISA Working Group of Global and Transnational Politics in the Centre.

- The New Political Communication Unit’s research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Core staff include Prof Andrew Chadwick, Prof Ben O’Loughlin and Dr Cristian Vicarri. Recent publications include Chadwick’s The Hybrid Media System (Oxford University Press, 2013) and Alister Miskimmon, Ben O’Loughlin and Laura Roselle, Strategic Narratives: Communication Power and the New World Order (Routledge, 2013). As well as hosting a large number of PhD students working in new political communication, Chadwick edited the Oxford University Press Series Oxford Studies in Digital Politics and O’Loughlin is co-editor of the journal, Media, War and Conflict.

- The Contemporary Political Theory Research Group was founded in October 2009, as a result of the development of political theory at postgraduate level and growth in academic staff numbers having created the critical mass it required. The group organizes its activities collectively, and its work focuses on issues around contemporary pluralism, liberalism, democratic theory and radical politics. It brings together staff working in contemporary Continental philosophy, normative political theory, and American pragmatism, and its postgraduate members include two students on the College’s most prestigious studentship, the Reid Award. The group also has ties to the College’s Philosophy Team and the interdepartmental Humanities and Arts Research Centre

Course content and structure

Core course units:
- The Politics of Democracy You will be provided with a sound understanding of contemporary thinking about democracy and political participation through the analysis of liberal democracy and its political institutions. The unit will draw upon a variety of contemporary and historical sources with particular reference to the political systems of Britain and the USA.

- Comparative Political Executives This unit explores the political executives of established democratic systems, focusing on institutions – presidents, prime ministers, cabinets and so on – and how they function and interact with other parts of the political system. You will gain knowledge of the ‘nuts and bolts’ of the executives in question, and will also gain useful insights into the difficulties of political leadership, the centrality of political executives and the interdependence of executives with other parts of the political system.

- European Union Politics and Policy This course provides students with an insight into the development and governance of the European Union as a political system. Particular attention is placed on the functions of the EU’s executive, legislative and judicial institutions as well as on a number of key policy areas in which the European Union’s sovereignty has developed in recent years. The course provides students with a solid theoretical background in understanding both the institutional politics and public policy of the EU.

- Political Parties
Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations You will be introduced to quantitative methods commonly used in the study of Politics and International Relations. You will acquire the skills to understand, critically analyse, and carry out a range of quantitative techniques, using statistical software packages such as SPSS.
Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Politics and International Relations You will be provided with an introduction to core theories and qualitative approaches in politics and international relations. You will examine a number of explanatory/theoretical frameworks, their basic assumptions, strengths and weaknesses, and concrete research applications. You will consider the various qualitative techniques available for conducting search research, the range of decisions qualitative researchers face, and the trade-offs researchers must consider when designing qualitative research.

- Dissertation (MSc only) The dissertation gives you the opportunity to study an aspect of Politics in depth. You will be assigned a dissertation supervisor and the length of the piece will be 12-15,000 words.

Elective course units:
- Internet and New Media Politics Drawing predominantly upon specialist academic journal literatures, this unit focuses on a number of important contemporary debates about the role and influence of new technologies on the values, processes and outcomes of: global governance institutions; public bureaucracies; representative institutions including political parties and legislatures; pressure groups and social movements.

- Elections and Voting Behaviour

- Social Media and Politics

- Public Opinion and political participation

- Human Rights: From Theory to Practice

- Advanced Quantitative Methods

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments related to public policy, democracy, politics, international relations and governance

- a sound knowledge of the texts, theories and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes and phenomena associated with particular fields of public policy, politics and international relations

- an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods within the disciplines of politics and international relations

- a solid foundation for progression to either a politics-related career, public policy careers, research or continued academic study.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different politics and international relations-related areas, including roles as officials in local government, personnel officers and higher education lecturers. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This programme is subject to validation. Examine the complexities and processes involved in world affairs. The relationships between states, international institutions, international non-governmental organisations (INGOs) and non-state operators are explored and analysed extensively. Read more
This programme is subject to validation.

Examine the complexities and processes involved in world affairs.

The relationships between states, international institutions, international non-governmental organisations (INGOs) and non-state operators are explored and analysed extensively.

You will take an interdisciplinary approach to your studies, integrating historical examples and theories from areas such as international relations, international political economy, sociology, psychology and history.

Why should I choose this programme?

We believe there are five essential elements to gaining the best possible postgraduate education in international relations and having the most rewarding student experience.

‌•An unmatched international character
‌•An unrivalled central London location
‌•An enriching and unique education
‌•An inspiring academic team
‌•A breadth of subject expertise
‌•All of this, combined with the small-feel atmosphere that characterises the study experience at Regent’s, provides the perfect environment to study your MA International Relations.

An unmatched international character

There is no better place to study international relations than Regent’s. Our tight-knit community of less than 4,000 students is made up of over 140 nationalities. To preserve this unique breadth of diversity, our admissions policy ensures that no single nationality is ever over-represented on campus.

Regent’s is a genuine microcosm of the world, offering a live example of effective international relations and cultural integration, with unequalled opportunities to establish your own networks. Intercultural intelligence is at the heart of our education, irrespective of the subject. You will find that everyone at Regent’s is interested in international relations, not just your peers in the classroom.

An unrivalled central London location

London is a global hub for international relations. It is home to the headquarters of many of the world’s most important international organisations, think-tanks, and charities, as well as university research groups. We offer the best of both worlds: a location in the heart of bustling central London, with all these resources at your disposal, in a beautiful private campus situated in the middle of royal Regent’s Park. There is nowhere in London or the UK that matches our Park Campus.

An enriching and unique education

Formal classroom-based learning is only one part of the overall package at Regent’s. An important part of your education is enrichment. Our MA International Relations includes a programme of guest lectures from high-profile experts who share their practical expertise and speakers from specific industries to allow you to establish important links to the world of work in the areas that interest you most.

Our students participate in the global Model United Nations conference in New York every year and have won many awards internationally. Our MA includes full ADR (Alternative Dispute Resolution) training which is based on our well-known executive mediation courses from which famous alumni such as Archbishop Desmond Tutu have graduated. Our Human Rights module is run in association with the Humanitarian Conference in Geneva, which you will attend and participate in.

Outside of your formal studies, you will have the opportunity to meet your personal Careers Advisor in your first week on campus. Your Advisor can provide ongoing support with your leadership development, employability, professionalism, entrepreneurialism, and career management skills.

An inspiring academic team

As well as helping to shape domestic and foreign policy, our team of inspiring lecturers lead key international debates and are regular commentators in the media, including BBC TV, BBC Radio, CNN, NBC, CBC, CBC Australia, World Today, Haaretz, Al Arabiya, Al Jazeera, The Guardian, The Independent, France 24, LBC TV and LBC Radio. Our academic team has strong connections with Chatham House, Human Rights Watch and the Council of Europe, and other key organisations in the area of international relations.

Our focus is on developing your leadership potential too. Our University mission statement is ‘Developing tomorrow’s global leaders’, and our MA International Relations aims to empower you to become a leader in your community, domestically and internationally.

A breadth of subject expertise

While our flagship MA International Relations retains the small-feel atmosphere that characterises the study experience at Regent's, our expertise covers a broad range of areas, including but not limited to: international relations theory; diplomacy, war and conflict resolution; strategy and complexity; human rights; US foreign policy; the Middle East; Latin America; Africa; the European Union; migration and refugees; human trafficking; gender; international political economy; global health; humanitarian issues; nationalism; advanced research methods; and energy and environment.

Key skills, aims and objectives

You will gain

A deep analytical understanding of key sub-fields and theories of International Relations as a discipline
The ability to identify major operators and institutions of international relations and their functions
Analytical understanding of international issues from a range of perspectives
The ability to evaluate decision-making processes, including moral and ethical implications
A familiarity with foreign cultures and languages

Future opportunities

Graduates of this programme are not limited to a single career path. It will prepare you for a number of careers in areas such as diplomacy, international business, economics, history, law and political science.

How to apply

Applying to study at RUL is a quick and easy process. We accept direct applications, have no formal application deadlines and there is no application fee.

Step 1 Apply

You can apply in the following ways:

•Apply online
•Apply directly to us using the application form available here http://www.regents.ac.uk/media/1188903/Regents-application-form.pdf
Once you have completed the application form, please send us the following supporting documents, by post, email or fax:

•Copies of academic transcripts and certificates of all academic study undertaken after secondary school
•One letter of academic reference
•A copy of your CV/resumé showing your work experience if applicable.
•A 300 to 500-word personal statement in support of your application, outlining your reasons for applying to your chosen programme and how you feel you will benefit from the course of study
•A copy of your passport photograph (ID) page
•One recent passport-sized, colour photograph, jpeg format (this must be emailed to us at )
•If not a native English speaker, proof of your English proficiency

Please note: most candidates will be assessed for admission on the basis of their submitted application materials. However, RUL reserves the right to invite candidates for interview and to reject those who decline to attend.

Step 2 Making an offer

We will assess whether you meet our minimum entry requirements and will make you an offer by both email and post, or notify you that you have been unsuccessful.

If you have completed your education and have met all the entry requirements, you will be sent an unconditional offer. If you still have to finish your exams, or have yet to submit supporting documentation, we will make you a conditional offer.

You can expect to receive a decision on your application within 10 working days of receipt of your completed application and supporting documents.

Step 3 Accepting the offer

If you wish to accept the offer you must:

•Confirm your acceptance via email/post/telephone/in person
•Pay the registration fee (non-refundable)
•Pay the non-EU advance tuition fee deposit, if applicable (non-refundable)
•Please note: although there is no formal deadline to pay your registration fee or non-EU advance deposit, if you need to apply for an international student visa to study in the UK, then we recommend that you pay these as soon as possible.

Please see here for information on how to pay http://www.regents.ac.uk/study/how-to-pay.aspx

Step 4 Full acceptance and visa

On receipt of your acceptance we will issue the final set of documentation and, where needed, the relevant visa support documentation. To find out if you need a student visa please consult the UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) website for current information: http://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/uk-visas-and-immigration (please note it is your own responsibility to arrange the appropriate visa).

For more information on course structure, admissions and teaching and assessment, please follow this link: http://www.regents.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/programmes/ma-international-relations.aspx#tab_course-overview

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This masters course enables graduates to acquire (at an advanced level) the theoretical, historical and practical knowledge and skills relevant to the analysis of contemporary international relations and is particularly oriented toward understanding developments, outlooks, relationships and possibilities in the Asia-Pacific region. Read more

Introduction

This masters course enables graduates to acquire (at an advanced level) the theoretical, historical and practical knowledge and skills relevant to the analysis of contemporary international relations and is particularly oriented toward understanding developments, outlooks, relationships and possibilities in the Asia-Pacific region.

Course description, features and facilities

The course develops students’capacities to collect and interpret information; to analyse arguments, policies and developments; and to construct cogent verbal and written arguments on international relations subjects. It also gives students an appreciation of the ways in which knowledge of international relations is utilised, including in professional employment.

Structure

Key to availability of units:
S1 = Semester 1; S2 = Semester 2; S3 = summer teaching period; N/A = not available in 2015;
NS = non-standard teaching period; OS = offshore teaching period; * = to be advised

All units have a value of six points unless otherwise stated.

Note: Units that are indicated as N/A may be available in 2016 or 2017.

For students in course by coursework only, take all units (72 points):

In Semester 1, 2015, students in course by coursework only can also enrol in POLS5671 Peace and Security in Africa.

S2 POLS5611 Religion, Global Identities and World Politics
S2 POLS5612 World Politics: Muslims in the West
S1 POLS5621 Evolution and Structure of the International Political System
S1 POLS5622 Contemporary Issues in the International Political System
N/A POLS5631 International Relations of the Asia–Pacific: the Role of Major Powers
N/A POLS5632 Major Issues and Regional Organisations in the Asia–Pacific
S1 POLS5641 International Security: Causes of War and Conflict
N/A POLS5642 Contemporary Issues in International Security
N/A POLS5651 International Political Economy: Global Change
N/A POLS5652 International Political Economy: Dynamics of Crises
S2 POLS5661 Theory in International Relations A: Contending Approaches
S2 POLS5662 Theory in International Relations B: Explanation and Understanding

For students in course by coursework and dissertation, take unit(s) to the value of 48 points:

S2 POLS5611 Religion, Global Identities and World Politics
S2 POLS5612 World Politics: Muslims in the West
S1 POLS5621 Evolution and Structure of the International Political System
S1 POLS5622 Contemporary Issues in the International Political System
N/A POLS5631 International Relations of the Asia–Pacific: the Role of Major Powers
N/A POLS5632 Major Issues and Regional Organisations in the Asia–Pacific
S1 POLS5641 International Security: Causes of War and Conflict
N/A POLS5642 Contemporary Issues in International Security
N/A POLS5651 International Political Economy: Global Change
N/A POLS5652 International Political Economy: Dynamics of Crises
S2 POLS5661 Theory in International Relations A: Contending Approaches
S2 POLS5662 Theory in International Relations B: Explanation and Understanding
S1 POLS5671 Peace and Security in Africa
S1, S2 POLS5672 Critical Perspectives in International Development

For students in course by coursework and dissertation, take unit(s) to the value of 24 points:

S1, S2 POLS5700 Master's Dissertation (full-time) (24 points)
S1, S2 POLS5701 Master's Dissertation (part-time) Part 1 (12 points)
S1, S2 POLS5702 Master's Dissertation (part-time) Part 2 (12 points)

Career opportunities

This course is relevant to people interested in working in businesses and government agencies with international linkages, agencies involved in regional or global governance, or international non-government organisations. Expertise in international relations complements qualifications in a range of professional areas and is applicable to a variety of employment options.

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