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Masters Degrees (International Law)

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International law is an increasingly important field of study and practice. Never before has international law taken such a central position in public debates. Read more

Overview

International law is an increasingly important field of study and practice. Never before has international law taken such a central position in public debates. The regulation of financial markets, environmental protection, the management of migrations or the prosecution of war criminals are all areas in which international law plays a major role. International law does not only affect the behaviour of states and intergovernmental institutions. Neither is it simply a discipline of diplomats, academics and philosophers. International law today dominates the activity of transnational corporations, NGOs and individuals, from footballers to victims of human rights violations. As a result, governments, international institutions, NGOs, businesses and law firms are increasingly looking for individuals capable of dealing with complex issues of transnational law.

Why Study International Law at Keele?

The Keele Law School has a long tradition of academic expertise in the field of international law. International law has been taught at Keele by world-renowned experts such as Michael Akehurst and Patrick Thornberry. In recent years, the Keele Law School has invested heavily in the area of international law. Students will be taught be dynamic academic staff with a wide range of expertise and research interests.

The Keele LLM in International Law differs from most existing LLMs in several important respects:

- Flexibility: the programme is based upon a ‘pathway’ structure, where students tailor their degree according to their needs and preferences. Depending on their choice of electives, students can graduate with any one of the following degrees: LLM in International Law; LLM in International Law and Politics; LLM in International Law and Human Rights; LLM in International Law and the environment; LLM in International Law and Business.

- Interdisciplinarity: students can choose from a wide range of electives offered not only within the Law School, but also within the School of Politics, International Relations and Philosophy (SPIRE) and the Keele Management School (KMS).

- Skills: students can study modern languages – including key UN languages – as part of their degree, increasing their range of professional skills. Keele currently offers courses in: Arabic, Mandarin Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Russian and Spanish.

- Professional opportunities: students interested in more hand-on practical experience have the possibility to do work placements as part of their degree, with any one of our partner institutions (UN agencies, international tribunals, non-governmental organisations, law firms, etc. – places are limited).

Keele is located on a beautiful and safe campus – the largest of its kind in the country – and has been ranked in the top 5 universities in the UK for student satisfaction.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/internationallaw/

Course Aims

The aims of the LLM in International Law are to:
- Provide students with a practical and theoretical understanding of the role, nature and functioning of international law.

- Encourage students to develop a critical awareness of the social, historical and political contexts in which international law operates.

- Provide a degree of specialisation in areas of international law of professional or intellectual interest to students.

- Develop students’ research skills in the context of supervised research on an agreed topic in public international law and encourage the production of original and creative scholarship.

- Encourage students to develop critical, analytical and problem-solving skills which can be applied to a wide range of legal and non-legal contexts.

- Provide a strong educational foundation that enhances a student’s prospects of professional, commercial or academic employment.

Teaching & Assessment

The LLM in International Law is taught by a team of talented academics and practitioners. Members of our staff hold degrees from the most prestigious Universities in Europe and North America (Sorbonne, Oxford, Cornell etc.). They have published widely on questions of United Nations law, international trade law, international investment law, dispute settlement, international criminal law, human rights law, international environmental law, or international legal theory. They have acted as legal advisers to governments and international organisations, have worked as human rights field officers, and have been consulted by the House of Lords on burning issues such as human trafficking.

The programme is taught principally through semester-long modules. During each taught module, students take part in lectures, tutor-led seminars and discussions, small group exercises, and case studies. Each module is accompanied by extensive independent study and throughout the course students are encouraged and required to undertake independent reading.

The programme is assessed principally, though not exclusively, through written work. Written work may be in the form of research essays, final examinations, blog discussions or reflective portfolios. Through the essays, students demonstrate their understanding of a particular area of international law (or one of the other taught subjects, i.e. human rights/environment/politics/business) as well as their ability for original thinking and high-level written communication skills.

The final form of assessment is the dissertation, which is an extended (15,000 – 20,000 words) and in-depth piece of writing that brings together all of the skills that students have learned throughout the programme. As part of the dissertation, students are also required to prepare a dissertation proposal and give an oral presentation (as part of the graduate research workshop).

Additional Costs

Modules across the programme will include recommended core and supplemental texts. Costs will vary depending on the particular text (Law textbooks vary between £20-40).

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Careers Development

The LLM in International Law will enable entry into a range of occupations where specialist expertise knowledge is needed. It provides an ideal basis for those seeking employment as international law practitioners in relevant national and international organisations (government agencies, UN bodies, NGOs), multinational corporations, or transnational law firms. Equally, the programme will equip students for further study in the form of a postgraduate research programme, such as a PhD, by providing appropriate research training and an introduction to key thinkers and scholarship.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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The Specialist LLM course in Public International Law provides a critical understanding of the principles within which public international law operates, raising issues of treaty interpretation and enforcement across a range of sub-disciplines. Read more
The Specialist LLM course in Public International Law provides a critical understanding of the principles within which public international law operates, raising issues of treaty interpretation and enforcement across a range of sub-disciplines.

Who is it for?

This course will be of interest to individuals who seek a deeper understanding of the many dimensions of public international law from both a theoretical and practical perspective. As this course has an international dimension it will appeal to students from around the world and at all stages of their legal education and professional experience.

Objectives

The Specialist LLM in Public International Law concentrates on the development of a thorough and critical understanding of Public International Law, the law governing the interaction of states. The last decade or so has seen tremendous challenges for International Law including matters relating to armed conflict, commercial relations and human rights. This course gives you the opportunity to trace and evaluate some of these practical and theoretical developments guided by leading academics and expert practitioners.

City's LLM in Public International Law takes a contemporary approach to the study of international law. You may choose from an extensive list of electives including the law of treaties, human rights, economic law, law of the sea and others.
All electives adopt a curriculum that is cutting edge in its theoretical approach and a skill-based methodology to enable you to develop your knowledge and skills in the subject in the best manner possible.

Placements

Each year a small number of internships become available and you will be provided with information about such opportunities and how to apply during the year of your study.

Academic facilities

As a City Law School student you will benefit from everything the institution has to offer including the Learning Success department and Lawbore, an online resource designed to help you find the information you need for the course modules. All course modules have online depositories through Moodle.

As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

You will benefit from City, University of London’s extensive library of hard copy and electronic resources, including its comprehensive database of domestic and international caselaw, legislation, treaties and legal periodicals. There are two law-specific libraries – one at the Gray’s Inn campus and one at our Northampton square campus - with individual study spaces and dedicated rooms for group work.

Additionally, we are a short walk away from the British Library and the Law Library of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies.

Teaching and learning

This course is taught by leading academics as well as visiting practitioners including barristers and solicitors who work in private practice and in legal departments of major companies.

Assessment

All modules are structured as 10-weekly two-hour seminars which comprise both lectures as well as interactive tutorials. All modules are supported by our online learning platform - Moodle. Assessment is by way of coursework which comprises 100% of the final mark in each module. Each module carries the same weight in terms of the overall qualification.

You will be allocated a dedicated supervisor for your dissertation who will help you develop a specific topic and provide support in terms of resources, content and structure.

Modules

As with all LLM specialisms at City, University of London, you may take either five modules and a shorter dissertation (10,000 words) or four modules and a longer dissertation (20,000 words). All modules are of the same duration and are taught per term (September – December or January – April) rather than the whole academic year. If you take four modules you will take two per term in each term and if you take five modules you will have three in one term and two in the other. Dissertations are written during the summer term when there are no classes.

In order to obtain this specialism, you must choose at least three modules from within this specialism and write their dissertation on a subject within the specialism.
-10,000 word Supervised Dissertation (30 credits)
OR
-20,000 word Supervised Dissertation (60 credits)

Specialism modules - choose from the following 30 credit modules:
-Air and Space Law
-Comparative Constitutional Law
-International Law of the Sea
-Public International Law
-Law of Treaties
-International Human Rights in Law and Practice
-International Investment Law
-Minorities and Indigenous Peoples in International Law
-International Dispute Settlement
-International Responsibility of States and International Organisations
-Law of International Organisations
-International Law and the Global Economy
-International Criminal Law: the Practitioner Perspective
-International Criminal Law: Crimes and Institutions
-Law and War
-World Trade Law

For your remaining modules you can choose from more than 50 modules covering a diverse range of subjects.

Career prospects

As a graduate of this specialist LLM in Public International Law you will be well placed to pursue careers in this area of law in private practice, in house in a legal practice, policy and government, non-governmental organisations, and a wide range of non-legal careers in the field of publc international law.

The City Law School has a vibrant Pro Bono programme including our award-winning commercial law clinic for tech start-ups Start-Ed. Students who complete the LLM may wish to continue their academic studies by enrolling in a PhD offered by The City Law School. Master and research students are encouraged to play an active role in our activities, which include a series of seminars organised by the International Law and Affairs Group at the City Law School.

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The University of Bristol LLM offers a variety of possibilities to study law at an advanced level and the opportunity to specialise in particular areas. Read more
The University of Bristol LLM offers a variety of possibilities to study law at an advanced level and the opportunity to specialise in particular areas. There are a number of specialist programmes enabling you to study a set of related units that, together, provide a more in-depth knowledge and understanding of those themes. Alternatively, you can opt for a broader and more general set of unit choices. In all cases, you are encouraged to explore at a deeper level your chosen areas of law and to see how those legal fields operate in different contexts, considering the relevant issues theoretically and practically and from a range of perspectives.

We offer an exciting and stimulating set of degree programmes, each of which prepares you for many different possible careers. If you have an interest in studying law at a level beyond your undergraduate degree and are seeking to enhance your analytical, research and legal writing skills, you will find Bristol’s LLM to be a challenging and rewarding experience.

We have a large and vibrant international community and University of Bristol LLM students benefit from small class sizes taught by world-leading experts.

The International Law LLM programme offers a range of units, suitable both for those with some previous knowledge and for those seeking an introduction to specific international law issues. The units are mainly in the field of public international law, although private international law issues can be explored through International Commercial Litigation, Arbitration or many of the other commercial law units.

Programme structure

Part one - You may study four units from the following list, or three units from the list and a further unit chosen from any of the other LLM programmes, or two units from the list and two from the LLM in European Legal Studies.
-General Principles of International Law
-International Commercial Arbitration
-International Commercial Litigation
-International Criminal Law
-International Law and the Use of Force
-International Law and Human Rights
-International Law of Labour and Welfare Rights
-International Law of the Sea
-International Law of Trade and Aid
-International Law and Use of Force
-Legal Perspectives on Sustainability
-Maritime Security
-Migration Law and Policy – International, European and Human Rights Dimensions
-World Trade Law

Assessment is by examination and/or essay. Please view our programme catalogue for further information on the course structure and units available. Please note that unit choices are subject to change depending on staff availability.

Part two - In the spring term, you will choose a dissertation topic within the field of international law for approval by the Law School. After passing part one, you start work on your dissertation for submission by September. You must pass both parts to obtain an LLM and may not proceed to part two until you have passed part one.

Careers

This programme provides students with a strong foundation for a broad range of careers that involve an international law perspective, such as international arbitration. Graduates go on to act as solicitors and barristers, as well as lawyers and researchers in international and European Organisations such as the United Nations or the European Commission. A number work for NGOs and other agencies. Some graduates go on to further study or to research in other universities.

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Making law work in our global society is a tough task that needs well-trained and highly dedicated lawyers. is that you?. Imagine a peaceful, prosperous and environmentally sustainable world society respecting human dignity and social justice. Read more
Making law work in our global society is a tough task that needs well-trained and highly dedicated lawyers ... is that you?

Imagine a peaceful, prosperous and environmentally sustainable world society respecting human dignity and social justice. Would this be possible without international law? Do not dream, make it work! Allow yourself to become a good international lawyer by ge tting to know the achievements and shortcomings or international law today. Develop ideas about how to improve international law and a cquire the skills to advise your government, an international organization, a company, individuals, or groups.

The programme is designed to provide an optimal mix to ensure the realization of our goals in the field of knowledge dissemination and the training of academic, legal and practical skills. Within these parameters the programme offers some flexibility in the range of courses that can be chosen. Students can opt for a peace & security, an economic/environmental or a dispute settlement profile. The master's thesis allows you to spend considerable time to study a topic of your choice under the supervision of an experienced staff member.

Why in Groningen?

The basic approach of the programme is that students learn most from being actively engaged in working on international law topics. Lectures are useful form of teaching, but much of the work will be done through practical investigation of relevant issues in international law and critical interaction between lecturers and students and among students. The programme is suitable for recent law graduates as well as for young professionals working in private practice or in the public sector.

Job perspectives

There are opportunities in legal departments of international organizations or foreign ministries, but also in many national governmental institutions and ministries, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations, internationally operating enterprises and academic institutions, be it in the field of trade & investment, environment, energy, or human rights. In larger law firms and legal companies expertise in public international law is relevant for international cases and arbitrations.

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With globalisation international law is becoming increasingly important and this course prepares you for your future career in the international arena. Read more
With globalisation international law is becoming increasingly important and this course prepares you for your future career in the international arena. Our LLM is one of the oldest and most popular courses in international law in London. It attracts students from every nationality and background, not only those who have previously studied law, but also those with a degree in political science, international relations, economics or other relevant discipline. This creates a uniquely vibrant and stimulating learning environment in which to study international Law.

The LLM International Law is linked to our Research Group, International Law at Westminster, which regularly organises public events on topical issues: we recently organised panels and conferences on nuclear proliferation, torture, and citizenship deprivation. We encourage all our students to get involved in the activities of the center so that they can build contacts with leading professionals. Our location, just off Regent Street also puts you within easy reach of all the main legal and political insitutions and organisations giving you fantastic networking opportunities.

Every year, the Oxford University Press Prize is awarded to the best LLM International Law student.

Course content

The course will enhance your understanding of the key principles of public international law, the main developments within the public international law framework and the process of globalisation and its significance for international law.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules
-DISSERTATION
-PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW

Option modules*
-INTERNATIONAL AND EUROPEAN REFUGEE LAW
-INTERNATIONAL ENERGY AND CLIMATE CHANGE LAW
-INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS LAW
-INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN LAW
-INTERNATIONAL LAW AND DEVELOPMENT
-INTERNATIONAL LAW OF THE SEA
-PEACEFUL SETTLEMENT OF INTERNATIONAL DISPUTES
-RESEARCH THEORY AND PRACTICE
-UNITED NATIONS LAW
-INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL LAW

Associated careers

On completion of the course, you will be able to specialise in a wide range of careers or academia. Graduates have worked for organisations such as Amnesty International, the United Nations, or in legal departments within international organisations and governments. There are also opportunities for further research or teaching.

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The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas. Read more
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas.

This specialisation allows international law and international relations to inform each other. It covers the general methods, scope and theories of international law, international humanitarian law and international relations. It provides a detailed understanding of the role, potential and limitations of public international law in international affairs. Its interdisciplinary approach is particularly suited to those involved with, or hoping to work for, international organisations, non-governmental organisations, foreign affairs departments and international law firms.

Students studying International Law with International Relations are encouraged to participate in the activities of the Centre for Critical International Law (CeCIL) at Kent. These include workshops, trips to international courts and tribunals, and guest lecture series.

Students taking this specialisation can choose to spend one term at our Canterbury campus and one at our Brussels centre (returning to their primary location to complete the dissertation) under our split-site option for this programme. The split site option is charged at a different rate. Please see under Fees below for more information.

Studying for a Master's in Law (LLM) at Kent means having the certainty of gaining an LLM in a specialist area of Law. The Kent LLM gives you the freedom to leave your choice of specialism open until after you arrive, your specialism being determined by the modules you choose.

Think Kent: International Law with International Relations

There is no universally agreed precise legal, technical or political definition of either the boundaries separating airspace from outer space or of the term ‘outer space’ itself. Yet two separate legal regimes exist for the regulation of these two environments. In this lecture, Dr Gbenga Oduntan, Senior Lecturer in International Commercial Law at the University of Kent, critiques the leading theories that have been postulated to solve this problem, and proposes an original solution regarding the spatial demarcation boundary point issue in air and space law.

About Kent Law School

Kent Law School (KLS) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

In addition to learning the detail of the law, students at Kent are taught to think about the law with regard to its history, development and relationship with wider society. This approach allows students to fully understand the law. Our critical approach not only makes the study of law more interesting, it helps to develop crucial skills and abilities required for a career in legal practice.

Our programmes are open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field. You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff.

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by Kent Law School was ranked 8th in the UK for research intensity. We were also ranked 7th for research power and in the top 20 for research output, research quality and research impact.

An impressive 99% of our research was judged to be of international quality and the School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Course structure

You can tailor your studies to your particular needs and interests to obtain an LLM or Diploma in a single specialisation, in two specialisations jointly, or by choosing a broad range of modules in different areas of law to obtain a general LLM or Diploma in Law.

Your choice of specialisation will be shaped by the modules you take and your dissertation topic. The double specialisation International Law with International Relations is slightly different to the other LLM Specialisations offered at the Kent Law School. International Relations is a ‘minor’ stream which is only available when combined with the International Law ‘major’ stream. For the award of a degree titled ‘Master of Laws in International Law with International Relations’ you should study at least three modules from the International Law stream together with your dissertation. You must then choose two modules from the International Relations ‘minor’ stream. The remaining module can be chosen from any of the other law modules offered on the LLM.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of this specialisation stream. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation and student demand. Most specialisation streams will require you to study a combination of subject specialisation modules and modules from other specialisation streams so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

LW814 Public International Law

LW844 Legal Aspects of Contemporary International Problems

LW906 International Environmental Law – Legal Foundations

LW843 International Human Rights Law

LW846 International Criminal Law

LW884 International Environmental Law – Substantive Legal Aspects

LW886 Transnational Criminal Law

LW922 Labour Rights in a Global Economy

LW925 Cultural Heritage Law

Assessment

The postgraduate programmes offered within the Law School are usually taught in seminar format. Students on the Diploma and LLM programmes study three modules in each of the autumn and spring terms. The modules normally are assessed by a 4-5,000-word essay. Students undertaking an LLM degree must write a dissertation of 15-20,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to provide:

1. LLM: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) advanced research, writing and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.
PGDip: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) written and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.

2. LLM: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of particular areas of law.
PGDip: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of the subjects studied.

3. LLM & PGDip: A degree of specialisation in areas of law and policy chosen from the LLM option streams available and an opportunity for students to engage with academic work at the frontiers of scholarship.

4. LLM & PGDip: A critical awareness of the operation of law and policy, particularly in contexts that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution.

5. LLM: The skills to undertake supervised research on an agreed topic in their specialisation and to encourage the production of original, evaluative analysis that meets high standards of scholarship.

6. LLM & PGDip: Critical, analytical and problem-solving skills that can be applied to a wide range of contexts.

7. LLM & PGDip: The skills of academic legal research and writing.

8. LLM: A sophisticated grounding in research methods.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Information about the internship programme for LLM students can be found on the Kent Law School Employability blog - http://blogs.kent.ac.uk/klsemployability/postgraduates/llm-internships/

Learn more about Kent

Visit us - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/visit/openday/pgevents.html

International Students - https://www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent/

Why study at Kent? - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

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The Joint LLM Comparative and European Private International Law programme aims to provide advanced instruction in key aspects of contemporary private international law, from comparative and European prospective, that are of particular contemporary relevance and which will benefit and interest students coming from a wide range of legal traditions. Read more
The Joint LLM Comparative and European Private International Law programme aims to provide advanced instruction in key aspects of contemporary private international law, from comparative and European prospective, that are of particular contemporary relevance and which will benefit and interest students coming from a wide range of legal traditions.

Why study at Dundee?

Building on the success of the Joint LLM in International Commercial Law, Dundee Law School has established a partnership with the University of Toulouse to run a joint LLM programme in Comparative and European Private International Law.

This is a topic of increasing practical importance in the era of globalisation - where to litigate, what law should be applied, and when can foreign judgments be recognised. This unique programme will explore the contrasting approaches of the common law and civil law worlds.

In the Spring semester (January-March) students will undertake private international law modules at Dundee, and then over the summer a dissertation.

In September, students will go to Toulouse to undertake a range of private international law modules, all taught through English.

What's great about Comparative & European Law at Dundee?

In the Times Good University Guide 2012 Dundee Law School was placed 7th in the United Kingdom law school rankings, and we were ranked 1st in Scotland in the 2011 National Student Survey (NSS).

In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise Dundee Law School was one of only two law schools in the United Kingdom to achieve a 100% international standard classification, with half of our submissions being graded internationally excellent or world leading. Our commitment on is to provide high quality instruction, with a focus on matters of practical relevance, to prepare students for a successful legal career, whether at home or abroad.

Postgraduate culture

Dundee Law School prides itself as being a friendly Law School where all members of staff are accessible and students are treated as individuals and valued members of our legal community.

We offer all new students an induction programme at the start of each semester, to ensure that all students have the necessary understanding of the UK and European legal systems as well as core principles of public and private law.

We seek to integrate all LLM students into the life of the Law School, and invite you to all guest lectures and seminars. We also have an annual reading party to a beautiful country house location, where you are joined by senior staff and can work on academic skills and dissertation preparation.

Who should study this course?

This course is designed for graduates in Law. However, the LLM can be taken both by students who have already studied private international law at undergraduate level as well as by those who are new to the subject, for the latter will be provided with additional instruction.

How you will be taught

Students are taught through a mix of lectures, seminar discussions and tutorials.

What you will study

Modules

At Toulouse, students will take a number of compulsory modules on core and specialist aspects of private international law.

Fundamental Private International Law
Private International Law Applications
Contract Law in European Context
International Organisations as Law Makers
European Criminal Law.
European contract and business law as well as international law are also covered.

In addition, students are required to attend intensive courses offered by invited foreign professors. At Dundee, students have to choose 2 private international law modules.

How you will be assessed

Substantive modules: continuous assessment plus end of semester examinations in December and March/April. Compulsory dissertation: 12-15,000 words.

Careers

Dundee graduates have reached the highest levels of success in the profession as senior partners, Queen's Counsel, judges and front bench politicians.

We have close links with employers and we offer programmes to support and develop the employability of our students. Our good reputation throughout the profession and close links to employers help Dundee graduates find employment.

The Law School runs an annual Law Fair which attracts law firms and employers from around the UK and further afield. Law firms also regularly visit the law school on an individual basis for recruitment purposes. While many students study law in order to qualify to practise, the skills acquired in a law degree are also attractive to many prospective employers in professions such as:

The Police
Banking
Journalism
Management
Civil service

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The LLM International Law analyses the how international law operates within the key areas of international human rights and international business law. Read more
The LLM International Law analyses the how international law operates within the key areas of international human rights and international business law.

The end of the Second World War has witnessed not only the creation of numerous international organisations, but also an increased level of global interconnection and the creation of common standards in many areas. International Law has become an important area of study because of the role it plays in regulating the relationships between states and how different states shapes their laws and legal systems.

Therefore the knowledge and understanding of the legal aspects of international law and how international law operates in the areas of international business and international human rights law is an important attribute that is highly regarded by prospective employers such as academic institutions, non-governmental organisations and charities, policy and research organisations, and international organisations.

What's covered in the course?

Our LLM International Law brings together different areas of international law and enables to critically examine how international operates within the fields of human rights and business law. The programme examines international law with the underlying philosophy of providing a structured programme characterised by sound theory and application to produce students capable of engaging with international institutions through their understanding of how law operates at the international level.

Additionally, our LLM provides an opportunity to acquire, or build upon existing skills gained from your undergraduate course - enhancing employment opportunities in the legal profession and providing a basis for progression to doctoral studies.

You will analyse and critically evaluate principle features of international law, including fundamental concepts, values, principles and rules, and the main institutions and procedures. You’ll also learn to evaluate complex legal issues, communicate complex and abstract ideas, and employ strategic transferable skills.

Why Choose Us?

-You will learn from a dedicated and passionate teaching team, who have experience with the international human rights institutions and who have track record of research in the field of international business Law.
-This course is a conversion LLM – you don’t need a degree in Law to be eligible to study it. You will be given support through an Introduction to Law programme at the start of your studies.
-The course covers transnational jurisdictions, so it is international in scope.
-The course has flexible delivery methods to suit your location and when you are able to study. You can enroll as either an on-campus student, flexible/blended learning student or as a distance learning student.
-You can commence studies either in September or in January.
-Studying of the LLM International Law will provide you with an opportunity to engage with the work of the Law School’s Centre for Human Rights.
-You will have an opportunity to enhance your employability skills by completing a placement.
-Birmingham City University has just launched the UK's first Centre for Brexit Studies, researching all aspects of the UK's vote to leave the EU, including the impact it has on domestic law and legislation.
-You will be able to benefit from the newly-introduced postgraduate loans. For more information, visit UCAS.

Course Structure

Our LLM is taught by an outstanding team of professionals. You must complete 6 six taught modules and either a dissertation, project or placement.

The programme may be studied on-campus, or on a flexible/blended learning basis or by distance learning, allowing you to access it irrespective of your location. All three modes offer a coherent, staged and progressive learning structure in which you will benefit from teaching which is informed by the research expertise of our academic team. Our approach is experiential and practice-led and will give you opportunities to apply your learning and to develop skills to enhance your employability and career.

This programme will support you in becoming an independent learner during the teaching, learning and assessment process. During induction we will support you in developing key study skills. Throughout the programme you will have the chance to complete activities which will enable you to practice legal skills including legal research, problem-solving, advocacy and drafting in order to develop and practice.

These activities also enable you to practice transferable skills including structuring and presenting arguments, working independently or in teams to complete tasks, oral and written communication, and time management. These skills will be valuable whatever your final choice of future career.

During the September and January terms you will study three 20-credit modules, thereafter you will study one 60-credit module: the LLM dissertation/placement/project module. The 20-credit Advanced Legal Research Methods module (studied in the January term) is delivered online via the Virtual Learning Environment, providing maximum flexibility.

For on-campus students there is an opportunity to study abroad and this offers a unique and exciting opportunity for you to experience the teaching environment from a different perspective, in another country, helping you to become a true globalized citizen. For all students further opportunities are also available to undertake a placement and obtain practical experience of how International Law operates.

Employment Opportunities

You will have the opportunity to undertake a placement as an alternative to a dissertation. In addition we have active, student-led Legal, Mooting and Debate Societies.

Our Student Mooting Society is one of the most successful in England, with our students reaching five finals in the past six years, regularly beating teams from some of the country’s most prestigious universities.

We also have a staff and student led Pro-Bono Unit that provides legal advice to the public.

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The University of Bristol LLM in International Law and International Relations is an exciting programme for students looking to pursue a career in international non-governmental organisations, government departments and international firms, or as international consultants. Read more
The University of Bristol LLM in International Law and International Relations is an exciting programme for students looking to pursue a career in international non-governmental organisations, government departments and international firms, or as international consultants.

It is a specialist programme that enables you to combine units provided by both the Law School and the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies to create an exceptional programme of study. The LLM in International Law and International Relations encourages an integrated theoretical and interdisciplinary approach to issues of international regulation and governance, so you can build a deep understanding of how one discipline informs the other. The programme covers the general methods, scope and theories of international law and international relations and allows for further specialisation within these broad fields.

We have a large and vibrant international community and University of Bristol LLM students benefit from small class sizes taught by world-leading experts.

Programme structure

Taught component
Students will choose two 30-credit Law School units from the following list:
-General Principles of International Law (compulsory for students with no prior international law training)
-Migration Law and Policy – International, European and Human Rights Dimensions
-International Dispute Settlement
-International Commercial Arbitration
-International Commercial Litigation
-International Law VI: International Law and Human Rights
-International Law of the Sea
-International Law and the Use of Force
-World Trade Law

Students will also study three 20-credit units in the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies. These are:
-Theories of International Relations (mandatory)
-Either International Security
OR
-International Political Economy
-An open choice from a range of optional units from teaching block two, such as Foreign Policy Analysis; Conflict, Security and Development; or Global Civil Society

Please note that unit choices are subject to change depending on staff availability.

Dissertation component
Students will also complete a 10,000-15,000 word, 60-credit dissertation, supervised either in the Law School or in the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies. In consultation with the programme director and based on their proposed area of specialisation, students have the choice to take the dissertation in either school, with a supervisory decision being made in December.

Careers

This programme provides a strong foundation for a broad range of careers that involve an international law and international relations perspective, such as international arbitration. Graduates may act as lawyers (if their first degree is in law), as researchers in international and European organisations (eg the United Nations, European Commission), or in the diplomatic service. Graduates may also work for NGOs and other agencies, and some go on to further study or research at the University of Bristol or elsewhere.

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Part of our comprehensive range of LLM programmes, the LLM in International Law offers you an opportunity to study the fundamentals of international law at an advanced level, linking theory to practice. Read more
Part of our comprehensive range of LLM programmes, the LLM in International Law offers you an opportunity to study the fundamentals of international law at an advanced level, linking theory to practice.

Pursuing an LLM allows you to focus in on a particular area of law by delving deep into the subject and undertaking independent research and learning. The modules available cover a diverse range of legal topics, making it possible to tailor the course towards the specific areas of law you wish to explore further.

Course detail

You will examine the key legal principles and rules underpinning the international legal system, and develop a contextual and critical understanding of key issues in contemporary international law. The depth and breadth of study will equip you well for working either in international law or international organisations.

Structure

The LLM in International Law consists of nine modules in total, including a dissertation of up to 15,000 words.

To gain the Postgraduate Certificate, you will study three compulsory modules (Research Methods, International Law and Institutions) and two optional modules.

To gain the Postgraduate Diploma, you will complete the necessary modules to gain the Certificate (as above) and another four optional modules.

To achieve the LLM, you will complete the necessary modules to gain the Diploma (as above) and also write a dissertation.

Modules

Compulsory modules:
• Research Methods
• International Law and Institutions

You will choose two modules from the following options:*
• Globalisation and the Law
• International Environmental Law
• International Human Rights Law

If you are continuing onto the Diploma or LLM, you will choose another four modules from the following options:*
• Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility
• Natural Resources Law
• International Humanitarian Law
• International Employment Law
• World Trade Organisation Law

Or one option*, not listed above, offered on any of the other LLM courses.

Finally, if you are undertaking the full LLM, you will need to write a 15,000 word dissertation.

Format

The flexible nature of the course allows you to study with us full or part time. The course involves both extensive independent research and discussion in the context of workshops, designed to encourage the development of your critical, analytical and reflective skills. You will be expected to prepare for each workshop and to participate actively in discussion with your tutors and peers.

Assessment

Taught modules on the LLM International Law course are assessed through a combination of written coursework assignments and oral presentations. The culmination of the course is a dissertation of up to 15,000 words, which constitutes an original contribution to the corpus of legal knowledge within an area of international law.

Careers / Further study

Studying for an LLM provides an ideal opportunity to develop specialist skills that will be favoured by employers, both in the legal world and beyond. It opens up a range of career opportunities and gives our students the edge over other graduates.

The in-depth knowledge you will acquire in a particular area of law will give you a thorough grounding in the subject area and raise your employability prospects, enabling you to become a specialist within your organisation. It is for this reason that many of our LLM graduates choose to go on to complete a PhD or go into teaching and research.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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International law regulates almost every aspect of state law and practice, whether in business, human rights or the environment, and also regulates the relationship between different states and governments. Read more
International law regulates almost every aspect of state law and practice, whether in business, human rights or the environment, and also regulates the relationship between different states and governments.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

The LLM International Law programme offers a varied and stimulating range of mandatory and optional modules, enabling students to shape their course to their best advantage, with the option to include Public International Law, Human Rights, International Environmental Law and International Business Law. International Law continues to be of global relevance and importance to business practices, state agencies and to legal advisers. This course offers you the opportunity to help enhance your future career prospects and professional development by providing specialist knowledge of this important, ever expanding, area of legal knowledge.

If you choose this course you could benefit from:
-An in-depth understanding and analysis of international law through the study of a range of contemporary modules in areas such as public international law, corporate governance, environmental law and international human rights law
-Extensive guidance on research, study and writing skills together with research design and methods, in preparation for writing assessments and researching and submitting your dissertation
-The study of a range of contemporary international law modules to allow specialism in international diplomatic relations, human rights law, corporate governance and environmental law
-The study of legal subjects and research and academic skills alongside home and EU students and a wide range of international students, thus gaining a rewarding and varied academic and personal experience

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

Courses are regularly reviewed and updated to reflect new developments and the requirements of the profession, together with the needs of industry and new legislative and other changes. The mandatory modules on the programme provide basic research skills and methodology and tuition in the core substantive legal areas:
-Research Skills
-Research Design
-Dissertation
-International Human Rights
-International Law in the Contemporary World Arena
-International Corporate Governance

The dissertation will be studied in semester 3 and most mandatory modules are completed in semester 1, although it is possible to study some in semester 2.

The optional modules, from which you choose two, supplement the mandatory subject areas and allow further specialism:
-International Environmental Law
-International Corporate Crime
-International Criminal Law
-Gender and International Human Rights
-Law of Diplomatic Relations

Optional modules are generally studied in semester 2, although it is possible to study some in semester 1.

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

LLM International Law can provide successful graduates with career opportunities in various companies, government and state agencies and non-governmental organisations, either as a legal adviser or in a non-legal capacity.

Some students may specialise in Diplomatic Relations or Human Rights Law as lawyers both at home and abroad, dealing with legal issues affecting the contemporary international community, for example, global security, international human rights and state responsibility and matters relating to international environmental law and responsibility. Others have gone on to work for international organisations in a non-legal capacity in areas such as international human rights and the environment, and for local and national government agencies. This course can also be an excellent preparation for further degrees and research and academic careers in universities and other academic and research institutions.

GLOBAL LEADERS PROGRAMME

To prepare students for the challenges of the global employment market and to strengthen and develop their broader personal and professional skills Coventry University has developed a unique Global Leaders Programme.

The objectives of the programme, in which postgraduate and eligible undergraduate students can participate, is to provide practical career workshops and enable participants to experience different business cultures.

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This programme is designed to equip students with a general yet comprehensive education in a range of areas within International Law. Read more
This programme is designed to equip students with a general yet comprehensive education in a range of areas within International Law. The course will enable students to master the basic principles of the discipline and explore advanced level theories, as well as understand the many traditional and contemporary challenges in International Law. They will have a wide range of International Law options to choose from, and may therefore acquire broad as opposed to specialised knowledge.

Through carefully designed course work and varied teaching approaches, students will acquire the intellectual open-ness, technical expertise and critical thinking abilities that are necessary for effectiveness in a globalising world. The programme will equip students to respond effectively to the wide range of intellectual and professional challenges facing contemporary International Lawyers. The LLM in International Law will equip them to deal with both case work and policy making.

Employment Opportunities
Employment opportunities for graduates of the programme will include work with international law firms, international organisations such as the United Nations, World Bank, World Trade Organisation and European Union, international courts and tribunals, ‘think tanks’ and research centres, non-governmental organisations and government (eg. Ministries of Justice and Foreign Affairs). Having taken one of our programmes, there will, of course, also be possibilities for academically inclined students to pursue careers in teaching and research.

Compulsory Modules:

Legal Research Methods
Public International Law
Dissertation on any topic within International Law
Optional Modules (choose 4):

International Criminal Law
International Human Rights Law
Children’s Rights in Domestic and International Law
European Human Rights Law
EU Internal Markets Law
Competition Law
Global Trade Law
Comparative Corporate Governance
International Banking Law
International Commercial Arbitration
Intellectual Property Law
International Law of Armed Conflict
Dealing with the Legacies of the Past
Structure
January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Teaching will mostly be seminar-based which will promote group and individual interaction, which also ensures that every individual student is encouraged to contribute to discussions. Seminar-based teaching enables lecturers and students to discuss issues and investigate topics in greater depth, and develops critical thinking and solution-based learning skills in students; whilst also allowing the course teachers to monitor closely each individual’s progress. Emphasis will be placed on the use of virtual learning through the mechanism of the Blackboard computer-assisted learning system and databases such as Westlaw and LexisNexis. Throughout all modules, comparative elements with other legal systems will be emphasised.

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This programme is designed to help students become experts in the areas of International Law that directly concern the human person - International Criminal Law & International Human Rights Law - whilst mastering the discipline of International Law of which they are part. Read more
This programme is designed to help students become experts in the areas of International Law that directly concern the human person - International Criminal Law & International Human Rights Law - whilst mastering the discipline of International Law of which they are part. In addition to the foundational courses in Legal Research Methods and Public International Law, students will be required to study International Criminal Law, International Human Rights Law and write a dissertation on a topic within the International Criminal Law or International Human Rights Law. The remaining courses can be chosen from a range of relevant options.

Through carefully designed course work and varied teaching approaches, students will acquire the intellectual open-ness, technical expertise and critical thinking abilities that are necessary for effectiveness in a globalising world. The programme will equip students to respond effectively to the wide range of intellectual and professional challenges facing those working on legal issues concerning the human person in International Law. The LLM in International Law (specialising in International Criminal Law & International Human Rights Law) will equip them to deal with both case work and policy making.

Employment Opportunities
Employment opportunities for graduates of the programme will include work with international law firms, international organisations such as the United Nations, World Bank, World Trade Organisation and European Union, international courts and tribunals, ‘think tanks’ and research centres, non-governmental organisations and government (eg. Ministries of Justice and Foreign Affairs). Having taken one of our programmes, there will, of course, also be possibilities for academically inclined students to pursue careers in teaching and research.

Compulsory Modules:

Legal Research Methods
Public International Law
International Criminal Law
International Human Rights Law
Dissertation on a topic within International Criminal Law or International Human Rights Law
Optional Modules (choose 2):

European Human Rights Law
Children’s Rights in Domestic and International Law
International Law of Armed Conflict
Dealing with the Legacies of the Past
Structure
January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Teaching will mostly be seminar-based which will promote group and individual interaction, which also ensures that every individual student is encouraged to contribute to discussions. Seminar-based teaching enables lecturers and students to discuss issues and investigate topics in greater depth, and develops critical thinking and solution-based learning skills in students; whilst also allowing the course teachers to monitor closely each individual’s progress. Emphasis will be placed on the use of virtual learning through the mechanism of the Blackboard computer-assisted learning system and databases such as Westlaw and LexisNexis. Throughout all modules, comparative elements with other legal systems will be emphasised.

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Security and the maintenance and promotion of security are key issues in international law and international relations. Read more

Why study International Law & Security at Dundee?

Security and the maintenance and promotion of security are key issues in international law and international relations. There are many career opportunities in these areas ranging from employment with an intergovernmental organisation such as the United Nations, to employment in an international court or tribunal, to advising government and securing a role in the military. If you intend to pursue such a career, then you will need a good understanding of why and how the international community and individual states are to respond to threats to international security. For this, you will need to understand the context in which decisions are made. international law and international relations provide that context.

Our MLitt in International Law & Security provides an overview of concepts and themes relating to the study of international security in the contemporary world, from a legal as well as an international relations point of view. It introduces both traditional and 'new' approaches to defining and conceptualising security and considers the impact of International Relations theories upon the subject. It also examines key issues such as war, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, the privatisation of warfare, energy security and environmental degradation.

Our course will equip you with the necessary analytical tools to understand and evaluate all aspects of security in the contemporary world. The issues outlined above lie at the heart of our course, which provides an opportunity to gain a deep understanding of the interactions of law and international relations and the way they combine to shape the responses of states to threats to security. The course also provides an opportunity to understand how those responses in turn shape international law and international relations.

What's so good about International Law & Security at Dundee?

The University of Dundee runs two parallel masters degree in International Law & Security: MLitt International Law & Security for graduates in International Relations or similar subjects, and LLM International Law & Security for Law graduates.

Each degree has one core module, and you will also be able to choose specialist option modules from the same list. You will also research and write a dissertation in your chosen area of interest, or work on a research project with integrated internship.

Internship opportunity:
The opportunity to undertake an approved internship as a part the programme of studies is an exciting innovation in this area of study which will enable students to gain a unique insight into the application of the materials addressed in taught modules and to gain valuable experience to add to their CV.

How you will be taught

The course starts in September or January, each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis or 24 months on a part time basis. A variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, independent research, seminars and presentations.

What you will study

The course is made up of two International Relations modules and two Law modules which are delivered during our two teaching semesters (Sep-Dec and Jan-Apr), and detailed below.

During the summer vacation students normally write a dissertation.

All students take the Law week-long induction in January, plus the first half of the module Legal Research Skills(including the first assessment), usually in your first semester, but can be deferred to your second semester if you don't select any first semester Law modules. You also take the non-credit bearing generic skills training seminars offered by the Humanities.

First Semester (Jan-Apr)

International Security (core module), plus one other taught 30-credit modules (from the list below).

Summer period (May-Aug)

Politics Dissertation (60 credits)

Second Semester (Sep-Dec)

Two taught 30-credit modules (from the list below).

Part time study

For part-time students the taught modules will be spread out over two years instead of one in a similar format as above, and the Dissertation or Research Project (with integrated internship) will be undertaken during the summer period of the second year of study.

Typical optional modules available

Individual Criminal Liability in International Criminal Law
Transnational Crime and Counter Terrorism
International Dispute Resolution
UN Human Rights Law
Regional Human Rights Systems
Global Human Rights: Traditions & Inspirations
Critical Studies on Terrorism
The Middle East and Terrorism
State Terror
Strategic Intelligence Studies
International Security of Drugs & Organised Crime
Human Rights in International Relations
Russian Politics & Security
Politics and Security in South Asia
Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism in Europe
Geopolitics of Natural Resources
Governing and Securing Cyber Space
European Union Security
Explaining and Understanding International Politics

How you will be assessed

By assessed coursework, examination and dissertation (or research project report).

Careers

Graduates from this degree are likely to pursue careers with international organisations such as the United Nations, the European Union, or institutions such as the International Court of Justice. You will also be well placed to pursue a career as a government adviser. Graduates from our Politics & International Relations degrees have successfully pursued careers in politics and diplomacy.

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The LLM in Public International Law will offer you a unique opportunity to study a wide range of courses on the role and place of law in international affairs. Read more
The LLM in Public International Law will offer you a unique opportunity to study a wide range of courses on the role and place of law in international affairs. Questions of international Law are increasingly an important part of domestic litigation in almost all jurisdictions. The modules are designed to equip you for a career in private legal practice, diplomatic service, or work with non-governmental organisations. All courses are taught by top class academics with extensive experience in the study and application of international law.

Taught Modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Public International Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.


◦ QLLM023 Courts in Comparative Perspective (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM047 International and Comparative Social Justice (45 credits)
◦ QLLM053 International Criminal Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM055 International Environmental Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM057 International Law of Armed Conflict and the Use of Force (45 credits)
◦ QLLM058 International Law of the Sea (45 credits)
◦ QLLM059 International Law on the Rights of the Child (45 credits)
◦ QLLM062 International Tax Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM068 Law of Economic Crime (45 credits)
◦ QLLM069 Law of Finance and Foreign Investment in Emerging Economies (45 credits)
◦ QLLM071 Law of Treaties (45 credits)
◦ QLLM096 Climate Change Law and Policy (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM097 International Natural Resources Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM127 International Human Rights Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM167 Indigenous Rights: Selected Issues in Practice and Theory (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM168 International Law and Indigenous Peoples (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM173 Terrorism and Human Rights: Constitutional Perspectives (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM174 Migration, Security and Human Rights (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM176 International Refugee Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM177 International Migration Law (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM187 International Investment Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM188 Regulation of International Investment and Public Policy (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM323 State Crime (sem 2)
◦ QLLM347 The Law of Geographical Indications (GIs) (sem 2)
◦ QLLM351 Cybercrime: Substantive Offences (sem 1)
◦ QLLM352 Cybercrime: International Co-operation and Digital Investigations (sem 2)
◦ QLLM358 Cyberspace Law: Internet Jurisdiction and Dispute Resolution (sem 2) (not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM365 Legal Aspects of Financing Development (sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM370 WTO Law: Market Access and Non-Discrimination (sem 1)
◦ QLLM371 WTO Law: Trade Remedies and Regulatory Issues (sem 2)
◦ QLLM376 International Economic Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM377 EU Financial and Monetary Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM382 Energy Law and Ethics (sem 1)
◦ QLLM383 / QLLG008 International Regulation of Shipping (sem 1)
◦ QLLM384 Law of the Sea, Navigational Freedoms and Practice (sem 2)
◦ QLLM387 International Trade and Investment Law of the EU (sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM388 Trade, Climate Change and Energy: EU and International Perspectives (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM397 Investment Treaty Arbitration (sem 1)
◦ QLLM398 Investment Arbitration: Substantive Protection (sem 2)
◦ QLLM400 United States Energy Law, Regulation and Policy (sem 1)

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