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Masters Degrees (International Human Rights)

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International Human Rights Law LLM is a unique programme designed to enable students to progress to become human rights practitioners and specialists in this dynamic area of law. Read more

About the course

International Human Rights Law LLM is a unique programme designed to enable students to progress to become human rights practitioners and specialists in this dynamic area of law.

Students will critically engage with many of the human rights issues that feature strongly in public debate today, gaining comprehensive understanding of international human rights law and its interconnection with international criminal and comparative criminal law.

This course places particular emphasis on the radical transformations that international human rights law has experienced since the beginning of the 21st century, with the genesis of the International Criminal Court, the on-going process of the United Nations reform and the post 9/11 shift to a more securitarian approach to criminal process values, especially regarding the war against terror.

The course offers:

A detailed analysis of the theory, history and development of human rights, and an examination of the main regional mechanisms of human rights protection.

An overview of a variety of contemporary human rights topics, including the examination of major developments and recent tendencies in the field of international human rights protection.

Analysis of contemporary topics and challenges of international human rights protection including:
the emergence of the right to development and the so-called third- generation rights;
human rights advocacy and global governance though NGOs and non-State actors;
the crystallisation of group rights, minorities and indigenous peoples’ rights;
the challenges posed to international human rights law by international migration and the enhanced need of protection of migrants, asylum seekers and refugees;
women’s rights and the rights of the child, including protection against victims of human trafficking;
the crystallisation of general equality and the development of human rights advocacy for sexual and gay rights.

Brunel Law School has an excellent reputation in this field. The International Human Rights Law Review - a peer-reviewed international journal - is edited at Brunel Law School. The School is able to attract a number of leading guest speakers to support further debate and learning’s around the complexity of human rights, and provides students with a wider variety of perspectives particularly in the international context.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months due to dissertation submission requirements)

The course is aimed at graduates from all over the world who are keen to develop an expertise in the evolving discipline and develop a career in international human rights law.

Aims

You will develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of international human rights law.

You will acquire critical and analytical skills in the complex field of international human rights law.

You will be able to demonstrate through original research the application of knowledge, practical understanding and critical appreciation that can contribute to the discourse on international human rights law.

You will gain professional skills required to develop a career in international human rights law.

You will gain detailed knowledge of the European system of human rights protection in particular, both at a theoretical and practical level, including the ability to handle cases before the European Court of Human Rights.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Term I

European System of Human Rights Protection (15 credits) 1 or 2
Foundations of International Human Rights Law (15 credits) 1 or 2

Term II

Theory and Practice of International Human Rights (15 credits) 1
Regional Systems of Human Rights Protection: America, Africa, Asia (15 credits) 1

Optional modules:

Term I

International Human Rights and Islamic Law (15 credits) 2
Public International Law (15 credits) 1 or 2
International Humanitarian Law 2
Multiculturalism and Human Rights (15 credits) 2
International Criminal Law (15 credits) 2

Term II

International Environmental Law (15 credits) 2
Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility (15 credits) 2
World Trade Organisation (WTO) abd Human Rights Law (15 credits) 2
Human Rights of Women (15 credits) 2
Counter-terrorism and Human Rights (15 credits) 2

** The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

Assessment

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience. In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions.

Assessment methods in this programme range from coursework, seen examinations and a dissertation (15,000 words) to oral presentations and assessment by contribution in seminars.

Special Features

Research Centres
The Law School benefits from active research centres which regularly host research seminars and workshops. Many of these have been on the topic of international human rights. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.

Extra-curricular Activities
The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies and research workshops organized by the research centres based at the school. LLM students are expected to play a leading role organising and participating in these activities.

Research Skills
The Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills.
Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

Career Support
Students benefit from the university's award winning 'Professional Development Centre' which offers specialist workshops, interview skills, and one-to-one advice sessions to help prepare graduates for their chosen career.

Teaching Expertise
Brunel Law School has an excellent reputation in this field. The International Human Rights Law Review - a peer-reviewed international journal - is edited at Brunel Law School. The school is able to attract a number of leading guest speakers to support further debate and learnings around the complexity of human rights, and provides students with a wider variety of perspectives particularly in the international context.
This is a challenging programme that is at the forefront of thinking in International Human Rights Law. It is taught by leading academics with a wide range of expertise in human rights practice, policy, activism and governmental, international and non-governmental organisations. As a result, the programme is research-led, and some of the reading required for the programme is based on books published by our academics.

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The key paradox of international human rights law is that the recent proliferation of treaties and adjudicative bodies has not significantly diminished serious human rights abuses. Read more
The key paradox of international human rights law is that the recent proliferation of treaties and adjudicative bodies has not significantly diminished serious human rights abuses.

The LLM in International Human Rights Law and Practice engages students in a critical and nuanced examination of this paradox, while providing them with the practical skills necessary to apply global norms at the local level.

Why study International Human Rights at York?

The LLM in Human Rights Law and Practice provides the knowledge, skills and networks necessary for mid-career professionals and recent graduates to work in the human rights field. The LLM is offered on both a full-time and part-time basis. Our LLM is distinctive because students:
-Work on real human rights issues, which gives practical skills, hands-on experience and improved job prospects
-Get the opportunity to work alongside human rights defenders during a two-week field visit to Malaysia (student numbers permitting) or placement in York
-Learn from international human rights defenders based at the Centre
-Explore how international human rights law interacts with national public policy in various states

LLM Structure

Three core modules cover international human rights law, policy and advocacy. Optional CAHR modules cover several topical issues through a human rights lens: culture, development, migration, and post-conflict justice.

The programme requires you to undertake a placement with human rights organisations in Malaysia (student numbers permitting) or the UK. This is an important part of the degree programme and will develop your practical skills and provide hands-on experience, both of which will prepare you for working in this field and improve your career prospects.

The LLM is taught in weekly lectures and seminars covering specific case studies and including skills training on oral presentations, advocacy, report writing, and memos.

Compulsory Modules
The compulsory modules reflect the three sides to human rights activism: law, policy and practice.
-Defending human rights (40 credits; terms 1-2)
-Applying international human rights law (20 credits; term 1)
-International human rights law and advocacy (20 credits; term 1)
-Dissertation (60 credits; terms 3-4)

Optional Modules
In the second term students will be able to take two options. Four optional modules taught by Centre staff will explore areas where rights are being used in new and innovative ways. Students may also choose optional modules taught by other departments, from the list below.

Optional modules taught at CAHR
-Asylum, migration and trafficking
-Culture and protest
-Development Alternatives: Development, Rights, Security
-Truth, justice and reparations after violence

Optional modules taught at the York Law School
-Corporate responsibility and law
-Financial citizenship and social justice

Optional modules taught in other departments
-Conflict and development (Politics)
-Globalisation and social policy (Social Policy and Social Work)
-Global social problems (Social Policy and Social Work)
-International organisations (Politics)
-New security challenges (Politics)
-Teaching and learning citizenship and global education (Education)
-Women, citizenship and conflict (Centre for Women's Studies)

Please note that optional modules may not run if the lecturer is on leave or there is insufficient demand.

Placements
A key part of the LLM is exposing students to the practice of international human rights law at the domestic level. Thus students have the opportunity to pursue a placement and related project with our NGO partners in Malaysia and York. The fieldwork takes place over a two week period in weeks 9 and 10 of the autumn term in either Kuala Lumpur or York. Please note that the Malaysia trip/placements will only run if there are sufficient student numbers.

Students will be expected to work together in small groups in partnership with a human rights organisation. This will include:
-Extensive background research on country context, the host organisation, relevant thematic issues etc.
-Devising a project prior to the field visit, in collaboration with the host organisation
-Two weeks of intensive work in Malaysia (student numbers permitting) or York in November and December
-Ongoing discussions about project completion once students return to York

Where after the LLM?

Our LLM provides career advice, networking opportunities, hands-on experience, and personalised reference letters to help our graduates find good jobs with human rights NGOs, humanitarian organisations, charities, policy think-tanks, national governments, and UN agencies.

For example, recent graduates are working with:
-Foreign and Commonwealth Office
-UK-based bar association
-Egyptian human rights NGO
-Development NGO in West Africa
-East and Horn of Africa Human Rights Defenders Network
-Human Rights Watch
-Pakistan's judicial sector
-UK-based NGO working with sub-Saharan children affected by HIV/AIDS

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The unique Specialist LLM in International Human Rights at The City Law School allows students to explore how international law intervenes to protect human rights. Read more
The unique Specialist LLM in International Human Rights at The City Law School allows students to explore how international law intervenes to protect human rights.

Who is it for?

The Specialism in International Human Rights Law is designed for students from all backgrounds who have an interest in the intersection between human rights and international law. It will enable students with this to develop a career in human rights law or to embark on policy-oriented careers in government and non-governmental organizations at the domestic and international level.

Objectives

The Specialist LLM in International Human Rights draws from the expertise of The City Law School's team of experienced human rights scholars. It gives you an opportunity to examine intellectually the subject from various angles - minority protection, human rights at times of war, the prosecution of international criminals, to name a few.

This masters degree helps you appreciate and understand how international law intervenes to protect human rights and where the gaps are in international law.

The Specialist LLM in International Human Rights provides the opportunity to study some of the most significant issues in international human rights protection facing the world today. You will have guidance and expert academic support to examine a number of important issues in international human rights protection law, including how the law of war and armed conflict protects the civilian, how minority protection is being regulated by international law, the remedies available in international criminal law, and the extent to which the rights of indigenous people are safeguarded by international law.

Placements

Each year a small number of internships become available and you will be provided with information about such opportunities and how to apply during the year of your study.

Academic facilities

As a City Law School student you will benefit from everything the institution has to offer including the Learning Success department and Lawbore, an online resource designed to help you find the information you need for the course modules. All course modules have online depositories through Moodle.

As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

You will benefit from City, University of London’s extensive library of hard copy and electronic resources, including its comprehensive database of domestic and international caselaw, legislation, treaties and legal periodicals. There are two law-specific libraries – one at the Gray’s Inn campus and one at our Northampton square campus - with individual study spaces and dedicated rooms for group work.

Additionally, we are a short walk away from the British Library and the Law Library of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies.

Teaching and learning

This course is taught by leading academics as well as visiting practitioners including barristers and solicitors who work in private practice and in legal departments of major companies.

All modules are structured as ten weekly two-hour seminars which comprise both lectures as well as interactive tutorials. All modules are supported by our online learning platform - Moodle. Assessment is by way of coursework which comprises 100% of the final mark in each module. Each module carries the same weight in terms of the overall qualification.

You will be allocated a dedicated supervisor for your dissertation who will help you develop a specific topic and provide support in terms of resources, content and structure.

Modules

As with all LLM specialisms at City, University of London, you may take either five modules and a shorter dissertation (10,000 words) or four modules and a longer dissertation (20,000 words). All modules are of the same duration and are taught per term (September – December or January – April) rather than the whole academic year. If you take four modules you will take two per term in each term and if you take five modules will have three in one term and two in the other. Dissertations are written during the summer term when there are no classes.

In order to obtain this specialism, you must choose at least three modules from within this specialism and write your dissertation on a subject within the specialism.

Specialism modules - choose from the following 30-credit modules:
-Comparative Constitutional Law
-Public International Law
-International Criminal Law: the Practitioner Perspective
-International Criminal Law: Crimes and Institutions
-International Human Rights in Law and Practice
-International Law and the Global Economy
-International Law and the Use of Force
-Law and War
-Minorities and Indigenous Peoples in International Law

For your remaining modules you can choose from more than 50 modules covering a diverse range of subjects.

Career prospects

As a graduate of this specialist LLM in International Human Rights, you will be well placed to pursue careers in this area of law in private practice, in-house in a law firm, policy and government, non-governmental organisations and a wide range of non-legal careers in the human rights field.

The City Law School has a vibrant Pro Bono programme including our award-winning commercial law clinic for tech start-ups Start-Ed.

Students who complete the LLM may wish to continue their academic studies by enrolling in a PhD offered by The City Law School.

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Our LLM International Human Rights examines the impact of international human rights standards on national constitutions and laws, with particular focus given to the conflict between international standards and national provision. Read more
Our LLM International Human Rights examines the impact of international human rights standards on national constitutions and laws, with particular focus given to the conflict between international standards and national provision.

The course will expose you to the fundamental aspects of international human rights and provide you with the opportunity to critically examine different systems of law at a higher level. In addition, our LLM provides an opportunity to acquire, or build upon existing skills gained from your undergraduate course - enhancing employment opportunities in the legal profession and providing a basis for progression to doctoral studies.

We have active student-led Legal, Mooting and Debate Societies. Our Student Mooting Society is one of the most successful in England. Our students have reached five finals in the past six years and have regularly beaten teams from some of the country’s most prestigious universities. In the past 10 years, we have beaten eight of the elite Russell Group of universities, including Cambridge, Oxford and Warwick.

Continuing Professional Development

The LLM is accredited for Continuing Professional Development purposes by the Solicitors Regulation Authority and the Bar Standards Board.

What's covered in the course?

The LLM International Human Rights also provides you with an opportunity to assess how international human rights law offers protection to different categories of vulnerable groups. You’ll also study the new and emerging area of law and catastrophe.

We’ll develop your ability to analyse and evaluate the principle features of international human rights, as well as being able to synthesise complex legal issues, arguments and discourse. You’ll learn how to communicate complex and abstract ideas in an articulate and confident manner, as well as developing a host of transferrable skills that employers crave.

The key areas on International Human Rights covered on the LLM modules include:
-Research methods
-The United Nations human rights system
-Regional human rights systems
-Women’s rights
-Children’s rights
-The rights of refugees
-The relationship between business and human rights
-Environmental rights
-Criminal justice
-The right to life

Why Choose Us?

-Our outstanding facilities include two mock courtrooms and an e-learning suite that can be used to bring study to life.
-Our Student Mooting Society is one of the most successful in the country; our students have reached five finals in the past six years and have regularly beaten teams from some of the country’s most prestigious universities including Cambridge University. Two members of the Society are the current Web Legal national mooting champions.
-The School’s Centre for American Legal Studies operates the UK’s largest US internship scheme, giving you the opportunity to gain practical experience in federal and state public defenders’ offices, private attorney offices and American university law schools.
-We have strong professional links with the Birmingham Law Society (the UK’s largest Law Society outside London), the four Inns of Court, and respected firms such as Squire Sanders LLP.
-We also boast a comprehensive law library and an outstanding team of staff with extensive practice experience. This gives you ample access to information, experience and insight.

Course Structure

The LLM is taught by an outstanding team of professional research active staff who have extensive practice experience.

The modules are delivered through weekly seminars, which you’re required to underpin with preparatory reading and research. The seminars are designed to facilitate participation and you will be required to articulate your preparatory reading and work in the seminar and complete activities.

You’ll also conduct work via our online learning system, Moodle. We’ll use this support interaction with the materials through online activities, including discussion forums.

To qualify for a Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) you must complete 60 credits of taught modules. To qualify for a Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip) you must complete 120 credits of taught modules. To qualify for the LLM you must complete all the taught modules and a dissertation.

Employability

We have active student-led Legal, Mooting and Debate Societies. Our Student Mooting Society is one of the most successful in England. Our students have reached five finals in the past six years and have regularly beaten teams from some of the country’s most prestigious universities. In the past 10 years, we have beaten eight of the elite Russell Group of universities, including Cambridge, Oxford and Warwick.

You may be working, or aspiring to work as a solicitor, barrister, or in-house counsel specialising (or seeking to specialise) in this area of the law. Public sector organisations increasingly require the 'private sector' skills and understanding which you will develop throughout your studies.

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On this programme you will acquire specialised and in-depth knowledge and understanding of international human rights law, political theory of rights and international relations relating to human rights. Read more
On this programme you will acquire specialised and in-depth knowledge and understanding of international human rights law, political theory of rights and international relations relating to human rights. The programme is interdisciplinary thus building on the strengths in this area of the Sutherland School of Law and the School of Politics and International Relations. Members of staff in the Sutherland School of Law have engaged in major research in this area spanning the full range of international human rights law from asylum law and practice, the EU and fundamental rights to the law of privacy in Ireland.

The LLM in International Human rights differs from existing degrees in Ireland by having a distinct interdisciplinary nature flowing from the co-ordination between the School of Law and the School of politics and International relations (SpIre).

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmininternationalhumanrights/

Your studies

On this programme you will acquire a specialised and in-depth knowledge and understanding of international human rights law, political theory of rights and international relations relating to human rights in a single course.
Your core modules will include International Human Rights Law and the Politics of Human Rights. You will also choose from modules such as: International Security; Politics of Development; Discrimination Law; and, Media and Regulation. You will complete a supervised dissertation and will also have international exchange opportunities during the programme. On completion of your studies, you will:
- be able to understand and think critically about the intersections between law, politics and international relations in the study of human rights;
- be able to apply this knowledge and understanding to real and hypothetical situations;
- be able to conduct independent research and write coherent, well-structured papers;
- have identified doctrinal and practical trends in legal practise and their impact; and,
- have an increased ability to identify and analyse problems from a legal perspective.

Studying abroad

The School affords its students the opportunity to spend a semester abroad as part of the Comparative, International and European Law (CIEL) Graduate exchange programme with our partner Universities in Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Spain. Students participating in the programme will have their dissertations jointly supervised by staff in UCD and in the institution which
they are visiting. Successful completion of the semester abroad will lead to the award of a Certificate in Comparative, International and European Law.

Your future

The programme qualifies you to work in the field of human rights, either domestically or internationally, as a practising lawyer, legal-adviser, policymaker, advocate, researcher, or academic. Career opportunities exist in intergovernmental organisations (United Nations, Council of Europe, European Union, Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe), government departments, international and domestic non-governmental organisations, law firms, and Universities.

Features

The Sutherland School of Law offers a wide range of modules for the Masters programmes. Reflecting its interdisciplinary nature, there are core modules that must be taken in both Law and Politics. The core law modules are

- International Human Rights considers the theoretical underpinnings and development of contemporary international human rights law, critically examines the institutional architecture developed by the UN system and regional systems to implement human rights norms as well as national methods of implementation of human rights law.

- Law of the ECHR offers a critical examination of key aspects of the operation and substantive law of the ECHR focussing on its incorporation into domestic law and an in-depth analysis and evaluation of the Court's jurisprudence for a number of substantive rights.

- Other Law modules of especial interest to those undertaking this programme include:

- Comparative Constitutional Law discusses a number of constitutional issues from a comparative perspective including the influence of the ECHR and its jurisprudence on constitutional structures and systems.

- Media Regulation discusses the regulatory environment in which the media operates, and encourages a critical analysis of the implications which the current system has for media freedom, journalistic ethics and practices, democracy and governance

CIEL

Any student admitted to an LLM programme in the Law School also can apply on a competitive basis to spend their second semester at one of our sister Law Schools:
- University of Antwerp
- Maastricht University
- The University of Mannhein
- Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona
- Universite de Toulouse 1 – Capitole

Students must score 6.5 in IELTS or 90 in the internet TOEFL exams in the relevant language of instruction (English, French or German). Spaces are allocated on a competitive basis. Students who are accepted onto this programme graduate with an LLM and are awarded a certificate in International and Comparative Law (CIEL).

Careers

This programme will equip graduates with the knowledge, skills and capacity to work in the field of human rights, either domestically or internationally, as practising lawyers, legal-advisers, policy-makers, advocates, researchers or academics. Career opportunities in the field of human rights can arise in a variety of different contexts. These include, but are not limited to, intergovernmental organisations (United Nations, Council of Europe, European Union, Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe), government departments, international and domestic non-governmental organisations, law firms and Universities.

We have an excellent Careers Development Centre here at UCD, designed to help you with information regarding future employment or studies. UCD hold a number of graduate events throughout the year including a dedicated law fair at which at which many of the big Law firms will be in attendance. The School of Law has a dedicated careers advisor on it’s Academic staff, Dr. Oonagh Breen, and a staff member from the careers office will be in attendance at the School of law on a number of occasions throughout the academic year. To see the full range of services offered by the careers office go to http://www.ucd.ie/careers/

Find out how to apply here http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmininternationalhumanrights/apply,80081,en.html

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmininternationalhumanrights/

Scholarships

The University and UCD Sutherland School of Law have a list of scholarships that are open to Irish, EU and International applicants.
For further information please see http://www.ucd.ie/scholarships
International students may wish to visit: http://www.ucd.ie/international

Why you should choose UCD

In the state-of-the-art UCD Sutherland School of Law, graduate students engage in advanced study with internationally renowned
specialists to develop the transformative potential of law.

The School is ranked by the authoritative QS World University Rankings as Ireland's number one law school and amongst the world's 100 leading law schools. Students benefit from the School’s strong links with university partners; businesses; NGOs; and, domestic, EU and international governments.
We place particular emphasis on the quality and breadth of our graduate programmes across Diploma, Masters and Doctoral levels. Our graduate degrees are available on a full-time or part-time basis, beginning in either January or September.
We also offer part-time Diploma programmes and single subject certificates with the possibility of securing CPD points and building study up to achieve diploma or masters awards.

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This programme is designed to help students become experts in the areas of International Law that directly concern the human person - International Criminal Law & International Human Rights Law - whilst mastering the discipline of International Law of which they are part. Read more
This programme is designed to help students become experts in the areas of International Law that directly concern the human person - International Criminal Law & International Human Rights Law - whilst mastering the discipline of International Law of which they are part. In addition to the foundational courses in Legal Research Methods and Public International Law, students will be required to study International Criminal Law, International Human Rights Law and write a dissertation on a topic within the International Criminal Law or International Human Rights Law. The remaining courses can be chosen from a range of relevant options.

Through carefully designed course work and varied teaching approaches, students will acquire the intellectual open-ness, technical expertise and critical thinking abilities that are necessary for effectiveness in a globalising world. The programme will equip students to respond effectively to the wide range of intellectual and professional challenges facing those working on legal issues concerning the human person in International Law. The LLM in International Law (specialising in International Criminal Law & International Human Rights Law) will equip them to deal with both case work and policy making.

Employment Opportunities
Employment opportunities for graduates of the programme will include work with international law firms, international organisations such as the United Nations, World Bank, World Trade Organisation and European Union, international courts and tribunals, ‘think tanks’ and research centres, non-governmental organisations and government (eg. Ministries of Justice and Foreign Affairs). Having taken one of our programmes, there will, of course, also be possibilities for academically inclined students to pursue careers in teaching and research.

Compulsory Modules:

Legal Research Methods
Public International Law
International Criminal Law
International Human Rights Law
Dissertation on a topic within International Criminal Law or International Human Rights Law
Optional Modules (choose 2):

European Human Rights Law
Children’s Rights in Domestic and International Law
International Law of Armed Conflict
Dealing with the Legacies of the Past
Structure
January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Teaching will mostly be seminar-based which will promote group and individual interaction, which also ensures that every individual student is encouraged to contribute to discussions. Seminar-based teaching enables lecturers and students to discuss issues and investigate topics in greater depth, and develops critical thinking and solution-based learning skills in students; whilst also allowing the course teachers to monitor closely each individual’s progress. Emphasis will be placed on the use of virtual learning through the mechanism of the Blackboard computer-assisted learning system and databases such as Westlaw and LexisNexis. Throughout all modules, comparative elements with other legal systems will be emphasised.

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The LL.M. in International Human Rights Law offers students the opportunity to specialise in International Human Rights Law, to facilitate enhanced career opportunities, or to lay the foundations for PhD study. Read more
The LL.M. in International Human Rights Law offers students the opportunity to specialise in International Human Rights Law, to facilitate enhanced career opportunities, or to lay the foundations for PhD study. The LL.M. is an internationally recognised postgraduate law degree and the international focus is a key advantage in today's globalised legal landscape.

Course Structure

The LL.M. in International Human Rights Law is one year in duration or can be divided over two years. The student will complete six subjects and a dissertation. In the first semester the student will complete three mandatory subjects and in the second semester, they will choose three human rights electives. Assessment in the taught modules in semesters 1 and 2 is by way of assignments and examinations. A dissertation is completed over the summer months under the guidance of a designated supervisor.

Core modules:

• Public International Law
• Advanced Legal Research and Writing
• International Human Rights Law

Optional modules:

• International Children's Rights Law*
• International Humanitarian Law*
• Social and Economic Rights*
• International Asylum and Immigration Law*
• International Criminal Law*
• Gender, Sexuality and Human Rights*

*These electives run subject to demand and discretion of the Faculty of Law

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This course is suitable for. Read more
This course is suitable for: solicitors and barristers in private practice and in-house; activists; campaigners and researchers involved in human rights issues; those working in organisations with public functions and who need to comply with human rights obligations; as well as human rights professionals in the UN and other international organisations and NGOs and those with an interest in Human Rights Law.
•Informa
This course is delivered in partnership with Informa Professional Academy, an organisation dedicated to working with leading academic bodies to provide high-calibre and well respected distance learning postgraduate courses
•Develop your own personal pathway
This course combines one core module with a diverse range of optional modules
•Study at your own pace
Enjoy flexible distance learning, with the option to exit at one of several points with a postgraduate award
•Differentiate yourself in the job market
Gain a competitive edge by increasing your knowledge of human rights law
•Boost your employability
Improve your career and employability options in a globalised job market

[[ Module choices:]]

International Human Rights Law – explores the birth of international human rights thinking and the struggle to balance competing rights. You will also examine the international legal system and human rights legal system

You will also select elective modules which might include:
•Social Justice & Human Rights
•International Child Law
•European Convention on Human Rights
•International Humanitarian Law
•International Law
•Negotiated Study
•Freedom of Religion, and the Rights of Minorities in International Law
•Gender & Sexuality in International Law
•The Protection of Refugees in International Law

Dissertation
You must also undertake a dissertation, providing an invaluable opportunity to work in depth on a particular aspect of the law. You will need to apply and enhance your technical knowledge and critical awareness in a subject of your choice. In order to obtain the LLM in International Human Rights Law your dissertation must have an international human rights theme.

Note: All modules are subject to change in order to keep content current.

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Our LLM International Human Rights Law is the oldest established human rights law course in Europe, and reflects our University’s global reputation as the leading centre for human rights research, practice and education. Read more
Our LLM International Human Rights Law is the oldest established human rights law course in Europe, and reflects our University’s global reputation as the leading centre for human rights research, practice and education. In 2009 the University was awarded the Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education in recognition of its excellence in the advancement of human rights.

We provide an advanced conceptual understanding of the international law on the promotion and protection of human rights, at the international, regional and national level, informed by the latest practice and scholarship.

Our course sets international human rights law in its philosophical and historical contexts, enabling you to understand international human rights law as it applies in various situations including states of emergency or acute crises, development and transition.

At Essex we specialise in commercial law, public law, and human rights law. We are top 20 in the UK for research excellence (REF 2014), and we are ranked among the top 200 departments on the planet according to the QS World [University] Rankings [2017] for law.

We attract some of the most experienced and academically qualified students from around the world, and we aim to produce graduates who will be leaders in the field of international human rights law as advocates, field officers, legal advisers or researchers with governments and international and non-governmental organisations.

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This practical and theoretical MA focuses on the study of war reporting, international human rights and the role of journalism in conflict resolution. Read more
This practical and theoretical MA focuses on the study of war reporting, international human rights and the role of journalism in conflict resolution.

This course aims to offer a challenging postgraduate programme of study with the opportunity to gain hands-on experience in print and online media, radio and TV. It is designed to provide a professional education in journalism, which allows you the chance to develop the practical and intellectual skills necessary for careers in the media.

The course is designed to appeal to those who are concerned with human rights and issues relating to war and peace, and who are looking for the opportunity to develop the journalistic skills necessary to communicate this to a wider public.

You will have the opportunity to undertake the academic analysis of a range of critical approaches to the study of war and the media, journalism and conflict resolution and journalism and international human rights. Your final project provides the chance to focus on a specific area in the field of journalism, war and international human rights.

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This scheme is intended to appeal to students who wish to study International Human Rights Law at Masters level, with the research focusing on a distinct although relatively broad specialism. Read more
This scheme is intended to appeal to students who wish to study International Human Rights Law at Masters level, with the research focusing on a distinct although relatively broad specialism.

The required courses, combined with appropriate options, lay a strong foundation in the basics of international human rights which are of increasing importance today. The coursework requirements will develop research skills, and lay the basis for a substantial dissertation. Graduates completing the programme will be equipped to engage in more specialised practical or academic research in this field.

This scheme offers two optional pathways, the programme of which will be confirmed by the student at registration:
• Studying five modules with a 20,000 word dissertation
• Studying six modules with a 15,000 word dissertation

Modules
Core modules:
• International Human Rights Law
• International Law
• Dissertation

One of the following Human Rights options:
• Rights of Peoples
• The Right to Adequate Food as a Human Right
• International Criminal Law

Optional modules
• Two/three from the Law modules detailed on page xx, depending on your chosen pathway

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Developed in association with the renowned human rights barrister, Geoffrey Robertson, QC, and distinguished colleagues of the world-famous Doughty Street Chambers, this innovative programme examines some of the key challenges in the field of International Human Rights. Read more
Developed in association with the renowned human rights barrister, Geoffrey Robertson, QC, and distinguished colleagues of the world-famous Doughty Street Chambers, this innovative programme examines some of the key challenges in the field of International Human Rights.

International law and human rights have been at the heart of teaching and scholarly work at Regent’s for many years: this new programme offers a truly unique opportunity to be guided by special guests from Doughty Street alongside our talented team of academics.

You will be introduced to a range of topics in the field including, a history of human rights law, international relations, humanitarian intervention, free speech, prohibition of torture and inhumane treatment and international criminal law, with all theory supplemented by cutting edge research and case studies.

Why should I choose this programme?

The issues covered within this programme have never been so pertinent and in demand. The programme will enable you to address some of the contemporary challenges faced in operational environments which aim to protect and promote human rights. The programme informs those already in professional practice or those aspiring to work in this field with the skills and knowledge and the ability to introduce changes that will improve human rights policies at an international, regional and domestic level.

This programme is unique in its close link with practising professionals and real life cases, allowing you to really explore and understand what’s happening in the world today. We have an exceptionally talented team of lecturers including:

‌•Dr. Sara Bazoobandi, an author on food security and Associate Fellow of Chatham House.
‌•Dr. Mireille Hebing, an expert on migration and refugees.
‌•Dr. Neven Andjelic, recently elected to the Advisory Committee on the Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities.
‌•Professor Yossi Mekelberg, expert and author on human rights issues ranging from right for self determination, gender, freedom of speech, refugees, collective punishment and house demolitions, rights of minorities and others. Professor Mekelberg has been a member of the London Committee of Human Rights Watch for the last 7 years and is regularly asked to write in international media about abuses of human rights.

As well as being guided by our team of experts, you will benefit directly from visiting lectures from renowned barristers from the Doughty Street Chambers who include:

‌•Geoffrey Robertson, QC
‌•Kirsty Brimelow, QC
‌•Professor Marc Weller
‌•Graeme Hall
‌•Edward Fitzgerald OBE, QC
‌•Professor Geraldine Van Beuren, QC
‌•Andrea Saccucci
‌•Jen Robinson

Engaging with these distinguished professionals will really bring the subject to life and provide you with a deep and comprehensive understanding of human rights law.

Key skills, aims and objectives

You will gain:

A systematic and comprehensive knowledge of international human rights law
The ability to identify and critically evaluate contemporary issues relating to international human rights
An understanding of how theory relates to practice, with extensive use of current and relevant case studies
The ability to interpret principal source materials as well as understanding relevant concepts, cases, statutes and treaties
Exposure to world renowned human rights lawyers who will share their knowledge and experience of working on landmark cases in the field

Future opportunities

This programme will prepare you for a number of careers, in areas such as diplomacy, international relations, domestic and international legal practice, international charities, and non-governmental organisations, as well as practising professionals in law, journalism, politics and economics.

How to apply

Applying to study at RUL is a quick and easy process. We accept direct applications, have no formal application deadlines and there is no application fee.

Step 1 Apply

You can apply in the following ways:

•Apply online
•Apply directly to us using the application form available here http://www.regents.ac.uk/media/1188903/Regents-application-form.pdf
Once you have completed the application form, please send us the following supporting documents, by post, email or fax:

•Copies of academic transcripts and certificates of all academic study undertaken after secondary school
•One letter of academic reference
•A copy of your CV/resumé showing your work experience if applicable.
•A 300 to 500-word personal statement in support of your application, outlining your reasons for applying to your chosen programme and how you feel you will benefit from the course of study
•A copy of your passport photograph (ID) page
•One recent passport-sized, colour photograph, jpeg format (this must be emailed to us at )
•If not a native English speaker, proof of your English proficiency

Please note: most candidates will be assessed for admission on the basis of their submitted application materials. However, RUL reserves the right to invite candidates for interview and to reject those who decline to attend.

Step 2 Making an offer

We will assess whether you meet our minimum entry requirements and will make you an offer by both email and post, or notify you that you have been unsuccessful.

If you have completed your education and have met all the entry requirements, you will be sent an unconditional offer. If you still have to finish your exams, or have yet to submit supporting documentation, we will make you a conditional offer.

You can expect to receive a decision on your application within 10 working days of receipt of your completed application and supporting documents.

Step 3 Accepting the offer

If you wish to accept the offer you must:

•Confirm your acceptance via email/post/telephone/in person
•Pay the registration fee (non-refundable)
•Pay the non-EU advance tuition fee deposit, if applicable (non-refundable)
•Please note: although there is no formal deadline to pay your registration fee or non-EU advance deposit, if you need to apply for an international student visa to study in the UK, then we recommend that you pay these as soon as possible.

Please see here for information on how to pay http://www.regents.ac.uk/study/how-to-pay.aspx

Step 4 Full acceptance and visa

On receipt of your acceptance we will issue the final set of documentation and, where needed, the relevant visa support documentation. To find out if you need a student visa please consult the UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) website for current information: http://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/uk-visas-and-immigration (please note it is your own responsibility to arrange the appropriate visa).

For more information on course structure, admissions and teaching and assessment, please follow this link: http://www.regents.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/programmes/ma-international-human-rights-law.aspx#tab_course-overview

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Many believe that international human rights law is one of our greatest moral achievements. However, there remain huge gaps between the theory and the practice of human rights implementation. Read more
Many believe that international human rights law is one of our greatest moral achievements. However, there remain huge gaps between the theory and the practice of human rights implementation.

You’ll study the interconnection of international human rights law with regional, European and national systems of human rights protection. Through the study of legal texts such as treaties, declarations and case law, you’ll examine the legal context behind contemporary issues.

Many of our staff engage in interdisciplinary human rights research, and this is reflected in our approach to teaching and learning on the course. You may also have the opportunity to work with real clients, on real issues, through the Human Rights Law Clinic.

How will I study?

You’ll learn through core modules and options in the autumn and spring terms. In the summer, you undertake supervised work on the LLM dissertation.

You will be assessed through coursework, a portfolio, essays and a 10,000-word dissertation.

Human Rights Law Clinic

When you’ve successfully completed the International Human Rights law core module, you can apply for The Human Rights Law Clinic option.

The Clinic gives you the chance to build on law and theory through the preparation of pro bono legal opinions for real clients. You’ll gain practical insights, work on research, and formulate advice and recommendations on contemporary human rights challenges.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Faculty

The Sussex Centre for Human Rights Research was established to foster a vibrant research culture for human rights researchers within the Sussex Law School.

Our work has a global as well as national focus and we adopt a range of different approaches to human rights research, for example:
-Doctrinal
-Critical
-Theoretical
-Practical
-Interdisciplinary

We hold regular research seminars, workshops and debates, which all students are welcome to attend. Listed below are faculty with particular expertise in human rights.

Careers

This LLM is ideal if you wish to achieve a law-oriented postgraduate qualification in human rights and want to go on to a career in law or human rights advocacy.

The international and comparative nature of this course means that you will be well placed to seek employment in the UK and overseas in organisations such as:
-International law firms
-Governments
-International organisations
-NGOs

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With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students. The LLM International Human Rights and Development offers a mixture of international human rights law, development studies and refugee studies modules. Read more
With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students.

The LLM International Human Rights and Development offers a mixture of international human rights law, development studies and refugee studies modules. You'll explore contemporary debates in the context of specific countries and themes.

You'll gain knowledge of the protection of international human rights within the context of international development and refugee practice and the role of a rights-based approach to international development practice.

Events

The Law Department hosts annual events such as updates on Human Rights delivered by our Visiting Professors, Sir Geoffrey Bindman, Joel Bennthan QC and Imran Khan. We also host the Young Legal Aid Lawyers Question Time and occasional events such as our recent inter-professional conference – Responding to Rape, and meetings and seminars for Burmese human rights campaigners.

Modules

Core Modules:

Images of development
Research methods
International law and human rights
International law in the developing world
Dissertation

Optional Modules:

International business, trade and less developed countries
International humanitarian law
Forced migration and resettlement
International refugee law
Case management
Advocacy
International criminal law
Forced migration in developing societies

Teaching and learning

The LSBU Law Department has a strong set of experts, consultants and international advisors in the field of Human Rights and hosts a number of annual events and conferences.

Head of the Law Department, Andy Unger, has worked as a consultant in former communist countries such as Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus and Georgia. In the South Caucuses, his most recent working has been with the British East-West Centre, designing and supervising the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office funded projects offering human rights training to lawyers and justice officials in the region.

Senior Lecturer in Law Caron Thatcher has observed elections in many parts of the former Soviet Union including Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Kyrgyzstan and also in Russia itself and monitoring the final election of Mr. Putin in 2004.

Professional links

Through our growing pool of visiting fellows and professors, the Law Department has developed a strong network of contacts with leading law practitioners in the UK. Many members of the Law Department are practitioners, or retain strong links with the legal profession. We enjoy strong links with a number of leading European Law Faculties, including Universitie Cergy Pontoise in France, INHOLLAND University in the Netherlands and Zagreb University in Croatia.

Employability

You'll graduate with the necessary knowledge and skills to work in the fields of law, human rights and development (either in the UK or abroad) as advisors, experts, researchers and policy makers.

With a background in law, you might practise in human rights, immigration and asylum, and public law.

With a development studies background you might go on to practice in the NGO sector employing a rights-based approach to development.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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The Postgraduate Diploma in International Human Rights Law offers students the opportunity to specialise in International Human Rights Law, to facilitate enhanced career opportunities, or to lay the foundations for PhD study. Read more
The Postgraduate Diploma in International Human Rights Law offers students the opportunity to specialise in International Human Rights Law, to facilitate enhanced career opportunities, or to lay the foundations for PhD study. 

Course Structure

The Postgraduate Diploma is one year in duration or can be split over two years. The student will complete six subjects. In the first semester, the student will complete three mandatory subjects and in the second semester, they will choose three electives. Assessment in the taught modules in semesters 1 and 2 is by way of assignments and examinations. Upon meeting with the faculty a two-year option may be arranged where necessary.

Core modules:

• Public International Law
• Advanced Legal Research and Writing
• International Human Rights Law

Optional modules:

• International Children's Rights Law*
• International Humanitarian Law*
• Social and Economic Rights*
• International Asylum and Immigration Law*
• International Criminal Law*
• Gender, Sexuality and Human Rights*

*These electives run subject to demand and discretion of the Faculty of Law

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