• University of York Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
  • Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Regent’s University London Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
University of Lincoln Featured Masters Courses
Cass Business School Featured Masters Courses
University of Southampton Featured Masters Courses
University of Kent Featured Masters Courses
Newcastle University Featured Masters Courses
"international" AND "envi…×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (International Environmental Law)

  • "international" AND "environmental" AND "law" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 481
Order by 
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas. Read more
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas.

This specialisation stimulates a critical awareness of the operation of international environmental law and policy, and features a particular focus on topics that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution. You develop a sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy, and the contexts within which international law operates.

You study the theoretical, social, political and scientific perspectives that underlie the substantive areas of law, as well as the practical situations in which international environmental law operates. Graduates of the LLM take with them the knowledge and expertise required to pursue a professional or academic career in this contemporary and developing discipline.

Studying for a Master's in Law (LLM) at Kent means having the certainty of gaining an LLM in a specialist area of Law. The Kent LLM gives you the freedom to leave your choice of specialism open until after you arrive, your specialism being determined by the modules you choose.

About Kent Law School

Kent Law School (KLS) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

In addition to learning the detail of the law, students at Kent are taught to think about the law with regard to its history, development and relationship with wider society. This approach allows students to fully understand the law. Our critical approach not only makes the study of law more interesting, it helps to develop crucial skills and abilities required for a career in legal practice.

The Law School offers its flagship Kent LLM at the University’s Canterbury campus (and three defined LLM programmes at the University’s Brussels centre). Our programmes are open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field. You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

Our programmes are open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field. You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by Kent Law School was ranked 8th in the UK for research intensity. We were also ranked 7th for research power and in the top 20 for research output, research quality and research impact.

An impressive 99% of our research was judged to be of international quality and the School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Course structure

You can tailor your studies to your particular needs and interests to obtain an LLM or Diploma in a single specialisation, in two specialisations jointly, or by choosing a broad range of modules in different areas of law to obtain a general LLM or Diploma in Law.

Your choice of specialisation will be shaped by the modules you take and your dissertation topic. To be awarded an LLM in a single specialisation, at least three of your six modules must be chosen from those associated with that specialisation and your dissertation focusing on that area of law. The other three modules can be chosen from any offered in the Law School. All students are required to take the Legal Research and Writing Skills module. To be awarded a major/minor specialisation you choose three modules associated with one specialisation, and three from another specialisation, with the dissertation determining your 'major' specialisation.

For example, a student who completes at least three modules in International Commercial Law and completes a dissertation in this area would graduate with an LLM in International Commercial Law; a student who completes three Criminal Justice modules and three Environmental Law modules and then undertakes a dissertation which engages with Criminal Justice would graduate with an LLM in Criminal Justice and Environmental Law.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of this specialisation stream. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation and student demand. Most specialisation streams will require you to study a combination of subject specialisation modules and modules from other specialisation streams so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

LW852 European Union Environmental Law and Policy

LW906 International Environmental Law – Legal Foundations

LW884 International Environmental Law – Substantive Legal Aspects

LW888 Climate Change and Renewable Energy Law

Assessment
The postgraduate programmes offered within the Law School are usually taught in seminar format. Students on the Diploma and LLM programmes study three modules in each of the autumn and spring terms. The modules normally are assessed by a 4-5,000-word essay. Students undertaking an LLM degree must write a dissertation of 15-20,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to provide:

1. LLM: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) advanced research, writing and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.
PGDip: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) written and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.

2. LLM: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of particular areas of law.
PGDip: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of the subjects studied.

3. LLM & PGDip: A degree of specialisation in areas of law and policy chosen from the LLM option streams available and an opportunity for students to engage with academic work at the frontiers of scholarship.

4. LLM & PGDip: A critical awareness of the operation of law and policy, particularly in contexts that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution.

5. LLM: The skills to undertake supervised research on an agreed topic in their specialisation and to encourage the production of original, evaluative analysis that meets high standards of scholarship.

6. LLM & PGDip: Critical, analytical and problem-solving skills that can be applied to a wide range of contexts.

7. LLM & PGDip: The skills of academic legal research and writing.

8. LLM: A sophisticated grounding in research methods.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Information about the internship programme for LLM students can be found on the Kent Law School Employability blog - http://blogs.kent.ac.uk/klsemployability/postgraduates/llm-internships/

Learn more about Kent

Visit Us - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/visit/openday/pgevents.html

International Students - https://www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent/

Why study at Kent? - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Read less
Northumbria has an enviable reputation for its practical, innovative LLM programmes, which are accessible to a wide range of professionals. Read more
Northumbria has an enviable reputation for its practical, innovative LLM programmes, which are accessible to a wide range of professionals.

Environmental law is a recognised branch of public international law shaping a significant amount of domestic law and policy. The protection of the environment is of global concern and this programme is designed to cover key themes of interest to those who have responsibility for environmental issues, whether students, in the corporate sector or legal professionals. This postgraduate programme provides students with an in-depth understanding of the legal issues involved with international environmental law and regulation and will provide students with a unique and reputable qualification in this emerging and exciting area of study.

Students on the programme gain specialist legal knowledge within a practical context, whilst developing expertise in chosen areas and enhancing research skills. The programme is designed to meet the needs of a range of students interested in environmental law and specifically international environmental law, including students wishing to improve upon their undergraduate qualifications and also professionals working in the field of environmental regulation within the domestic, EU or international sphere.

Read less
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas. Read more
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas.

Following a specialisation in International Criminal Justice enables you to develop a critical understanding of the operation of international and transnational criminal justice, particularly in contexts that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution. You learn about the main legal instruments and institutions that provide for international co-operation and prosecution of international, transnational and national crime and the impact of human rights and combine this with critical reflection of the broader context and of the effectiveness of law.

There is co-operation with the MA in Criminology, run by the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research. In addition to available law options, you may choose one module from the MA in Criminology. This includes modules on terrorism and sociological theories of violence and gender and crime in a globalised world.

You are also encouraged to participate in the activities of the Kent Centre for Critical International Law (CeCIL).

International Criminal Justice will be of particular interest to those who work, intend to work, or have an interest in the fields of international and transnational criminal justice, criminal justice and human rights more broadly.

Studying for a Master's in Law (LLM) at Kent means having the certainty of gaining an LLM in a specialist area of Law. The Kent LLM gives you the freedom to leave your choice of specialism open until after you arrive, your specialism being determined by the modules you choose.

About Kent Law School

Kent Law School (KLS) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

In addition to learning the detail of the law, students at Kent are taught to think about the law with regard to its history, development and relationship with wider society. This approach allows students to fully understand the law. Our critical approach not only makes the study of law more interesting, it helps to develop crucial skills and abilities required for a career in legal practice.

The Law School offers its flagship Kent LLM at the University’s Canterbury campus (and two defined LLM programmes at the University’s Brussels centre). Our programmes are open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field. You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by Kent Law School was ranked 8th in the UK for research intensity. We were also ranked 7th for research power and in the top 20 for research output, research quality and research impact.

An impressive 99% of our research was judged to be of international quality and the School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Course structure

You can tailor your studies to your particular needs and interests to obtain an LLM or Diploma in a single specialisation, in two specialisations jointly, or by choosing a broad range of modules in different areas of law to obtain a general LLM or Diploma in Law.

As a student on the LLM at Canterbury, your choice of specialisation will be shaped by the modules you take and your dissertation topic. To be awarded an LLM in a single specialisation, at least three of your six modules must be chosen from those associated with that specialisation with your dissertation also focusing on that area of law. The other three modules can be chosen from any offered in the Law School. All students are also required to take the Legal Research and Writing Skills module. To be awarded a major/minor specialisation you will need to choose three modules associated with one specialisation, and three from another specialisation, with the dissertation determining which is your 'major' specialisation.

For example, a student who completes at least three modules in International Commercial Law and completes a dissertation in this area would graduate with an LLM in International Commercial Law; a student who completes three Criminal Justice modules and three Environmental Law modules and then undertakes a dissertation which engages with Criminal Justice would graduate with an LLM in Criminal Justice and Environmental Law.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of this specialisation stream. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation and student demand. Most specialisation streams will require you to study a combination of subject specialisation modules and modules from other specialisation streams so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

LW843 International Human Rights Law

LW846 International Criminal Law

LW886 Transnational Criminal Law

LW924 European Union Criminal Law and Procedure

Assessment

The postgraduate programmes offered within the Law School are usually taught in seminar format. Students on the Diploma and LLM programmes study three modules in each of the autumn and spring terms. The modules normally are assessed by a 4-5,000-word essay. Students undertaking an LLM degree must write a dissertation of 15-20,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to provide:

1. LLM: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) advanced research, writing and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.
PGDip: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) written and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.

2. LLM: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of particular areas of law.
PGDip: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of the subjects studied.

3. LLM & PGDip: A degree of specialisation in areas of law and policy chosen from the LLM option streams available and an opportunity for students to engage with academic work at the frontiers of scholarship.

4. LLM & PGDip: A critical awareness of the operation of law and policy, particularly in contexts that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution.

5. LLM: The skills to undertake supervised research on an agreed topic in their specialisation and to encourage the production of original, evaluative analysis that meets high standards of scholarship.

6. LLM & PGDip: Critical, analytical and problem-solving skills that can be applied to a wide range of contexts.

7. LLM & PGDip: The skills of academic legal research and writing.

8. LLM: A sophisticated grounding in research methods.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Information about the internship programme for LLM students can be found on the Kent Law School Employability blog - http://blogs.kent.ac.uk/klsemployability/postgraduates/llm-internships/

Learn more about Kent

Visit us - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/visit/openday/pgevents.html

International Students - https://www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent/

Why study at Kent? - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Read less
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas. Read more
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas.

Law and the Humanities is a distinct field of interdisciplinary study of growing significance. As the only programme of its kind in the UK, this LLM specialisation, taught at the University’s Canterbury and Paris centres, offers a unique perspective on the study and practice of law.

It draws upon the theoretical and methodological richness of the humanities, including history, political and social theory, literature, theatre and visual culture studies, to equip students with the conceptual tools and skills for a more thorough understanding of the traditions and workings of the law. It develops and strengthens students’ analytical, critical, and imaginative capabilities, and cultivates specific skills such as textual analysis, critical reading, and effective argument.

Studying for a Master's in Law (LLM) at Kent means having the certainty of gaining an LLM in a specialist area of Law. The Kent LLM gives you the freedom to leave your choice of specialism open until after you arrive - your specialism being determined by the modules you choose.

About Kent Law School

Kent Law School (KLS) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

In addition to learning the detail of the law, students at Kent are taught to think about the law with regard to its history, development and relationship with wider society. This approach allows students to fully understand the law. Our critical approach not only makes the study of law more interesting, it helps to develop crucial skills and abilities required for a career in legal practice.

The Law School offers its flagship Kent LLM at the University’s Canterbury campus (and two defined LLM programmes at the University’s Brussels campus). The KLS programmes enable you to gain expertise in a wide range of international and domestic subjects and to develop advanced, transferable research, writing and oral communication skills. All of our LLM and Diploma programmes allow you to broaden and deepen your understanding and knowledge of law.

Our programmes attract excellent law graduates from around the world and are also open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field. You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by Kent Law School was ranked 8th in the UK for research intensity. We were also ranked 7th for research power and in the top 20 for research output, research quality and research impact.

An impressive 99% of our research was judged to be of international quality and the School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Course structure

You can tailor your studies to your particular needs and interests to obtain an LLM or Diploma in a single specialisation, in two specialisations jointly, or by choosing a broad range of modules in different areas of law to obtain a general LLM or Diploma in Law.

As a student on the LLM at Canterbury, your choice of specialisation will be shaped by the modules you take and your dissertation topic. To be awarded an LLM in a single specialisation, at least three of your six modules must be chosen from those associated with that specialisation with your dissertation also focusing on that area of law. The other three modules can be chosen from any offered in the Law School. All students are also required to take the Legal Research and Writing Skills module. To be awarded a major/minor specialisation you will need to choose three modules associated with one specialisation, and three from another specialisation, with the dissertation determining which is your 'major' specialisation.

For example, a student who completes at least three modules in International Commercial Law and completes a dissertation in this area would graduate with an LLM in International Commercial Law; a student who completes three Criminal Justice modules and three Environmental Law modules and then undertakes a dissertation which engages with Criminal Justice would graduate with an LLM in Criminal Justice and Environmental Law.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of this specialisation stream. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation and student demand. Most specialisation streams will require you to study a combination of subject specialisation modules and modules from other specialisation streams so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

Several modules from the MA on Resistance offered by the School of Politics are also available.

LW 927 - Law and the Humanities I: Ethos and Scholarship - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW927
LW 928 - Law and the Humanities 2: Current Issues - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW928
LW 925 - Cultural Heritage Law - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW925
LW 843 - International Human Rights Law - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW843
LW 813 - Contemporary Topics in Intellectual Property - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW813

Assessment

The postgraduate programmes offered within the Law School are usually taught in seminar format. Students on the Diploma and LLM programmes study three modules in each of the autumn and spring terms. The modules normally are assessed by a 4-5,000-word essay. Students undertaking an LLM degree must write a dissertation of 15-20,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to provide:

- LLM: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) advanced research, writing and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.
PDip: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) written and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.

- LLM: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of particular areas of law.
PDip: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of the subjects studied.

- LLM & PDip: A degree of specialisation in areas of law and policy chosen from the LLM option streams available and an opportunity for students to engage with academic work at the frontiers of scholarship.

- LLM & PDip: A critical awareness of the operation of law and policy, particularly in contexts that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution.

- LLM: The skills to undertake supervised research on an agreed topic in their specialisation and to encourage the production of original, evaluative analysis that meets high standards of scholarship.

- LLM & PDip: Critical, analytical and problem-solving skills that can be applied to a wide range of contexts.

- LLM & PDip: The skills of academic legal research and writing.

- LLM: A sophisticated grounding in research methods.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Information about the internship programme for LLM students can be found on the Kent Law School Employability blog - http://blogs.kent.ac.uk/klsemployability/postgraduates/llm-internships/

Learn more about Kent

Visit us - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/visit/openday/pgevents.html

International Students - https://www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent/

Why study at Kent? - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Read less
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas. Read more
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas.

This specialisation examines the role of law within contemporary health care, providing a sound introduction to the institutions and organisations associated with medical law and the inter-relationships between them. It explores the practical context within which medical law operates in order to develop an understanding of the theoretical and ethical issues that underpin it. A foundation module introduces students who are new to the study of law to the key principles and institutions associated with the legal system, core medico-legal concepts and research methods.

Studying for a Master's in Law (LLM) at Kent means having the certainty of gaining an LLM in a specialist area of Law. The Kent LLM gives you the freedom to leave your choice of specialism open until after you arrive, your specialism being determined by the modules you choose.

About Kent Law School

Kent Law School (KLS) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

In addition to learning the detail of the law, students at Kent are taught to think about the law with regard to its history, development and relationship with wider society. This approach allows students to fully understand the law. Our critical approach not only makes the study of law more interesting, it helps to develop crucial skills and abilities required for a career in legal practice.

The Law School offers its flagship Kent LLM at the University’s Canterbury campus (and two defined LLM programmes at the University’s Brussels campus). The KLS programmes enable you to gain expertise in a wide range of international and domestic subjects and to develop advanced, transferable research, writing and oral communication skills. All of our LLM and Diploma programmes allow you to broaden and deepen your understanding and knowledge of law.

Our programmes attract excellent law graduates from around the world and are also open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field. You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by Kent Law School was ranked 8th in the UK for research intensity. We were also ranked 7th for research power and in the top 20 for research output, research quality and research impact.

An impressive 99% of our research was judged to be of international quality and the School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Course structure

You can tailor your studies to your particular needs and interests to obtain an LLM or Diploma in a single specialisation, in two specialisations jointly, or by choosing a broad range of modules in different areas of law to obtain a general LLM or Diploma in Law.

As a student on the LLM at Canterbury, your choice of specialisation will be shaped by the modules you take and your dissertation topic. To be awarded an LLM in a single specialisation, at least three of your six modules must be chosen from those associated with that specialisation with your dissertation also focusing on that area of law. The other three modules can be chosen from any offered in the Law School. All students are also required to take the Legal Research and Writing Skills module. To be awarded a major/minor specialisation you will need to choose three modules associated with one specialisation, and three from another specialisation, with the dissertation determining which is your 'major' specialisation.

For example, a student who completes at least three modules in International Commercial Law and completes a dissertation in this area would graduate with an LLM in International Commercial Law; a student who completes three Criminal Justice modules and three Environmental Law modules and then undertakes a dissertation which engages with Criminal Justice would graduate with an LLM in Criminal Justice and Environmental Law.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of this specialisation stream. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation and student demand. Most specialisation streams will require you to study a combination of subject specialisation modules and modules from other specialisation streams so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

LW862 Death and Dying

LW864 Foundations of the English Legal System

LW921 Privacy and Data Protection Law

LW863 Consent to Treatment

LW866 Medical Practice and Malpractice

LW867 Reproduction and the Beginning of Life

Assessment

The postgraduate programmes offered within the Law School are usually taught in seminar format. Students on the Diploma and LLM programmes study three modules in each of the autumn and spring terms. The modules normally are assessed by a 4-5,000-word essay. Students undertaking an LLM degree must write a dissertation of 15-20,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to provide:

1. LLM: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) advanced research, writing and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.
PGDip: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) written and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.

2. LLM: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of particular areas of law.
PGDip: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of the subjects studied.

3. LLM & PGDip: A degree of specialisation in areas of law and policy chosen from the LLM option streams available and an opportunity for students to engage with academic work at the frontiers of scholarship.

4. LLM & PGDip: A critical awareness of the operation of law and policy, particularly in contexts that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution.

5. LLM: The skills to undertake supervised research on an agreed topic in their specialisation and to encourage the production of original, evaluative analysis that meets high standards of scholarship.

6. LLM & PGDip: Critical, analytical and problem-solving skills that can be applied to a wide range of contexts.

7. LLM & PGDip: The skills of academic legal research and writing.

8. LLM: A sophisticated grounding in research methods.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Many students at our Brussels centre who undertake internships are offered contracts in Brussels immediately after graduation. Others have joined their home country’s diplomatic service, entered international organisations, or have chosen to undertake a ‘stage’ at the European Commission, or another EU institution.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Information about the internship programme for LLM students can be found on the Kent Law School Employability blog - http://blogs.kent.ac.uk/klsemployability/postgraduates/llm-internships/

Learn more about Kent

Visit us -https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/visit/openday/pgevents.html

International Students - https://www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent/

Why study at Kent? - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Read less
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas. Read more
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas.

Studying for a Master's in Law (LLM) at Kent means having the certainty of gaining an LLM in a specialist area of Law. The Kent LLM gives you the freedom to leave your choice of specialism open until after you arrive, your specialism being determined by the modules you choose.

About Kent Law School

Kent Law School (KLS) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

In addition to learning the detail of the law, students at Kent are taught to think about the law with regard to its history, development and relationship with wider society. This approach allows students to fully understand the law. Our critical approach not only makes the study of law more interesting, it helps to develop crucial skills and abilities required for a career in legal practice.

The Law School offers its flagship Kent LLM at the University’s Canterbury campus (and two defined LLM programmes at the University’s Brussels centre). Our programmes are open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field.

You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by Kent Law School was ranked 8th in the UK for research intensity. We were also ranked 7th for research power and in the top 20 for research output, research quality and research impact.

An impressive 99% of our research was judged to be of international quality and the School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Course structure

You can tailor your studies to your particular needs and interests to obtain an LLM or Diploma in a single specialisation, in two specialisations jointly, or by choosing a broad range of modules in different areas of law to obtain a general LLM or Diploma in Law.

As a student on the LLM at Canterbury, your choice of specialisation will be shaped by the modules you take and your dissertation topic. To be awarded an LLM in a single specialisation, at least three of your six modules must be chosen from those associated with that specialisation with your dissertation also focusing on that area of law. The other three modules can be chosen from any offered in the Law School. All students are also required to take the Legal Research and Writing Skills module. To be awarded a major/minor specialisation you will need to choose three modules associated with one specialisation, and three from another specialisation, with the dissertation determining which is your 'major' specialisation.

For example, a student who completes at least three modules in International Commercial Law and completes a dissertation in this area would graduate with an LLM in International Commercial Law; a student who completes three Criminal Justice modules and three Environmental Law modules and then undertakes a dissertation which engages with Criminal Justice would graduate with an LLM in Criminal Justice and Environmental Law.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

LW919 - Legal Research and Writing Skills (5 credits) - http://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW919
LW801 - Intellectual Property (20 credits) - http://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW801
LW802 - International Business Transactions (20 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW802
LW810 - International Law on Foreign Investment (20 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW810
LW814 - Public International Law (20 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW814
LW815 - EU Constitutional and Institutional Law (20 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW815
LW839 - Environmental Quality Law (20 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW839
LW844 - Legal Aspects of Contemporary International Problems (20 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW844
LW847 - World Trade Organisation (WTO) Law and Practice I (20 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW847
LW852 - European Environmental Law and Policy (20 credits) - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW852
More available - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/327/law#!structure

Assessment

The postgraduate programmes offered within the Law School are usually taught in seminar format. Students on the Diploma and LLM programmes study three modules in each of the autumn and spring terms. The modules normally are assessed by a 4-5,000-word essay. Students undertaking an LLM degree must write a dissertation of 15-20,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide a postgraduate qualification of value to those intending to play a leading role in any field of law
- provide a detailed knowledge and high level of understanding of a range of specialised subject areas
- provide more broadly-based communication skills of general value to those seeking postgraduate employment
- provide a sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and particular contexts in which law operates
- provide a degree of specialisation in areas of public international law of individual interest from among the wide range of LLM/PDip options that are available and which require you to engage with academic work which is at the frontiers of scholarship
- encourage you to develop a critical awareness of the operation of public international law, particularly in contexts which are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution
- provide you with the skills to undertake supervised research on an agreed topic in law and to encourage the production of original and evaluative commentary that meets high standards of scholarship (applies to LLM only)
- encourage you to develop critical, analytical and problem-solving skills which can be applied to a wide range of contexts
- develop your skills of academic legal research, particularly by the written presentation of arguments in a manner which meets relevant academic conventions
- assist those students who are minded to pursue academic research at a higher level in acquiring a sophisticated grounding in the essential techniques involved by following a specialised module in research methods (applies to LLM only)
- contribute to widening participation in higher education by taking account of the past experience of applicants in determining admissions whilst ensuring that all students that are admitted possess the potential to complete the programme successfully.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Many students at our Brussels centre who undertake internships are offered contracts in Brussels immediately after graduation. Others have joined their home country’s diplomatic service, entered international organisations, or have chosen to undertake a ‘stage’ at the European Commission, or another EU institution.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Information about the internship programme for LLM students can be found on the Kent Law School Employability blog - http://blogs.kent.ac.uk/klsemployability/postgraduates/llm-internships/

Learn more about Kent

Visit us - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/visit/openday/pgevents.html

International Students - https://www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent/

Why study at Kent? - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Read less
http://www.ies.be/about. The Institute for European Studies (IES), a Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence in Brussels, offers an outstanding research-focused environment in the heart of Europe. Read more

The Institute for European Studies

http://www.ies.be/about

The Institute for European Studies (IES), a Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence in Brussels, offers an outstanding research-focused environment in the heart of Europe. Located close to the main EU institutions, and in proximity to international organisations and law firms, there are excellent networking and internship opportunities. The lES boasts excellent teaching facilities and a modern working space, right next to the amenities of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) Etterbeek campus.

The LLM in International and European law

http://www.llminbrussels.eu/about/

The LLM in International and European law is a postgraduate LLM renowned for its outstanding quality and international character. Hosted right at the heart of the European Union, this Brussels-based LLM (formerly known as “PILC”) has offered excellence in this field for 44 years.

The programme is tailored for demanding global career in law, as the professors are nominated specifically for each course in the Programme and are an international mixture of high-ranking practitioners and leading academics.

The courses are exclusively at advanced master (i.e post-graduate) level and the curriculum covers in parallel the essential aspects of international and European law.

We have made special efforts to maintain our tuition as affordable as possible to the students. Small class size ensures a true “family feel” on a global scale.
Our over 1200 PILC alumni are of 108 nationalities.

Programme Setup

http://www.llminbrussels.eu/academics/

The LLM in International and European law is an 60 ECTS Advanced Master’s degree obtained in one academic year (from end September until early July)

The programme offers a balanced, versatile package that consists of compulsory and optional courses as well as a Master thesis.


Four compulsory courses (18 credits) giving a broad overview of the main topics of international and European law in the first semester:

- EU Institutional Framework and Judicial Protection (Profs. Devuyst and Arts);
- Globalisation, International Law and Sustainable Development (Prof. van Thiel);
- International and Comparative Law (Profs. Smis and Gosalbo);
- EU Economic Law (Prof. Joris);

These courses are accompanied by two compulsory courses (6 credits) which deepen the knowledge and insights in international and European law:

- International and European Protection of Human Rights (Prof. Gutwirth);
- International Economic Law and Organizations (Prof. Hoffmeister).

In addition, to help set the mood for the Thesis and to gain experience in teamwork in an international context, you are to team up at the start of the first semester in multinational groups of three to four students to write a joint research paper (for the ‘Globalisation, International Law and Sustainable Development’ course).

Second Semester

In the second semester you will follow the two remaining compulsory courses (6 credits):
- International and EU Competition Law (Prof. Smulders);
- EU External Relations (Prof. Martenczuk).

You also need to choose whether to complete the courses offered in the Public Law or the Business Law option.

The Public Law option:

- *Case study on Public International/EU law (Profs. Kalimo and Oberthür);
- EU Environmental Law in an International Context (Profs. Kalimo and Oberthür);
- International and European Criminal Law (Prof. Smis).

The Business Law option:

- *Case study on European Competition Law (Prof. Joris);
- European and International Private Law (Prof. Nuyts);
- International and European Taxation (Prof. van Thiel).


Teaching staff

The teaching staff is a unique mixture of renowned EU scholars and top level EU and international law practitioners. They combine academic rigour with the latest practical insights in a context of cultural diversity.

Applications and scholarships

http://www.llminbrussels.eu/admissions/

We accept and review applications on a rolling basis, starting 1 October. We recommend prospective students to apply as soon as possible, as the selection will be closed once the full quota of maximum 40 qualifying candidates is reached.

The IES Selection Committee aims at providing a decision within two weeks from receiving all the application documents and letters of reference duly completed. You will receive the decision by both by e-mail and by post.
For the period 2016-2017, IES is able to cap the tuition fee at €4800.

Visit our website for details on how to apply.

Career & alumni

http://www.llminbrussels.eu/news/

All IES students can benefit from career advice, including interview preparation and CV review at the VUB Career Centre. This unique service offered by the VUB in cooperation with Randstad was launched in 2011. Clients of the VUB Career Centre include major law firms, the European Commission, the European Parliament, European Agencies and consultancies. We have over 1200 highly successful alumni who are now working in international institutions such as the European Union, the World Trade Organization, the International Monetary Fund, the United Nations and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, in national administrations, diplomatic services, the judiciary, as well as in major law firms, corporations and NGOs.

Read less
Our Master of Law Degree will equip you with the knowledge and relevant skills to enhance your professional career in a range of legal environments. Read more
Our Master of Law Degree will equip you with the knowledge and relevant skills to enhance your professional career in a range of legal environments.

Responding to student and employer demand, we have restructured our top-rated Law degree to incorporate maximum flexibility both in the topics you cover and in the way and pace you learn. Our courses are ranked within the top Universities by the Complete University Guide and The Guardian University Tables.

We have added further pathways allowing you to specialise in such sought-after areas of expertise as Dispute Resolution, International Commercial Law, International Law and Energy Law or to spread your studies across a wider selection of the modules we offer at Masters level. There is a strong international flavour to the subjects offered. You are now able to study online, on campus or combine on campus classes with online ones to suit your circumstances. Alternatively, individual modules are available for the purposes of Continuing Professional Development: http://www.rgu.ac.uk/professional

Visit the website: http://www.rgu.ac.uk/law/study-options/distance-and-flexible-learning/llm-law-degree/

Course detail

A candidate for the LLM Master of Laws must complete 180 credit points, comprising of our list of LLM modules (see link below), and including a dissertation. The choice of modules for any one candidate may be limited by module availability in any particular year, by timetabling factors, by prerequisites that a module may have, by the limit on online modules that may be taken by international students for visa purposes, and for any other reason approved by the Head of Law. A candidate who does not hold an LLB degree or equivalent may be required to include the Legal Framework module (subject to validation) within the modules chosen.

Master of Laws: LLM Specialism

Candidates may be awarded a specialist LLM if, in addition to fulfilling the requirements and conditions of the LLM, they obtain the appropriate ratio of credit points in the specialist area. In order to obtain an LLM ‘with’ a specialism, at least 25% of the modules studied must be from the chosen specialist list of modules; in order to an LLM ‘and’ a specialism, at least 40% of the modules studied must be from the chosen specialist list, as follows:

LLM Law and Dispute Resolution

• Theory And Principles Of Conflict Resolution
• Mediation In Practice
• Dispute Resolution in Oil and Gas Contracting
• Construction Adjudication Law
• Mediation in Context
• Advanced Mediation Practice

Either
• International Commercial Dispute Resolution
or
• Arbitration Law

LLM Law and International Commercial Law

• International Business Law (on campus only)
• Intellectual Property Law (on campus only)
• Employment Contracts & Rights
• Construction Law
• Advanced Construction Law
• International Corporate Governance (on campus only)
• European Union Trade Law (on campus only)
• Compliance (In International Business)
• Legal Aspects Of Mergers & Acquisitions
• Maritime Law

Either
• International Commercial Dispute Resolution
or
• Arbitration Law Module (Distance Learning)

LLM Law and International Law

This award cannot currently be obtained through fully online study, but will be available from 2017/18;
• International Business Law (on campus only)
• Public International Law (on campus only)
• European Union Trade Law (on campus only)
• Compliance (In International Business)
• International Construction Contracts
• Maritime Law
• Intellectual Property Law (on campus only)
• Comparative Company Law

LLM Law and Energy Law

No more than 5 modules may be selected from this list, students seeking to take further options in this specialism are advised to enrol on the LLM/MSc Oil and Gas Law course.

• Oil And Gas Law
• Oil & Gas Taxation: Fiscal Law and Policy (on campus only)
• Environmental Aspects Of Oil And Gas Law
• Energy Law And Policy
• Renewable Energy Issues
• Dispute Resolution in Oil and Gas Contracting
• Oil And Gas Contract Law

Format

You are able to choose whether to take only modules that are taught on campus in face to face classes or to add to the mix by taking online modules. In either case you are supported by the Moodle learning platform, and you will be taught and supported by a teaching team which contains a balance of experienced industry professionals and high quality academic staff - who will help create a challenging interactive environment for your study.

The programme is designed to maximise flexibility in the timing as well as the content of your studies: you can join the course in September or January; you can study full-time or part-time.

Careers

Whatever you choose, our classes prepare you for a future where your knowledge and skills will truly make a difference. If you are a recent graduate, this course will assist you in securing your first role within a law or business environment, or prepare you for further academic study. In an increasingly competitive jobs market, practitioners equipped with both understanding of commercially relevant aspects of law and strong professional skills are highly sought after. The programme also provides the opportunity for lawyers in mid-career to acquire increasingly expected skills and knowledge while non-lawyers are assisted in the transition into specialist legal areas that complement their existing experience in business and commerce.

A Masters qualification is key to career advancement and professional confidence, and is a highly regarded asset in any professional or academic sector. This course will enhance your knowledge and ability, professional standing and employability. Several of the modules are accredited or recognised by professional bodies such as the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators and the Energy Institute.

How to apply

To find out how to apply, use the following link: http://www.rgu.ac.uk/applyonline

Funding

For information on funding, including loans, scholarships and Disabled Students Allowance (DSA) please click the following link: http://www.rgu.ac.uk/future-students/finance-and-scholarships/financial-support/uk-students/postgraduate-students/postgraduate-students/

Read less
The MSc in International Management & Law is a unique course that will help you to develop the knowledge and skills required by international managers and leaders to operate globally with a solid understanding of various forms of legal regulation. Read more

Why this course?

The MSc in International Management & Law is a unique course that will help you to develop the knowledge and skills required by international managers and leaders to operate globally with a solid understanding of various forms of legal regulation.

You'll develop the knowledge, understanding, technical and analytical skills in International Business and Law. This will allow you to work in all organisations where a good knowledge of International Business, Management Practice and Law is required.

What you’ll study

Semester 1
You’ll begin with an introduction to the Professional Management Practice programme. Running throughout the first two semesters, this class offers a combination of workshops and learning exercises. You’ll have the opportunity to identify and develop the soft skills needed as a future international manager or leader.

You’ll also attend an Integrated Skills Workshop which focuses on your personal approach to learning and managing yourself.

Core classes:
-Managing Across Cultures
-Law of International Business

Semester 2
Core classes:
-Global Business Environment
-Comparative Law of Obligations

You’ll also take part in group exercises (eg arranging a professional, cultural or careers-focused event) to address a managerial or leadership development need identified during the outward bound activity.

You’ll choose two elective classes from a shared pool of international and general management and one elective class from law topics. Elective modules vary from year to year, but may include:

Management electives:
-Digital Leadership: Strategy & Management
-Programme & Project Management
-Strategic Financial Management
-Managing in Europe (Toulouse)
-Developing Effective Consulting Skills
-Foundations of Risk
-Games of Strategy
-New Venture Creation
-Leadership

Law electives:
-Contemporary Employment Relations
-Labour Law in the Global Economy
-Comparative Company Law
-World Trade Law
-UK & EU Environmental Law
-International Environment Law
-International Banking Law
-Financial Regulation & Compliance
-E-Commerce
-Arbitration Law
-Intellectual Property Law

You’re required to complete a practically-oriented project. This gives you an opportunity to explore, at length, some aspects of theory or methods, or knowledge or skills introduced on the taught element of the programme. You can focus on either International Management or Law. The project is supported by a class in project methodology.

Work placement

This course includes a number of elective classes for you to choose from. If you're interested in studying abroad, the Managing in Europe elective class provides the opportunity to do this with classes taught at Toulouse Business School, France.

Collaborative learning

The MSc in International Management & Law is designed to be a collaborative learning experience. It's a partnership between academic staff and students, and between students from different cultural backgrounds. Working together allows those involved to build upon their collective understanding in interrogating, at an advanced level, the global issues impacting organisations.

Course content

Semester 1
The MSc in International Management & Law begins with an introduction to the Management Development Programme. During this introduction, it's impressed on you that you're responsible for developing both your knowledge and skills and that you should approach your studies as active learners. This introduction is complemented by an Integrated Skills Workshop which focuses on your personal approach to learning and managing themselves.

The core Law class in the first semester is the Law of International Business. It introduces you to the concepts underpinning the regulation of businesses. It will explain the different types of business entities and introduce you to company and corporate law concepts.

In this semester the core International Management class is Managing Across Cultures. This class will help you develop an awareness, knowledge and understanding of the importance of the often overlooked 'soft skills' of management, particularly as concerns cross-cultural variations and their impact on the practices and processes of management. It'll examine the main concepts currently employed to understand the complexity presented to managers in their process of managing people across national and cultural borders, addressing the issues of the impact of culture on management structures and processes. It will then provide understanding of the role which cross-cultural management can play in achieving competitive advantage in international business.

Semester 2
The programme then leads into two core classes. The first is in International Management, namely Global Business Environment. This class is designed to inspire you with the platform of knowledge and understanding on the economic, institutional and socio-cultural contexts which form the background to International Management.

The core Law class is Comparative Law of Obligations. This will consider obligations law in the context of different constitutional arrangements around the world. It will include material on delict/torts, contract and restitution in countries including the UK, Australia, Canada, the EU, the USA and China and also some material on the law of obligations in the Islamic tradition.

Upon completion of the compulsory classes and towards the end of the taught programme, you choose elective classes, allowing you to explore a range of topics. Students enrolled on the MSc in International Management & Law will be able to choose classes from a shared pool of international, general management and law topics available.

Semester 3
The project class rounds off the programme in the third and final semester. This provides you with an opportunity to explore at length and in depth some aspects of theory or methods, knowledge or skills introduced on the taught element of the programme. The project is supported by a class in project methodology. At this stage of the programme you may be interested in aligning career aspirations with project work.

Learning & teaching

Modes of learning include lectures, seminars, workshops, case studies, expert guest lecturers, self-study exercises, project work, and individual study and research. Individual class specifications detail the objectives, learning outcomes and content for each core module of the programme, with a breakdown of teaching methods and forms of assessments used.

There's a strong theme throughout the core classes of ongoing transferable skills development, including team-work, problem-solving, data handling and analytical skills, evaluation skills and written and oral communication. Particularly, the consulting in practice class provides you with professional, highly-transferable skills including leadership, project management, decision-making and negotiation.

Assessment

All core classes in the programme include coursework as an element of final assessment. Other methods of assessment are also used, appropriate to the focus of the class, including group and individual project work, presentations and online assessed exercises. Relative weighting of coursework and other assessment methods vary from class to class.

The dissertation or project will be assessed by in-depth project evaluation reports, supervisor feedback reports and a critical reflection of professional and personal skills.

How can I fund my course?

One scholarship of £6000 – DSO Female Leader of the Future
One scholarship of £6000 – DSO European Visionary Scholarship* (for those who are prepared to test new ideas; to go beyond the status quo and make a difference to industry and society)
Two scholarships of £6000 – DSO International Leader of the Future Scholarships
£2000 partial scholarships for Strathclyde graduates may also be available for eligible candidates

Check our Scholarship Search for more help with fees and funding: http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/

Scottish students:
Students living in Scotland can find out more about funding from the Student Awards Agency Scotland.

English/EU students:
Students ordinarily resident in England may be eligible to apply for a loan of up to £10,000 to cover their tuition fees and living costs. Students resident in the EU may also apply.

Read less
Security and the maintenance and promotion of security are key issues in international law and international relations. Read more

Why study International Law & Security at Dundee?

Security and the maintenance and promotion of security are key issues in international law and international relations. There are many career opportunities in these areas ranging from employment with an intergovernmental organisation such as the United Nations, to employment in an international court or tribunal, to advising government and securing a role in the military. If you intend to pursue such a career, then you will need a good understanding of why and how the international community and individual states are to respond to threats to international security. For this, you will need to understand the context in which decisions are made. international law and international relations provide that context.

Our MLitt in International Law & Security provides an overview of concepts and themes relating to the study of international security in the contemporary world, from a legal as well as an international relations point of view. It introduces both traditional and 'new' approaches to defining and conceptualising security and considers the impact of International Relations theories upon the subject. It also examines key issues such as war, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, the privatisation of warfare, energy security and environmental degradation.

Our course will equip you with the necessary analytical tools to understand and evaluate all aspects of security in the contemporary world. The issues outlined above lie at the heart of our course, which provides an opportunity to gain a deep understanding of the interactions of law and international relations and the way they combine to shape the responses of states to threats to security. The course also provides an opportunity to understand how those responses in turn shape international law and international relations.

What's so good about International Law & Security at Dundee?

The University of Dundee runs two parallel masters degree in International Law & Security: MLitt International Law & Security for graduates in International Relations or similar subjects, and LLM International Law & Security for Law graduates.

Each degree has one core module, and you will also be able to choose specialist option modules from the same list. You will also research and write a dissertation in your chosen area of interest, or work on a research project with integrated internship.

Internship opportunity:
The opportunity to undertake an approved internship as a part the programme of studies is an exciting innovation in this area of study which will enable students to gain a unique insight into the application of the materials addressed in taught modules and to gain valuable experience to add to their CV.

How you will be taught

The course starts in September or January, each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis or 24 months on a part time basis. A variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, independent research, seminars and presentations.

What you will study

The course is made up of two International Relations modules and two Law modules which are delivered during our two teaching semesters (Sep-Dec and Jan-Apr), and detailed below.

During the summer vacation students normally write a dissertation.

All students take the Law week-long induction in January, plus the first half of the module Legal Research Skills(including the first assessment), usually in your first semester, but can be deferred to your second semester if you don't select any first semester Law modules. You also take the non-credit bearing generic skills training seminars offered by the Humanities.

First Semester (Jan-Apr)

International Security (core module), plus one other taught 30-credit modules (from the list below).

Summer period (May-Aug)

Politics Dissertation (60 credits)

Second Semester (Sep-Dec)

Two taught 30-credit modules (from the list below).

Part time study

For part-time students the taught modules will be spread out over two years instead of one in a similar format as above, and the Dissertation or Research Project (with integrated internship) will be undertaken during the summer period of the second year of study.

Typical optional modules available

Individual Criminal Liability in International Criminal Law
Transnational Crime and Counter Terrorism
International Dispute Resolution
UN Human Rights Law
Regional Human Rights Systems
Global Human Rights: Traditions & Inspirations
Critical Studies on Terrorism
The Middle East and Terrorism
State Terror
Strategic Intelligence Studies
International Security of Drugs & Organised Crime
Human Rights in International Relations
Russian Politics & Security
Politics and Security in South Asia
Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism in Europe
Geopolitics of Natural Resources
Governing and Securing Cyber Space
European Union Security
Explaining and Understanding International Politics

How you will be assessed

By assessed coursework, examination and dissertation (or research project report).

Careers

Graduates from this degree are likely to pursue careers with international organisations such as the United Nations, the European Union, or institutions such as the International Court of Justice. You will also be well placed to pursue a career as a government adviser. Graduates from our Politics & International Relations degrees have successfully pursued careers in politics and diplomacy.

Read less
Under the programme, students must follow three compulsory modules, and choose from a range of optional modules. Modules will be delivered either through small group seminars. Read more
Under the programme, students must follow three compulsory modules, and choose from a range of optional modules. Modules will be delivered either through small group seminars. Attendance is mandatory for these seminars, which have been chosen as the primary means of delivering material to students due to the advanced nature of the course. Furthermore, small group seminars encourage participation and the development of communications skills. What is more, small group settings allow students to benefit from close contact with the academics teaching on the programme, many of which are also experienced practitioners and consultants in their respective fields of expertise.

The compulsory modules ensure students secure a grounding in the fundamentals of international law and governance, and facilitate in-depth understanding of the foundations of public international law and become familiar with the current debates in the field.

Optional modules then allow students to explore particular aspects of international law and governance, international and regional institutional law, international dispute settlement, international human rights and international humanitarian law and international economic law amongst others, in greater depth.

This continues to the end of the Programme, through the compulsory Dissertation module. In this way, optional modules, and the dissertation, allow for development of students’ subject specific knowledge as the Programme progresses. The development of the students’ skills is achieved mainly through the combination of the compulsory module in Applied Research Methods in Law, taught in Michaelmas term, and the students’ pursuit of the dissertation, supervision for which begins at the start of Epiphany term. It is through this that students can practise their skills much more intensely (whilst continuing to acquire a much deeper level of specialised knowledge on their chosen law topic).

An important objective of the LLM in International Law and Governance programme is to provide students with skills that will enable them to thoroughly analyse and interpret legal sources, literature, and cases, and to research and formulate an independent opinion on international legal questions. Students will also learn to clearly present your findings both orally and in writing to international legal specialists, to participate actively in academic debate, and to apply this advanced academic knowledge in public international law in a professional context.

As such, an LLM in International Law and Governance will provide students with an excellent foundation to pursue an international law career, whether it be in legal practice, employment in international institutions, or employment in non-governmental organisations. What is more, the LLM qualification will be an excellent vehicle for the further development of research skills and as such also offers entry into further postgraduate study and, in particular, doctoral research.

Core modules

-Fundamental Issues in International Legal Governance
-Applied Research Methods in Law
-Dissertation

Optional modules

Please note: not all modules necessarily run every year, and we regularly introduce new modules. The list below provides an example of the type of modules which may be offered.
-Law of the WTO
-International Investment Law
-International Dispute Resolution
-International Humanitarian Law
-International Peace and Security Law
-Global Environmental Law
-Law of the Sea
-International Human Rights and Development
-International Criminal Law
-History and Theory in International Law
-The European Union as a Global Actor

Learning and Teaching

This programme involves both taught modules and a substantial dissertation component. Taught modules are delivered by a mixture of lectures and seminars. Although most lectures do encourage student participation, they are used primarily to introduce chosen topics, identify relevant concepts, and introduce the student to the main debates and ideas relevant to the chosen topic. They give students a framework of knowledge that students can then develop, and reflect on, through their own reading and study.

Seminars are smaller-sized, student-led classes. Students are expected to carry out reading prior to classes, and are usually set questions or problems to which to apply the knowledge they have developed. Through class discussion, or the presentation of student papers, students are given the opportunity to test and refine their knowledge and understanding, in a relaxed and supportive environment.

The number of contact hours in each module will reflect that module’s credit weighting. 15-credit modules will have, in total, 15 contact hours (of either lectures or seminars); 30-credit modules will have 30 contact hours. Students must accumulate, in total, between 90 and 120 credits of taught modules for the programme (depending upon the length of their dissertation).

In addition to their taught modules, all students must produce a dissertation of between 10,000 and 20,000 words. This is intended to be the product of the student’s own independent research. Each student is allocated a dissertation supervisor, and will have a series of (usually four) one-to-one meetings with their supervisor over the course of the academic year.

Finally, all taught postgraduate students on this programme, are encouraged to attend the various events, including guest lectures and seminars, organised through the School’s research centres, including the Institute for Commercial and Corporate Law, and Durham European Law Institute.

Read less
The MA in International and Comparative Commercial Law allows students to learn about commercial law and its application in the globalised world. Read more
The MA in International and Comparative Commercial Law allows students to learn about commercial law and its application in the globalised world. The modules available cover a broad range of geographical and legal areas, including comparative law, economic approaches to law, law and globalisation, banking and finance, Islamic, Chinese and Middle Eastern law, labour law, copyright, trade law, fraud, multinational enterprises and the WTO. All SOAS modules are designed not only to introduce students to the general fields of law, but also to provide an understanding of how generic legal structures and processes may operate in non-Western social and cultural settings. All teachers on modules offered at SOAS are experts in their designated field. Many have years of experience advising governments, international organisations or non-governmental organisation, and many also have been or continue to be legal practitioners.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/ma/maintcompcomlaw/

Structure

To facilitate the study of law, all MA students are required to attend a two-week Preliminary Law, Legal Reasoning and Legal Methods in the September before beginning the MA programme.

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units including the dissertation. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised MA are required to take at least two (2.0) of the three (3.0) taught units within their chosen specialism. The third unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules List or the following courses associated with the International and Comparative Commercial Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):

Banking Law - 15PLAC105 (1 Unit)
Chinese Commercial Law- 15PLAC106 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAC175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAC116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAC135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAC159 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):

Foundations of Comparative law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
Dissertation in Law - 15PLAC999 - (1 Unit)

The Department

Key facts:
- LLB (QLD), BA (joint honours), LLM, MA & research degrees

- unique focus on both the developed and developing world

- research and teaching strengths in comparative, regional, international & global law

School of Law in UK top 5 for proportion of publications judged to be 'world-leading':
18 December 2014: the School was also graded in the top 20 nationally for its research environment. Find out more...

Our strengths:
We have unrivalled expertise in comparative law (China, Africa, South/South-East Asia, the Middle East), complemented by specialists in international and transnational law, human rights, transnational commercial law, environmental law and socio-legal method.

Facts and figures

- We are introducing student exchange programmes with leading universities in the US and China

- We achieve one of the highest percentages of training contracts with Magic Circle Law firms awarded to UK Law Schools

Teaching:
- 91% satisfaction for teaching (National Student Survey 2012/13): 96% of law students agreed that our staff are good at explaining things and 91% said their course was ‘intellectually stimulating’

- Excellent staff/student ratio

- Ranked 10th in UK (Guardian University Guide 2015)

Research:
- Thriving research culture with a packed schedule of seminars and conferences across our research centres and specialisms

- Close links with the internationally-renowned Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (IALS) and the Van Vollenhoven Institute, Leiden University

- Each year a number of distinguished Lawyers join SOAS as Research Fellows

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
Making law work in our global society is a tough task that needs well-trained and highly dedicated lawyers. is that you?. Imagine a peaceful, prosperous and environmentally sustainable world society respecting human dignity and social justice. Read more
Making law work in our global society is a tough task that needs well-trained and highly dedicated lawyers ... is that you?

Imagine a peaceful, prosperous and environmentally sustainable world society respecting human dignity and social justice. Would this be possible without international law? Do not dream, make it work! Allow yourself to become a good international lawyer by ge tting to know the achievements and shortcomings or international law today. Develop ideas about how to improve international law and a cquire the skills to advise your government, an international organization, a company, individuals, or groups.

The programme is designed to provide an optimal mix to ensure the realization of our goals in the field of knowledge dissemination and the training of academic, legal and practical skills. Within these parameters the programme offers some flexibility in the range of courses that can be chosen. Students can opt for a peace & security, an economic/environmental or a dispute settlement profile. The master's thesis allows you to spend considerable time to study a topic of your choice under the supervision of an experienced staff member.

Why in Groningen?

The basic approach of the programme is that students learn most from being actively engaged in working on international law topics. Lectures are useful form of teaching, but much of the work will be done through practical investigation of relevant issues in international law and critical interaction between lecturers and students and among students. The programme is suitable for recent law graduates as well as for young professionals working in private practice or in the public sector.

Job perspectives

There are opportunities in legal departments of international organizations or foreign ministries, but also in many national governmental institutions and ministries, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations, internationally operating enterprises and academic institutions, be it in the field of trade & investment, environment, energy, or human rights. In larger law firms and legal companies expertise in public international law is relevant for international cases and arbitrations.

Read less
International law in the broadest sense is concerned not only with inter-state relations, but also with relations between states, individuals, international organisations and other non-state actors. Read more
International law in the broadest sense is concerned not only with inter-state relations, but also with relations between states, individuals, international organisations and other non-state actors. It encompasses issues relating to the creation of legal obligations, recognition of states, the role of international organisations, liability for international crimes and dispute settlement, as well as questions such as the use of force, environmental protection, human rights and regulation of international trade and investment.

This course provides a wide choice of subjects and topics, enabling students to tailor the course to their areas of particular interest to facilitate their career aspirations. It is open to both law and non-law graduates.

As well as the LLM in International Law, we offer four specialised international law LLM courses along with an LLM by Research.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/llm-in-international-law/

Why choose this course?

- All members of the LLM course team are active researchers and encourage students to become involved in their respective areas of research by teaching specialist modules in which they have expertise and by supervising dissertations in their specialist subjects.

- You can enhance your CV and career prospects by developing specialisations that go beyond the standard law subjects of a LLB or other law degree.

- Your course tutors, fellow students and alumni are drawn from countries around the world giving you the opportunity to build a truly international network of contacts.

- Special support is provided for international students, particularly those whose first language is not English, to ensure that they find their feet quickly and are able to participate fully.

- The 2015 Times/ Sunday Times Good University Guide places the School of Law at Oxford Brookes in the top 30 of all the UK’s university Law Schools.

- You will benefit from a range of teaching and learning strategies, from case studies to interactive seminars, presentations and moots.

- Oxford has much to offer lawyers and as one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, with conferences, seminars and forums taking place across a range of international law topics within the University, the city of Oxford and in nearby London. In addition to our own excellent libraries and resource centres, LLM students have access to the unparalleled legal holdings at the Bodleian Law Library.

Teaching and learning

A wide diversity of teaching methods are employed throughout the LLM courses in order to provide a high-quality learning experience. These include lectures, seminar discussions, individual and small group tutorials, case studies, and group and individual presentations.

Particular emphasis is placed on skills training, with opportunities provided to acquire and practise legal reasoning as well as research and IT skills. Assessment methods include coursework and individual and group presentations.

All the members of the LLM course team are active researchers and encourage students to become involved in their respective areas of research by teaching specialist modules in which they have expertise and by supervising dissertations in their specialist subjects.

Careers

Graduates from the LLM succeed across an impressive range of careers from policy makers and human rights activists through to diplomats and commercial lawyers. LLM staff can advise you and direct you to possible careers and employers depending on your particular needs and ambitions.

"I have joined a corporate law team at a leading multinational law firm in Beijing, thanks to my LLM."
- LLM Alumna, Lin Zheng

- Pursuing an academic career in law
Rsearch is fundamental to the Law School and is one of the reasons we performed so well in the last REF. Your own interests will be reflected in the modules you choose and many students feel moved to continue their academic studies and become specialists themselves. Several former LLM students have chosen to become researchers, publishing and lecturing on their work and graduating to do a PhD.

"The grounding that I now have in international law has allowed me to take on work that I would not previously have been qualified for. For example, I am currently developing a programme of litigation on the issue of counter-terrorism and human rights for an international organisation. I have lectured at Harvard Law School and been invited to contribute to an edited volume produced by Harvard."
- LLM Alumnus Richard Carver, Associate Lecturer and Human Rights Consultant

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Professor Peter Edge researches in the interaction of religion and law, and the law of small jurisdictions including International Finance Centres.

Recent projects exploring these at the transnational level have included a study of foreign lawyers working in small jurisdictions, and a comparative study of the status of ministers of religion in employment law. Past PhD students have worked on projects such as a comparison of the European Convention on Human Rights and Shariah, and a comparative study of how criminal law treats religion.

Professor Lucy Vickers’ research into the religious discrimination at work has led to consultancy work for Equality and Human Rights Commission, as well invitations to speak at United Nations with the UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Religion and Belief.

Sonia Morano-Foadi, interviewed and quoted in The Economist, secured £12,000 from the European Science Foundation to fund exploratory work into the effects of EU directives on migration and asylum.

Professor Ilona Cheyne has been invited to participate in the EU COST group on 'Fragmentation, Politicisation and Constitutionalisation of International Law', working on standards of review in international courts and tribunals.

Research areas and clusters

Oxford Brookes academics who are at the forefront of a wide range of internationally recognised and world-leading research and projects. In the 2014 REF 96% of the School of Law’s research was internationally recognised.

The LLM course team consists of researchers working within the International Law and Fundamental Rights and Equality research groups. LLM students can attend the programmes of research seminars and other events that underpin the research culture of the School of Law.

Read less
The LLM in International Law, Globalisation and Development provides the opportunity to study the history, theories and application of the concepts of development and globalisation under international law. Read more
The LLM in International Law, Globalisation and Development provides the opportunity to study the history, theories and application of the concepts of development and globalisation under international law. The course covers contemporary topics such as foreign investment, food security, the right to development and self-determination, post-conflict and transitional countries, and conflicts over energy and resources.

This course provides a wide choice of subjects and topics, focusing on the key aspects of economic activity and environmental protection currently regulated under the auspices of the United Nations, the World Trade Organization, the World Bank and other international and regional institutions. It combines rigorous legal education with a contemporary and global perspective, and is ideally suited to students from a law, history, politics, business, economics or other social sciences background.

The course is designed to provide the specialist skills and in-depth knowledge that will be attractive to employers in the areas of international legal practice and international development. It would also appeal to those who intend to pursue careers in international governmental and non-governmental organisations, as well as in government and academic posts.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/llm-international-law-globalisation-and-development/

Why choose this course?

- All members of the LLM course team are active researchers and encourage students to become involved in their respective areas of research by teaching specialist modules in which they have expertise and by supervising dissertations in their specialist subjects.

- Enhance your CV and career prospects by developing specialisations that go beyond the standard commercial and trade law subjects of a LLB or other law degree.

- Your course tutors, fellow students and alumni are drawn from countries around the world giving you the opportunity to build a truly international network of contacts.

- Special support is provided for international students, particularly those whose first language is not English, to ensure that they find their feet quickly and are able to participate fully.

- The 2015 Times/ Sunday Times Good University Guide places the School of Law at Oxford Brookes in the top 30 of all the UK’s university Law Schools.

- You will benefit from a range of teaching and learning strategies, from case studies to interactive seminars, presentations and moots.

- Oxford has much to offer lawyers and as one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, with conferences, seminars and forums taking place across a range of international law topics within the university, the city of Oxford and in nearby London.

- In addition to our own excellent libraries and resource centres, LLM students have access to the unparalleled legal holdings at the Bodleian Law Library.

Teaching and learning

A wide diversity of teaching methods are employed throughout the LLM courses in order to provide a high-quality learning experience. These include lectures, seminar discussions, individual and small group tutorials, case studies, and group and individual presentations.

Particular emphasis is placed on skills training, with opportunities provided to acquire and practise legal reasoning as well as research and IT skills. Assessment methods include coursework, and individual and group presentations.

All the members of the LLM course team are active researchers and encourage students to become involved in their respective areas of research by teaching specialist modules in which they have expertise and by supervising dissertations in their specialist subjects.

How this course helps you develop

Graduates from the LLM succeed across an impressive range of careers from policy makers and human rights activists through to high flying diplomats and commercial lawyers. LLM staff can advise you and direct you to possible careers and employers depending on your particular needs and ambitions.

"I have joined a corporate law team at a leading multinational law firm in Beijing, thanks to my LLM."
- LLM Alumna, Lin Zheng

- Pursuing an academic career in law

Research is fundamental to the School of Law. Students are taught exclusively by research active staff with diverse interests and projects. Many students feel moved to continue their academic studies and become specialists themselves and the teaching staff will be able to guide you in this decision. Several former LLM students have chosen to become researchers - publishing and lecturing on their work and graduating to do a PhD.

"The grounding that I now have in international law has allowed me to take on work that I would not previously have been qualified for. For example, I am currently developing a programme of litigation on the issue of counter-terrorism and human rights for an international organisation. I have lectured at Harvard Law School and been invited to contribute to an edited volume produced by Harvard."
- LLM Alumnus Richard Carver, Associate Lecturer and Human Rights Consultant.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Professor Peter Edge researches in the interaction of religion and law, and the law of small jurisdictions including International Finance Centres. Recent projects exploring these at the transnational level have included a study of foreign lawyers working in small jurisdictions, and a comparative study of the status of ministers of religion in employment law. Past PhD students have worked on projects such as a comparison of the European Convention on Human Rights and Shariah, and a comparative study of how criminal law treats religion.

Professor Lucy Vickers’ research into the religious discrimination at work has led to consultancy work for Equality and Human Rights Commission, as well invitations to speak at United Nations with the UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Religion and Belief.

Sonia Morano-Foadi, interviewed and quoted in The Economist, secured £12,000 from the European Science Foundation to fund exploratory work into the effects of EU directives on migration and asylum.

Professor Ilona Cheyne has been invited to participate in the EU COST group on 'Fragmentation, Politicisation and Constitutionalisation of International Law', working on standards of review in international courts and tribunals.

Research areas and clusters

Oxford Brookes academics are at the forefront of a wide range of internationally recognised and world-leading research and projects. In the 2014 REF 96% of the School of Law’s research was internationally recognised. The LLM course team consists of researchers working within the International Law and Fundamental Rights and Equality research groups. LLM students can attend the programmes of research seminars and other events that underpin the research culture of the School of Law.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page


Share this page:

Cookie Policy    X